Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3510 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (127 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (297 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1231 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (202 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
    - INSURANCE (26 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (61 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (586 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (106 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)

Showing 1 - 14 of 14 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Economic Journal : Macroeconomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 164)
Corporate Governance and Sustainability Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Growth     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Governance and Regulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Macroeconomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Macromarketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Macroeconomic Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Microeconomics and Macroeconomics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
NBER Macroeconomics Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51)
Perfil de Coyuntura Económica     Open Access  
Review of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253)
Review of Market Integration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Journal of Macroeconomics and Public Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Review of Economic Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 9.589
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 253  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0034-6527 - ISSN (Online) 1467-937X
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [425 journals]
  • How the Other Half Died: Immigration and Mortality in U.S. Cities

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      Pages: 1 - 44
      Abstract: AbstractFears of immigrants as a threat to public health have a long and sordid history. At the turn of the 20th century, when immigrants made up one-third of the population in crowded American cities, contemporaries blamed high urban mortality rates on the newest arrivals. We evaluate how the implementation of country-specific immigration quotas in the 1920s affected urban health. Cities with larger quota-induced reductions in immigration experienced a persistent decline in mortality rates, driven by a reduction in deaths from infectious diseases. The unfavourable living conditions immigrants endured explains the majority of the effect as quotas reduced residential crowding and mortality declines were largest in cities where immigrants resided in more crowded conditions and where public health resources were stretched thinnest.
      PubDate: Fri, 17 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad035
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Misspecified Moment Inequality Models: Inference and Diagnostics

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      Pages: 45 - 76
      Abstract: AbstractThis paper is concerned with possible model misspecification in moment inequality models. Two issues are addressed. First, standard tests and confidence sets for the true parameter in the moment inequality literature are not robust to model misspecification in the sense that they exhibit spurious precision when the identified set is empty. This paper introduces tests and confidence sets that provide correct asymptotic inference for a pseudo-true parameter in such scenarios, and hence, do not suffer from spurious precision. Second, specification tests have relatively low power against a range of misspecified models. Thus, failure to reject the null of correct specification does not necessarily provide evidence of correct specification. That is, model specification tests are subject to the problem that absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. This paper develops new diagnostics for model misspecification in moment inequality models that do not suffer from this problem.
      PubDate: Sat, 04 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad033
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • International Spillovers and Bailouts

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      Pages: 77 - 128
      Abstract: AbstractWe study how cross-country macroeconomic spillovers caused by sovereign default affect equilibrium bailouts. Because of portfolio diversification, the default of one country causes a macroeconomic contraction in other countries, which motivates a bailout. But why do creditor countries choose to bailout debtor countries instead of their own private sector' We show that this is because an external bailout could be cheaper than a domestic bailout. We also show that although anticipated bailouts lead to higher borrowing, they can be Pareto improving not only ex post (after a country has defaulted) but also ex ante (before the country chooses its debt).
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad025
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Diagnostic Business Cycles

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      Pages: 129 - 162
      Abstract: AbstractA large psychology literature argues that, due to selective memory recall, decision-makers’ forecasts of the future are overly influenced by the perceived news. We adopt the diagnostic expectations (DE) paradigm [Bordalo et al. (2018), Journal of Finance, 73, 199–227] to capture this feature of belief formation, develop a method to incorporate DE in business cycle models, and study the implications for aggregate dynamics. First, we address (1) the theoretical challenges associated with modelling the feedback between optimal actions and agents’ DE beliefs and (2) the time-inconsistencies that arise under distant memory (i.e. when news is perceived with respect to a more distant past than just the immediate one). Second, we show that under distant memory the interaction between actions and DE beliefs naturally generates repeated boom–bust cycles in response to a single initial shock. We also propose a portable solution method to study DE in dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models and use it to estimate a quantitative DE New Keynesian model. Both endogenous states and distant memory play a critical role in successfully replicating the boom–bust cycle observed in response to a monetary policy shock.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad024
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Beyond Dividing the Pie: Multi-Issue Bargaining in the Laboratory

