Subjects -> POLITICAL SCIENCE (Total: 1097 journals)
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    - POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCES: GENERAL (35 journals)

POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 201 - 281 of 281 Journals sorted alphabetically
Eastern Review     Open Access  
Economia Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Economic and Regional Studies / Studia Ekonomiczne i Regionalne     Open Access  
Ecopolítica     Open Access  
eJournal of eDemocracy and Open Government     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
El Banquete de los Dioses     Open Access  
Electoral Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Encuentro     Open Access  
Entramados y Perspectivas     Open Access  
Environment and Planning C : Politics and Space     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Estudios digital     Open Access  
Estudios Políticos     Open Access  
Estudos Avançados     Open Access  
Ethical Theory and Moral Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Ethics & Global Politics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ethics & International Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Éthique publique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Études internationales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Eunomia. Rivista semestrale del Corso di Laurea in Scienze Politiche e delle Relazioni Internazionali     Open Access  
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Integration Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
European Journal for Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of American Culture     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Cultural and Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Government and Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
European Journal of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
European Journal of Political Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
European Journal of Political Research : Political Data Yearbook     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Politics and Gender     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
European Politics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
European Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
European Union Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Evaluation and Program Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Exchange : The Journal of Public Diplomacy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fascism     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Federal Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Federalism-E     Open Access  
Fédéralisme Régionalisme     Open Access  
FEU Academic Review     Open Access  
Financial Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Foreign Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Foreign Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Foro Interno. Anuario de Teoría Política     Open Access  
French Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Frontiers in Political Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gaceta Laboral     Open Access  
Genocide Studies International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Geopolítica(s). Revista de estudios sobre espacio y poder     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geopolitics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geopolitics under Globalization     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
German Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
German Politics and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Germinal : Marxismo e Educação em Debate     Open Access  
Gestão & Regionalidade     Open Access  
Ghana Journal of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ghana Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Global Affairs     Hybrid Journal  
Global Change, Peace & Security: formerly Pacifica Review: Peace, Security & Global Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 274)
Global Discourse : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Current Affairs and Applied Contemporary Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Global Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Global Public Policy and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Global Societies Journal     Open Access  
Global Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Global South, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Global Studies Quarterly     Open Access  
Göç Dergisi     Full-text available via subscription  
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government : Annual Research Journal of Political Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Government and Opposition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Granì     Open Access  
Group Processes & Intergroup Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Hague Journal of Diplomacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Hegel Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hic Rhodus : Crisis capitalista, polémica y controversias     Open Access  
Histoire Politique : Revue du Centre d'histoire de Sciences Po     Open Access  
Historia i Polityka     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History of Communism in Europe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hommes & Migrations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
HONAI : International Journal for Educational, Social, Political & Cultural Studies     Open Access  
Horyzonty Polityki     Open Access  
Human Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Human Rights Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Human Rights Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Icelandic Review of Politics and Administration     Open Access  
Idäntutkimus     Open Access  
identidade!     Open Access  
Identities : Journal for Politics, Gender and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
IDP. Revista de Internet, Derecho y Politica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ids Practice Papers     Hybrid Journal  
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies     Open Access  
Indes : Zeitschrift für Politik und Gesellschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Index on Censorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
India Quarterly: A Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
India Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Indialogs : Spanish Journal of India Studies     Open Access  
Innovation Policy and the Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Innovations : Technology, Governance, Globalization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Insight on Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
InSURgência : revista de direitos e movimentos sociais     Open Access  
Intelligence & National Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Interdisciplinary Political Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Interdisziplinäre Zeitschrift für Südasienforschung     Open Access  
Interest Groups & Advocacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Interfaces Brasil/Canadá     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Area Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Communication of Chinese Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Critical Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Gramsci Journal     Open Access  
International Interactions: Empirical and Theoretical Research in International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal : Canada's Journal of Global Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of African Renaissance Studies - Multi-, Inter- and Transdisciplinarity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Children's Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Diplomacy and Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of E-Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Electronic Government Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Environmental Policy and Decision Making     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Human Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 416)
International Journal of Intercultural Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Law and Politics Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Peace Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Press/Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Social Quality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal on Minority and Group Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Migration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
International Migration Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
International Negotiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 121)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 255)
International Political Science Abstracts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Political Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
International Quarterly for Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Regional Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
International Relations of the Asia-Pacific     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Review of Public Policy     Open Access  
International Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 86)
International Socialism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Spectator : Italian Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Studies Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Studies Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
International Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Theory: A Journal of International Politics, Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Irish Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Israel Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Italian Political Science Review / Rivista Italiana di Scienza Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Italian Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
IZA Journal of Development and Migration     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Izquierdas     Open Access  
Japan Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Japanese Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
JAWI     Open Access  
JCMS : Journal of Common Market Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Jewish Culture and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
JICSA : Journal of Islamic Civilization in Southeast Asia     Open Access  
JISIP-UNJA : Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik Fisipol Universitas Jambi     Open Access  
JKAP (Jurnal Kebijakan dan Administrasi Publik)     Open Access  
Journal Exit-Deutschland. Zeitschrift für Deradikalisierung und demokratische Kultur     Open Access  
Journal for Deradicalization     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal for Peace and Justice Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal for Peace and Nuclear Disarmament     Open Access  
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of African Conflicts and Peace Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of APF Command and Staff College     Open Access  
Journal of Borneo-Kalimantan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Catholic Social Thought     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Chinese Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Chinese Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Civil Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Cold War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Conflict Resolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Journal of Conflict Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Contemporary East Asia Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Contemporary European Research     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Contemporary European Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Current Chinese Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

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International Migration Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.641
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 63  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0197-9183 - ISSN (Online) 1747-7379
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Review Essay: Refugees as Economic Agents in Protection Systems

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kristin Bergtora Sandvik
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T06:10:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221098947
       
