Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3541 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (132 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (306 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1229 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (212 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
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    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (61 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (595 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (106 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (61 journals)

Showing 1 - 61 of 61 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acciones e Investigaciones Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario IET de Trabajo y Relaciones Laborales     Open Access  
Arbeiderhistorie     Full-text available via subscription  
Arbeidsrett     Full-text available via subscription  
Arbetsliv i omvandling     Open Access  
Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Public Relations Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Çalışma İlişkileri Dergisi     Open Access  
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Class, Race and Corporate Power     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Economic & Labour Market Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Economic and Labour Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Estudios del Trabajo : Revista de la Asociación Argentina de Especialistas en Estudios del Trabajo (ASET)     Open Access  
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Forskning & Forandring : Research and Change     Open Access  
Giornale di Diritto del Lavoro e relazioni industriali     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Hak İş Uluslararası Emek ve Toplum Dergisi     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Labour Economics     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Business Reflections     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Collaborative Enterprise     Hybrid Journal  
International Labor Rights Case Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Labour Law Reports Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
IZA Journal of Labor & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
IZA Journal of Labor Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
IZA Journal of Labor Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal for Labour Market Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Collective Bargaining in the Academy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Employment Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Human Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Labor and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Labor Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 88)
Journal of Participation and Employee Ownership     Hybrid Journal  
Labor e Engenho     Open Access  
Labor History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Labor Studies Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Laboreal     Open Access  
Labos : Revista de Derecho del Trabajo y Protección Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Labour & Industry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Labour & Law Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Lan Harremanak : Revista de Relaciones Laborales     Open Access  
Management and Labour Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
MIX : Jurnal Ilmiah Manajemen     Open Access  
Mundo do Trabalho Contemporâneo     Open Access  
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Nowadays and Future Jobs     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Población y Sociedad     Open Access  
Project Leadership and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Quaderni di Economia del Lavoro     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista de Estudios Jurídico Laborales y de Seguridad Social     Open Access  
Revista Gestão e Desenvolvimento     Open Access  
Revista Latinoamericana de Antropología del Trabajo     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social and labour relations : Theory and Practice     Open Access  
Sociohistórica     Open Access  
Sociología del Trabajo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Søkelys på arbeidslivet (Norwegian Journal of Working Life Studies)     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for Arbejdsliv     Hybrid Journal  
Transfer - European Review of Labour and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Travail et Emploi     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Capital and Class
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.282
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0309-8168 - ISSN (Online) 2041-0980
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Book Review: Marx in the Field

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      Authors: Rafael Shimabukuro
      Pages: 301 - 303
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Volume 46, Issue 2, Page 301-303, June 2022.

      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T09:33:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221101949
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Imperialism and the Development Myth: How Rich Countries
           Dominate in the Twenty-First Century

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      Authors: Gönenç Uysal
      Pages: 303 - 305
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Volume 46, Issue 2, Page 303-305, June 2022.

      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T09:36:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221101949a
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Seven Ethics against Capitalism: Towards a Planetary Common

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      Authors: Daniel Hinze
      Pages: 305 - 307
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Volume 46, Issue 2, Page 305-307, June 2022.

      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T09:35:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221101949b
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: The Tragedy of the Worker: Towards the Proletarocene

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      Authors: Chelsey Ancliffe
      Pages: 308 - 310
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Volume 46, Issue 2, Page 308-310, June 2022.

      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T09:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221101949c
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Disenfranchised: The Rise and Fall of Industrial Citizenship
           in China

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      Authors: Furkan Elmas
      Pages: 310 - 312
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Volume 46, Issue 2, Page 310-312, June 2022.

      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T09:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221101949d
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Capitalism, Alone: The Future of the System that Rules the
           World

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      Authors: Kadir Selamet
      Pages: 312 - 314
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Volume 46, Issue 2, Page 312-314, June 2022.

      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T09:36:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221101949e
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Cogs and Monsters: What Economics Is and What It Should Be

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      Authors: Jamin Andreas Hübner
      Pages: 314 - 317
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Volume 46, Issue 2, Page 314-317, June 2022.

      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T09:36:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221101949f
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Make Bosses Pay: Why We Need Unions

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      Authors: Gregor Gall
      Pages: 318 - 321
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Volume 46, Issue 2, Page 318-321, June 2022.