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      Pages: 163 - 191
      Abstract: AbstractWe design a laboratory experiment to study bargaining behaviour when negotiations involve multiple issues. Parties must discover both trading prices and agreement scopes, giving rise to unexplored information structures and bargaining strategies. We find that bargainers often trade the efficient set of issues despite lacking information about individual aspects. However, beneficial agreements critically hinge on integrated negotiations that allow deals on bundles of issues. Moreover, access to more information boosts agreement rates in small-surplus negotiations but can also backfire as it triggers increased risk-taking and conflicting fairness preferences in large-surplus negotiations. Finally, successful negotiations display a specific bargaining convention that emerges endogenously. It involves alternating offers that meet the other side’s most recent demand halfway.
      PubDate: Thu, 02 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad031
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Energy Efficiency and Directed Technical Change: Implications for Climate
           Change Mitigation

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      Pages: 192 - 228
      Abstract: AbstractI develop a directed technical change model of economic growth and energy efficiency in order to study the impact of climate change mitigation policies on energy use. I show that the standard Cobb–Douglas production function used in the environmental macroeconomics literature overstates the reduction in cumulative energy use that can be achieved with a given path of energy taxes. I also show that, in the model, the government combines energy taxes with research and development (R&D) policy that favors output-increasing technology—rather than energy efficiency technology—to maximize welfare subject to a constraint on cumulative energy use. In addition, I study energy use dynamics following sudden improvements in energy efficiency. Exogenous shocks that increase energy efficiency also decrease the incentive for subsequent energy efficiency R&D and increase long-run energy use relative to a world without the original shock. Subsidies for energy efficiency R&D, however, permanently alter R&D incentives and decrease long-run energy use.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad001
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Monetary Policy and Birth Rates: The Effect of Mortgage Rate Pass-Through
           on Fertility

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      Pages: 229 - 258
      Abstract: AbstractThis paper examines whether monetary policy pass-through to mortgage interest rates affects household fertility decisions. Our empirical strategy exploits variation in households’ eligibility for a rate adjustment, coupled with the large reductions in the monetary policy rate that occurred during the Great Recession in the U.K. and U.S. We estimate that each one percentage point drop in the policy rate increased birth rates amongst households eligible for a rate adjustment by 3%. Our results provide new evidence on the nature of monetary policy transmission to households and suggest a new mechanism via which mortgage contract structures can affect both aggregate demand and supply.
      PubDate: Sat, 04 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad034
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Size and Life-Cycle Growth of Plants: The Role of Productivity,
           Demand, and Wedges

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      Pages: 259 - 300
      Abstract: AbstractWhat determines the distribution of establishments in terms of size and life-cycle growth' How are those determinants related to aggregate productivity' We provide novel answers by developing a framework that uses price and quantity information on establishments’ outputs and inputs to jointly estimate the demand and production parameters, and subsequently, establishments’ quality-adjusted productivity, deriving both micro-level and aggregate implications. We find that the dominant source of variation in establishment size is variation in quality/product appeal but that variation in technical efficiency plays an important supporting role. Multiple factors dampen dispersion in establishment size including dispersion in input (quality-adjusted) prices, markups, and residual wedges. Relatively moderate dampening factors induce large aggregate allocative efficiency losses relative to their absence. We show that joint estimation of the parameters of the demand and production function crucially affects inferences on the determinants of the size distribution of firms and their implications for aggregate productivity.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad029
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Cost of Wage Rigidity

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      Pages: 301 - 339
      Abstract: AbstractPrivate efficiency of wage rigidity has taken centre stage in economics. Measuring its effects has proven elusive for lack of actual wage data. Using a unique confidential labour contract-level dataset matched with firm-level high-frequency asset prices, we find robust evidence that firms’ stock prices and employment fluctuate more in response to monetary policy announcements, the higher the degree of wage rigidity. Hand-collected information on the periods across renegotiations of collective bargaining agreements allow us to construct an accurate and predetermined measure of wage rigidity. We find that the amplification induced by wage rigidity is stronger for firms with high labour intensity, low profitability, and a large share of workers with more rigid contracts.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad020
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Liberty, Security, and Accountability: The Rise and Fall of Illiberal
           Democracies