  • The EU Urban Partnership on Inclusion: Institutionalizing
           Local–Supranational Integration Governance

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      Authors: Janina Stürner-Siovitz, Christiane Heimann
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      In times when immigrant integration is considered both a highly salient political topic and a practical challenge by local, national, and European decision-makers, an analysis of the governance approach developed by the European Union (EU) Urban Partnership on Inclusion of Migrants and Refugees opens up new opportunities to advance research on migration studies’ “local turn.” In this IMR Dispatch from the Field, we argue that exploring the joint local-EU agenda-setting and cooperation in the Urban Partnership on Inclusion can refine understandings of multilevel governance. We argue that what is intriguing about the Urban Partnership on Inclusion for migration scholars is the institutionalization of local–supranational cooperation within an existing intergovernmental EU structure as a way to advance multilevel governance, even when the national level remains passive. Demonstrating the ways in which the Urban Partnership on Inclusion differs from city networks focused on questions of migration and integration, we show that the Urban Partnership on Inclusion offers a common structure to EU institutions and local authorities to coordinate agendas and actions, both from the local level upward and from the EU level downward while aiming to find ways around national passivity. Paying closer attention to such forms of institutionalized local–supranational governance developing within state-led structures, we suggest, can advance migration research and shed light on emerging local–supranational governance arrangements both at the European and the international levels.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T05:56:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221102419
       
  • Costa Rica as a Destination for Migrants in Need of International
           Protection: IMR Country Report

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      Authors: Abigail Weitzman, Gilbert Brenes Camacho, Arodys Robles, Matthew Blanton, Jeffrey Swindle, Katarina Huss
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      In this IMR Country Report, we draw attention to Costa Rica as a strategic location for expanding research and theory on migrants in need of protection (MNP), who have migrated abroad primarily to evade an imminent threat to their survival. MNP constitute an increasing share of all international migrants in Costa Rica and worldwide, yet research on these migrants and their migration dynamics remains comparatively underdeveloped relative to research on migrants who relocate abroad primarily in pursuit of material gains, social status, or family reunification. As we highlight, Costa Rica is an instrumental site to deepen understandings of MNP populations and migration dynamics because its large and rapidly growing MNP population is incredibly diverse with respect to national origins, demographic characteristics, and underlying motivations for migration. This diversity presents ample opportunities to better understand heterogeneity in the different types of threats MNP seek to evade; how and why MNP incorporation is shaped by individuals’ demographic attributes and pre-migration threats; and how the social networks of various MNP subpopulations develop and overlap with time. Moreover, the geographic concentration of MNP in two regions in Costa Rica lends itself to primary data collection among this population and generates opportunities for estimating local MNPs’ demographic characterization, even in the absence of a reliable sampling frame.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T06:26:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221104473
       
  • Book Review: Immigration Nation: Aid, Control, and Border Politics in
           Morocco by Lorena Gazzotti

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      Authors: Sara Benjelloun
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:19:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221098939
       
  • Diasporas and Collective Remittances: From State-Driven to Unofficial
           Forms of Diaspora Engagement

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      Authors: Nare Galstyan, Maurizio Ambrosini
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article advances understandings of collective remittances practices by elaborating on the case of the Armenian diaspora in the Netherlands. It argues that the collection, management, and distribution of collective remittances are crucial aspects of how diasporic immigrant groups function. Hence, collective remittances represent a lens through which to analyze a diaspora's internal life, gender differences and tensions, relations with the origin state or homeland, and connections to other relevant institutions. Furthermore, the article brings three new insights to diaspora studies. First, it demonstrates how practices connected to the collection and sending of collective remittances reflect the internal dynamics of diasporic migrations and diaspora-homeland relations. Second, the article unpacks the concept of collective remittances itself, classifying it into three categories: collective remittances initiated from above, with a state-driven character; collective remittances organized by transnational non-state institutions, such as religious institutions and pan-diasporic organizations; and collective remittances initiated from below, organized by migrants and local networks of diaspora members. Third, this article highlights women's roles in organizing alternative forms of collective remittances, from external to official channels. The qualitative examination of collective remittances presented here supplies a new vision of collective remittances in which informal and hidden aspects, gender roles, forms of reciprocation, and creation and circulation of trust are highlighted.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T06:09:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221103572
       
  • Does City Size Affect International Migrants and Native-Born Workers
           Differently' Exploring Inequalities in Unemployment and Occupations
           Across Spanish Cities

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      Authors: Jacobo Muñoz-Comet, Fernando Fernández-Monge
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      The 20th century witnessed populations increasingly concentrated in cities, and this global pattern has persisted into the 21st century. A principal reason for the urban concentration lies in the greater employment advantages offered by bigger metropolises. While this relationship is well documented, few studies have examined whether these benefits differ according to urban dwellers’ birth country. This article analyzes to what extent the migrant–native gap in unemployment and occupational attainment varies according to municipality or city size and, if so, whether that change in inequality is explained by differences in the sociodemographic composition of foreign and native-born populations in big metropolises. Using data from the Spanish General Social Survey, results show that absolute migrant–native labor inequality does vary across city sizes, although in different ways. In larger cities, gross inequality with respect to unemployment seems to be disappearing, whereas in the same places, gross inequality in access to unskilled occupations grows progressively. Controlling for individual, family, and context-related factors explains changes across cities in the unemployment gap, but not in occupational attainment. In other words, big cities do not equalize the risk of unemployment between foreign-born workers and the native-born population but do have a negative impact on equality when it comes to avoiding the occupational ladder's bottom rung. This finding suggests that many international migrants may move to big cities attracted by employment chances, but, in this urban “land of opportunities,” they are more dependent on unskilled jobs and fall into a “trap of precariousness.”
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T06:49:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221098332
       