      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T09:37:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221101949g
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Half-Earth Socialism: A Plan to Save the Future from
           Extinction, Climate Change and Pandemics

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      Authors: Christian Stache
      Pages: 322 - 324
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Volume 46, Issue 2, Page 322-324, June 2022.

      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T09:37:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221101949h
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: The Oldest Trick in the Book: Panic-driven Scapegoating in
           History and Recurring Patterns of Persecution

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      Authors: Guy Lancaster
      Pages: 324 - 326
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Volume 46, Issue 2, Page 324-326, June 2022.

      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T09:37:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221101949i
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Books available for review

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      Pages: 327 - 328
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Volume 46, Issue 2, Page 327-328, June 2022.

      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T09:36:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221102046
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Progress by death: Labor precaritization and the financialization of
           social reproduction in South Korea

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      Authors: Jiwoon Yulee
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      This article looks at the contemporary South Korean political economy of crisis and recovery to visualize the material conditions of working-class lives and the ways in which their capacity to reproduce labor and life contradicts the regionally specific logic of ‘progress’. I visualize three critical scenes of workplace death that chart the ways in which the social reproduction capacity of the working class is fatally contracted in the era of neoliberal reforms. These scenes of death mirror the process of neoliberal transition that the financial crises of 1997 and 2008 accelerated in the region. In doing so, I articulate the notion of ‘progress by death’ as the intensified necropolitical logic of neoliberal capitalism that is led by the post-developmental state and fully transnationalized chaebol capital in South Korea. Building on feminist theories of social reproduction and the studies on the financialization of life, I argue that the logic of ‘progress by death’ as a constitutive element of financial capitalism reproduces the uneven patterns of growth and the transnational relations of violence, debt, and dispossession across Asian economies.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T09:31:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221084113
       
  • Corporate and business domination of food banks and food diversion schemes
           in Canada

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      Authors: Anahita Azadian, Mary Catherine Masciangelo, Zsofia Mendly-Zambo, Alan Taman, Dennis Raphael
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      Critics have identified the corporate and business sector as contributing to household food insecurity through its endorsement of low wages, anti-union activities and lobbying for retrenchment of the Canadian welfare state. It is therefore troubling that this same corporate and business sector has come to dominate positions on the boards of directors of civil society organizations with missions to reduce household food insecurity. Fisher uses the term ‘Big Hunger’ to describe how this ‘hunger-industrial complex’ of food banks, food diversion schemes and corporations and companies are accruing benefits to themselves yet do little to reduce household food insecurity. We consider such processes as illustrating two key political economy concepts: (1) Marx’s concepts of base and superstructure and (2) Gramsci’s cultural hegemony. We carry out a critical case study of the relevance of these concepts to the Canadian household food insecurity scene by examining how the corporate and business sector now dominates the boards of directors of four major civil society organizations concerned with reducing household food insecurity. We find evidence of these civil society organizations exhibiting agenda distortion, reciprocity and loss of integrity, all reflecting their becoming part of the superstructure of capitalist society whose ruling elites come to dominate the ideas and values of society. Issues of wages, unionization and collective agreement bargaining, taxes and taxation, income inequality and retrenchment of the welfare state – all important contributors to household food insecurity and key concerns of the corporate and business community – are for the most part absent from these civil society organizations’ reports, documents and statements. We specify the implications these developments have for addressing household food insecurity and the inequitable distribution of other social determinants of health.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T08:59:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221092649
       
  • The US rate of profit 1964–2017 and the turnover of fixed and
           circulating capital

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      Authors: William Jefferies
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      This article addresses how Marxist economists have estimated the quantity of fixed and circulating capital advanced in the denominator of the rate of profit calculation. Generally, Marxist economists have used neoclassical fixed capital estimates of opportunity cost, as applied most notably, in the US system of national accounts. These Hulten and Wyckoff measures aggregate the lifetime revenues (both costs and profits) of fixed assets and so grossly over estimate the value of the fixed capital stock. This article applies the Internal Revenue Service Depreciable Assets less Depreciation for a more accurate estimate of the actual quantity of fixed capital advanced. Furthermore, it criticises the absence of a convincing measure of the rate of turnover of Marx’s circuit of capital accumulation M . . . C . . . P . . . C’ . . . M’ in most rate of profit estimates. Developing the work of Bertrand and Fauqueur, this article demonstrates that the cash conversion cycle or net operating cycle mirrors Marx’s circuit. This article applies the cash conversion cycle to Internal Revenue Service Total Corporations data 1964–2017 to estimate the rate of turnover. The article addresses the distinction between unproductive and productive output and develops an estimation of those respective quantities based on Internal Revenue Service data. It combines these elements together to estimate the US rate of profit from 1964 to 2017. It finds that the US rate of profit rose strongly, albeit with dramatic fluctuations, after 2001.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T09:12:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221084110
       
