Subjects -> POLITICAL SCIENCE (Total: 1097 journals)
    - CIVIL RIGHTS (16 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (148 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCES: GENERAL (35 journals)

POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 201 - 281 of 281 Journals sorted alphabetically
Eastern Review     Open Access  
Economia Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Economic and Regional Studies / Studia Ekonomiczne i Regionalne     Open Access  
Ecopolítica     Open Access  
eJournal of eDemocracy and Open Government     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
El Banquete de los Dioses     Open Access  
Electoral Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Encuentro     Open Access  
Entramados y Perspectivas     Open Access  
Environment and Planning C : Politics and Space     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Estudios digital     Open Access  
Estudios Políticos     Open Access  
Estudos Avançados     Open Access  
Ethical Theory and Moral Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Ethics & Global Politics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ethics & International Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Éthique publique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Études internationales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Eunomia. Rivista semestrale del Corso di Laurea in Scienze Politiche e delle Relazioni Internazionali     Open Access  
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Integration Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
European Journal for Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of American Culture     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Cultural and Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Government and Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
European Journal of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
European Journal of Political Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
European Journal of Political Research : Political Data Yearbook     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Politics and Gender     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
European Politics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
European Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
European Union Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Evaluation and Program Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Exchange : The Journal of Public Diplomacy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fascism     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Federal Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Federalism-E     Open Access  
Fédéralisme Régionalisme     Open Access  
FEU Academic Review     Open Access  
Financial Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Foreign Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Foreign Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Foro Interno. Anuario de Teoría Política     Open Access  
French Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Frontiers in Political Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gaceta Laboral     Open Access  
Genocide Studies International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Geopolítica(s). Revista de estudios sobre espacio y poder     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geopolitics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geopolitics under Globalization     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
German Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
German Politics and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Germinal : Marxismo e Educação em Debate     Open Access  
Gestão & Regionalidade     Open Access  
Ghana Journal of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ghana Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Global Affairs     Hybrid Journal  
Global Change, Peace & Security: formerly Pacifica Review: Peace, Security & Global Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 274)
Global Discourse : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Current Affairs and Applied Contemporary Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Global Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Global Public Policy and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Global Societies Journal     Open Access  
Global Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Global South, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Global Studies Quarterly     Open Access  
Göç Dergisi     Full-text available via subscription  
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government : Annual Research Journal of Political Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Government and Opposition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Granì     Open Access  
Group Processes & Intergroup Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Hague Journal of Diplomacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Hegel Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hic Rhodus : Crisis capitalista, polémica y controversias     Open Access  
Histoire Politique : Revue du Centre d'histoire de Sciences Po     Open Access  
Historia i Polityka     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History of Communism in Europe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hommes & Migrations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
HONAI : International Journal for Educational, Social, Political & Cultural Studies     Open Access  
Horyzonty Polityki     Open Access  
Human Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Human Rights Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Human Rights Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Icelandic Review of Politics and Administration     Open Access  
Idäntutkimus     Open Access  
identidade!     Open Access  
Identities : Journal for Politics, Gender and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
IDP. Revista de Internet, Derecho y Politica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ids Practice Papers     Hybrid Journal  
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies     Open Access  
Indes : Zeitschrift für Politik und Gesellschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Index on Censorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
India Quarterly: A Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
India Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Indialogs : Spanish Journal of India Studies     Open Access  
Innovation Policy and the Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Innovations : Technology, Governance, Globalization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Insight on Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
InSURgência : revista de direitos e movimentos sociais     Open Access  
Intelligence & National Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Interdisciplinary Political Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Interdisziplinäre Zeitschrift für Südasienforschung     Open Access  
Interest Groups & Advocacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Interfaces Brasil/Canadá     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Area Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Communication of Chinese Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Critical Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Gramsci Journal     Open Access  
International Interactions: Empirical and Theoretical Research in International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal : Canada's Journal of Global Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of African Renaissance Studies - Multi-, Inter- and Transdisciplinarity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Children's Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Diplomacy and Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of E-Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Electronic Government Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Environmental Policy and Decision Making     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Human Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 416)
International Journal of Intercultural Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Law and Politics Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Peace Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Press/Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Social Quality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal on Minority and Group Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Migration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
International Migration Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
International Negotiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 121)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 255)
International Political Science Abstracts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Political Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
International Quarterly for Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Regional Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
International Relations of the Asia-Pacific     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Review of Public Policy     Open Access  
International Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 86)
International Socialism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Spectator : Italian Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Studies Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Studies Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
International Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Theory: A Journal of International Politics, Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Irish Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Israel Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Italian Political Science Review / Rivista Italiana di Scienza Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Italian Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
IZA Journal of Development and Migration     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Izquierdas     Open Access  
Japan Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Japanese Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
JAWI     Open Access  
JCMS : Journal of Common Market Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Jewish Culture and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
JICSA : Journal of Islamic Civilization in Southeast Asia     Open Access  
JISIP-UNJA : Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik Fisipol Universitas Jambi     Open Access  
JKAP (Jurnal Kebijakan dan Administrasi Publik)     Open Access  
Journal Exit-Deutschland. Zeitschrift für Deradikalisierung und demokratische Kultur     Open Access  
Journal for Deradicalization     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal for Peace and Justice Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal for Peace and Nuclear Disarmament     Open Access  
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of African Conflicts and Peace Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of APF Command and Staff College     Open Access  
Journal of Borneo-Kalimantan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Catholic Social Thought     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Chinese Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Chinese Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Civil Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Cold War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Conflict Resolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Journal of Conflict Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Contemporary East Asia Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Contemporary European Research     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Contemporary European Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Current Chinese Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Conflict Resolution
Journal Prestige (SJR): 4.037
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 68  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0022-0027 - ISSN (Online) 1552-8766
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Losing Hearts & Minds: Aid and Ideology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Travers B Child
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      “Hearts and minds” theory contends development aid strengthens community support for counterinsurgents by providing jobs and public goods. Based on field interviews in Kabul, we develop an alternative theoretical framework emphasizing instead the ideological preferences of civilians. In our model, some aid projects are ideologically contentious while others are benign. Given a mix of foreign aid, each civilian supports either the counterinsurgents or rebels, depending on his/her idiosyncratic preferences. In this setting, greater provisions of aid can actually erode community support. Donors therefore calibrate the mix of foreign aid to appease population groups with relatively strong ideological sensibilities. Individual-level analysis based on unique Afghan data substantiates key features of our theory. Benign projects lead to favorable opinions of development, while contentious aid has the opposite effect. Moreover, favorable opinions of development are associated with stronger support for government and counterinsurgents, and weaker support for rebels.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T12:08:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221074898
       
