Subjects -> POLITICAL SCIENCE (Total: 1097 journals)
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    - POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)
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POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 201 - 281 of 281 Journals sorted alphabetically
Eastern Review     Open Access  
Economia Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Economic and Regional Studies / Studia Ekonomiczne i Regionalne     Open Access  
Ecopolítica     Open Access  
eJournal of eDemocracy and Open Government     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
El Banquete de los Dioses     Open Access  
Electoral Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Encuentro     Open Access  
Entramados y Perspectivas     Open Access  
Environment and Planning C : Politics and Space     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Estudios digital     Open Access  
Estudios Políticos     Open Access  
Estudos Avançados     Open Access  
Ethical Theory and Moral Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Ethics & Global Politics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ethics & International Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Éthique publique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Études internationales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Eunomia. Rivista semestrale del Corso di Laurea in Scienze Politiche e delle Relazioni Internazionali     Open Access  
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Integration Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
European Journal for Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of American Culture     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Cultural and Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Government and Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
European Journal of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
European Journal of Political Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
European Journal of Political Research : Political Data Yearbook     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Politics and Gender     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
European Politics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
European Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
European Union Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Evaluation and Program Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Exchange : The Journal of Public Diplomacy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fascism     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Federal Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Federalism-E     Open Access  
Fédéralisme Régionalisme     Open Access  
FEU Academic Review     Open Access  
Financial Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Foreign Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Foreign Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Foro Interno. Anuario de Teoría Política     Open Access  
French Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Frontiers in Political Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gaceta Laboral     Open Access  
Genocide Studies International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Geopolítica(s). Revista de estudios sobre espacio y poder     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geopolitics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geopolitics under Globalization     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
German Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
German Politics and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Germinal : Marxismo e Educação em Debate     Open Access  
Gestão & Regionalidade     Open Access  
Ghana Journal of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ghana Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Global Affairs     Hybrid Journal  
Global Change, Peace & Security: formerly Pacifica Review: Peace, Security & Global Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 274)
Global Discourse : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Current Affairs and Applied Contemporary Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Global Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Global Public Policy and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Global Societies Journal     Open Access  
Global Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Global South, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Global Studies Quarterly     Open Access  
Göç Dergisi     Full-text available via subscription  
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government : Annual Research Journal of Political Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Government and Opposition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Granì     Open Access  
Group Processes & Intergroup Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Hague Journal of Diplomacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Hegel Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hic Rhodus : Crisis capitalista, polémica y controversias     Open Access  
Histoire Politique : Revue du Centre d'histoire de Sciences Po     Open Access  
Historia i Polityka     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History of Communism in Europe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hommes & Migrations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
HONAI : International Journal for Educational, Social, Political & Cultural Studies     Open Access  
Horyzonty Polityki     Open Access  
Human Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Human Rights Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Human Rights Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Icelandic Review of Politics and Administration     Open Access  
Idäntutkimus     Open Access  
identidade!     Open Access  
Identities : Journal for Politics, Gender and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
IDP. Revista de Internet, Derecho y Politica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ids Practice Papers     Hybrid Journal  
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies     Open Access  
Indes : Zeitschrift für Politik und Gesellschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Index on Censorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
India Quarterly: A Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
India Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Indialogs : Spanish Journal of India Studies     Open Access  
Innovation Policy and the Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Innovations : Technology, Governance, Globalization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Insight on Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
InSURgência : revista de direitos e movimentos sociais     Open Access  
Intelligence & National Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Interdisciplinary Political Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Interdisziplinäre Zeitschrift für Südasienforschung     Open Access  
Interest Groups & Advocacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Interfaces Brasil/Canadá     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Area Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Communication of Chinese Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Critical Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Gramsci Journal     Open Access  
International Interactions: Empirical and Theoretical Research in International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal : Canada's Journal of Global Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of African Renaissance Studies - Multi-, Inter- and Transdisciplinarity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Children's Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Diplomacy and Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of E-Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Electronic Government Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Environmental Policy and Decision Making     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Human Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 416)
International Journal of Intercultural Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Law and Politics Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Peace Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Press/Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Social Quality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal on Minority and Group Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Migration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
International Migration Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
International Negotiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 121)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 255)
International Political Science Abstracts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Political Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
International Quarterly for Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Regional Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
International Relations of the Asia-Pacific     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Review of Public Policy     Open Access  
International Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 86)
International Socialism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Spectator : Italian Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Studies Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Studies Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
International Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Theory: A Journal of International Politics, Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Irish Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Israel Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Italian Political Science Review / Rivista Italiana di Scienza Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Italian Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
IZA Journal of Development and Migration     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Izquierdas     Open Access  
Japan Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Japanese Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
JAWI     Open Access  
JCMS : Journal of Common Market Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Jewish Culture and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
JICSA : Journal of Islamic Civilization in Southeast Asia     Open Access  
JISIP-UNJA : Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik Fisipol Universitas Jambi     Open Access  
JKAP (Jurnal Kebijakan dan Administrasi Publik)     Open Access  
Journal Exit-Deutschland. Zeitschrift für Deradikalisierung und demokratische Kultur     Open Access  
Journal for Deradicalization     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal for Peace and Justice Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal for Peace and Nuclear Disarmament     Open Access  
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of African Conflicts and Peace Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of APF Command and Staff College     Open Access  
Journal of Borneo-Kalimantan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Catholic Social Thought     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Chinese Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Chinese Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Civil Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Cold War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Conflict Resolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Journal of Conflict Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Contemporary East Asia Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Contemporary European Research     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Contemporary European Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Current Chinese Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.004
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1368-4302 - ISSN (Online) 1461-7188
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Like the cool kids' The role of popular classmates in the development
           of anti-immigrant attitudes in adolescence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrea Bohman, Aleš Kudrnáč
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      While classmates have been identified as important socializing agents in relation to adolescents’ prejudice, there is limited understanding of how popularity status plays into classroom transmission of prejudicial attitudes. Drawing on theories of social influence, we used a three-wave panel of Swedish adolescents (N = 941, aged 13–15) to examine the role of sociometric and prestige popular classmates in the development of adolescents’ anti-immigrant attitudes. Multilevel repeated measurement models revealed positive relationships between popular and individual prejudice; between sociometric prejudice and the level and rate of change; and between prestige prejudice and wave-to-wave shifts in individual prejudice. Overall, we found sociometrically popular classmates to be more influential in relation to adolescents’ prejudice. Additionally, we found the effect of sociometric prejudice to be more pronounced if political issues were frequently discussed in the classroom.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T10:00:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221099444
       
