Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3510 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (127 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (297 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1231 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (202 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
    - INSURANCE (26 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (61 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (586 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (106 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Monetary Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Information Technologies & International Development     Open Access   (Followers: 82)
International Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
International Labour Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 60)
Journal of International Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
IMF Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Review of International Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of International Money and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of International Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
International Review of Social History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Journal of International Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Review of Economics & Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Review of Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
PharmacoEconomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Journal of International Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Quarterly Journal of Political Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Applied Behavioral Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of World Trade     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Human Resource Management International Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of International Trade Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Human Resource Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
European Business Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Economic and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Contemporary European Research     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Studies in Comparative International Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Labor and Working-Class History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Review of International Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of International Trade & Economic Development: An International and Comparative Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Small Business Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
European Company Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Review of Financial Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of International Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of the Association for Consumer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
World Competition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Review of Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
World Trade and Arbitration Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of International Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Studies of Management and Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Emerging Markets Finance and Trade     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal for International Business and Entrepreneurship Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Economic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Information Resources Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Public Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition and Regulation in Network Industries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Management International Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Advances in Economic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Review of Applied Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Economics and Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Global Trade and Customs Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
South African Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
TDM Transnational Dispute Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
EC Tax Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Accounting, Auditing and Taxation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Intertax     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
IN VIVO     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Japanese and International Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Insolvency Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Review of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of International Financial Management & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Revenue and Pricing Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Revue Internationale du Travail     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Foreign Trade Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Syracuse Journal of International Law and Commerce     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of International Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Monthly Statistics of International Trade - Statistiques mensuelles du commerce international     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Management international / International Management / Gestiòn Internacional     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Digital Finance : Smart Data Analytics, Investment Innovation, and Financial Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International Food & Agribusiness Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Shipping and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Transactions In Operational Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
China Business Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Qualitative Research in Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Trade Journal : Western Hemispheric Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Korea Trade     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
MEED Middle East Economic Digest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global Summitry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Global & Strategis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Economica Et Turistica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transnational Corporations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Economic Journal of Emerging Markets     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Export Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
World Oil Trade     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Economics and International Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudos Internacionais : revista de relações internacionais da PUC Minas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Research World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asia and the Global Economy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economics Research International     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue internationale P.M.E. : économie et gestion de la petite et moyenne entreprise     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Critical Perspectives on International Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Commerce Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Botswana Journal of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Antitrust Enforcement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Japanese Political Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Asian Business and Information Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
L'Année du Maghreb     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Amnis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
China Economic Quarterly International     Open Access  
Regional Formation and Development Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Reviews on Global Economics     Open Access  
Journal of International Business Policy     Hybrid Journal  
East Asian Community Review     Hybrid Journal  
Ekonomia Międzynarodowa     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Ekonomi Terapan     Open Access  
Jurnal Hubungan Internasional     Open Access  
Journal of Advanced Research in Economics and International Business     Full-text available via subscription  
Proceedings of the International Conference on Business Excellence     Open Access  
Journal of Accounting and Finance in Emerging Economies     Open Access  
International Journal of Governance and Financial Intermediation     Hybrid Journal  
South American Development Society Journal     Open Access  
Revista Multiface Online     Open Access  
Revue internationale de l'économie sociale     Full-text available via subscription  
Expert Journal of Business and Management     Open Access  
Crossroads     Hybrid Journal  
Relações Internacionais (R:I)     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Gestão de Negócios     Open Access  
Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal  
EMAJ : Emerging Markets Journal     Open Access  
Journal of International Commerce, Economics and Policy     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Comparative International Management     Full-text available via subscription  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Quarterly Journal of Political Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 6.453
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 20  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1554-0626 - ISSN (Online) 1554-0634
Published by Now Publishers Inc Homepage  [28 journals]
  • Local Labor Markets and Party Elite: Crafting Trade Policy in the United
           States House of Representatives