  • Due Process and Accountability Under Transitional Justice: Evidence from
           Mosul, Iraq

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vera Mironova, Sam Whitt
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Do citizens care about due process rights when holding insurgent groups accountable for violence' We examine public perceptions of justice and fairness in judicial proceedings brought against suspected Islamic State (ISIS) militants and their supporters in Mosul, Iraq. We conducted a survey of Mosul residents and people in ISIS-affiliated displacement camps outside Mosul to evaluate public support for detainee due process rights. Using a trial and punishment survey experiment, we find that Mosul residents, while favoring capital punishment for ISIS involvement, are also sensitive to procedural due process rights of the accused. People with self-reported ISIS affiliations, in contrast, are more concerned with substantive due process, and do not see capital punishment outcomes as fair, regardless of procedural considerations. Although rebel group sympathizers and opponents have clashing perspectives on what constitutes equitable punishment for participation in insurgency, both recognize the importance of due process rights to long-term peace and security.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:51:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221093401
       
  • Effects of Defensive and Proactive Measures on Competition Between
           Terrorist Groups

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Subhayu Bandyopadhyay, Todd Sandler
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      A two-stage game investigates how counterterrorism measures affect within-country competition between two rival terrorist groups. Although such competition is commonplace (e.g., al-Nusra Front and Free Syria Army; Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia and the National Liberation Army; and al-Fatah and Hamas), there is no theoretical treatment of how proactive and defensive measures influence this interaction. Previous studies on rival terrorist groups are solely empirical concerning group survival, outbidding, and terrorism level, while ignoring the role that government countermeasures exert on the rival groups’ terrorism. In a theoretical framework, alternative counterterrorism actions have diverse impacts on the level of terrorism depending on relative group sizes and government-targeting decisions. In the two-stage game, optimal counterterrorism policy rules are displayed in terms of how governments target symmetric and asymmetric terrorist groups. Comparative statics show how parameter changes affect Nash or subgame perfect equilibrium outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:23:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221108432
       
  • Citizens and Peace Mediations in Divided Societies: Identifying Zones of
           Agreement through a Conjoint Survey Experiment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Neophytos Loizides, Charis Psaltis, Edward Morgan-Jones, Laura Sudulich, Raluca Popp, Tekin Baykiz
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      How can areas of potential agreement be identified and endorsed by citizens in protracted conflicts' In an effort to answer this question, the article introduces a conjoint experiment across the ethnically and territorially split communities of Cyprus and tests a range of hypotheses about the structure of public opinion with respect to a future settlement. We test hypotheses on security and credible commitments, the legacy of past negotiations, as well as transitional justice mechanisms following United Nations plans to mediate the conflict between Greek and Turkish Cypriots. Contrary to conventional wisdom, we demonstrate that a zone of possible agreement (ZOPA) exists from a public opinion perspective. We specifically explore power-sharing in the context of security, provisions for the internally displaced, federal courts, and territorial readjustments and highlight their relative importance for public opinion interventions across conflict-ridden societies.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T02:36:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221108221
       
