Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3530 journals)
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INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Monetary Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Information Technologies & International Development     Open Access   (Followers: 82)
International Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
International Labour Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 60)
Journal of International Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
IMF Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Review of International Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of International Money and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of International Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
International Review of Social History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Journal of International Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Review of Economics & Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Review of Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
PharmacoEconomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Journal of International Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Quarterly Journal of Political Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Applied Behavioral Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of World Trade     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Human Resource Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of International Trade Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Human Resource Management International Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
European Business Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Economic and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Contemporary European Research     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Studies in Comparative International Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Labor and Working-Class History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Review of International Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of International Trade & Economic Development: An International and Comparative Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Small Business Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
European Company Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of International Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Review of Financial Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
World Competition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of the Association for Consumer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Review of Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of International Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Studies of Management and Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Economic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Public Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal for International Business and Entrepreneurship Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
World Trade and Arbitration Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Information Resources Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Economics and Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Competition and Regulation in Network Industries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Emerging Markets Finance and Trade     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Management International Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Advances in Economic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Review of Applied Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Global Trade and Customs Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
South African Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
TDM Transnational Dispute Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
EC Tax Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Accounting, Auditing and Taxation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Intertax     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
IN VIVO     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Review of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Revenue and Pricing Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Japanese and International Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of International Financial Management & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Insolvency Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Monthly Statistics of International Trade - Statistiques mensuelles du commerce international     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Revue Internationale du Travail     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Syracuse Journal of International Law and Commerce     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Management international / International Management / Gestiòn Internacional     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Digital Finance : Smart Data Analytics, Investment Innovation, and Financial Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Foreign Trade Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of International Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Transactions In Operational Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Shipping and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
China Business Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of International Food & Agribusiness Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Qualitative Research in Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Trade Journal : Western Hemispheric Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
MEED Middle East Economic Digest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global Summitry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Export Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Economics and International Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudos Internacionais : revista de relações internacionais da PUC Minas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Korea Trade     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Critical Perspectives on International Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Acta Economica Et Turistica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Amnis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
L'Année du Maghreb     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Commerce Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Global & Strategis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Botswana Journal of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue internationale P.M.E. : économie et gestion de la petite et moyenne entreprise     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Antitrust Enforcement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Economics Research International     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Japanese Political Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Asian Business and Information Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Economic Journal of Emerging Markets     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia and the Global Economy     Open Access  
China Economic Quarterly International     Open Access  
World Oil Trade     Hybrid Journal  
Regional Formation and Development Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Reviews on Global Economics     Open Access  
Journal of International Business Policy     Hybrid Journal  
East Asian Community Review     Hybrid Journal  
Ekonomia Międzynarodowa     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Ekonomi Terapan     Open Access  
Jurnal Hubungan Internasional     Open Access  
Journal of Advanced Research in Economics and International Business     Full-text available via subscription  
Proceedings of the International Conference on Business Excellence     Open Access  
Journal of Accounting and Finance in Emerging Economies     Open Access  
International Journal of Governance and Financial Intermediation     Hybrid Journal  
South American Development Society Journal     Open Access  
Revista Multiface Online     Open Access  
Revue internationale de l'économie sociale     Full-text available via subscription  
Expert Journal of Business and Management     Open Access  
Transnational Corporations Review     Hybrid Journal  
Research World     Hybrid Journal  
Crossroads     Hybrid Journal  
Relações Internacionais (R:I)     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Gestão de Negócios     Open Access  
Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal  
EMAJ : Emerging Markets Journal     Open Access  
Journal of International Commerce, Economics and Policy     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Comparative International Management     Full-text available via subscription  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.847
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-1553 - ISSN (Online) 1567-9764
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • CHANS-Law: preventing the next pandemic through the integration of social
           and environmental law

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      Abstract: Abstract Zoonotic viruses have sacrificed hundreds of millions of people throughout human history. There are currently 1.7 million unidentified viruses estimated to be circulating in mammal and bird populations. It is foreseeable that in the near future, another of these will transmit to people, heralding the start of the next pandemic—one potentially more deadly than COVID-19. At the core of this article is a call for pre-emptive protection of the natural environment and its regenerative systems as the first fundamental step in the prevention of future epidemics and pandemics. While zoonoses originate in nature, the predominant legal discipline, managing these crises, is international health law which is invoked reactively once an outbreak has been reported. In this paper, we identify the need for a legal shift in epidemic and pandemic responses. In particular, we call for the incorporation of international environmental agreements to prevent the initial viral spillover from animal to human populations. We propose a strategy of strengthening existing agreements and a coupling of legal disciplines, such as health and environmental law, emphasizing the need for synergies across legal disciplines to enhance the emergence and management of future pandemics and epidemics. We introduce Coupled Human and Natural Systems (CHANS) Law to frame the required integration across legal instruments to regulate inextricably human-nature connections and advocate for the development of a Convention on Epidemics and Pandemics.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Cultivated ties and strategic communication: do international
           environmental secretariats tailor information to increase their
           bureaucratic reputation'