  • Book Review: The Arab Spring Abroad: Diaspora Activism Against
           Authoritarian Regimes by Dana M. Moss

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      Authors: Jannis Julien Grimm
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T04:16:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221101029
       
  • Ethnic Wage Penalty and Human Capital Transferability: A Comparative Study
           of Recent Migrants in 11 European Countries

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      Authors: Stefano Cantalini, Raffaele Guetto, Nazareno Panichella
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the ethnic wage penalty among migrants in 11 Western European countries. It aims to extend the literature on the models of migrant occupational inclusion in European labor markets by studying the wage gap and to disentangle whether the gross wage penalty experienced by foreign-born residents can be explained by human capital-related factors and/or by migrants’ occupational segregation. Estimating probit models with sample selection on European Labour Force Survey data (2009–2016), we find that both male and female migrants experienced a larger gross wage penalty in Southern Europe, where they had lower education levels and faced stronger occupational segregation. In the other countries under study, we find a smaller gross wage penalty among foreign-born women. Results show that migrants from Eastern Europe were not systematically less penalized than migrants from Africa, Asia, and Latin America, except for men in Italy and Greece. Wage penalties were higher among tertiary-educated migrants, compared to their less-educated counterparts, only in Mediterranean countries, where the former were mainly concentrated at the bottom of the occupational structure. Finally, the acquisition of the highest education after migration reduced migrants’ wage penalty, thanks to a better match between educational credentials and job allocation, especially in Southern Europe. Focusing on the ethnic wage penalty and on both human capital- and occupation-related factors of ethnic penalization highlights cross-country differences not yet explored by existing comparative research, allowing a new and more comprehensive picture of migrants’ penalization in Europe.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T07:40:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221099481
       
  • Does Self-Employment Contribute to Immigrants’ Economic Integration'
           Examining Patterns of Self-Employment Exit in Belgium

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      Authors: Dries Lens
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article assesses whether self-employment can help immigrants overcome some of the ongoing challenges they face in highly segmented labor markets, by investigating the reasons behind native-immigrant differences in exit from self-employment. While a considerable literature examines the factors influencing immigrants’ decision to become self-employed, surprisingly few studies address the factors that shape exit from self-employment. This article studies native-immigrant differences in self-employment exit, drawing on longitudinal data (2008–2017) for Belgium, and adds to previous research on immigrant self-employment by considering second-generation and female immigrant business owners. Results show that immigrants were much more likely than natives to become unemployed or leave the labor force after a period in self-employment, supporting the idea that immigrants are pushed out of self-employment. Second-generation immigrants generally had better self-employment outcomes than first-generation immigrants, whereas female immigrants sometimes experienced a “double disadvantage.” Weaker attachment to the labor market preceding self-employment entry helps explain why immigrants had worse self-employment outcomes than natives in Belgium. Hence, self-employment may not provide an independent path to economic integration that allows immigrants to overcome the hurdles they face in the labor market. Instead, how people fared in the labor market before becoming self-employed strongly influenced their success as self-employed workers. This article highlights the policy complexity of immigrants’ labor market integration in Western European labor markets. As it shows, it is not enough to promote self-employment as an easy way out of immigrants’ labor market exclusion. Instead, more is needed to counteract immigrants’ problematic labor market outcomes.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T07:35:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221095833
       
  • IMR Country Report – Nigerian Migration to Russia: Accommodation and
           Discrimination in a Post-Soviet Society

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      Authors: Isaac Olumayowa Oni
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      This IMR Country Report examines Nigerian migration to Russia, exploring the changes in this migration stream from a flow driven by educational motivations during the Soviet era to one shaped by economic and family-reunion reasons after the Soviet Union’s dissolution. In doing so, it offers insights into the social realities of Nigerian migrants living in Russia. The research discussed here included interviews with 25 Nigerian migrants living in Moscow and focused on their challenges and strategies in obtaining housing. As it shows, apartment owners in Moscow exhibited ethnic and racial biases against Nigerian migrants, who also faced rental contract constraints, due to incomplete migratory documentation. This IMR Country Report highlights a contradiction between Russian government policies and apartment owners’ preferences and willingness to accommodate and apply for registration on behalf of Nigerian migrants. It adds to understandings of the conditions faced by sub-Sahara African migrants regarding access to housing in an understudied destination and to barriers to social integration that sub-Saharan African migrants encounter in Russia.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T07:37:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221095838
       
  • Book Review: Advanced Introduction to Migration Studies by Skeldon, Ronald

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      Authors: David Scott FitzGerald
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T07:13:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221088227
       
  • Multidimensionality in the Integration of First- and Second-Generation
           Migrants in Europe: A Conceptual and Empirical Investigation

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      Authors: Veronika Fajth, Laurence Lessard-Phillips
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      Immigrant integration scholarship increasingly discusses integration as a multidimensional process. Yet there is considerable inconsistency in how that multidimensionality is conceptualized. This article posits that there are two different logical approaches by which multidimensional frameworks of integration tend to outline their dimensions: the “thematic” (or conceptually driven) approach and the “empirical” approach. We contend that these two approaches lead to differently structured multidimensional frameworks of immigrant integration. To demonstrate these points, we, first, review different conceptualizations and approaches to multidimensionality in prior immigrant integration research, focusing largely on Europe. Through a synthesis of these prior approaches, we outline eight thematic dimensions of integration prevalent in the existing literature. Second, we conduct an original study with cross-European data on first- and second-generation migrants (ESS7 2014-15, N = 1,066) to outline a multidimensional framework based on empirical patterns of co-variation (or distinction) among integration-related outcomes. Our factor analysis of 18 common indicators of integration reveals five main dimensions of integration, with some items relating strongly to more than one dimension. These five “empirical” dimensions (economic/structural integration; health; subjective well-being; cultural assimilation and civic/political integration; and minority socialization) differ from the eight typical “thematic” dimensions identified in existing scholarship in key respects, which we discuss alongside potential connections between integration aspects as suggested by our findings (e.g., between economic and civic/political or between civic/political and cultural aspects). Overall, our article advances migration studies by helping us think more critically about the multidimensionality of immigrant integration and contributes to an emerging literature on integration's multidimensionality.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T06:31:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221089290
       