  • The Dual Effect of COVID-19 on Intergroup Conflict in the Korean Peninsula

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nimrod Nir, Eran Halperin, Juhwa Park
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      The coronavirus pandemic has fundamentally shifted the way human beings interact, both as individuals and groups, in the face of such a widespread outbreak. This paper seeks to investigate the effects of COVID-19 on intergroup emotions and attitudes within an intractable intergroup conflict, specifically, through the lens of the Korean conflict. Using a two-wave, cross-sectional design, this study was able to track the profound psychological changes in intergroup emotions and attitudes both prior to the pandemic and during its onslaught. Results of these two wave representative samples show that South Korean citizens demonstrated higher levels of fear of their neighbors in North Korea after the outbreak of COVID-19 than before. In turn, this led to increased societal support of hostile government policies towards North Koreans. Conversely, the same participants exhibited higher levels of empathy towards North Koreans during the pandemic, which led to a higher willingness to collaborate with their outgroup. This dual effect on intergroup emotions within intractable conflicts brings forth new avenues from which societies may be able to restrain the destructive influence of the COVID-19 threat on intergroup relations — as well as harvesting its constructive potential for reconciling warring intergroup relations.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T09:50:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221107088
       
  • Divergent Perceptions of Peace in Post-Conflict Societies: Insights from
           Sri Lanka

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sabine C. Carey, Belén González, Christian Gläßel
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Research on postwar peace focuses primarily on how elites and institutions can prevent relapse into civil war. In line with this special issue’s focus on citizens’ experiences, we take a micro-level approach to explore peace beyond the absence of war. We investigate how members of opposing sides experience peace a decade after a decisive victory of the majority. Using original survey data from a representative sample of 2000 respondents in 2018 Sri Lanka, we find that even one decade after the conflict members of the Sinhalese winning majority are consistently more likely to report improvements in peace than Tamils, who were represented by the defeated minority. But the benefit of a “victor’s peace” does not seem to translate into an optimistic outlook of the victorious group, nor does it increase people’s endorsement for repressive state measures. Despite the drastically improved physical security for the defeated ethnic minority since the war, they experience a deterioration in other dimensions of peace. Our findings have important implications for a deeper understanding of variations in peace and reconciliation processes.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T02:59:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221104719
       
  • Wargame of Drones: Remotely Piloted Aircraft and Crisis Escalation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Erik Lin-Greenberg
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      How do drones affect escalation dynamics' The emerging consensus from scholarship on drones highlights increased conflict initiation when drones allow decisionmakers to avoid the risks of deploying inhabited platforms, but far less attention has been paid to understanding how drones affect conflict escalation. Limited theorization and empirical testing have left debates unresolved. I unpack the underlying mechanisms influencing escalation decisions involving drones by proposing a logic of remote-controlled restraint: drones limit escalation in ways not possible when inhabited assets are used. To test this logic and explore its instrumental and emotional microfoundations, I field "comparative wargames." I immerse national security professionals in crisis scenarios that vary whether a drone or inhabited aircraft is shot down. I validate wargame findings using a survey experiment. The wargames shed light on the microfoundations of escalation, highlight limits of existing theories, and demonstrate the utility of comparative wargaming as an IR research tool.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T06:30:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221106960
       
  • Poor Prospects—Not Inequality—Motivate Political Violence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Henrikas Bartusevičius, Florian van Leeuwen
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Despite extensive scholarly interest in the association between economic inequality and political violence, the micro-level mechanisms through which the former influences the latter are not well understood. Drawing on pioneering theories of political violence, social psychological research on relative deprivation, and prospect theory from behavioral economics, we examine individual-level processes that underpin the relationship between inequality and political violence. We present two arguments: despite being a key explanatory variable in existing research, perceived lower economic status vis-à-vis other individuals (an indicator of relative deprivation) is unlikely to motivate people to participate in violence; by contrast, although virtually unexplored, a projected decrease in one’s own economic status (prospective decremental deprivation) is likely to motivate violence. Multilevel analyses of probability samples from many African countries provide evidence to support these claims. Based on this, we posit that focusing on changes in living conditions, rather than the status quo, is key for understanding political violence.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T08:01:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221074647
       
  • Under the Umbrella: Nuclear Crises, Extended Deterrence, and Public
           Opinion