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      Abstract: Abstract The past few years have witnessed a growing interest among scholars and policy-makers in the interplay of international bureaucracies with civil society organizations, other non-profit entities, and the private sector. This article extends the state of research by investigating whether and how secretariats try to strengthen their reputation within their respective policy regimes through information provision and alliance building. Based on reputation theory, the article argues that ties cultivated with stakeholders as well as appearance and presentation of information are decisive in this regard. Methodologically, the study implements a mixed-methods design that combines a quantitative survey with social network analysis and qualitative content analysis of interviews with stakeholders within the climate and biodiversity regime. We show that the secretariats of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) maintain relationships with a wide range of state and non-state actors to enhance their reputation. Moreover, different types of actors receive different types of information from the two secretariats studied. Our findings reveal that both secretariats use their limited resources for investing strategically into networks with different types of actors (in the broader transnational policy network), either via the tailored provision of information or through strategic networking with multipliers. They also indicate that reputation does not simply depend on characteristics of bureaucracies, but also on framework conditions and different communication strategies.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Evaluation of the UNFCCC Technology Mechanism’s contribution to an
           international climate policy framework

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      Abstract: Abstract The Paris Agreement, adopted in 2015, is ushering in a new climate regime. Owing to the increasing importance of technology development and transfer, a technology subregime became part of the Paris Agreement in the form of Article 10, which obligates parties to strengthen their cooperative action on technology development and transfer. This technology subregime includes the Technology Mechanism as a working mechanism, established in 2010 under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The effective implementation of the technology subregime hinges upon the supporting role of the Technology Mechanism, particularly its implementing organization, the Climate Technology Centre & Network (CTCN). Technology subregimes are regarded not only as effective means to tackle environmental problems, but also as an inducement to extend the participation of developing countries in international environmental agreements. However, the means to assess them have not been widely explored. A recent UNFCCC discussion considered whether the CTCN impacted the enhancement of environmental quality in terms of mitigation of and adaptation to climate change. Therefore, this study evaluates the institutional effectiveness of the technology subregime of the Paris Agreement with the CTCN. This study utilizes five evaluation criteria: (1) environmental effectiveness, (2) technological effectiveness, (3) economic effectiveness, (4) compliance and participation incentives, and (5) administrative feasibility. It summarizes analytical results and concludes by proposing policy implications regarding the assessment of institutional effectiveness of the technology subregime.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • eThekwini’s green and ecological infrastructure policy landscape:
           research paradigms, theories and epistocrats

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this paper is to indicate how dominant research paradigms, social theories, and an epistocracy influence the governance of green and ecological infrastructures within a South African local government context. Paradigms and theories play an important constituting role that (local) government actors and institutions actively and subconsciously promote within the green and ecological infrastructure policy landscape. Research conducted by the author indicates that epistemic actors within the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality, South Africa, use paradigms and theories to promote green and ecological infrastructures, as materialities, coupled with climate change adaptation and mitigation and water governance and security aspirations. I conclude that an epistocracy is active in the municipality and that it promotes the development and implementation of the infrastructure types through a positivist paradigm and accompanied theories. In this article, I will report on a two-year study that investigated eThekwini’s green and ecological infrastructure policy landscape.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Environmental-agreement design and political ideology in democracies

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      Abstract: Abstract Does the political ideology of negotiating parties influence the design of international environmental agreements' This article distinguishes between leftist and rightist executives in democracies to develop a twofold argument. First, left-leaning democratic governments tend to be generally more environmental-friendly, which implies that they should favor designs that are more conducive to effective institutions. Second, leftist democratic executives are commonly less concerned about sovereignty costs. Both mechanisms suggest that environmental treaties likely comprise “legalized,” i.e., hard-law elements when left-wing democracies negotiate their design. The empirical implication of the theory is tested with quantitative data on international environmental agreements since 1975. The findings report an association between leftist ideology in democracies and agreement legalization, although this is driven by aspects of sovereignty delegation. This article contributes to the literatures on environmental institutions, international cooperation more generally, as well as party politics.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Carbon emission, solid waste management, and electricity generation: a
           legal and empirical perspective for renewable energy in Nigeria