  • On the hoard of money and expanded reproduction

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      Authors: C Saratchand
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      The paper incorporates the hoard of money in a simple three-department scheme of expanded reproduction. The sui-generis features of the hoard of money are briefly set out. The paper then demonstrates that due to the existence of the hoard of money, it is possible for there to be generalised over-production of all non-money commodities. The paper concludes with some suggestions for further work in this research direction.JEL classifications: B14, B24, B51, E11.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T11:04:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221084114
       
  • Caesarism, passive revolution, and the state: Insights from Rafael
           Correa’s government in Ecuador (2007–2017)

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      Authors: Jorge Enrique Forero
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      Over the last decade, the concept of passive revolution has been central in the Neo-Gramscian academic production. However, the role of the state in this type of political junctures has not received enough attention, neither in relation to the embedded class struggles nor on the impact these have had in the processes of ‘conservation-innovation’ that, according to Gramsci, are featured in passive revolutions. This article aims to contribute to such literature gap by bringing forth theoretical insights from Nicos Poulantzas and Kees Van der Pijl regarding ‘state autonomy’ and using them for the analysis of a recent political process, which several scholars label as a passive revolution: Rafael Correa’s government in Ecuador (2007–2017). The article suggests that the latter should be understood as a case of Caesarism, and more specifically, a political intervention of Ecuador’s cadres, aimed to break a ‘catastrophic equilibrium’ in the confrontation between the country’s power block and its contending anti-neoliberal coalition.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T06:14:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221084112
       
  • Sports, neoliberalism and crime in India: Towards a Marxist analysis

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      Authors: Suddhabrata Deb Roy
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      Sports and Crime are an integral part of the social reality of India. The recent case of Olympic medalist Sushil Kumar has again reinvigorated the public sentiments regarding the relationship between crime and the state of `minor’ sports in the country. This paper analyses the issue through an intersectional paradigm informed by the neo-Marxist analysis of sports and Classical Marxist Criminology. The paper argues that sports and crime are integrally related to each other in the rural hinterlands of India. This relationship is expressed in the processes in which sportspersons attempt to adapt to varying circumstances. Under neoliberal capitalism, where the dominant ideology proposes to normalise the idea of succeeding at all costs, sportspersons associated with `minor’ sports in India often resort to criminality because of their lack of social capital coupled with the faults associated with the process of management of these sports.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T08:15:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221074089
       
  • The struggle against corporate encroachment in Indian agriculture

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      Authors: Navpreet Kaur, C. Saratchand
      First page: 159
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      The repeal of the Three Farm Laws by the Union Government of India is the first consequential setback to the neoliberal project in India after 2014. The struggle was largely carried out by peasants in alliance with workers. The Left in India played a decisive role in crafting this setback to the neoliberal project by working towards the building of a tendential working alliance between peasants and workers. The popular resistance that has been engendered by the upsurge of peasants and workers will need to nurture this alliance, renew its focus on combatting gender and caste oppression, and engage in an authentic effort to build solidarity among the various constituents of the democratic movement in India.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2022-02-09T04:25:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168221074093
       
  • Prediction and caution after COVID-19 crisis: The ecological and
           epidemiological risks of financial speculation

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      Authors: Guilherme Leite Gonçalves, Bruno H. P. Rosado
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      Since the COVID-19 pandemic spread worldwide, optimistic ecological and economic analyses have arisen. On one hand, the lockdowns that have taken place are pointed out as a means of reducing gas emissions, environmental exploitation, and consequently, factors that reduce the risk of zoonoses. On the other hand, macroeconomic policies that support state intervention in the economy and social benefits are seen as a signal for a more social and eco-friendly organized capitalism. The objective of our article is to call for caution on these predictions, indicating a post-pandemic countertrend according to which the relationship between economy and environment might be even more unstable and conflictual after the pandemic. Here, we discuss the relevance of Karl Marx’s fictitious capital concept as a fundamental key to thinking about financial market pressures on the environment. Hereby, we aim to raise the concern that the financial policies adopted in the course of the crisis have encouraged speculative instruments that lead to the overaccumulation of fictitious capital. This, in turn, requires the increased exploitation and expropriation of the environment in order to realize the overaccumulated rights and claims on future surplus value. Thus, we argue that the risk of environmental destruction will not be reduced as claimed by optimistic assumptions, but on the contrary will increase in the next few years. Such a risk does not dismiss, but rather suggests that new zoonoses may also arise.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-12-17T06:19:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211061581
       