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      Pages: 340 - 371
      Abstract: AbstractWe study a model of the rise and fall of illiberal democracies. Voters value both liberty and economic security. In times of crisis, voters may prefer to elect an illiberal government that, by violating constitutional constraints, offers greater economic security but less liberty. However, violating these constraints allows the government to manipulate information, in turn reducing electoral accountability. We show how elements of liberal constitutions induce voters to elect illiberal governments that remain in power for inefficiently long—including forever. We derive insights into what makes constitutions stable against the rise of illiberal governments. We extend the model to allow for illiberal governments to overcome checks and balances and become autocracies. We show that stronger checks and balances are a double-edged sword: they slow down autocratization but may make it more likely. We discuss the empirical relevance of our theoretical framework and its connection to real world examples.
      PubDate: Mon, 27 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad030
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Job Matching with Subsidy and Taxation

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      Pages: 372 - 402
      Abstract: AbstractIn markets for indivisible resources such as workers and objects, subsidy and taxation for an agent may depend on the set of acquired resources and prices. This paper investigates how such transfer policies interfere with the substitutes condition, which is critical for market equilibrium existence and auction mechanism performance among other important issues. For environments where the condition holds in the absence of policy intervention, we investigate which transfer policies preserve the substitutes condition in various economically meaningful settings, establishing a series of characterisation theorems. For environments where the condition may fail without policy intervention, we examine how to use transfer policies to re-establish it, finding exactly when transfer policies based on scales are effective for that purpose. These results serve to inform policymakers, market designers, and market participants of how transfer policies may impact markets, so more informed decisions can be made.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad032
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Salience and Taxation with Imperfect Competition

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      Pages: 403 - 437
      Abstract: AbstractThis paper studies commodity taxation in a model featuring heterogeneous consumers, imperfect competition, and tax salience. We derive new formulas for the incidence and marginal excess burden of commodity taxation highlighting interactions between tax salience and market structure. We estimate the necessary inputs to the formulas by using Nielsen Retail Scanner and Consumer Panel data covering grocery stores and households in the U.S. and detailed sales tax data. We estimate a large amount of pass-through of taxes onto consumer prices and find that households respond more to changes in prices than taxes. We also estimate significant heterogeneity in tax salience across households. We calibrate our new formulas using these results and conclude that essentially all of the incidence of sales taxes falls on consumers, and the marginal excess burden of taxation is larger than estimates based on standard formulas that ignore imperfect competition and tax salience.
      PubDate: Thu, 02 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad028
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • A Macro-Finance Model with Sentiment

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      Pages: 438 - 475
      Abstract: AbstractThis paper incorporates diagnostic expectations into a general equilibrium macroeconomic model with a financial intermediary sector. Diagnostic expectations are a forward-looking model of extrapolative expectations that overreact to recent news. Frictions in financial intermediation produce non-linear spikes in risk premia and slumps in investment during periods of financial distress. The interaction of sentiment with financial frictions generates a short-run amplification effect followed by a long-run reversal effect, termed the feedback from behavioural frictions to financial frictions. The model features sentiment-driven financial crises characterized by low pre-crisis risk premia and neglected risk. The conflicting short-run and long-run effect of sentiment produces boom–bust investment cycles. The model also identifies a stabilizing role for diagnostic expectations. Under the baseline calibration, financial crises are less likely to occur when expectations are diagnostic than when they are rational.
      PubDate: Mon, 06 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad023
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Inference for Ranks with Applications to Mobility across Neighbourhoods
           and Academic Achievement across Countries