  • Proud to support social equality: Investigating the roles of pride, guilt,
           anger, and disgust in attitudes towards immigrants

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Angelo Panno, Valeria De Cristofaro, Valerio Pellegrini, Luigi Leone, Mauro Giacomantonio, Maria Anna Donati
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has demonstrated that low social dominance orientation (social equality orientation) promotes empathy with disadvantaged group members. In three studies, we tested a model relating preference for egalitarianism to positive attitudes towards immigrants through emotional experiences (pride, guilt, moral anger/ anger, disgust). Studies 1 and 2 showed that social equality orientation was positively related to proimmigrant attitudes through increased pride in helping immigrants, controlling for participants’ gender, age, and political orientation. Such a preference for egalitarianism was unrelated to proimmigrant attitudes through guilt for not helping immigrants and moral anger concerning mistreatment of immigrants. By focusing on emotional experience concerning proimmigrant national initiatives (e.g., integrating immigrants into the labor market), Study 3 corroborated the indirect effect of social equality orientation on proimmigrant attitudes through increased pride, controlling for participants’ gender, age, political orientation, as well as competitive jungle and dangerous world beliefs. Although much weaker, we also found a positive association between social equality orientation and proimmigrant attitudes through reduced anger, while no significant association through guilt and disgust was found. Results suggest that, relative to guilt, anger, and disgust, pride is the key channel through which preference for egalitarianism is related to positive attitudes towards immigrants. Implications and future directions for research are discussed.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-06-11T11:13:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221098633
       
  • United we stand' Perceived loyalty of dual nationals, multiracial
           people, and dual state residents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rachel D. Fine, Nour S. Kteily, Jacqueline M. Chen, Steven O. Roberts, Arnold K. Ho
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      As multiracial children of foreign-born parents, Kamala Harris and Barack Obama embody diversity in politics for many perceivers. Yet some have also questioned their loyalty to their respective groups. We explored perceptions of dual group members’ (DGM; dual nationals, multiracial people, and dual state residents) loyalty among first-party (those who share a group membership with a DGM target) and third-party perceivers (those who do not). Studies 1a–2b showed that first- and third-party perceivers rated DGMs as less loyal than their single group member (SGM) counterparts. However, only first- (Studies 2a–2b) but not third-party (Studies 1a–1b) perceivers preferred SGMs to DGMs for loyalty-dependent roles. Study 3 revealed that perceivers who were higher in patriotism supported DGMs for loyalty-dependent roles less when they were first- (vs. third) party observers. These studies suggest that perceivers readily intuit that DGMs are less loyal than SGMs and, under some conditions, this may lead to discrimination.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T11:34:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221096322
       
  • Economic inequality shapes the agency–communion content of gender
           stereotypes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eva Moreno-Bella, Guillermo B. Willis, Angélica Quiroga-Garza, Miguel Moya
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Economic inequality is a main issue in current societies, and it affects people’s psychological processes. In this research, we propose that perceived economic inequality might affect how people perceive men and women. In two experiments carried out in Spain (N = 170) and Mexico (N = 215), we tested whether high (vs. low) economic inequality leads to changes in the perceived agency and communion of both men and women. Our findings suggest that when economic inequality is high (vs. low), the communal content in social perceptions of both men and women decreases. Specifically, under high (vs. low) inequality, the difference in agency and communion ascribed to a man becomes greater (i.e., men are perceived as even more agentic than communal), whereas this difference becomes smaller for women (i.e., women are still perceived as more communal than agentic, but this difference is smaller). We discuss these findings’ implications regarding the psychosocial effects of economic inequality.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T11:06:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221095338
       
  • Majority members’ acculturation: How proximal-acculturation relates to
           expectations of immigrants and intergroup ideologies over time