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      Abstract: AbstractDriven by concerns over American jobs, factions within both the Democrat and Republican parties have appealed for greater trade protection. Does the legislative record reflect this rhetoric and have protectionist demands impacted the direction of trade policy in recent decades' Our answers are yes and no, respectively. We investigate the content of all 3356 trade bills introduced in Congress, 2005–2016, and classify them as liberalizing and protectionist. Analyzing legislator decisions to sponsor or cosponsor bills, we show that legislators who represent districts hardest hit by trade competition promote protectionism at a higher rate. We find strong evidence that district economic conditions reinforce the party position for Democrats and reveal intra-party cleavages among Republicans. Yet, these local interests are quickly sidelined in the legislative process. The few trade bills that become public law advance liberalization. The attrition process reflects the positions of party leadership who exercise gatekeeping powers to promote legislation that aligns with productive firms and the broader national interest. Thus we show how local economic conditions, partisan politics, and Congressional elite jointly shape the direction of trade policy, reinforcing U.S. engagement in the global economy.Suggested CitationAdrienne Hosek and Lauren Peritz (2022), "Local Labor Markets and Party Elite: Crafting Trade Policy in the United States House of Representatives", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 4. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00020048
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Oct 2022 00:00:00 +010
       
  • The Oligarch Vanishes: Defensive Ownership, Property Rights, and Political
           Connections

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      Abstract: AbstractWe examine the use of proxies, shell companies, and offshore firms to defend property against seizure by private and state actors. Our theoretical framework emphasizes the role of political connections in defensive ownership. Linking information from investigative journalists on the key holdings of numerous Ukrainian oligarchs with firm-level administrative data on formal ownership ties, we observe some form of defensive ownership among more than two-thirds of oligarch-controlled firms, but such conduct is much less common for those connected to the incumbent regime. Further exploiting the abrupt shock to political connections that accompanied the Orange Revolution, we find a sharp rise in defensive ownership among previously connected oligarchs.Suggested CitationJohn S. Earle, Solomiya Shpak, Anton Shirikov and Scott Gehlbach (2022), "The Oligarch Vanishes: Defensive Ownership, Property Rights, and Political Connections", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 4. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00020228
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Oct 2022 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Affective Polarization Did Not Increase During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Abstract: AbstractWe document trends in affective polarization during the COVID-19 pandemic. In our main measure, affective polarization is relatively flat between July 2019 and February 2020, then falls significantly around the onset of the pandemic. Three of five other data sources display a similar downward trend, with two of five data sources showing no significant change. A survey experiment shows that priming respondents to think about the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic significantly reduces affective polarization.Suggested CitationLevi Boxell, Jacob Conway, James N. Druckman and Matthew Gentzkow (2022), "Affective Polarization Did Not Increase During the COVID-19 Pandemic", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 4. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00021027
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Oct 2022 00:00:00 +010
       
  • The Rank Effect in Multimember District Elections

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      Abstract: AbstractIn this paper, I estimate the effects of first rank using a regression discontinuity design in the context of three multimember district (MMD) elections, in Korea, Spain, and Japan. By analyzing MMD elections, I can estimate the effects of first rank separately from those of incumbency because there are multiple winners with different ranks. The results indicate that there is no first-rank effect on the outcomes of subsequent elections in any of the three cases. However, I do find evidence that achieving first rank increases candidates' probabilities of running for and winning higher office. In addition, I show that the first-rank effect on political advancement is likely to be driven by political parties, not by voters.Suggested CitationB. K. Song (2022), "The Rank Effect in Multimember District Elections", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 4. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00021045
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Oct 2022 00:00:00 +010
       
  • From the Editors in Chief: A Farewell Message

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      Abstract: AbstractSuggested CitationScott Ashworth and Joshua D. Clinton (2022), "From the Editors in Chief: A Farewell Message", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 4, pp 449-450. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00022126
      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2022 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Communication in Collective Bargaining