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David M. Allison, Stephen Herzog, Jiyoung Ko
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      How robust is public support for extended nuclear deterrence in patron and client states' Recent studies have improved scholarly understanding of US public opinion about nuclear weapon use against non-nuclear adversaries. Yet, there is limited knowledge of public attitudes regarding retaliation for nuclear strikes against US allies. We develop a theoretical typology of nuclear crises and investigate this phenomenon with a novel survey experiment (n = 6,623). Americans, Japanese, and South Koreans viewed realistic emergency alert messages about a most-likely case for nuclear retaliation: a North Korean missile attack on a US ally protected by the nuclear umbrella. Support for nuclear retaliation is low in all three countries, with important cross-national differences. Favorability increases with North Korean nuclear first-use, but it remains limited nonetheless. Surprisingly, US “tripwire” troop casualties do not increase Americans’ demands for nuclear retaliation. These findings have important implications for the study of nuclear crises and practice of extended deterrence.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T05:41:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221100254
       
  • Wartime Experiences and Popular Support for Peace Agreements: Comparative
           Evidence from Three Cases

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Karin Dyrstad, Helga M. Binningsbø, Kristin M. Bakke
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Peace agreements are negotiated and signed by representatives of the government and the rebels, often after many years of violent conflict, but their ability to transform a war-torn society hinges on the approval of ordinary people. Yet we have little systematic knowledge of what ordinary people think of peace agreements in the long run. This study begins to fill that gap, drawing on a set of comparative public opinion surveys from Guatemala, Nepal, and Northern Ireland, three cases where long civil wars were ended by peace agreements. The peace agreements in these countries have strong popular support, though there is variation across specific provisions. Across these cases, our findings suggest that legacies of violence are not generally associated with long-term support for peace agreements. However, when we look at provisions that grant concessions to the rebels, there is some evidence of lasting legacies.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T10:04:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221104728
       
  • Do citizens’ preferences matter' Shaping legislator attitudes
           towards peace agreements

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Miguel García-Sánchez, Aila M Matanock, Natalia Garbiras-Díaz
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      To what extent are legislators, responsible for the implementation of many peace agreements, responsive to citizens’ preferences' Examining the 2016 Colombian peace agreement, we embed an experiment in the 2019 wave of a survey of all the members of Congress. We inform legislators about the attitudes of the general population and residents of conflict-affected regions on a provision included in the peace agreement: the creation of 16 special seats in the House of Representatives reserved for conflict areas. We find that legislators underestimate citizen support for this policy, and the magnitude of their misconception is correlated with the positions of their parties on the issue. Moreover, we find that providing information about citizens’ support for the policy does not affect legislator support for the provision.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T08:42:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221099245
       
  • The Impact of Modern-System Training on Battlefield Participation by
           Kurdish Soldiers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matthew Cancian
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      What drives soldiers to risk death on the battlefield' Scholars have suggested that battlefield participation is driven by ideology, coercion, and cohesion while overlooking the importance of confidence in tactical success. On contemporary battlefields, training in effective, modern-system tactics will increase initial confidence and create a positive feedback loop of battlefield participation and combat effectiveness. I test this theory through the as-if random assignment of Peshmerga (Kurdish soldiers) to modern-system training by Western countries. One third of the Peshmerga had no formal training, one third had non–modern-system training from other Peshmerga, and one third had been trained in the modern-system. While non–modern-system training slightly increased unit confidence, it did not impact battlefield participation; coalition training in modern-system tactics dramatically increased confidence and, more importantly, led to higher levels of self-reported battlefield participation
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T03:07:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221078332
       
  • Coordination and Fair Division in Refugee Responsibility Sharing

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Richard E Ericson, Lester A Zeager
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      We analyze the problem of international responsibility sharing for a refugee group seeking protection from the dangers of mass violence arising from inter-state conflict or the collapse of a fragile state. After reviewing several proposed solutions, we characterize responsibility sharing as a coordination problem in a simple sequential “moves” game between two potential host countries. We demonstrate that, ultimately, the country that makes the first move to receive refugees bears a disproportionate responsibility. We then draw on two historical case studies that illustrate the difficulties of coordinating a fair division of refugee responsibilities. To solve the coordination problem, we adapt a fair division procedure by inverting one first presented by Hugo Steinhaus for dividing “goods.” We demonstrate that the procedure is applicable to costly “obligations” under different scenarios and is manipulation proof, as each participating country has an obviously dominant strategy.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T06:05:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221080985
       