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katharina Lefringhausen, Tara C. Marshall, Nelli Ferenczi, Hanna Zagefka, Jonas R. Kunst
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      How do English majority members’ national culture maintenance and immigrant culture adoption (i.e., globalisation-based proximal-acculturation) predict their acculturation expectations (i.e., how they think immigrants should acculturate) and intergroup ideologies (i.e., how they think society should manage diversity)' Cross-sectional results (N = 220) supported hypothesised relationships using a variable- and person-centred approach: welcoming expectations/ideologies related positively to immigrant culture adoption (or an integration/assimilation strategy) and negatively to national culture maintenance (or a separation strategy), whilst the reverse was true for unwelcoming expectations/ideologies. Notably, colourblindness showed only weak correlations with/differences across acculturation orientations/strategies. In longitudinal analyses, adopting immigrants’ cultures increased the intergroup ideologies polyculturalism and multiculturalism whilst reducing support for assimilation over time, whereas national culture maintenance had the opposite effect. Meanwhile, the expectation integration-transformation was especially related to higher odds of following an integration rather than separation strategy over time. Overall, results advance the psychological study of multiculturalism, providing first longitudinal insights on majority members’ acculturation.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T09:37:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221096324
       
  • When “good guys” do bad things: Evaluations of sexual harassment
           allegations against male allies

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      Authors: Morgana Lizzio-Wilson, Anna Klas, Edward J. R. Clarke
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Across two studies (Ns = 268 and 574), we examined the perceived legitimacy of sexual harassment allegations made against male allies. Overall, observers were less inclined to believe an allegation (Studies 1 and 2) and endorsed less severe punishments against a perpetrator who engaged in egalitarian (vs. sexist) behaviors toward women (Studies 1 and 2). Observers also endorsed weaker reparatory measures, were more willing to move past the allegation, and were more inclined to blame the victim for the incident when an egalitarian (vs. sexist) man was accused, especially when there was greater uncertainty surrounding his guilt (Study 2). Importantly, these effects were mediated by perpetrator typicality: the egalitarian perpetrator less closely resembled a typical perpetrator of sexual harassment, which, in turn, predicted more lenient evaluations (Study 2). These findings highlight how accusations of male allies’ problematic behavior can reinforce widespread scepticism surrounding sexual harassment allegations and discriminatory attitudes towards victims.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T11:16:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221094432
       
  • Changes in nonprejudiced motivations track shifts in the U.S.
           sociopolitical climate

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Douglas L. Kievit, Jennifer LaCosse, Stephanie R. Mallinas, David S. March, Jonathan W. Kunstman, Kevin L. Zabel, Michael A. Olson, E. Ashby Plant
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Recently, major societal events have shaped perceptions of race relations in the US. The current work argues that people’s motivations to be nonprejudiced toward Black people have changed in concert with these broader societal forces. Analyses of two independent archival datasets reveal that nonprejudiced motivations changed predictably in accordance with shifts in the social milieu over the last 15 years. In one dataset (N = 13,395), we track movement in internal and external motivations to respond without prejudice from 2004 to 2017. Internal motivation initially decreased before ticking upward following multiple events suggesting worsening race relations (e.g., noteworthy killings of unarmed Black men, resurgent racialized politics). Conversely, external motivation initially increased but reversed course across the same time span. A second dataset (N = 2,503) corroborates these trends in two conceptually related nonprejudiced motivations. Results suggest that changes in nonprejudiced motivations may reflect broader shifts in the sociopolitical climate.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T11:44:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221089768
       
  • To alleviate group members’ physiological stress, supervisors need to be
           more than polite and professional

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christopher T. Begeny, Yuen J. Huo, Heather J. Smith, Blanca Sarai Rodriguez
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Although stressors are common in group life, people cope better when group authorities treat them with care/concern. However, it remains unclear whether such treatment affects individuals’ physiological stress. In this experiment, individuals engaged in an interview known to increase cortisol (stress biomarker). Surrounding the interview, an ingroup supervisor treated them with standard professionalism (politeness [control]), explicit care/concern (high-quality treatment), or disregard (poor-quality treatment). While those in the control condition experienced a spike in cortisol, individuals in the high-quality treatment condition did not experience this physiological stress (cortisol). Those given poor-quality treatment also did not exhibit stress, suggesting the explicit disregard for them may have undermined the interview’s legitimacy, thereby removing social evaluative threat. Paralleling past research, self-reported stress did not reflect individuals’ physiological stress (cortisol). Overall, results suggest that to alleviate group members’ physiological stress, supervisors need to be more than polite and professional–also demonstrating care/concern for them as individuals.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T12:56:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221091065
       
  • The authoritarian incubator: Examining the effect of conversion to
           Christianity on right-wing authoritarianism and social dominance
           orientation