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      Pages: 476 - 518
      Abstract: AbstractIt is often desired to rank different populations according to the value of some feature of each population. For example, it may be desired to rank neighbourhoods according to some measure of intergenerational mobility or countries according to some measure of academic achievement. These rankings are invariably computed using estimates rather than the true values of these features. As a result, there may be considerable uncertainty concerning the rank of each population. In this paper, we consider the problem of accounting for such uncertainty by constructing confidence sets for the rank of each population. We consider both the problem of constructing marginal confidence sets for the rank of a particular population as well as simultaneous confidence sets for the ranks of all populations. We show how to construct such confidence sets under weak assumptions. An important feature of all of our constructions is that they remain computationally feasible even when the number of populations is very large. We apply our theoretical results to re-examine the rankings of both neighbourhoods in the U.S. in terms of intergenerational mobility and developed countries in terms of academic achievement. The conclusions about which countries do best and worst at reading, math, and science are fairly robust to accounting for uncertainty. The confidence sets for the ranking of the fifty most populous commuting zones by measures of mobility are also found to be small. These confidence sets, however, become much less informative if one includes all commuting zones, if one considers neighbourhoods at a more granular level (counties, census tracts), or if one uses movers across areas to address concerns about selection.
      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad006
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Are Executives in Short Supply' Evidence from Death Events

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      Pages: 519 - 559
      Abstract: AbstractUsing exhaustive administrative data on Italian social security records, we construct measures of local labour market thickness for executives that vary by industry and location. We show that firm performance is strongly and persistently affected by executive death, but only in thin local labour markets. The new executives hired after death events in thin local labour markets have lower education levels and are more likely to be replaced. These predictions are consistent with a simple model of executive search in which market thickness determines the arrival rate of applications for executive positions.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad027
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Human Capital, Female Employment, and Electricity: Evidence from the Early
           20th-Century United States

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      Pages: 560 - 594
      Abstract: AbstractThis paper revisits the link between electrification and the rise in female labour force participation (LFP), and presents theoretical and empirical evidence showing that electrification triggered a rise in female LFP by increasing market opportunities for skilled women. I formalize my theory in an overlapping generations model and find that my mechanism explains one quarter of the rise in female LFP during the rollout of electricity in the U.S. (1880–1940), and matches the slow decline in female home production hours during this period. I then present micro-evidence supporting my theory using newly digitized data on the early electrification of the U.S.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad021
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Correction to: Inference for Ranks with Applications to Mobility across
           Neighbourhoods and Academic Achievement across Countries

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      Pages: 595 - 595
      Abstract: This is a correction to: Magne Mogstad and others, Inference for Ranks with Applications to Mobility across Neighbourhoods and Academic Achievement across Countries, The Review of Economic Studies, Volume 91, Issue 1, January 2024, Pages 476–518, https://doi.org/10.1093/restud/rdad006
      PubDate: Mon, 24 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad074
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Correction to: Unemployment Insurance in Macroeconomic Stabilization

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      Pages: 596 - 596
      Abstract: This is a correction to: Rohan Kekre, Unemployment Insurance in Macroeconomic Stabilization, The Review of Economic Studies, Volume 90, Issue 5, October 2023, Pages 2439–2480, https://doi.org/10.1093/restud/rdac080
      PubDate: Mon, 09 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad092
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Correction to: Understanding Cultural Persistence and Change

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      Pages: 597 - 597
      Abstract: This is a correction: Paola Giuliano, Nathan Nunn, Understanding Cultural Persistence and Change, The Review of Economic Studies, Volume 88, Issue 4, July 2021, Pages 1541–1581, https://doi.org/10.1093/restud/rdaa074
      PubDate: Mon, 09 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/restud/rdad097
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 1 (2023)
       
 
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  Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3510 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (127 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (297 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1231 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (202 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
    - INSURANCE (26 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (61 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (586 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (106 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)

Showing 1 - 14 of 14 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Economic Journal : Macroeconomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 164)
Corporate Governance and Sustainability Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Growth     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Governance and Regulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Macroeconomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Macromarketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Macroeconomic Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Microeconomics and Macroeconomics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
NBER Macroeconomics Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51)
Perfil de Coyuntura Económica     Open Access  
Review of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253)
Review of Market Integration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Journal of Macroeconomics and Public Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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