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      Abstract: AbstractWe analyze how institutions shape communication incentives in a Romer–Rosenthal agenda-setting model with private information and private values. An agenda-setter faces multiple voters who are privately informed about their ideal points in a one-dimensional policy space. We consider two institutions. In one setting, cheap-talk communication precedes a take-it-or-leave-it agenda-setting game. The second involves sequential agenda setting where the setter can revise the proposal only when the first one fails to gain enough support. The latter institution requires the setter to commit to a policy as a screening technology. The commitment fosters information disclosure from strategic voters and thus results in efficiency gains over straw polls, where the setter is not constrained in how she reacts to revealed information. In addition, we also find voters' sabotage incentive that may discount the informativeness of political communication. Specifically, when a voter preferring the status quo cannot directly block less preferred policies, he could have an incentive to induce an extreme reform proposal and expect it to fail. With numerical examples, we identify the sabotage phenomenon in nonmonotonic equilibrium, where the types of voters that sufficiently prefer and dislike the status quo send one signal, and the intermediate types send another one.Suggested CitationJidong Chen (2022), "Communication in Collective Bargaining", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00017058
      PubDate: Sun, 31 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Out of Step and Still in Congress' Electoral Consequences of Incumbent
           and Challenger Positioning Across Time

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      Abstract: AbstractRecent research suggests that the penalty congressional candidates pay for ideological extremism declined abruptly in 1994 when the House majority became competitive for the first time in decades. We reexamine congressional accountability in light of this evidence, first evaluating the centrality of 1994 as a turning point and then allowing that voters may not weigh incumbents' and challengers' positions equally. Several findings emerge. Even when the penalty for extremism is constrained to be equal for challengers and incumbents, accountability does not abruptly decline in 1994 but instead decreases gradually from 1980 through recent elections. Furthermore, once incumbent and challenger ideology are examined separately, the results on incumbents do not match those for challengers. Depending on the specification and ideology measure, incumbent accountability may stay similar, decrease, or even increase over time. By comparison, the relationship between challenger ideology and vote share consistently declines across electoral cycles. These results suggest that analyses treating incumbents and challengers identically will be prone to find decreased congressional accountability, even when the evidence on incumbents does not merit such a conclusion.Suggested CitationBrandice Canes-Wrone and Michael R. Kistner (2022), "Out of Step and Still in Congress' Electoral Consequences of Incumbent and Challenger Positioning Across Time", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00019222
      PubDate: Sun, 31 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Selective Civilian Targeting: The Unintended Consequences of Partial Peace

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      Abstract: AbstractPeace agreements may inadvertently increase selective violence against civilians when they are incomplete in two key dimensions. First, only a fraction of the existing armed groups participates in the agreement. Second, the legitimate government fails to establish an institutional presence in the areas previously controlled by those who do participate. Under these two conditions, the resulting vacuum of power may attract active armed groups who engage in selective civilian victimization to obtain control. Studying the recent Colombian experience, we find that the permanent ceasefire declared by the FARC insurgency in 2014 led to a surge in the targeting of community leaders in former FARC strongholds, perpetrated by armed groups excluded from the peace process, with the goal of consolidating their dominance in those areas. Critically, selective victimization is attenuated by some dimensions of state capacity and exacerbated in places that are more valuable as proxied by the existence of recent land conflicts.Suggested CitationMounu Prem, Andrés F. Rivera, Dario A. Romero and Juan F. Vargas (2022), "Selective Civilian Targeting: The Unintended Consequences of Partial Peace", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00020088
      PubDate: Sun, 31 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +020
       
  • How Does the Rising Number of Women in the U.S. Congress Change
           Deliberation' Evidence from House Committee Hearings

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      Abstract: AbstractThe rising number of women in Congress changes deliberation. Using committee hearing transcripts from 1995 to 2017, we analyze how the gender composition of committees affects group dynamics in committee hearings. While we find limited evidence that increasing proportions of women affects women's participation, we find that discussion norms within committees change significantly in the presence of more women. Namely, interruptions decrease when there are more women on the committee; with higher proportions of women, men are less likely to interrupt others. Furthermore, committee members are more likely to engage and stay on the same topics in the presence of more women, suggesting a shift in norms toward more in-depth exchange. Overall, our results show that increasing the proportion of women changes discussion dynamics within Congress by shifting norms away from interruptions and one-sided talk in committees, thereby shifting group norms that govern decision-making during an important policy-making stage.Suggested CitationPamela Ban, Justin Grimmer, Jaclyn Kaslovsky and Emily West (2022), "How Does the Rising Number of Women in the U.S. Congress Change Deliberation' Evidence from House Committee Hearings", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00020112
      PubDate: Sun, 31 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Strategic Civil War Aims and the Resource Curse