  • The reality of the law of value

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      Authors: Kiyoshi Nagatani
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      In the wake of Böhm-Bawerk’s criticism that Marx’s law of value runs contrary to empirical facts, Marxian economics has developed mainly in two different directions: one based on the simple commodity production and the other on the mathematical identity of value with prices of production (the transformation problem). The author agrees with neither, arguing that Marx intended to base the law of value on the production process of capital, as in Capital Volume 1, independently of Capital Volume 3. However, the notion of this process and the law of value have not been sufficiently explained in Volume 1. Marx presents the value of a commodity as socially necessary labour objectified in Chapter 1 on the commodity, and later applies this rule to capitalist commodity products in Chapter 7. Pointing out the defects of this method, this article relocates the presentation of the dual nature of labour to the Labour Process (Chapter 7, Section 1), and the proof of the substance of value or the law of value to the Valorization Process (Chapter 7, Section 2). The Labour Process plays a key role in Volume 1, but it contains a fatal flaw. Consequently, Section 2 ends up with insufficient explanation. By reconstructing the Labour Process and the Process of Creating Value and Surplus value, the author confirms the meaning and reality of the law of value in Chapter 7, Section 2.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-12-06T07:23:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211061587
       
  • The depoliticization of health and safety committees and representation:
           The Ontario case

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      Authors: Alan Hall
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      Studies in several national jurisdictions have highlighted the limitations of joint health and safety committees and worker representatives in affecting change in working conditions. Using Canadian data, this article focuses on the argument that many health and safety committees and worker representatives have been captured or substantially controlled through the State’s promotion of an internal responsibility system framed around a technocratic partnership. The historical development of this framing is first understood within a political economic framework which highlights several major influences, followed by a field theory analysis which explains how these control relations are established by management within workplace settings.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T11:16:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211061584
       
  • ‘SYRIZA and Podemos, we shall overcome’' Left transnational
           cooperation in times of crisis

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      Authors: Vladimir Bortun
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      The Eurozone crisis and its austerity-centred management opened up a fertile ground for the so-called ‘radical left parties’ (RLPs) and their anti-austerity agenda. Moreover, it provided a unique opportunity for this party family to enhance its rather underdeveloped transnational cooperation. Sharing several objective and subjective features, SYRIZA (Greece) and Podemos (Spain) – arguably the two most prominent European RLPs today – seemed particularly well-placed to develop a strong transnational cooperation. However, the current literature has hardly addressed whether such expectations have been borne out. Indeed, despite a recently increased interest in the radical left, there are still very few studies focusing on the transnational cooperation among RLPs. Building on documentary research and qualitative elite interviews covering the 2014–2017 period, the article has two main objectives: first, to map the cooperation between SYRIZA and Podemos by identifying the key channels and actors of this process; second, to assess their cooperation over said period, with a focus on the factors fuelling and obstructing it. The article argues that the relationship between the two parties reached its peak around SYRIZA’s electoral victory in January 2015 but declined following its deal with the ‘Troika’ 6 months later, which blatantly contradicted SYRIZA’s anti-austerity programme. It is shown that while the main incentives behind their cooperation have been their shared opposition to neoliberalism, the European Union’s (EU) reaction to the crisis, and the similarities in their countries’ economic situations, the main obstacles hindering that cooperation have been the primacy of national politics and the diverging views on the EU. The findings arguably provide useful insights for the wider left transnational cooperation today, in a time of renewed global capitalist crisis, when such cooperation is perhaps more relevant than ever.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-11-29T10:07:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211061585
       