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      Abstract: Abstract This research investigates the necessity for transformation of wastes to energy for environmentally friendly and improvement in Nigeria’s power sector for sustainability, to reduce greenhouse gas discharges and to encourage financings of renewable energy resources, and to alleviate the anxieties on dumping of deleterious wastes in Nigeria. The research utilises a library-centred doctrinal legal study modus operandi with a conceptual methodology, count on current researches. It investigates the effectiveness of subsisting legal regime and other regulations and policies which are requisite on the procedure of waste administration involving electricity generation in the country. Furthermore, the study conducts a quantitative assessment concerning augmented dickey fuller for analysing the stationarity of the data sequences and abound test cointegration approach to ascertain the subsistence of enduring connection between carbon emission and its determinants. A relative assessment of the renewable energy practise via biological wastes to electricity in other nations was also performed in this research. Additionally, the study uses dogmatic-legal analysis which draws on the results of linguistic grammatical, systemic, and teleological (purposive) interpretation of the existing legal regime on solid waste management and electricity generation in Nigeria. The study’s fundamental finding indicates that when the Federal Government takes pragmatic actions to combat waste dumping, it will curtail waste from the numerous bases in compliance with the regulatory and statutory obligations. This can be exploited to produce power while carbon emissions are regulated. The research investigates the consequence of metropolitan solid waste administration and electricity sources on carbon emissions, advocating substitution of power generation source in tackling environmental problems in the country. The study ends with suggestions for the amalgamation of policies and non-statutory encouragements for transforming waste to energy in the country’s power industry and prescribes comprehensible law on energy bases with strict execution of electricity regulations for constant electricity generation and sustainability in the country's electricity industry.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • An adaptation-mitigation game: does adaptation promote participation in
           international environmental agreements'

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper studies how the investment in adaptation can influence the participation in an international environmental agreement (IEA) when countries decide in adaptation before they choose emissions. Three types of agreements are studied, a mitigation agreement for which countries coordinate their decisions only on emissions; an adaptation agreement for which there is only coordination when countries decide their levels of adaptation and a complete agreement when there is coordination in both emissions and adaptation levels. In every case, we assume that the degree of effectiveness of adaptation is bounded from above, in order words, adaptation can alleviate the environmental problem, but it cannot solve it by itself leading the vulnerability of the country to almost zero. Our first results show that in our symmetric model where signatories select the same level of adaptation there are not signatory-signatory international externalities and the complete agreement coincides with the mitigation agreement, and moreover it does not matter when adaptation is chosen with respect to emissions. The main contribution of this paper is to show that the grand coalition could be stable for all types of agreement, but only for extremely high degrees of effectiveness of adaptation. If this condition is not satisfied, the model predicts low levels of membership. The standard result of three countries is found for the mitigation/complete agreement. For the adaptation agreement participation can be higher than three, but not higher than six countries. In any case, we can conclude that under reasonable values for the degree of effectiveness of adaptation, in our model adaptation does not promote participation in an IEA.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • International legal aspects of countering environmental terrorism in the
           context of modern trends in radical environmentalism

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      Abstract: Abstract Environmental terrorism is a new global threat. The modern period of society's development is characterized by an increase in this threat, where terrorism in the traditional view evolves and takes on new outlines. When defining the concept of environmental terrorism, the role of the criminal-legal definition of a crime is of particular importance, since this ultimately reflects the degree of public danger and is reflected in determining an offender's punishment and its appropriate publicity in the media space. This study examines the genesis of the environmental terrorism concept, as well as various approaches to its understanding, taking into account its legal definition. Using the method of political and legal analysis, the study aims to answer the question of whether ecoterrorism is only a manifestation of radical environmentalism, or has different motives. Taking into account the difference in approaches to the concept of “environmental terrorism,” the study also notes a difference in the qualifications of eco-terrorism. This work gives grounds to assert that the absence of a clearly developed conceptual apparatus and the definition of this term in international acts complicates the solution of issues of countering such a phenomenon as environmental terrorism. The study concludes that the concept of environmental terrorism should be considered in terms of its connection with the concept of environmentalism. Terrorist acts that use natural objects (resources) as a political goal should be considered and qualified separately from the environmental terrorism concept because of the differences in the legal nature of these two phenomena. In practical terms, this study is of interest to subjects of political initiative and lawyers engaged in public administration.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Embracing policy paradoxes: EU’s Just Transition Fund and the aim “to
           leave no one behind”