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      Authors: Christopher Lockhart, Chris G. Sibley, Danny Osborne
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Although religiosity correlates positively with authoritarianism, the temporal ordering of this relationship is unclear. Because religious teachings often promote authoritarian values, right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) should increase following religious conversion. Yet spiritual beliefs may also promote egalitarianism. As such, social dominance orientation (SDO) might decrease postconversion. We tested these hypotheses using data from a subset of participants who converted to Christianity at some point during a 9-year longitudinal panel study (N = 536). We also examined a separate subsample who deconverted over the same period (N = 696). As hypothesised, RWA was stable before conversion, but increased slightly after becoming religious. Unexpectedly, SDO was stable both pre- and postconversion. Conversely, those who deconverted from Christianity experienced declines in RWA both before and after losing their religion, whereas SDO declined only postdeconversion. These results suggest that religious conversion precedes increases in RWA (but not SDO), and that declines in RWA precede deconversion.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-16T01:03:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221085508
       
  • Social background concealment among first-generation students: The role of
           social belonging and academic achievement concerns

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jenny Veldman, Loes Meeussen, Colette van Laar
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Although higher education has become more accessible to people from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, the transition to university is more difficult for first- compared to continuing-generation students. Previous research showed that social identity processes are key to understand differences between first- and continuing-generation students’ experiences at university. In the present paper, we argue that social background identity concealment may occur as a coping process among first-generation students. A longitudinal study among 829 first-year university students showed that first-generation students indeed concealed their social background at university more than continuing-generation students. This was especially the case when they had experienced concerns about their social belonging at university, indicating that identity concealment resulted from concerns to fit in at university. Finally, social background concealment was related to a decrease in well-being, suggesting that concealment is a costly social identity management strategy. Instead, universities should put in efforts to increase first-generation students’ sense of belonging.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T08:48:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221089116
       
  • Being on the same page about social rules and norms: Effects of shared
           relational models on cooperation in work teams

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Johannes F. W. Arendt, Katharina G. Kugler, Felix C. Brodbeck
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      In working teams, each member has an individual understanding of the social rules and norms that underlie social relationships in the team, as well as about what behavior is appropriate and what behavior can be expected from others. What happens if the members of a team are not “on the same page” with respect to these social rules and norms' Drawing on relational models theory, which posits four elemental relational models that people use to coordinate their social interactions, we examined the effects of a common understanding of relational models in teams (i.e., “shared relational models”) on various aspects of cooperative and uncooperative behaviors. We hypothesized that a shared understanding of relational models in a team is positively related to justice perception and negatively related to relationship conflict, which are in turn related to helping behavior and knowledge hiding. We conducted a field study, collecting data from 46 work teams (N = 189 total participants) in various organizations, and found support for all proposed hypotheses. Our findings emphasize the importance of a shared understanding of relational models for (un)cooperative behavior in teams, thereby opening a new door for research on relational models in organizations.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T08:46:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221088506
       
  • Reducing Islamophobia: An assessment of psychological mechanisms that
           underlie anti-Islamophobia media interventions

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      Authors: Samantha L. Moore-Berg, Boaz Hameiri, Emily Falk, Emile Bruneau
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Western countries have witnessed increased hostility towards Muslims among individuals, and structurally in the ways that the media covers stories related to Islam/Muslims and in policies that infringe on the rights of Muslim communities. In response, practitioners have created media interventions that aim to reduce Islamophobia. However, it is unclear what causal effects these interventions have on reducing Islamophobia. Here, we test the effects of 11 media interventions developed by practitioners with an intervention tournament among U.S. samples. In Study 1, we identified three videos that most effectively reduced Islamophobia both immediately after watching and 1 month later. In Studies 2–4, we examined the psychological mechanisms of these successful videos and found an indirect effect of the interventions on reduced support for anti-Muslim policies through recognition of media bias against Muslims. This research highlights that drawing attention to structural biases, including biased media coverage of Muslims, is one potential strategy for ameliorating Islamophobia.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T08:44:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221085832
       
  • Victimhood beliefs are linked to willingness to engage in intergroup
           contact with a former adversary through empathy and trust

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      Authors: Shpend Voca, Sylvie Graf, Mirjana Rupar
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      After intergroup conflicts end, beliefs about past suffering of the ingroup compared to an outgroup influence relations between former adversaries. In Kosovo and Bosnia and Herzegovina, we simultaneously examined the effects of inclusive victimhood (i.e., a belief that both the ingroup and a former adversary suffered similarly) and competitive victimhood (i.e., a belief that the ingroup suffered more than a former adversary) on willingness to engage in contact with a former adversary, a precursor of positive changes in postconflict societies. In one correlational (nAlbanians = 159; nCroats = 227) and two experimental studies (NAlbanians = 161; NCroats = 341, preregistered), inclusive victimhood was linked to higher willingness to engage in contact with former adversaries through higher empathy (Studies 1 to 3) and trust (Studies 1 and 2). In contrast, competitive victimhood was associated with lower willingness to engage in contact through lower empathy (Study 1) and trust (Studies 1 and 3). We discuss the practical implications of our findings for interventions in postconflict societies.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T08:39:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221084859
       
  • Perceived Muslim population growth triggers divergent perceptions and
           reactions from Republicans and Democrats