  • Contesting neoliberalism: Mapping the terrain of social conflict

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      Authors: David J. Bailey, Paul C. Lewis, Saori Shibata
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the terrain of social conflict as it developed across advanced capitalist democracies throughout the ‘age of austerity’ that followed the global economic crisis. It shows how a (broadly defined) working class mobilised in different ways in different capitalist contexts, contesting the institutional forms (and the crises that emerged from them) which constitute each particular model of capitalism. Considered this way, we are able to conceptualise and explain the forms of working-class mobilisation that have emerged in opposition to contemporary neoliberalism. In doing so, we go beyond a narrow focus on workplace-focused or trade-union-led forms of working-class mobilisation, highlighting the continuing contestation of neoliberal capitalism. Drawing on a protest event analysis of 1,167 protest events in five countries (Spain, Germany, Japan, the United States and the United Kingdom), and developing a Régulation Theory approach to the study of protest/social movements, we provide an overview of the most visible patterns of social contestation in each national neoliberal capitalist context, tracing links to the institutional configurations that constitute those national models of capitalism. While there exists no direct (linear) process of causality between the model of neoliberal capitalism and the forms of mobilised dissent witnessed, nevertheless we are able to clearly trace the different pressures of capital accumulation that have given rise to the protest/social movements identified in each case, thereby allowing us to gain a better insight into both each particular model of capitalism and the forms of dissent that constitute it.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-11-27T09:28:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211054802
       
  • Mutual aid versus volunteerism: Autonomous PPE production in the Covid-19
           pandemic crisis

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      Authors: Katya Lachowicz, Jim Donaghey
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      The Covid-19 pandemic crisis has confirmed neoliberal capitalism’s inability to meet critical social needs. In the United Kingdom, mutual aid initiatives based on ‘solidarity not charity’ blossomed in a context of state incompetence and private sector negligence – including Scrub Hub, a network of groups that autonomously produced personal protective equipment and provided it directly to health workers. Using a convergence of autonomist and anarchist perspectives, this article examines Scrub Hub as an example of emergent autonomous political economies and considers the challenges of resisting co-optation into volunteerist hierarchies and suppression by the neoliberal state.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-11-22T06:58:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211057686
       
  • Envisaging global balance-sheet capitalism: The Bank for International
           Settlements as a collective organic intellectual

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      Authors: Jack Foster
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines how the Bank for International Settlements, as a collective organic intellectual of finance capital, has sought to maintain the hegemony of financial globalization in the context of an increasingly fractured global order following the 2007–2009 financial crisis. I show how the Bank for International Settlements’ defence of financial globalization has pivoted around the construction of a new ‘economic imaginary’ of global capitalism in which the global financial cycle, which culminates in systemic financial crises, threatens economic and political stability. Asserting that this cycle can be ‘properly managed’, the Bank for International Settlements has advocated a set of formal shifts in macro-policy frameworks. Focusing on the temporality of economic governance as envisioned by the Bank for International Settlements, I highlight two important dimensions of the organization’s discourse: the reduction of policy to process and the fetishization of policy innovation. Here, the pursuit of principles of ‘good’ economic management is prioritized over the achievement of concrete economic or social outcomes. In traversing this economic imaginary, this article offers insights into how global capitalism and its management are envisioned by elites in the current period of hegemonic disorganization and political-economic turmoil.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-11-18T10:04:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211057683
       
  • The Chilean economy, an analysis of the dynamics of profits, investments
           and production: A Marxist approach

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      Authors: Gonzalo Durán, Michael Stanton
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to examine the dynamics of the Chilean economy as a consequence of actions taken by companies whose aim is to make profits. As such, the economic analysis used is Marxist and makes use of those classical indicators described in Capital (Rate of Surplus-Value, Organic Composition of Capital and Rate of Profit). It is maintained that with the Marxist method, we can discover that behind the accumulation of incomes lies the fact that out of each 8 hours worked, only 3 finance wages and 5 benefit the owners of capital. That fraction of the unpaid labour received by capital but invested back as new capital, plus that ‘excess’ surplus value that is consequence of high copper prices, raises the physical, but not necessarily the value, capital-per-worker ratio. As a consequence, that relation of exploitation to capital accumulation, which Marx called the Rate of Profit, is found to fall, rise and then fall again. We understand that various approaches have been made to calculate the classical indicators and include some of them as alternative methods in our results.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-11-01T08:48:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211054799
       
  • Marketisation and regional planning in neoliberal public services:
           Evidence from French hospitals