  • Sick Days: Logical Versus Survey Identification of the Foreign-Born
           Population in the United States

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      Authors: Claire E. Altman, James D. Bachmeier, Cody Spence, Christal Hamilton
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      The self-reported number of workdays missed due to injury or illness, or sick days, is a reliable measure of health among working-aged adults. Although sick days is a relatively underexplored health-related outcome in migration studies, it can provide a multidimensional understanding of immigrant wellbeing and integration. Current understandings of the association between migration status and sick days are limited for two reasons. First, in the United States, few nationally representative surveys collect migration status information. Second, researchers lack consensus on the most reliable approach for assigning migration status. We use the 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to examine sick days and draw comparisons between two methods for assigning migration status—a logical approach and a survey approach. The logical method assigns migration status to foreign-born respondents based on characteristics such as government employment or welfare receipt, while the survey approach relies on self-reported survey responses. Sick days among immigrants was correlated with and predicted by other health conditions available in the SIPP. Comparisons of sick days by migration status vary based on migration assignment approach. Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs) reported more sick days than non-LPRs and appear less healthy when migration status is assigned using the logical approach. The logical approach also produced a gap in sick days between LPRs and non-LPRs that is not replicated in the survey approach. The results demonstrate that if migration status is not measured directly in the data, interpretation of migration status effects should proceed cautiously.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T06:09:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221084333
       
  • How Homeland Experiences Shape Refugee Belonging: Rethinking Exile, Home,
           and Integration in the Syrian Case

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      Authors: Wendy Pearlman
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      Studies of refugee belonging, as a key facet of integration, primarily focus on post-flight processes. Adopting an approach to integration that is temporally and spatially broader, this article argues that refugees’ varied experiences of belonging or estrangement in origin countries fundamentally condition their subsequent experiences of belonging or estrangement in settlement countries. To explore this argument, the article develops a framework that distinguishes between the psychosocial and locational aspects of home, identifying five distinct categories of experience: home in the homeland, exile in the homeland, exile outside the homeland, home outside the homeland, or overlaps of exile and home across borders. The article illustrates these categories in the Syrian case, using original interviews with displaced Syrians and a range of texts by Syrian writers. In doing so, it demonstrates how knowing whether or how refugees found belonging inside their homelands before displacement enriches understandings of who refugees are, what they seek, and what home or exile means to them. While these pre-flight experiences cannot precisely predict integration outcomes, they shape the frame of reference that refugees carry into homemaking in refuge and, thus, the experiences of belonging that they develop there.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:54:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221088206
       
  • Transnational Social Stratification' Legal Status of Immigrant Parents
           and the Educational Achievements of Mexican Children

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      Authors: Kyle E. Waldman
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      Although there is evidence documenting the impacts of Mexican parents’ migration to the United States on the educational attainment of the children they leave behind, the potential role of parents’ legal status in stratifying their children's educational achievement is poorly understood. Using data from the Mexican Migration Project, I estimate the educational effects of parents’ documentation status for the children left behind in Mexico. I utilize coarsened exact matching and entropy balancing, alongside community fixed effects, in a counterfactual regression framework to address the endogeneity of parental migration decisions. I find that parental migration's effectiveness as a mechanism for securing educational gains among children left in Mexico differs by parents’ legal status. Documentation allows migrant parents to translate their experiences in the United States into relatively greater educational achievement for their children in Mexico. In the post-1986 period, the non-immigrant children of undocumented parents experienced a significant education penalty. These findings elucidate the effect of US immigration policy on social stratification in Mexican society.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T07:56:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221084329
       
  • Climate Change, Drought, and Potential Environmental Migration Flows Under
           Different Policy Scenarios

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      Authors: Oleg Smirnov, Gallya Lahav, John Orbell, Minghua Zhang, Tingyin Xiao
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      Unmitigated climate change will likely produce major problems for human populations worldwide. Although many researchers and policy-makers believe that drought may be an important “push” factor underlying migration in the future, the precise relationship between drought and migration remains unclear. This article models the potential scope of such movements for the emissions policy choices facing all nation-states today. Applying insights from climate science and computational modeling to migration research, we examine the likely surge of drought-induced migration and assess the prospects of different policy scenarios to mitigate involuntary displacement. Using an ensemble of 16 climate models in conjunction with high-resolution geospatial population data and different policy scenarios, we generate drought projections worldwide and estimate the potential for internal and international population movement due to extreme droughts through the remainder of the 21st century. Our simulations suggest that a potential for drought-induced migration increases by approximately 200 percent under the current international policy scenario (corresponding to the current Paris Agreement targets). In contrast, total migration increases by almost 500 percent, should current international cooperation fail and should unrestricted policies toward greenhouse gas emissions prevail. We argue that despite the continued growth projections of drought-induced migration in all cases, international cooperation on climate change can substantially reduce the global potential for such migration, in contrast to unilateral policy approaches to energy demands. This article highlights the importance of modeling future environmental migrations, in order to manage the pressures and unprecedented policy challenges which are expected to dramatically increase under conditions of unmitigated climate change.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-07T03:15:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221079850
       