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      Abstract: AbstractDoes oil wealth promote or inhibit prospects for civil war' Empirical evidence relating oil to civil war onset is mixed, and depends on the aims of the rebellion: although separatist civil wars (in which rebels aim to create an autonomous region or independent state) occur more frequently in oil-rich regions, oil-rich countries experience fewer center-seeking civil wars (in which rebels aim to capture the capital city). This article provides a new theoretical framework in which the challenger strategically chooses its civil war aims. I first incorporate strategic civil war aims into a formal bargaining model with commitment problems. Then, I derive two countervailing theoretical effects of economic activities, such as oil production, that provide an easy source of government revenues: a conflict-suppressing revenue effect (more money for the government) and a conflict-enhancing predation effect (more for the rebels to capture). Finally, I highlight two reasons that the magnitude of the oil predation effect is larger for separatist than for center-seeking challengers, which connects the theoretical implications to the motivating empirical pattern. First, a strategic selection effect for ethnic minorities: governments face more severe commitment problems toward small ethnic groups — who prefer separatist over center-seeking civil war. Second, a geography of rebellion effect: oil-funded repression more effectively deters center-seeking challenges than peripheral insurgencies.Suggested CitationJack Paine (2022), "Strategic Civil War Aims and the Resource Curse", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 2. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00020065
      PubDate: Sat, 30 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +020
       
  • The Unintended Effects of Bottom-Up Accountability: Evidence from a Field
           Experiment in Peru

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      Abstract: AbstractNumerous recent studies show that sharing politician or bureaucrat performance information with voters seldom succeeds at generating bottom-up pressure. One explanation is that local politics in developing democracies are typically mediated through local "development broker" elites, who often lack critical procedural information. Does supplying local leaders with information about decentralized political processes allow them to participate more effectively, generate accountability pressure, and improve public goods provision' A randomized field experiment in Peru demonstrates that information can indeed provoke attitudinal and behavioral change among village elites regarding participation, government performance and protest, but often in unanticipated ways. The study finds that training workshops in fact reduce participation in local participatory budgeting processes, reduce satisfaction with mayors, and increase support for protest and recall elections. Aggregate behavioral measures find a reduction in participatory budgeting attendance, but no changes in the probability of protest or recall initiation. Although village leaders are frustrated with mayoral performance, they struggle to generate collective action and thus have to settle for withdrawing from processes they can leave unilaterally. A test of mechanisms indicates this is not driven primarily by rent-seeking. There are no overall effects on district government performance in the following year. The evidence indicates that information can prompt local leaders to make political moves, but the high costs of collection action makes it difficult to produce meaningful change in politician behavior.Suggested CitationRenard Sexton (2022), "The Unintended Effects of Bottom-Up Accountability: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Peru", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 2. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00020079
      PubDate: Sat, 30 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Accountability and Inclusion in Customary Institutions: Evidence from a
           Village-Level Experiment in Zimbabwe

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      Abstract: AbstractThe problem of traditional leadership is often conceived as one of low accountability due to a single unelected leader having unchecked power within communities. Instead, we argue there are strong norms of collective deliberation in most traditional political institutions. As a result, a key constraint on inclusive decision-making and broad accountability is the composition of traditional leaders' advisers and councils. We test whether encouragement to broaden advisers to village chiefs in Zimbabwe can result in better decision-making outcomes using a field experiment in 270 villages. The field experiment included two treatment arms, one which provided village chiefs with information on laws and norms encouraging inclusive decision-making through workshops and one that additionally included a local civil society leader in the workshops. We find that including a civil society leader results in more inclusive decision-making processes and improved outcomes for the village chief's political opponents, including fairer court decisions and less partisan food aid distribution. These results have important implications for how scholars conceptualize traditional leadership and indicate the possibility for improved representation through incremental changes to traditional political institutions.Suggested CitationKate Baldwin, Shylock Muyengwa and Eric Mvukiyehe (2022), "Accountability and Inclusion in Customary Institutions: Evidence from a Village-Level Experiment in Zimbabwe", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 2. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00020110
      PubDate: Sat, 30 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Policing Ethnicity: Lab-in-the-Field Evidence on Discrimination,
           Cooperation, and Ethnic Balancing in the Liberian National Police