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      Abstract: Abstract With the adoption of the 2030 Agenda, UN Member States pledge “to leave no one behind” and “endeavour to reach the furthest behind first”. The EU Just Transition Fund (JTF) was designed to meet these policy objectives. It is one of three pillars of the Just Transition Mechanism, aiming at fair delivery of the European Green Deal and reducing adverse social and economic impacts of the transition towards a climate-neutral Europe. We examine the formulation of the JTF Regulation, from January 2020 until July 2021 and analyse seven topics of importance during the JTF formulation. Based on the results, we identify and discuss four paradoxes related to governance scales, offsetting exclusion, equity illusion, and eligibility criteria. The paradoxes arise from tension between the all-inclusive objective to leave no one behind, and selective affirmative actions, seeking to reach the furthest behind first. Results of the analysis enabled us to put forward plausible strategies to embrace these policy paradoxes to offer important lessons learned for the JTF and also to future policies that seek to leave no one behind.
      PubDate: 2022-08-16
       
  • Rethinking polycentricity: on the North–South imbalances in
           transnational climate change governance

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      Abstract: Abstract The transnational climate change governance (TCCG) landscape, led by sub- and non-state actors including businesses, municipalities, and NGOs, holds legitimate potential for tackling persisting climate injustices, in part by virtue of its polycentric character. However, while in theory polycentric governance systems could serve to correct structural power imbalances, the geography of TCCG remains remarkably uneven. This article explores this puzzle in the context of polycentric governance theory and the allegedly paradoxical relationship between polycentricity and equity. Two interrelated empirical and analytical research questions are addressed: (1) How is TCCG organized geographically along the global North–South divide' And, based on the geography of TCCG, (2) Does its polycentric character contribute toward more equitable governance across the global North and South' Following a large-N analysis of a novel dataset containing 174 governance arrangements and 1196 stakeholders with decision-making powers, I argue that the geography of TCCG is remarkably resistant to change, gravitating unmistakably toward the global North and its existing diplomatic hotspots. I argue that the TCCG system currently in place resembles a system of concentrated polycentricity—a product of an overarching system of rules shared with the international regime that could, in turn, potentially explain the persisting North–South inequities in a still seemingly increasingly polycentric climate.
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s10784-022-09579-2
       
  • Retraction Note to: Economic and legal regulation of the use and
           development of renewable energy sources

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      PubDate: 2022-06-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10784-022-09582-7
       
  • Credibility dilemmas under the Paris agreement: explaining fossil fuel
           subsidy reform references in INDCs

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      Abstract: Abstract Fossil fuel subsidies are a market distortion commonly identified as an obstacle to decarbonization. Yet  due to trenchant political economic risks, reform attempts can be fraught for governments. Despite these concerns, an institutionally and economically diverse group of states included references to fossil fuel subsidy reform (FFSR) in their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) under the Paris Agreement. What conditions might explain why some states reference politically risky reforms within treaty commitments, while most others would not' We argue that the Article 4 process under the Paris Agreement creates a “credibility dilemma” for states–articulating ambitious emissions reduction targets while also defining national climate plans engenders a need to seek out appropriate policy ideas that can justify overarching goals to international audiences. Insomuch as particular norms are institutionalized and made salient in international politics, a window of opportunity is opened: issue advocates can “activate” norms by demonstrating how related policies can make commitments credible. Using mixed methods, we find support for this argument. We identify contextual factors advancing FFSR in the lead-up to the Paris Agreement, including norm institutionalization in regimes and international organization programs as well as salience-boosting climate diplomacy. Further, we find correspondences between countries targeted by transnational policy advocates and FFSR references in INDCs, building on the momentum in international politics more generally. Though drafting INDCs and NDCs is a government-owned process, the results suggest that understanding their content requires examining international norms alongside domestic circumstances.
      PubDate: 2022-06-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s10784-022-09581-8
       
  • Reflecting on twenty years of international agreements concerning water
           governance: insights and key learning