  • The Labor Force Trajectories of Immigrant Women in the United States:
           Intersecting Individual and Gendered Cohort Characteristics

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      Authors: Sandra Florian, Chenoa Flippen, Emilio Parrado
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      Research on immigrant women's labor market incorporation has increased in recent years, yet systematic comparisons of employment trajectories by national origin and over time remain rare. Likewise, the literature on immigrant assimilation remains dominated by attention to men, with little focus on larger gendered migration dynamics. Using US Census and ACS data from 1990 to 2016, we construct synthetic migration cohorts by national/regional origin, period, and age at arrival to track immigrant women's labor force participation (LFP) over time. We propose and model a typology of workforce incorporation, adjusting for individual characteristics and gendered migration-cohort characteristics (i.e., the gender ratio, share of women arriving single, and share of men arriving with a college education). Results indicate that immigrant women gradually join the workforce over time, though with significant variation in starting employment levels and growth rates. We classify the observed patterns into a five-group typology: Gradual incorporation (cohorts from Europe, Canada, Africa, China, and Vietnam), delayed incorporation with low entry LFP level (cohorts from Mexico), delayed incorporation with moderate entry LFP level (cohorts from Central America, South America, and Cuba), accelerated incorporation (cohorts from India, Korea, and other Asian countries), and continuous intensive employment (cohorts from the Philippines and the Caribbean). We show that gendered migration cohort characteristics explain a substantial share of national/regional origin variation in immigrant women's workforce participation, highlighting the importance of broader cultural and structural forces shaping gendered patterns of immigrant labor market incorporation.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T06:29:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221076781
       
  • Spatial Incorporation of Multiple Immigrant Groups in Gateway Cities:
           Comparative Analysis of Sydney, Barcelona, and Prague

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      Authors: Jiří Hasman, Ivana Křížková
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      Immigrant incorporation in cities is often explained using the theories of spatial and segmented assimilation, which differ, among other things, in their approach to the spatial aspects of incorporation. However, empirical evidence about immigrant spatial incorporation from both theories is ambiguous, since most case studies focus on a single location and a limited number of immigrant groups, which hampers their external validity. Nonetheless, the level of immigrant spatial incorporation depends heavily on the characteristics of immigrant groups, the destination context, and the interplay between them. Therefore, we compared the spatial incorporation of 143 immigrant groups in Sydney, 54 in Barcelona, and 95 in Prague. These three cities differ greatly in their immigration histories, since each represents a different stage of the migration cycle. By employing both traditional and advanced quantitative methods, we show that immigrant spatial incorporation patterns vary considerably across groups and destination cities, with cultural proximity and the maturity of the immigration system among the key determinants. These findings imply that geographical context has a substantial potential to affect the immigrant spatial incorporation.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T04:16:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221078017
       
  • Spatial Assimilation at a Halt' Intergenerational Persistence in
           Neighborhood Contexts among Immigrant Minorities in Norway

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      Authors: Are Skeie Hermansen, Pål Oskar Hundebo, Gunn Elisabeth Birkelund
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      Spatial assimilation theory claims that immigrants’ acculturation and socioeconomic progress will lead to converging neighborhood attainment relative to non-migrant natives. Recently, it has been argued that equalization of local services and life chances across neighborhoods in egalitarian welfare states may delay spatial assimilation by reducing immigrants’ incentives to move out of low-income areas with many (co-ethnic) immigrant neighbors. In this article, we extend this argument to study whether neighborhood equalization also contributes to intergenerational persistence in neighborhood contexts among descendants of immigrants in Norway. Using administrative data, we find that immigrant descendants as adults often remain in neighborhood contexts that resemble their childhood neighborhoods, characterized by relative economic disadvantage and comparatively few ethnic majority residents. Intergenerational persistence in neighborhood contexts is strongest among descendants of immigrants from Pakistan, the Middle East, and Africa. The remaining immigrant–native gaps in spatial economic inequality largely reflect differences in individuals’ education and earnings, family background, and childhood neighborhood context, but these factors matter less for ethnic neighborhood segregation. For both economic and ethnic dimensions of neighborhood attainment, childhood neighborhood context is the factor that matters most in accounting for immigrant–native gaps, whereas individual socioeconomic attainment is the least important. Overall, our findings point to a pattern of “uneven assimilation” among immigrant descendants, where spatial assimilation is slow despite rapid socioeconomic progress across immigrant generations in the egalitarian Norwegian welfare state.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T03:44:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211067771
       
  • Time to Mainstream the Environment into Migration Theory'

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      Authors: Lori M. Hunter, Daniel H. Simon
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      As with all social processes, human migration is a dynamic process that requires regular theoretical reflection. This article offers such reflection as related to the role of the natural environment in contemporary migration research and theory. A growing body of evidence suggests that environmental contexts, as shifting social and ecological realities, are consequential to migration theory. In this article, we review some of this evidence, providing migration research examples that integrate environmental context and are applicable to core migration theories, including neoclassical economic and migration systems perspectives, the “push-pull” framework, and the new economics of labor migration. We suggest that neglecting consideration of the natural environment may yield misspecified migration models that attribute migration too heavily to social and economic factors, particularly in the context of contemporary climate change. On the other hand, we suggest, failure to consider migration theory in climate scenarios may lead to simplistic projections and understandings, as in the case of “climate refugees.” We conclude that migration researchers have an obligation to accurately reflect the complexity of migration's drivers, including the environment, within migration scholarship, especially in the context of global climate change.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T02:29:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221074343
       