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      Authors: Hui Bai
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      The Muslim population is rapidly growing worldwide. Five experiments show that Republicans and Democrats respond to this demographic change with divergent reactions in three domains: perception of threats, celebratory reactions, and emotional responses. In terms of threat perceptions, Republicans tend to perceive Muslim population growth as a threat to Christians and the U.S. society in terms of American culture, legal norms, and peace. Furthermore, Republicans are less likely to have celebratory reactions to Muslim population growth (a theoretically novel reaction). They experience less hope and pride, along with more anxiety and anger. The divergent responses from partisans are partially explained by their ideological orientation and media exposure, but they are not explained by any racial mechanisms or the partisans’ religious identity. Together, these studies reveal that political leaning can be an antecedent to reactions to the demographic change in many complex ways beyond the dominant group’s concern for their status.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T08:36:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221084850
       
  • When they want to take away what is “ours”: Collective ownership
           threat and negative reactions towards refugees

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      Authors: Sabahat Cigdem Bagci, Maykel Verkuyten, Esra Canpolat
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      People can display negative reactions towards those who challenge their sense of psychological ownership. We tested whether natives would show negativity towards refugees upon perceiving collective ownership threat (COT)—the fear of losing control over a territory that is perceived to be “ours”—in the context of mass immigration (Syrian refugees in Turkey; total N = 1,598). Correlational Studies 1 and 2 demonstrated COT to be associated with intolerance and negative reactions towards refugees through negative intergroup emotions (anger specifically). Preregistered experimental studies demonstrated that while there was no causal effect of COT in neighborhoods with relatively high refugee concentration (Study 3a), COT decreased outgroup tolerance and increased defensive reactions towards Syrian refugees via outgroup anger among a more general community sample (Study 3b). The wider intergroup implications of the fear of losing one’s sense of territorial ownership are discussed.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T08:34:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221084232
       
  • A social identity analysis of how pay inequality divides the workplace

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      Authors: Porntida Tanjitpiyanond, Jolanda Jetten, Kim Peters
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      The present research examines why organizations with more unequal pay structures have been found to be characterized by a range of negative workplace outcomes. Drawing on the social identity approach, we propose that higher pay disparity can increase the comparative fit of pay categories whereby the organizational “haves” (the highest paid employees) and “have nots” (the lowest paid employees) are more likely to be categorized into distinct social groups. In turn, this can lead to poorer organizational functioning. In two studies, a field survey (N = 413) and an experiment (N = 286), we found that higher pay inequality increased the comparative fit of pay categories, which, in turn, was associated with lower superordinate (organizational) identification, higher perceived workplace conflict, higher leader toxicity, and lower perceptions of identity leadership (i.e., a leader who creates a sense of shared identity in the organization). Our research provides novel insights into how higher inequality affects employees’ categorization processes, thereby creating a psychological divide and contributing to organizational dysfunction.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T08:30:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221074550
       
  • Investigating motivations underlying collective narcissism and in-group
           identification

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      Authors: Irem Eker, Aleksandra Cichocka, Chris G. Sibley
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      We draw on self-determination theory and research on religious orientations to investigate motivations associated with collective narcissism—a belief in in-group greatness that is underappreciated by others—versus secure in-group identity, an unpretentious positive regard for the in-group. Four surveys examined these associations focusing on different social identities: personally important groups (Study 1, N = 212), nationalities (Study 2, N = 196), and religious groups (Study 3, N = 1,690; Study 4, N = 399). In Studies 1, 2, and 4, self-determined motivations were associated with secure in-group identity, whereas non-self-determined motivations were related to collective narcissism. In Studies 3 and 4, intrinsic religiosity was related to collective narcissism and secure in-group identity, while extrinsic personal religiosity was associated with collective narcissism only. Results indicate that collective narcissism is motivated by seeking external and internal rewards.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T11:18:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221081470
       
  • Ally endorsement: Exploring allyship cues to promote perceptions of
           allyship and positive STEM beliefs among White female students

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      Authors: India R. Johnson, Evava S. Pietri
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Many science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) domains are White-male-dominated; yet, investigations exploring how White men scientists can counter women’s underrepresentation are lacking. We examined whether exposure to a White male scientist endorsed as an ally by a gender ingroup member (i.e., an allyship cue) encouraged identity-safety and positive STEM beliefs among White female students. Relative to a White male scientist without an allyship cue, participants that viewed an endorsed scientist reported greater perceptions of allyship, identity-safety (Experiment 1–3), interest, and self-efficacy in computer science (Experiments 2 and 3). In Experiment 3, we recruited White women in STEM and found that ally endorsement from a White or Black female, but not a White male, promoted identity-safety. Moreover, the endorsed scientist encouraged perceptions that they possessed a shared reality with participants and recognized the bias that women in STEM face. Allyship cues may help White men attract White female students to STEM.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T11:17:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221080467
       
  • Disgust sensitivity relates to attitudes toward gay men and lesbian women
           across 31 nations