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      Abstract: AbstractEthnic balancing in the security sector increasingly accompanies power sharing agreements after civil war, but new challenges arise as these institutions must sustain cooperation amidst increasing ethnic heterogeneity. Inclusive involvement in security sector institutions may reduce discrimination against minority groups. But pressure to assimilate may also foment "loyalty conflict" among minority group members, exacerbating discrimination. We test these competing logics using surveys and lab-in-the-field experiments with teams of Liberian National Police officers. Consistent with a logic of loyalty conflict, we find that teams with minority police officers are more rather than less discriminatory against minority civilians. This effect is not driven by heterogeneity, but rather by the presence of minority police officers per se. We also find that teams that include minority police officers are no more or less cooperative than those that do not, and that heterogeneous teams are no more or less cooperative than homogeneous ones. We argue that these effects are likely a result of professionalization processes that encourage conformity and loyalty to an existing police subculture.Suggested CitationRobert A. Blair, Sabrina M. Karim, Michael J. Gilligan and Kyle Beardsley (2022), "Policing Ethnicity: Lab-in-the-Field Evidence on Discrimination, Cooperation, and Ethnic Balancing in the Liberian National Police", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 2. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00019226
      PubDate: Sat, 30 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Can the Political Ambition of Young Women Be Increased' Evidence from
           U.S. High School Students

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      Abstract: AbstractThe under-representation of women in American politics can likely be explained, at least in part, by women's comparatively lower levels of political ambition. We analyze a co-ed, religious program for high school students in which participants lobby their Members of Congress and receive political skills training. By leveraging longitudinal survey data about the participants and a difference-in-differences design, we find that the program successfully increased the political ambition of its female participants. To the best of our knowledge, we offer the first quasi-experimental evidence demonstrating a possible means of increasing the political ambition of high school-aged American women. Our results demonstrate that female political ambition can be increased without relying on programs that explicitly focus on gender and ambition.Suggested CitationJoshua Kalla and Ethan Porter (2022), "Can the Political Ambition of Young Women Be Increased' Evidence from U.S. High School Students", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 2. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00020106
      PubDate: Sat, 30 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Third-Party Intervention and Strategic Militarization

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      Abstract: AbstractCodified at the 2005 United Nations World Summit, the doctrine of Responsibility to Protect articulates an ideal of international interventions motivated by compassion for victims and a desire to bring stability to hot-spots around the world. Despite this consensus, practitioners and scholars have debated the importance of unintended consequences stemming from the expectation of third-party intervention. We analyze how third-party intervention shapes the incentives to arm, negotiate settlements, and fight wars in a parsimonious game theoretic model. Among the unintended consequences we find: interventions that indiscriminately lower the destructiveness of war increase the probability of conflict and increasing the cost of arming makes destructive wars more likely. Other interventions, however, can have much more beneficial effects and our analysis highlights peace-enhancing forms of third-party intervention. From a welfare perspective, most interventions do not change the ex-ante loss from war, but do have distributional effects on the terms of peace. As a result R2P principles are hard to implement because natural forms of intervention create incentives that make them largely self-defeating. Suggested CitationAdam Meirowitz, Massimo Morelli, Kristopher W. Ramsay and Francesco Squintani (2022), "Third-Party Intervention and Strategic Militarization", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 1. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00019118
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Jan 2022 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Coordination and Innovation in Judiciaries: Correct Law versus Consistent
           Law