  • Health-Care Utilization of Refugees: Evidence from Austria

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      Authors: Thomas Schober, Katrin Zocher
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      European countries have experienced significant inflows of migrants in the past decade, including many refugees from regions engaged in armed conflicts. Although previous research on migrant health has largely focused on economic migration, empirical evidence on refugee health is sparse. This article uses administrative data from Austria to differentiate between economic migrants and refugees and to analyze both groups’ health-care expenditures in comparison to natives. We contribute to the literature on migrant health in several dimensions. First, we follow economic migrants and refugees over the first five years after arrival and show different health-care expenditure patterns among migration groups. In contrast to patterns for economic migrants, we find substantially higher health-care expenditures for refugees compared to natives, especially in the first year after arrival. This difference is not explained by specific diseases or individual refugee groups, indicating refugees’ generally inferior health status in the first years of settlement. Second, we focus on the health effects of granting asylum and find that the expenditure differences decrease after a positive asylum decision. In the last part, by using refugees’ quasi-random placement as a natural experiment, we show that the local health-care sector's characteristics do not have a significant effect on expenditure levels. The findings highlight the importance of distinguishing between migrant groups in the analysis of health-care utilization and show that the time spent in the host country, as well as legal status, have a substantial impact on migrants’ health-care utilization.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T04:29:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211061091
       
  • When Diaspora Politics Meet Global Ambitions: Diaspora Institutions Amid
           China's Geopolitical Transformations

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      Authors: Jiaqi M. Liu
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      Through a case study of China, one of the largest emigration states and a rising global power, this article probes how a homeland state envisions diaspora politics amid geopolitical transformations. Drawing on historical, policy, and interview data, I argue that China's changing positioning toward Chinese emigrants, triggered by the state's geopolitical vicissitudes, has reshaped and repurposed diaspora institutions. I find that since the 2010s, China's diaspora policies have shifted away from soliciting diasporic support for domestic economic growth and national unification and toward liaising externally with migrants to expand Chinese soft power abroad. In consequence, diaspora institutions with more extensive overseas connections and flexible working experiences have taken precedence over formal state agencies specialized in domestic policymaking. This article makes two theoretical contributions to a multilevel understanding of diaspora politics as traversing simultaneously the domestic and global political fields. First, following neo-pluralism, I examine China's diaspora bureaucracy as composed of a diverse set of state entities with distinctive, or even contradictory, interests, orientations, and philosophies. These organizational variations shape diaspora institutions’ different strengths and fluctuating significance in China's shifting geopolitical strategies. Second, by situating emigrants and diaspora institutions in the macrohistorical framework of world politics, this article pushes research on diaspora politics into more profound dialog with world-systems theory. Rather than assuming an asymmetric interdependence between weaker emigration countries and hegemonic immigration countries, I demonstrate how an aspirational homeland state seeks to challenge this established world order and accomplish its geopolitical ascendancy through diaspora re-strategizing and institutional reshuffling.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T11:30:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211072824
       
  • Gendered and Stratified Family Formation Trajectories in the Context of
           Latin American Migration, 1950 to 2000

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      Authors: Andrés F. Castro Torres, Edith Y. Gutierrez-Vazquez
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      The interdependence of migration and family formation has been studied extensively, but studies that consider the embeddedness of this interdependence within gender and class relations are less common. Most existing research on family and migration treats gender and social class as separate determinants of family events or transitions, instead of analyzing how the intersections of both shape full family formation trajectories, defined as all partnership and childbearing statuses throughout an individual life course. We overcome this gap by using an intersectionality framework to analyze trajectories of family formation and migration collected by the Mexican and Latin American Migration projects (1982–2016). Using retrospective information, we reconstruct full family formation and dissolution trajectories (i.e., individuals’ marital statuses and number of children born from ages 15 to 39) for 16,000 individuals and apply sequence and cluster analysis to define a six-category typology of ideal family formation trajectories. Next, we associate this typology with individuals’ sex, age at migration (domestic, international), and educational attainment as a way to measure individuals’ social class position. Our results suggest that the relationship between migration and typical family trajectories depends on the intersection of individuals’ social class and gender. Previous studies have neglected this intersection by overly focusing on the “average” migrant's experience. Migration research must acknowledge and account for migrants’ heterogenous experiences and pay more attention to how intersecting social categories mediate the relationship between migration and other demographic processes.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T03:23:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211067768
       
  • Badante or Bride' Patterns of Female Migration in Italy, Japan, Korea,
           and Spain

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      Authors: Margarita Estévez-Abe, Tiziana Caponio
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates the intersection of care and migration regimes by comparing four carefully matched familialist countries—Italy, Japan, South Korea, and Spain. These four countries, while sharing a similar familialist culture and welfare regime, responded to the problem of eldercare deficits differently in the 1990s and the 2000s. Italy and Spain developed a ‘migrant-in-the-family model,’ relying heavily on informal eldercare provided by migrant workers whom Italians colloquially call badante. Korea and Japan, by contrast, relied more on marriage migrants, with Korea developing its own variant of the migrant-in-the-family model where the migrant is typically the daughter-in-law. In Japan, some marriage migrants became care workers in the formal eldercare sector. By tracing the historical trajectories of female migration to these four countries, the article identifies a recursive relationship between migration regimes and care regimes. Initial differences in migration regimes shaped the female migratory pathways in specific ways, which, in turn, affected the development of distinctive eldercare regimes. Once these new care regimes emerged, however, they influenced the migration regime in the next cycle. The article contributes to the literatures on the intersection of care and migration regimes by untangling the reciprocal feedback processes between these two systems.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-17T01:41:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211070296
       