  • Getting to the Root of the Issue(s): Expanding the Study of Issues in MIDs
           (the MID-Issue Dataset, Version 1.0)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Joshua Jackson, Andrew P. Owsiak, Gary Goertz, Paul F. Diehl
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Because existing issue classification schemes omit prominent issues (e.g., domestic armed conflict) or contain significant within-category heterogeneity, theorizing about the role of issues in international conflict processes has stagnated. Our project jump-starts it again, by independently—and systematically—reconceptualizing and gathering data on five issues connected to dyadic militarized interstate disputes (MIDs) during the period 1900–2010: land (borders), maritime (borders), islands, civil conflict, and coups. After conceptually introducing these issues and embedding them within a larger framework, we describe and apply our MID-Issue data. These efforts show that (i) the MID dataset’s issue classification scheme does not systematically capture our issues, (ii) events in 37.58% of dyadic MIDs connect to domestic armed conflict—a prevalence not on the field’s radar, (iii) some factors promote issue-based international conflict, but only via indirect channels, and (iv) significant value even derives from a further conceptualization of “territorial issues” (broadly defined).
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T10:40:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221080967
       
  • Friday on My Mind: Re-Assessing the Impact of Protest Size on Government
           Concessions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Charles Butcher, Jonathan Pinckney
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Do more protesters on the streets make governments likely to grant their demands' Several studies link protest size and government concessions. Yet existing research has limitations: many studies suffer from potential endogeneity due to potential protesters joining protests when they anticipate that concessions are likely, causal mechanisms are often unclear, and many of the most rigorous event-level studies are limited to Western democracies. We reexamine this relationship in a non-Western sample using a novel instrumental variable approach, using Fridays as an instrument for exogenous variation in protest size in predominately Muslim countries. We perform two analyses: one using the NAVCO 3.0 dataset, and the second using the Mass Mobilization in Autocracies Dataset (MMAD). In both analyses exogenous variation in protest size negatively affects the likelihood of concessions. Larger protests are less likely to receive government concessions. We suggest these surprising results point to the importance of unanticipated protests that produce new information about regime stability to motivate government concessions.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T01:00:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221099887
       
  • Signaling Strength with Handicaps

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Noam Reich
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      In the presence of incomplete information, strong states have an incentive to invest in costly signals that can differentiate them from weaker states. I argue that states can signal strength by handicapping themselves, deliberately reducing their combat effectiveness. In an ultimatum crisis bargaining model, I show that strong states can reduce the risk of war by making themselves weaker without reducing their demands. The key to this result is a comparative advantage that allows stronger types to fight more effectively with handicaps. This allows for an equilibrium where (1) stronger states adopt larger handicaps, thereby revealing their strength to the receiver, (2) larger handicaps are more likely to deter the receiver, and, (3) the positive risk of war precludes weaker types from imitating handicap signals. The ability to reveal strength peacefully has important ramifications for theories of mutual optimism, war termination, and the relationship between parity and war incidence.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T12:45:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221080121
       
  • A Brutality-Based Approach to Identifying State-Led Atrocities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David Cingranelli, Skip Mark, James B. Garvey, Jordan Hutt, Yuri Lee
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      The comparative study of atrocities and atrocity prevention faces several obstacles including a lack of consensus on the universe of cases and too few cases to statistically test alternative theories. The brutality-based (BB) conception is based on the idea that widespread, state-led violations of physical integrity rights constitute an assault on the personhood and human dignity of the members of society— a mass atrocity. Applying this idea to all countries annually systematically identifies a larger number of atrocities and facilitates categorization into three levels of intensity. The BB methodology for generating annual atrocity lists is replicable and transparent. The findings show that, between 1981 and 2019, the frequency of atrocities as defined and identified by other projects has been decreasing, but BB atrocities have been increasing. The sequence of different types of widespread physical integrity violations suggests new avenues for research on atrocity occurrence, escalation, de-escalation, and cessation.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T05:07:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221077228
       
  • Oil Crops and Social Conflict: Evidence From Indonesia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Donald Grasse
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      When do agricultural transformations impact social stability' Cash crops are typically associated with economic prosperity and social peace. I argue agricultural booms may spur violent conflict over resource allocation by pitting would-be producers against incumbent landowners when the gains from production are concentrated and the negative externalities are diffuse. I study the rapid expansion of oil palm in Indonesia, a growingly important crop in the global economy. I find when oil palm grows more valuable and expands within producing districts, violent resource conflicts increase. The positive relationship does not exist for other cash crops, nor other types of conflict, and is moderated by the presence of sustainability certified processing mills. The results connect commodity shocks to non-state violence over resources, and suggest land use change is an important mechanism connecting agricultural booms to social conflict.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T02:22:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221084826
       