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this article is to examine the research advanced in the journal, International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics that represents key insights into international agreements on water and their political, legal, economic and cross-disciplinary dimensions for water governance. The article analyses evidence and lessons learnt over the last twenty years to inform policy through a review of theoretical advances, innovations in principles and policy instruments, outcomes of problem-solving and knowledge gained regarding water agreements and associated institutions. Important international agreement principles of no significant harm and economic frames of water as a ‘commons’ advance equity and community of interest in relation to water. The studies on water, sanitation and hygiene point to the ways the role of the state can be advanced in achieving Sustainable Development Goals and in complex contexts of water scarcity and public private partnerships. Cross-disciplinary learnings substantiate the existence and utility of multiple water frames in legal arrangements and use of multiple policy instruments. Cross-disciplinary insights are significant in addressing equity, whether through the nascent development of water indicators or in advancing social learning. Water governance frameworks increasingly focus on adaptation by incorporating multiple stakeholders. These findings that advance equity and inclusivity are tempered by crucial lessons in our understanding of the very contested, power-laden nature of water governance that impact agency at multiple scales and policy coordination across sectors of water, food and energy.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10784-022-09564-9
       
  • The politics of multilateral environmental agreements lessons from
           20 years of INEA

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      Abstract: Abstract This review article addresses the question: What lessons can we learn from work published in International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics regarding the politics of multilateral environmental agreements' What are the implications of these lessons for those responsible for creating and administering these agreements' Based on an analysis of 147 articles published over the past 20 years, the article explores issues of institutional design, institutional politics, implementation, and effectiveness. It concludes that key conditions for success in this realm include: (a) developing a toolkit that is not limited to rules-based governance, (b) paying attention to matters of implementation, (c) bearing in mind the overall regime complex, (d) developing effective leadership based on credibility and accountability, and (e) allowing for institutional adaptation.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10784-022-09567-6
       
  • Lessons learnt in global biodiversity governance

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      Abstract: Abstract INEA has featured many articles covering the dilemmas, puzzles, and tensions related to global biodiversity governance; this coverage was infrequent in earlier issues but has steadily increased as both environmental diplomacy and international law on biodiversity conservation and environmental justice have expanded. Using the definition found in the Convention on Biological Diversity, we scanned INEA articles and derived several lessons learnt over the 2000–2020 period. These include: implementation remains a central challenge, but challenge should not be conflated with ineffectiveness; multilateral environmental agreements are vital for success; coordination and policy coherences are often lacking, insufficient, or superficial; institutional change and policy reform within existing institutions are incremental at best; understanding local political dynamics is critical; equity concerns remain central to biodiversity policy development at all levels; the role of non-state actors and private voluntary standards fluctuates; tensions over state sovereignty and collective action and the commons have often been visible but as often lurk in the shadows of environmental diplomacy and most ongoing discussions of global biodiversity governance. After elaborating on each of these lessons, we offer some insights on research gaps and potential thematic directions for future contributors to INEA.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10784-022-09565-8
       
  • Economic analysis of international environmental agreements: lessons
           learnt 2000–2020

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      Abstract: Abstract On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law & Economics, we conduct an extensive review of papers published in this journal that address the economic dimensions of international environmental agreements (IEAs). We focus particularly on the lessons learnt from this body of literature and the implications for the assessment and design of IEAs in relation to goals such as efficiency, effectiveness, and equity. Our key conclusions run as follows. First, at the international level, universal coalitions are more cost-efficient and effective than fragmented regimes, but more difficult to negotiate and less stable. Second, in developing countries, there is need for substantial external funding to cover the short-run costs of environmental compliance. Third, market-based solutions have been increasingly applied in international agreements but with mixed results. For example, cap-and-trade systems have the potential to achieve greenhouse gas emissions reductions and least economic cost. But in the provisioning of water services, private sector solutions often result in outcomes that are unaffordable for low-income groups or nonviable for businesses, suggesting well-designed public–private partnerships. At the international level, Green Bond markets can attract investors for climate and environmental projects, but implementation failures tend to weaken outcomes. Finally, in practical politics, economically optimal designs are rarely achieved. Future applied economic research should therefore critically investigate institutions and the scope for their reform. Gains in knowledge are expected to come from economic analyses taking a broader perspective on “the economy”, taking institutions and social and ecological relations into account from the start.
      PubDate: 2022-04-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s10784-022-09576-5
       
  • Consensus decision-making in CCAMLR: Achilles’ heel or fundamental
           to its success'