  • Immigration, Identity, and Anonymity: Intentionally Masked Intolerance in
           Ireland

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      Authors: Mathew J. Creighton, Éamonn Fahey, Frances McGinnity
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      Newcomers to Ireland confront a context of reception shaped by large-scale historical emigration and more recent immigration defined by an increasingly diverse set of origin contexts, both within and outside the European Union (EU). How has the Irish population responded to these groups, and how openly do Irish residents express their views toward different immigrant groups' We test this response using a survey experiment, which offered respondents an anonymous way to express any negative attitudes to immigrant groups they may have had. Results from the survey experiment show that Irish residents’ support for Black and Polish immigrations is overstated when expressed directly. In contrast, their sentiment toward Muslim immigrants is notably insensitive to the level of anonymity provided, indicating little difference between overt and covert expression of support (or antipathy). In other words, when race/ethnicity or EU origin is made salient, Irish respondents are more likely to mask negative sentiment. When Islam is emphasized, however, Irish antipathy is not masked. We find that in-group preferences, instead of determining support in an absolute sense, shape the reluctance with which opposition to immigrant groups is overtly expressed.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T10:52:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211054806
       
  • The Tradeoff of Temporariness: Economic and Social Impacts of H-2A Status
           on Mexican Migrant Men

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      Authors: Shelby O'Neill
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      As the H-2A visa program expands to become a core component of contemporary Mexican migration to the United States, questions emerge about the tradeoffs migrants face between temporary and undocumented statuses. This article employs propensity score matching of participants in the Mexican Migration Project—an extensive binational survey of Mexican migrants and their families—to compare economic and social outcomes of H-2A visa recipients vis-à-vis undocumented migrants. Findings indicate that although H-2A visas offer benefits like a lower cost of living while abroad, they do not produce a discernible effect on wages relative to wages earned by undocumented migrants. While H-2A migrants are more likely to work in the formal economy, they are also less likely to build social capital or language proficiency in the United States than undocumented migrants, indicating a degree of social isolation that can be exploited by employers. This comparison contributes to a growing literature on the proliferation of temporary migratory statuses and the marginality experienced by migrants within these statuses.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T04:43:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211066015
       
  • Does Aid Drive Migration' Evidence from a Shift-Share
           Instrument∗

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      Authors: Hamish Fitchett, Dennis Wesselbaum
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      Foreign aid payments have been a key policy response by Global North countries to reduce increased migration flows from the Global South. In this article, we contribute to the literature on the relationship between aid and international migration flows and estimate the contemporaneous effect of bilateral aid payments on bilateral, international migration flows. The fundamental problem in analyzing this relationship is endogeneity, or reverse causality. To address this issue and achieve causal inference, we use a shift-share, or Bartik, instrument. Examining migration flows between 198 origin countries and 16 OECD destination countries over 36 years (1980−2015), we find a positive relationship between aid and migration. A ten-percent increase in aid payments will increase migration by roughly 2 percent. We further document non-linearity in the relationship between aid and migration and find an inverted U-shaped relationship between aid and migration flows. The findings presented here have implications for the design of bilateral and multilateral aid policies and for achieving various United Nations Sustainable Development Goals by stressing the importance of a better coordination between aid and immigration policies.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T02:20:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211069316
       
  • Book Reviews: Migrants, Thinkers, Storytellers: Negotiating Meaning and
           Making Life in Bloemfontein, South Africa by Jonatan Kurzwelly and Luis
           Escobedo

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      Authors: Amanuel Isak Tewolde
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T08:42:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211067815
       
  • Exclusionary Contexts Frustrate Cultural Integration: Migrant
           Acculturation Into Support for Gender Equality in the Labor Market in
           Western Europe

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      Authors: Saskia Glas
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      Countering linear acculturation theories, the adoption of Western European gender customs over time differs across migrant groups. This diversity implies that acculturation into support for gender equality is context dependent. However, little quantitative scholarship has identified what sort of contexts strengthen or impede acculturation. This article investigates one source of context-dependent acculturation: exclusionary contexts. I build and test a context-dependent exclusions framework that proposes that contexts that exclude non-Western migrants hamper their acculturation into support for gender equality in the labor market in Western Europe. Empirically, I synchronize European Social Survey, European Values Study, and Eurislam data on over 11,000 non-Western migrants in Western Europe. Cross-classified models show that non-Western migrants’ support for labor-market gender equality is, indeed, lower in exclusionary contexts, for instance, in destinations with stronger anti-migrant sentiments. Pivotally, the impact of destinations’ gender customs on migrants’ gender values differs across destination, origin, and community contexts. For instance, in destinations with stronger populist right-wing parties, migrants internalize destinations’ gender equality less. Altogether, non-Western migrants’ acculturation into support for labor-market gender equality is highly dependent on contextual exclusions, which means that populist claims about non-Western migrants’ universal lack of acculturation into support for gender equality should be viewed cautiously.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T03:11:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211059171
       
  • Transnational Parenthood and Migrant Subjective Well-Being in Italy

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      Authors: Francesca Tosi, Roberto Impicciatore
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      Transnational parents are migrant mothers and fathers who have at least one child left behind in the home country. Despite their non-negligible prevalence in many destination countries, scarcity of data on the topic has caused a lack of attention to this phenomenon in both policy and scholarship. In particular, little is known about how the interplay between migration and family relations at a distance affects the individual well-being of both migrant parents and their left-behind children, especially in a European context. This article evaluates the subjective well-being of migrant couples currently residing in Italy who have children left behind, compared with childless migrants and with migrant parents living with their children in Italy. Multivariate logistic regression applied to individual-level data from Istat's Survey on Social condition and integration of foreign citizens, 2011–2012, shows that transnational parents experienced lower levels of self-rated health compared with migrants with different family statuses and that the well-being loss associated with transnational parenthood is strongly gendered. Controlling for individual characteristics, socio-economic conditions, the presence of minor children, and migration background, our analysis demonstrates that men's subjective wellbeing did not vary based on their family status while transnational mothers experienced significantly lower well-being compared with childless migrant women. Our research suggests the need for adopting a transnational approach to migration starting from data gathering, for instance through the design and implementation of multi-sited and retrospective surveys.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T03:11:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211068507
       