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      Abstract: AbstractWe identify the coordination consideration among judges who do not have formal authority over each other, and investigate its consequences for their decisions and legal innovations. Coordination concerns arise because judges value the consistent application of law. To mitigate their strategic uncertainty, judges overweight interpretations that are visible throughout the judiciary (e.g., prominent judges’ opinions) because their visibility facilitates coordination. This creates a tradeoff between the consistent and correct application of law—the two desiderata of judicial decision-making. In particular, anticipating overreactions to their opinions, some prominent judges refrain from expressing their informed opinions. Paradoxically, the propensity to refrain is strongest in prominent judges who care most about the correct application of law. From their perspective, excessive concern for uniformity in the judiciary overrides the informational value of expressing informed opinions. We explore the implications for issuing narrow or broad opinions, the stickiness of precedent, and the practice of stare decisis. We provide concrete examples from contract, property, tort, and constitutional law that support our theoretical mechanisms. Suggested CitationMehdi Shadmehr, Sepehr Shahshahani and Charles Cameron (2022), "Coordination and Innovation in Judiciaries: Correct Law versus Consistent Law", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 1. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00019216
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Jan 2022 00:00:00 +010
       
  • A Theory of Power Wars

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      Abstract: AbstractWe present a theory of war onset and war duration in which power is multidimensional and can evolve through conflict. The resources players can secure without fighting are determined by their political power, while the ability of appropriating resources with violence is due to their military power. When deciding whether to wage a war, players evaluate the consequences on the current allocation of resources as well as on the future distribution of military and political powers. We deliver three main results: a key driver of war is the mismatch between military and political power; dynamic incentives may amplify static incentives, leading forwardlooking players to be more belligerent; and a war is more likely to last for longer if political power is initially more unbalanced than military power and the politically under-represented player is militarily advantaged. Our results are robust to allowing the peaceful allocation of resources to be a function of both political and military powers. Finally, we provide empirical correlations on interstate wars that are consistent with the theory. Suggested CitationHelios Herrera, Massimo Morelli and Salvatore Nunnari (2022), "A Theory of Power Wars", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 1. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00019136
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Jan 2022 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Parents, Infants, and Voter Turnout: Evidence from the United States

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      Abstract: AbstractDespite evidence that infants affect families’ economic and social behaviors, little is known about how young children influence their parents’ political engagement. I show that U.S. women with an infant during an election year are 3.5 percentage points less likely to vote than women without children; men with an infant are 2.2 percentage points less likely to vote. Suggesting that this effect may be causal, I find no significant decreases in turnout the year before parents have an infant. Using a triple-difference approach, I then show that universal vote-by-mail systems mitigate the negative association between infants and mothers’ turnout. Suggested CitationAngela Cools (2022), "Parents, Infants, and Voter Turnout: Evidence from the United States", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 1. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00020072
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Jan 2022 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Transparency and Stability

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      Abstract: AbstractWe revisit the theory that Hollyer, Rosendorff, and Vreeland use in their research program on transparency and political stability. We show that in a representative citizen setting and in their multi-citizen model, more transparency increases the likelihood of revolution if this likelihood is sufficiently small, but reduces the likelihood of revolution if it is sufficiently large. Rather than coordination concerns, the mechanism driving this result reflects the logic of “gambling for resurrection”: when you’re ahead, don’t give information, but when you’re behind, gamble for resurrection by providing more information. Their model suggests that protest risk drives transparency, not the converse: regimes facing a low likelihood of revolution should reduce transparency, while those facing a high likelihood of revolution should raise transparency, generating a positive correlation between transparency and instability. Moreover, we show that in Hollyer et al.’s core models, a citizen’s net payoff from revolting does not depend on either the citizen’s private economic well-being, or the public economic situation: economic interest, either self-interest or sociotropic interest, is not itself an incentive to protest. Rather, the model is a sunspot game, with economic data playing the role of sunspots, which, by assumption, act as focal points for coordination. Suggested CitationMehdi Shadmehr and Dan Bernhardt (2022), "Transparency and Stability", Quarterly Journal of Political Science: Vol. 17: No. 1. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/100.00019195
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Jan 2022 00:00:00 +010
       
 
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