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      Authors: Florian van Leeuwen, Yoel Inbar, Michael Bang Petersen, Lene Aarøe, Pat Barclay, Fiona Kate Barlow, Mícheál de Barra, D. Vaughn Becker, Leah Borovoi, Jongan Choi, Nathan S. Consedine, Jane Rebecca Conway, Paul Conway, Vera Cubela Adoric, Ekin Demirci, Ana María Fernández, Diogo Conque Seco Ferreira, Keiko Ishii, Ivana Jakšić, Tingting Ji, Inga Jonaityte, David M. G. Lewis, Norman P. Li, Jason C. McIntyre, Sumitava Mukherjee, Justin H. Park, Boguslaw Pawlowski, David Pizarro, Pavol Prokop, Gerasimos Prodromitis, Markus J. Rantala, Lisa M. Reynolds, Bonifacio Sandin, Barış Sevi, Narayanan Srinivasan, Shruti Tewari, Jose C. Yong, Iris Žeželj, Joshua M. Tybur
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Previous work has reported a relation between pathogen-avoidance motivations and prejudice toward various social groups, including gay men and lesbian women. It is currently unknown whether this association is present across cultures, or specific to North America. Analyses of survey data from adult heterosexuals (N = 11,200) from 31 countries showed a small relation between pathogen disgust sensitivity (an individual-difference measure of pathogen-avoidance motivations) and measures of antigay attitudes. Analyses also showed that pathogen disgust sensitivity relates not only to antipathy toward gay men and lesbians, but also to negativity toward other groups, in particular those associated with violations of traditional sexual norms (e.g., prostitutes). These results suggest that the association between pathogen-avoidance motivations and antigay attitudes is relatively stable across cultures and is a manifestation of a more general relation between pathogen-avoidance motivations and prejudice towards groups associated with sexual norm violations.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T04:27:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302211067151
       
  • Perceived authenticity as a vicarious justification for prejudice

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      Authors: Mark H. White, Christian S. Crandall
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      When is the expression of prejudice seen as authentic' Perceived authenticity refers to how much one judges another’s behavior to reflect the beliefs, attitudes, goals, and desires of that person. We investigate whether perceived authenticity can operate as a vicarious justification for prejudice—a way for prejudiced people to defend the prejudiced statements of others. In six studies, prejudice was positively related to perceived authenticity of similarly prejudiced statements: People are more likely to label prejudiced statements they agree with as authentic. We develop a vicarious justification account of “authentic prejudice.” People need not justify what is socially acceptable; if authenticity serves as a justification for prejudice, it will be reported only when the prejudice is nonnormative. Three studies demonstrate that the positive relationship between prejudice and perceived authenticity is heightened when the expressed prejudice is seen as unacceptable. People call “authentic” what they agree with but feel they cannot express.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T06:19:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221080466
       
  • Remembrance of contact past: When intergroup contact metacognitions
           decrease outgroup tolerance

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      Authors: Lisbeth Drury, Michèle D. Birtel, Georgina Randsley de Moura, Richard J. Crisp
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Positive intergroup contact reliably reduces prejudice, yet little is known about the metacognitive processes involved in recalling prior contact experiences and their impact on outgroup tolerance. The present research examined whether contact interventions that rely on the recollection of past contact experiences can be susceptible to ease of retrieval effects, and the potential impact on intergroup attitudes. Specifically, we tested whether manipulating the number of contact memories participants were asked to recall (five vs. one) impacts on outgroup tolerance, and whether this effect is contingent upon participants’ prior contact experiences. Results of two experiments (N = 220) revealed a moderated mediation effect of contact recollection on outgroup tolerance via perceived ease of retrieval, dependent upon levels of prior contact. Recalling more (five) versus fewer (one) contact memories was perceived as more difficult, and this, in turn, decreased tolerance, specifically for individuals low in prior contact. Countering this negative indirect effect, however, recalling more contact experiences had a positive direct effect. Therefore, greater cognitive effort appears to act as a suppressor of the positive effect of contact recall. Our findings provide insight into meta-cognitive processes involved in recalling autobiographical contact memories, and the resulting impact on intergroup relations.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T01:57:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221079220
       
  • The role of minority discrimination and political participation in shaping
           majority perceptions of discrimination: Two cross-national studies

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      Authors: Judit Kende, Julia Reiter, Canan Coşkan, Bertjan Doosje, Eva G. T. Green
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      We develop a minority influence approach to multilevel intergroup research and examine whether country-level minority norms shape majority members’ perceptions of discrimination. Defining minority norms via actual minority discrimination and political participation, we hypothesized that in national contexts with greater minority experiences of discrimination and greater minority political participation, majority perceptions of discrimination should be higher. We implemented two cross-national multilevel studies drawing on the European Social Survey and Eurobarometer data with 19,392 participants in 22 countries in Study 1, and with 17,651 participants in 19 countries in Study 2. Higher aggregate levels of minority discrimination were not related to greater acknowledgment of discrimination among majority members. However, higher aggregate minority political participation did relate to higher perceptions of discrimination in Studies 1 and 2. We conclude that country-level minority norms are consequential for majority attitudes, but these norms need to be actively communicated through political participation.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T01:55:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221075711
       