  • Point of Reference: A Multisited Exploration of African Migration and
           Fertility in France

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      Authors: Julia A. Behrman, Abigail Weitzman
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      A considerable literature explores whether the fertility of migrants from high-fertility contexts converges with that of women in lower fertility destinations. Nonetheless, much of this research compares migrants’ reproductive outcomes to those of native-born women in destination countries. Drawing on research emphasizing the importance of transnational perspectives, we standardize and integrate data collected in France (the destination) and in six high-fertility African countries (the senders). We show that African migrants in our sample had higher children ever born (CEB) than native French women but lower CEB than women in corresponding origin countries. These findings suggest that socialization into pronatalist norms is an incomplete explanation for migrant fertility in the first generation, an insight that is overlooked when analyzing destination settings only. Next, we conduct multivariate analyses that weight migrants’ background characteristics to resemble women in both origin and destination countries. Findings indicate that observed differences between African migrants in France and women in African origin countries help explain differences in CEB between the two groups, which supports selection. We also demonstrate that African migrants in France had delayed transitions into first, second, and third births and lower completed fertility compared to women in origin countries, thus disputing the disruption hypothesis. Finally, we show that observed differences between African migrants in France and native French women explain differences in CEB between the two groups, which supports adaptation. These multifaceted findings on selection, disruption, and adaptation would be obscured by analyzing destination settings only, thus validating a multisited approach to migrant fertility.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T03:11:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211046571
       
  • Trajectories of Spatial Assimilation or Place Stratification' A
           Typology of Residence and Workplace Histories of Newly Arrived Migrants in
           Sweden

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      Authors: Guilherme Kenji Chihaya, Szymon Marcińczak, Magnus Strömgren, Urban Lindgren, Tiit Tammaru
      First page: 433
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      In most societies, resources and opportunities are concentrated in neighborhoods and workplaces occupied by the host population. The spatial assimilation and place stratification theories propose trajectories (the sequences of events) leading to minority and migrant access to or exclusion from these advantageous places. However, most previous research on these theories did not ask whether such theorized trajectories occur. We apply sequence analysis to decade-long residence and workplace histories of newly arrived migrants in Sweden to identify a typology of combined residence-work trajectories. The seven types of trajectories in our typology are characterized by varying degrees of proximity to the host population in residential neighborhoods and workplaces and by different patterns of change in such proximity over time. The pivotal role of socioeconomic gains in spatial assimilation, posited by the namesake theory, is not supported, as we do not find that migrant employment precedes residence alongside the host population. The importance of housing-market discrimination for migrants’ exclusion from host-dominated spaces, posited by place stratification theory, is only weakly supported, as we find that migrants from less affluent countries accumulate disadvantage over time, likely due to discrimination in both the labor and housing markets. Our findings also underscore the need for new theories explaining migrant residential outcomes which apply to contexts where migrant-dense neighborhoods are still forming.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T06:28:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211037314
       
  • National Cultural Frames and Muslims’ Economic Incorporation: A
           Comparison of France and Canada

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      Authors: Jeffrey G. Reitz, Emily Laxer, Patrick Simon
      First page: 499
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article shows that differences in the economic incorporation of Muslims and other immigrant minorities in France and in Canada are mainly related to immigrant selectivity, labor market structures, and welfare transfers. Differences in ethno-specific penalties due to national cultural frames — related to multiculturalism in Canada and secular republicanism in France — are small, affect only the second generation, and are related both to minority household patterns and to treatment in mainstream institutions. Using data on household incomes from two large-scale surveys (Trajectories and Origins in France 2008–2009 and the Canadian National Household Survey 2011) and taking account of cross-setting differences in Muslim and other minority origins, we model cross-generational economic trajectories reflecting the impact of immigrant selectivity, labor market structures, and welfare transfers. Within this framework, we examine four ways that cultural frames may affect minority economic disadvantage: the significance of religion relative to race, citizenship access, labor market discrimination, and minority household patterns, including employment of women in couples and intergenerational cohabitation. Across all minorities, we find a striking cross-national difference in intergenerational economic trajectories: flat in France and upward in Canada, plausibly reflecting institutional differences. Net of sociodemographic controls, both religion and race matter in each setting, and net Muslim disadvantage is similar in each. Citizenship differences have little impact. Labor market earnings discrimination appears similar. A small potential effect of cultural frames appears in second-generation Muslim households: in France, lower female employment rates reduce household incomes, while in English-speaking Canada, more frequent cohabitation with more affluent parents increases household incomes. Yet even these findings do not necessarily diminish the overriding significance of immigrant selectivity, labor market structure, and welfare transfers.
      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T01:35:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211035725
       
  • New year, new plans for IMR’s book review section

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 636
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T04:34:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183221076123
       
  • Book Reviews: Migration and Hybrid Political Regimes: Navigating the Legal
           Landscape in Russia by Rustamjon Urinboyev

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Olga Tkach
      First page: 660
      Abstract: International Migration Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Migration Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T03:16:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01979183211073070
       
 
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