  • Dissent Networks, State Repression, and Strategic Clemency for Defection

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Howard Liu
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Why do governments severely punish some dissidents while showing mercy to others' This study argues that when constrained by limited information on dissent, states have incentives to cast the net of repression wider by executing not just key dissent actors but also members closely connected to them to ensure demobilization. States also crave information, and granting clemency to defectors who bring in information improves state intelligence. Given that tips have different values, regimes will grant clemency to defectors who are closely connected to key dissent actors and possess high-value tips, allowing the state to pursue top fugitives and dissolve resistance more efficiently. Using newly declassified data on political victims during Taiwan’s White Terror authoritarian period, I find that the regime tends to execute both key actors (i.e., leaders and recruiters) and their closely connected members. Defectors who share information tend to receive mercy, but defectors closely connected to key actors are much less likely to face execution than less connected defectors. These findings shed new insight into the toolkit dictators use to gather intelligence on dissent and how strategic clemency induces defection and betrayal among dissidents, helping destroy dissent networks from within.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T05:30:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221077220
       
  • Restitution or Retribution' Detainee Payments and Insurgent Violence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christopher W. Blair
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Counterinsurgents frequently rely on mass arrests to impede rebel operations, but in so doing, risk detaining innocent civilians. Wrongful detention can backfire, fueling insurgent violence by alienating detainees and their kin. Can counterinsurgents mitigate wrongful detention through targeted compensation' I study this question using project-level data on US payments to individuals deemed innocent and released from Coalition custody in Iraq between 2004 and 2008. Leveraging plausibly exogenous variation in the allocation of detainee release payments, I document a robust, negative association between counterinsurgent compensation for wrongful detention and insurgent violence. The violence-reducing effects of detainee release payments were greatest in Sunni and mixed sectarian areas; for the types of insurgent attacks, most prone to civilian informing; and when detainee release was complemented by other population-centric reforms. These results suggest that post-harm mitigation helps shift civilian perceptions, inducing civilians to share more information with counterinsurgent forces.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T07:19:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221080118
       
  • Citizens in Peace Processes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Felix Haass, Caroline A. Hartzell, Martin Ottmann
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Citizen engagement in and support for peace processes have been deemed important for sustainable peace after civil wars. Yet much of what we know about peace processes in civil wars centers on the interests of elite actors. This special feature aims to advance a research agenda focusing on citizens in peace processes to address this mismatch. In the introduction to the special feature, we first present empirical evidence situating citizens in relation to civil war peace processes. We then trace the current state of the literature on the roles of citizens in peace processes. Following that, we introduce a conceptual framework designed to improve scholarly analysis of the political behavior of citizens in peace processes. We also locate the individual contributions to the special feature within the framework in order to demonstrate its utility and as a means of helping to identify directions for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T01:57:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221089691
       
  • The Charitable Terrorist: State Capacity and the Support for the Pakistani
           Taliban

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Federico Masera, Hasin Yousaf
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Violent organizations are often providers of many social services in competition with the state. We provide evidence that these organizations use the provision of social services to gain support. This strategy is only effective when it fills the void left by a weak state. We show this by studying the provision of natural disaster relief by the Pakistani state and the Taliban. We first analyze the floods of 2010 that received an inadequate response from the government and show that support for the Taliban increased in the areas affected by the flood. These effects were concentrated in places where the Taliban likely provided help and where the state under-delivered. We then study the 2005 earthquake that instead received a swift government response and show that the Taliban lost support in the affected areas. Results cannot be explained by alternate mechanisms as anger against incumbents, political competition, electoral participation, and religiosity.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T12:59:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221079398
       
  • Knowing is Half the Battle: How Education Decreases the Fear of Terrorism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Peter Krause, Daniel Gustafson, Jordan Theriault, Liane Young
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Although only 23 people on average have been killed per year by terrorist attacks in the United States since 2001, American citizens and politicians consistently rank terrorism as a top security threat, leading to costly wars abroad and the repression of civil liberties at home. To what extent can education about terrorism alter perceptions of the threat' Much existing scholarship—and consistent polling over the past two decades—suggests that it cannot, but we disagree. Evidence gathered from an extensive series of experimental and observational surveys involving students in 31 terrorism and non-terrorism related courses at 12 universities—including massive open online courses (MOOC) and online surveys—reveals that the more individuals learn about terrorism, the smaller they perceive the threat to be to themselves and to the U.S. In the fight against terrorism and the fear it inspires, knowing really is half the battle.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T02:20:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221079648
       
  • Commitment to the “National” in Post-Conflict Countries: Public and
           Private Security Provision in Lebanon