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      Authors: Charles Umney, Genevieve Coderre-LaPalme
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      Marxist scholarship has documented the implications of ‘neoliberal’ reforms to public services. This scholarship often considers these reforms as class projects which have disciplined working populations and created new opportunities for capitalist profit-making. But in this article, we shift emphasis to the internal dysfunction that shapes states’ pursuit of market-oriented policy agendas. We place closer focus on the specific levers through which marketising reforms are implemented, noting the conflicting pressures they unleash, and the cracks this may open through which a more democratic agenda can be advanced. Taking the French hospital sector as an example, we show how attempts to expand and intensify competition in public services have coincided with attempts to decentralise governance to the regional level. While ostensibly part of the same ‘reforming’ policy agenda, marketising policies have a strongly centralising logic which has in practice undermined efforts to develop meaningful regional planning. These institutional tensions have catalysed new political currents, as the relationship between public authorities and private sector actors has become more overtly conflictual. We argue that Marxist theorists of the state need to pay closer attention to the often dysfunctional relationship between different branches of the state, and that in the context of neoliberal public service reform, the tensions between central and regional states are particularly salient. We conclude that opponents of the marketisation of public services need to pay attention to the contested and ambiguous nature of ‘decentralisation’: while it is often a rhetorical cover for marketisation, there are opportunities for the left in demanding more meaningful and authentic forms of regional planning.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-11-01T08:45:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211054798
       
  • ‘You couldn’t have a heart and want to strike’: Mobilising workers
           in England’s social care sector

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      Authors: Grace J. Whitfield
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      This article uses John Kelly’s mobilisation framework, with its foundational concept of injustice, to explore workers’ propensity towards unionism in England’s outsourced social care sector. Drawing on 60 interviews with union organisers and officers, care workers, support workers and care company managers, this research highlights the difficulties of union organising in the sector and explores theorisations of mobilising. The research contends that for mobilisation theory to provide insight into relationships between work and unionism, varieties of injustice and collectivism need to be contextualised. Paid care provision generates both employment-related injustices and care-related injustices, which lead to divergent collective identities and attitudes towards unions. An absence of a coherent entity for workers to attach blame to – within a context where private providers frequently remain reliant on state funding levels – affects whether injustice and collectivism progress to mobilisation and unionisation.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-10-28T10:46:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211054803
       
  • Moving to new generational beats: Lived experiences of capitalism,
           student-led (re)makings of knowledge, and the evolution of critical
           research agendas

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      Authors: Ian Bruff
      First page: 167
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      Via a reflection on the evolution of a module on comparing capitalisms that I have been teaching for more than a decade, this article discusses the collective influence of new generations of students on how knowledge is (re)made. I deploy a conjunctural understanding of the term ‘generations’ in order to make sense of how students’ interpretations of the topics covered by the module have, across the 2010s, led me to increasingly question the field that was, in an earlier conjuncture, essential for my intellectual foundation and development. Their lived experiences of capitalism are more likely to be dominated by themes such as political, economic and social crises and conflicts, inequality, personal indebtedness and precarity, and in some cases activism. This has had profound and long-lasting effects on my teaching and research, discomfiting me in an ultimately beneficial way; most notably, through the recognition that future critical work on comparing capitalisms ought to move away from previous attempts to engage immanently with dominant, mainstream approaches and towards the articulation of a more confident, autonomous position. Hence, a key aspect of the development and evolution of critical research agendas occurs in and through educational exchanges in the seminar room.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T07:16:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0309816821997119
       
  • Human rights for profit: The system-preserving tendencies of the regional
           human rights courts

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      Authors: Stéfanie Khoury, David Whyte
      First page: 189
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents an analysis of the way that profit-making corporations have sought human rights protections in the following two regional human rights courts: the European Court of Human Rights and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. It seeks to deepen our understanding of a controversial principle in that corporations can claim protections as ‘legal persons’. After exploring precisely how and why each of those regional systems have accepted claims for human rights protections by corporations and their shareholders, the article then develops an analysis of what the way that the regional human rights courts have carefully weighed their decisions implies more broadly about the prospects for human rights law to exhibit either system-threatening or system-preserving tendencies. The article then concludes by setting out a general principle of social ordering that underpins the decisions made in human rights courts.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-04-26T04:49:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211005054
       
  • Extractivism or specificity of capital accumulation' A critique on the
           extractivist approach regarding the case of Argentina