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      Abstract: Abstract The Commission for the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources is the body responsible for the conservation and management of most species in the Southern Ocean. The Convention mandates that decisions be made by consensus agreement of its Members. This approach has been largely successful in delivering strong management decisions across both complex issues and widely ranging national interests. However, recent failures to progress the implementation of a network of marine protected areas or to agree any concrete response actions to climate impacts raise concerns about its effectiveness. This paper reviews the level of uptake of Member-driven proposals and then examines examples of proposals that were not resolved within the usual three years to analyse the processes utilised by Members to find resolution. It concludes that CCAMLR has been successful in reaching agreements when focusing on fisheries management but less so on issues within its broader conservation mandate, such as area protection for biodiversity purposes or non-fishery management focused scientific study, or for issues that are perceiv ed to extend the competency of the Convention. It notes that CCAMLR lacks operational mechanisms to facilitate agreement in the absence of compromise text or when one or two Members cannot accept a proposal.
      PubDate: 2022-04-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s10784-021-09561-4
       
  • Agency dynamics of International Environmental Agreements: actors,
           contexts, and drivers

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      Abstract: Abstract The structural elements of global environmental governance are notoriously difficult to change and align with the needs of a rapidly deteriorating earth system. This, however, only increases the need to focus on the role of agency in this context. This paper does so by taking stock of what we know about agency in relation to International Environmental Agreements (IEAs) and suggests directions for future research. We contribute a conceptual framework to enable the mapping of research on agency related to IEAs and advance more systematic study of agency in this context. The framework differentiates between the negotiation of IEAs, their implementation and outcomes, and includes agency-related and context-related drivers of agency in these processes. We subsequently review articles published between 2003 and 2020 in the journal International Environmental Agreements (as one of the few journals exclusively focusing on IEAs) dealing with actors’ agency and analyse how these articles address agency in the context of IEAs. We conclude firstly by identifying avenues for how further research can fill important gaps, including a need for increased transparency on the methods and theories used in articles, and more comparative research particularly on agency dynamics in implementation; and secondly by highlighting important pointers for policy-makers including the need to re-evaluate the role of national sovereignty and address the forces that counteract equality and justice. Key lessons include the need to improve global south countries' capacity to influence IEA negotiations (input legitimacy), the central role of public and peer pressure on countries to implement commitments, the impact of multilevel governance dynamics and the importance of ensuring that IEAs benefit local communities (output legitimacy).
      PubDate: 2022-04-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s10784-022-09571-w
       
  • Population growth, family planning and the Paris Agreement: an assessment
           of the nationally determined contributions (NDCs)

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      Abstract: Abstract Under the Paris Agreement, nations made pledges known as nationally determined contributions (NDCs): national climate plans detailing countries’ ambitions to adapt to climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Population growth is a driver of both climate vulnerability and climate-altering emissions. We asked, to what extent do countries take population growth into account in their NDCs, beyond simple statements of population trends' Our research method was a comprehensive text review of 164 NDCs submitted by countries. About one-third (49) of countries’ NDCs either link population growth to a negative effect and/or identify population growth as a challenge or trend affecting societal needs. Common impacts of population growth noted were increased energy demand, natural resource degradation, vulnerability to climate impacts, and decreased food and water security. Seven NDCs included strategies to slow population growth, and none specified implementation measures. Overall, the adaptation potential and mitigation co-benefits associated with slowing population growth through meeting the unmet need for family planning are largely overlooked in national NDC documents, suggesting that they are also neglected in countries’ climate change planning. In upcoming rounds of NDC updates, we recommend that governments consider the potential impact of population growth on adaptation and mitigation efforts, prioritize meeting their unmet needs for family planning, and integrate population-health-environment projects in their national climate plans.
      PubDate: 2022-03-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s10784-022-09573-8
       
  • Institutional interplay in global environmental governance: lessons
           learned and future research

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      Abstract: Abstract Over the past decades, the growing proliferation of international institutions governing the global environment has impelled institutional interplay as a result of functional and normative overlap across multiple regimes. This article synthesizes primary contributions made in research on institutional interplay over the past twenty years, with particular focus on publications with International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics. Broadening our understanding about the different types, dimensions, pathways, and effects of institutional interplay, scholars have produced key insights into the ways and means by which international institutions cooperate, manage discord, engage in problem solving, and capture synergies across levels and scales. As global environmental governance has become increasingly fragmented and complex, we recognize that recent studies have highlighted the growing interactions between transnationally operating institutions in the wake of polycentric governance and hybrid institutional complexes. However, our findings reveal that there is insufficient empirical and conceptual research to fully understand the relationship, causes, and consequences of interplay between intergovernmental and transnational institutions. Reflecting on the challenges of addressing regulatory gaps and mitigating the crisis of multilateralism, we expound the present research frontier for further advancing research on institutional interplay and provide recommendations to support policy-making.
      PubDate: 2022-03-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10784-022-09569-4
       
 
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