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Melani Cammett, Christiana Parreira, Dominika Kruszewska-Eduardo, Sami Atallah
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      A core function of contemporary states is to ensure the security of their citizens. Yet in many post-conflict settings, non-state actors provide security alongside the state, typically prioritizing their own ascriptive groups and potentially undercutting a sense of national political community. When do citizens prefer group-specific versus national security' While most studies focus on individual psychological factors, we argue that group-level characteristics also shape political preferences. Based on a conjoint experiment in Lebanon, we explore the relative appeal of group-specific versus national pledges to assure protection. We find that respondents view national security provision quite positively, while members of communities with stronger group-specific security simultaneously favor private provision. Individuals with closer ties to credible group security providers are also more likely to prefer those services. Citizens therefore do not see a clear trade-off between private and public protection, while group-specific legacies mediate heterogeneity in support for pluralist security provision.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T07:31:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221079401
       
  • Institutional Design, Information Transmission, and Public Opinion: Making
           the Case for Trade

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ryan Brutger, Siyao Li
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Domestic debates about trade have increased the salience of international economic cooperation among the public, raising the question of whether, and how, domestic support can be rallied in support of international trade agreements. We argue that institutional features of trade agreements provide important cues to domestic audiences that shape support, particularly the membership composition and voting rules for multilateral deals. We use two survey experiments to show that the US public is more supportive of trade when it is negotiated with like-minded countries. We also find that the voting rules shape support for trade agreements, but differently across partisan audiences. Republican voters strongly favor the home country having veto power, whereas Democrats prefer agreements with equal voting rules. These differences are largely driven by perceptions of the agreement’s benefit for the nation and the public’s trust of the negotiators and perceived fairness of the rules.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:52:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221085072
       
  • Terrorism and Political Tolerance toward “Fellow Travelers”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mark Peffley, Marc L. Hutchison, Michal Shamir
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      How does terrorism influence citizens’ willingness to deny basic liberties to domestic groups alleged to be “fellow travelers” of the perpetrators of terrorism' Based on intergroup threat theory and social identity theory, we hypothesize that political intolerance toward fellow traveler groups is determined by three factors: (1) the level of terrorism, (2) the degree to which domestic outgroups are alleged to be demographically or politically associated with terrorist groups, and (3) whether individuals identify strongly with the political Right. Consistent with our hypotheses, we find that higher levels of terrorism in Israel over a thirty-year period produce a “diffusion of political intolerance” among Israeli Jews on the Right that extends to domestic groups distant from the perpetrators of terrorism. Our findings have important implications for the study of terrorism, democracy, and political tolerance.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T01:51:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027211069121
       
  • Climbing the Ladder: Explaining the Vertical Proliferation of Cruise
           Missiles

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bryan Robert Early, Nolan Fahrenkopf, Michael C. Horowitz, James Igoe Walsh
      First page: 955
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Why do some states possess more advanced military technologies than others' Our study explores the vertical proliferation of land-attack cruise missiles (LACMs), seeking to understand which demand- and supply-side factors best explain why some countries acquire more sophisticated LACMs. We theorize that states’ security environments, regime types, possession of related strategic technologies, and membership in the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) influence the possession of more sophisticated cruise missiles. Our analysis employs a unique new global dataset with granular data on every LACM national militaries have deployed. We use this dataset to evaluate the proliferation of LACMs across the international system from 1991–2015. Using a selection model that first controls for the horizontal proliferation of LACMs, we find that insecurity, scientific and technical expertise from related technologies, the possession of highly authoritarian and highly democratic regimes, and MTCR membership all have positive effects on the sophistication of LACM-possessors’ arsenals.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-04-08T10:52:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221079399
       
  • International Investment Disputes Media Coverage and Backlash Against
           International Law

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ryan Brutger, Anton Strezhnev
      First page: 983
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      This paper puts forth a theory explaining domestic backlash against international investment law by connecting media coverage—specifically the bias in the news media’s selection of international disputes—to public opinion formation towards international agreements. To test our theory, we examine both the content and effects of the media’s reporting on international disputes, focusing on the increasingly controversial form known as investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS). We find that newspaper outlets in both the United States and Canada have a bias in favor of covering disputes filed against their home country as opposed to those filed by home country firms. Using two national survey experiments fielded in the United States and Canada, we further find that the bias in news story selection has a strong negative effect on attitudes towards ISDS and related agreements, especially among highly nationalistic individuals.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-04-08T03:34:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221081925
       