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      Authors: Nicolás Pérez Trento
      First page: 211
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      The recent economic and political transformations in many Latin American countries have been increasingly analysed under the (neo-)extractivism approach. Specifically, the debate surrounding the contradictions and limitations of this development model, as well as its consequences, gained traction among scholars. In this article, we intend to put forth a critical analysis of this approach with the goal of giving an account of its explanatory power, focusing on Argentina. In order to do this, we summarize some of the more noteworthy conceptual features of (neo-)extractivism, as well as the main arguments to include Argentina as a case. Then, after presenting some immediate conceptual limitations linked to this theoretical perspective, we introduce an alternative approach in regard to the specific way in which capital accumulation takes place in Argentina, based on the Critique of Political Economy put forward by Marx in Capital, and taking the global unity of capital accumulation as a starting point. This allows us to critically engage, in the last section, with the main claims of extractivism.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-06-02T08:54:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211017432
       
  • What is commercial capital' Japanese contributions to Marxian market
           theory

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      Authors: Shinya Shibasaki, Kei Ehara
      First page: 235
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      This article deals with the Japanese contributions to the Marxian theory of commercial capital, which can be originally found in Part 4 of Capital Vol. 3. This part was formerly considered important for developing the historical development of capitalist society in Japan, which is called the stages theory. From the 1980s to the 2000s, Shigekatsu Yamaguchi led the Japanese studies on the Marxian theory of commercial capital to reorganise the theory in Parts 4 and 5 of Capital Vol. 3, thereby pioneering the theoretical study of the capitalist market. Based on that development, we discuss the reconstruction of the relationship between the theory of the capitalist market and the stages theory, thereby illustrating a renewed and clearer understanding of the historical trajectory of capitalism.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-07-09T09:48:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211029005
       
  • The concept of a social formation in the writings of E. P. Thompson and
           Ellen Meiksins Wood

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      Authors: Tony Burns
      First page: 257
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I consider what E. P. Thompson and Ellen Meiksins Wood have to say about the concept of a social formation and its significance for Marxism. I consider these thinkers together for two reasons. In the first place, the views of Meiksins Wood owe a great deal to her engagement with Thompson’s writings. In the second place, despite Meiksins Wood claim that she is simply following a lead provided by E. P. Thompson, there is a significant (though unacknowledged) difference between her views and his. Meiksins Wood departs from Thompson when she argues that the concept of a social formation ought to be excluded from the lexicon of Marxism. When discussing the concept of a social formation, both Thompson and Meiksins Wood attach importance to the ‘general illumination’ passage in the general introduction to Marx’s Grundrisse. However, they read this passage in very different ways. According to Thompson, this focal passage supports the view that the concept of a social formation is of fundamental importance for Marxist historians. This reading constitutes a challenge to Meiksins Wood’s view that the concept of a social formation is an Althusserian accretion which has a little significance for our understanding of the views of Marx and Marxism.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T11:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211029000
       
  • Reactionary radicalism and the analysis of worker subjectivity in Marx’s
           critique of political economy

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      Authors: Magnus Granberg
      First page: 279
      Abstract: Capital & Class, Ahead of Print.
      This analysis starts off from the contemporary relevance of the theory of ‘the radicalism of tradition’, arguing that it presents a challenge to Marxism because Marxist work has not sufficiently attended to elements of a theory of worker subjectivity scattered in the critique of political economy. This theory is located on a lower level of abstraction than is commonly assumed and can be applied to subjective dynamics in labour militancy. However, this requires that some basic categories in Marx’s critique are reconsidered, especially those that do not seem immanent to the capitalist social formation, categories that appear, and have mostly been read, as the ahistorical ground on which properly social forms arise. Therefore, apparently ahistorical categories pertaining to use value and concrete labour’s use value for capital are explored to reconstruct a theory relating capital’s positing of labour to contemporary militancies that appropriate tradition. In contrast to the view of tradition as external to capital, the view advanced is that ‘reactionary radicalism’ relates to how capital, as totalizing social form, abstracts tradition. Furthermore, tradition is radicalized through a negative subjectivity inherent to the commodification of labour power and the real subsumption of labour; proletarian experience is a precondition of radicalized tradition.
      Citation: Capital & Class
      PubDate: 2021-08-18T09:06:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03098168211037404
       
 
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