  • How are we going to treat Chinese people during the pandemic' Media
           cultivation of intergroup threat and blame

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      Authors: Rong Ma, Zexin Ma
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      This study integrates cultivation and intergroup threat theories to examine media cultivation effects during the COVID-19 pandemic. We argue that U.S. media have consistently portrayed China as a threat and target of blame. The cultivation of media has thus resulted in perceived threat of and blame on Chinese people for the COVID-19 pandemic. Results of a cross-sectional survey in two samples (MTurk: N = 375; college: N = 566) showed that the amount of media consumption predicted stronger perceptions that Chinese people were a health threat, and also predicted blame on Chinese people for the COVID-19 outbreak. Threat perception and blame were further associated with support of media content that derogated China, stronger intentions to attack, and weaker intentions to help Chinese people. The findings have profound implications for intergroup threat and cultivation research, and practical importance for intergroup relations, especially when the global community finds itself in a public crisis.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T01:53:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221075695
       
  • Social constructionist and essentialist beliefs about gender and race

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      Authors: Zach C. Schudson, Susan A. Gelman
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Social constructionist beliefs posit that sociocultural forces shape power-stratified social categories, whereas essentialist beliefs posit that social categories are defined by an immutable, natural essence shared by category members. Across three studies, we developed and validated the Social Constructionist and Essentialist Beliefs Scale (SCEBS) to assess the latent structure of ontological beliefs about two social categories: gender and race. In Study 1 (N = 598), we found a three-factor structure for SCEBS-Gender and SCEBS-Race, consisting of Social Constructionism, Essentialism, and Realism. In Study 2a (N = 300), we examined factor structure stability and criterion-related validity. We found incremental validity of SCEBS, and social constructionist beliefs particularly, for predicting modern sexism and symbolic racism beyond extant, essentialism-focused measures. In Study 2b (N = 218), we established 4-week test–retest reliability of SCEBS. Our research demonstrates the value of assessing both social constructionist and essentialist beliefs in the study of prejudice.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-03-01T12:15:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302211070792
       
  • Ideological responses to the breaking of COVID-19 social distancing
           recommendations

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      Authors: Craig A. Harper, Darren Rhodes
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 has plagued the globe since January 2020, infecting millions and claiming the lives of several hundreds of thousands (at the time of writing). Despite this, many individuals have ignored public health guidance and continued to socialize in groups. Emergent work has highlighted the potential role that ideology plays in such behavior, and judgements of it. In response to this contemporary cultural phenomenon, we tested whether judgements of those allegedly flouting the guidance on social distancing were influenced by an interaction between the ideologies of those providing judgements and those allegedly breaking the rules. Our data suggest that judgements of those flouting social distancing guidance are influenced by ideology in a symmetrical way. That is, both liberals and conservatives condemn outgroup flouting more than ingroup flouting. We discuss this finding in the context of theoretical work into ideological symmetries, and the implications of growing ideological polarization in contemporary Western democracies.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-02-26T08:45:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221074546
       
  • The intergroup sensitivity effect among racial groups in the United States

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      Authors: Katherine R. G. White, Jessica Bray, Jonathan C. Lang, Amilynne McLeroy, Scarlet Hernandez, Chloe McLaughlin
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      The intergroup sensitivity effect (ISE) refers to individuals responding more negatively to criticism directed toward their ingroup if the criticism is delivered by someone outside the group. The ISE has never been examined for groups defined by race. In light of ongoing racial tensions in America, the purpose of the current research was to examine whether the ISE replicates among racial groups. Study 1 replicated the ISE among African American, European American, and Latinx American university students and, unexpectedly, found that European American participants responded more positively to praise delivered by a racial outgroup member. Study 2 replicated these results in a nonstudent sample and identified motivation to respond without prejudice as a moderator of the praise effect. In both studies, the ISE was mediated by perceptions of comment legitimacy/constructiveness but was not moderated by feelings toward the outgroup. Future directions and explanations for the praise effect are discussed.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T12:27:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302211069962
       
  • Using sport media exposure to promote gender equality:
           Counter-stereotypical gender perceptions and the 2019 FIFA Women’s World
           Cup

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      Authors: Loris Vezzali, Emilio Paolo Visintin, Elisa Bisagno, Laura Bröker, Alessia Cadamuro, Eleonora Crapolicchio, Leyla De Amicis, Gian Antonio Di Bernardo, Fei Huang, Xi Lou, Sofia Stathi, Inmaculada Valor-Segura, Jake Harwood
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      By relying on literature on counter-stereotypes and media contact, we investigated whether media exposure is associated with counter-stereotypical gender perceptions. Focusing on the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup, we recruited samples (N = 2,228) from eight competing countries (China, France, Germany, Italy, Scotland, Spain, England, US) across three continents. We hypothesized that exposure to media coverage of the competition’s counter-stereotypical female exemplars would be associated with increased counter-stereotypical perceptions of women. Results revealed that media exposure was associated with greater communion and agency attributed to women. In turn, communion and agency were associated (negatively and positively, respectively) with attribution of stereotypically male abilities (abilities to engage in stereotypically male academic disciplines and jobs) to women compared to men. No effects emerged for perceptions of stereotypically female characteristics. Gender moderated these effects, with associations being stronger among male than among female respondents. Theoretical and practical implications of findings are discussed.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T08:35:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302221075691
       