  • Brewing Violence: Foreign Investment and Civil Conflict

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pablo M. Pinto, Boliang Zhu
      First page: 1010
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Two prominent features in current world affairs are the unprecedented level of global economic integration and the growing incidence of intrastate violence. We develop and test a novel argument linking global integration through foreign investment to intrastate armed conflict. The presence of multinational corporations in developing countries can cause market concentration, resulting in high rents. Disputes between governments and would-be challengers over the appropriation of these rents are likely to turn violent, increasing the incidence of armed conflict. State capacity mitigates this positive association between foreign investment and intrastate war. Strong states have the capacity to deter rebellions, address citizens’ demands through institutionalized mechanisms, and credibly commit to the peaceful resolution of conflicts. Using data from developing countries for over four decades and addressing potential endogeneity and selection biases, we find strong support for our hypotheses. Our findings have important implications for understanding the link between economic interdependence and conflict.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T01:17:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027211073918
       
  • Wartime Sexual Violence, Social Stigmatization and Humanitarian Aid:
           Survey Evidence from eastern Democratic Republic of Congo

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carlo Koos, Summer Lindsey
      First page: 1037
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Sexual violence by armed groups is common in civil wars. Qualitative studies have shown that victims and their families experience social stigmatization. Stigmatization is viewed as a central mechanism to social exclusion and disintegration impeding post-conflict social, political, and economic recovery. We provide new theory on the social conditions under which rape-related stigma intensifies and decreases. Drawing on an original population-based survey in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, we find that victims and their families experience higher levels of stigma compared to unaffected families and these effects are dependent on community attitudes and norms. Furthermore, we find that humanitarian support interventions designed to address the social nature of stigma can reduce stigma. Our article significantly expands prior knowledge on a central mechanism in post-conflict recovery by providing a refined theory on wartime rape-related stigma and the role of humanitarian aid in mitigating negative effects based on representative data.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-02-11T03:51:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027211064259
       
  • Conflict-Related Sexual Violence and the Perils of Impunity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Helga Malmin Binningsbø, Ragnhild Nordås
      First page: 1066
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      “Ending impunity” is often heralded as the key mechanism for stopping rape in war. Yet, little systematic evidence or analyses exist of the relationship between impunity (or lack thereof) and sexual violence. We argue that amnesties signal impunity and permissiveness for sexual violence, which can perpetuate and instigate more sexual violence by rebels. Trials, on the other hand, signal a nonzero probability of punishment, which could have a deterrent effect. Studying all intrastate armed conflicts in the period 1989–2011, we find in line with the impunity signal that amnesties are associated with sexual violence by rebels, but we are not able to demonstrate a deterrent effect of trials. While the study prevents us from conclusively saying that ending impunity would be an effective policy tool to stop sexual violence in war, the association between amnesties and subsequent sexual violence is a testament to the perils of impunity.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T08:55:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221078330
       
  • The Logic of Transitional Justice and State Repression: The Effects of
           Human Rights Prosecutions in Post-Conflict States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Risa Kitagawa, Sam R. Bell
      First page: 1091
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      Human rights prosecutions addressing wartime crimes are often credited with deterring future rights abuses, but routinely occur alongside state repression. This article develops a theory of how such prosecutions generate uneven effects across domestic human rights practice by making some repression tactics costlier than others—in the public visibility of the abuse or ease of attribution to leadership—or by directly substituting certain tactics. We test the implications with a multivariate probit analysis of novel prosecution data in contemporary conflict and post-conflict settings. Trials significantly reduce reliance on political imprisonment and extrajudicial killings, relatively visible abuses, whereas gains for less visible physical integrity rights are limited. Further, trials themselves are sometimes deployed as a direct substitute for political imprisonment. The findings reveal how human rights prosecutions themselves can be part of a government’s repressive toolkit, with implications for the study of transitional justice and the judicialization of repression.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T01:57:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027211066616
       
  • Thinking about the distant future promotes the prospects of peace: A
           construal-level perspective on intergroup conflict resolution

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nir Halevy, Yair Berson
      First page: 1119
      Abstract: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Ahead of Print.
      The current research reveals that the pursuit of peace entails an inherent paradox. The urgent need to save lives and alleviate human suffering necessitates swift solutions to the problem of intergroup conflict. However, because the human mind associates peace with longer time horizons, people anticipate peace more when considering the distant rather than the near future. Six experiments demonstrate a robust and large effect whereby thinking about the distant future promotes the prospects of peace compared to thinking about the near future. These experiments also provide evidence for the role that construal fit, that is, the tendency to match high temporal distance with abstractness, plays in this effect. We discuss implications for shorter-term and longer-term peace interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Conflict Resolution
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T06:43:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220027221079402
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.78.122
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-