  • Moving political opponents closer: How kama muta can contribute to
           reducing the partisan divide in the US

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      Authors: Johanna K. Blomster Lyshol, Beate Seibt, Mary Beth Oliver, Lotte Thomsen
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Dislike of political opponents has increased over the past years in the US. This paper presents a preregistered study investigating the effect of kama muta (being moved by sudden closeness) on increasing warmth, social closeness, and trust toward political opponents through including them in a common American identity. Eight hundred forty-one U.S. Americans watched either a moving or a neutral video about the US or a different theme in a full-factorial design. We found main effects of emotion and theme on the increase of warmth, social closeness, and trust toward political opponents through viewing them as fellow Americans. Accordingly, the linear combination of moving U.S. videos showed the largest increase in warmth, social closeness, and trust. Exploratory analyses showed that moving U.S.-themed videos evoked the most kama muta from suddenly increasing one’s identification with the US. This suggests that kama muta is an important, and heretofore largely overlooked, emotional process promoting common in-group identification.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-01-29T04:57:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302211067152
       
  • The rejection and acceptance of Muslim minority practices: A
           person-centered approach

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      Authors: Marija Dangubić, Kumar Yogeeswaran, Maykel Verkuyten, Chris G. Sibley
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      In Western societies, generalized prejudice and anti-Muslim sentiments can be major drivers of the rejection of Muslim religious practices. However, people can also reject such practices for other reasons, such as concerns about civil liberties or the secular nature of the state. With national samples of German and Dutch majority members (N = 3,703), we used a multiple-acts-multiple-actors design to simultaneously examine attitudes toward four religious practices of three religious groups. Latent profile analysis revealed a subgroup of people that used a double standard and more strongly rejected Muslims than Christians and Jews engaging in the same practices (discriminatory rejection, 16.3%). However, four other subgroups responded to the practices independently of religious group (equal acceptance, 18.3%; equally moderate, 35%; equal rejection, 17.3%; and partial equal rejection, 13.1%). The five subgroups differ on key psychological correlates and self-reported reasons for rejection. We conclude that a multiple-acts-multiple-actors design provides a more nuanced understanding of how majority members evaluate Muslim minority practices in Western nations.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T11:33:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302211067967
       
  • Racial bias in perceptions of disease and policy

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      Authors: Sophie Trawalter, Nana-Bilkisu Habib, James N. Druckman
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Narratives about Africa as dark, depraved, and diseased justified the exploitation of African land and people. Today, these narratives may still have a hold on people’s fears about disease. We test this in three (pre-COVID-19) experiments (N = 1,803). Across studies, we find that participants report greater worry about a pandemic originating in Africa (vs. elsewhere). In turn, they report greater support for travel bans and for loosening abortion restrictions. We then document these narratives in an archival study of newspaper articles of the 2015–2016 Zika pandemic (N = 1,475). We find that articles were more negative—for example, they included more death-related words—if they mentioned Africa. Finally, we replicate the experimental results within the COVID-19 context, using a representative sample (N = 1,200). Taken together, the studies make clear that reactions to pandemics are biased, and in a way consistent with historical narratives about race and Africa.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-01-13T11:23:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302211062129
       
  • We stand in solidarity with you (if it helps our ingroup)

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      Authors: Kimberly E. Chaney, Marley B. Forbes
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Intraminority solidarity research has previously focused on how similarities in discrimination experiences can facilitate stigma-based solidarity. Yet, research on a lay theory of generalized prejudice has demonstrated that people tend to perceive attitudes towards stigmatized social groups as co-occurring. Integrating these lines of research, the present studies sought to examine if the extent to which prejudices are perceived to co-occur can facilitate stigma-based solidarity for marginalized social groups, and in turn promote interest in coalitional justice. Recruiting heterosexual Black Americans (Study 1), White women (Studies 2–3), and White men (Study 4), the present research demonstrates that perceiving prejudices as co-occurring increases stigma-based solidarity that in turn produces greater interest in coalitional justice efforts that include the ingroup. The present findings demonstrate the importance of focusing on beliefs about perpetrators’ attitudes when examining intraminority solidarity and highlight the limitations of a lay theory of generalized prejudice to fight prejudices broadly.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-01-13T11:14:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302211067143
       
  • Effect of attribution on the emotions and behavioral intentions of
           third-party observers toward intergroup discriminators during the COVID-19
           pandemic

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      Authors: Bin Zuo, Hanxue Ye, Fangfang Wen, Wenlin Ke, Huanrui Xiao, Jin Wang
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      The global outbreak of novel coronavirus disease COVID-19 has caused intergroup discrimination associated with the disease to become increasingly prominent. Research demonstrates that the attitudes and behaviors of third-party observers significantly impact the progression of discrimination incidents. This study tested a parallel mediating model in which the attribution tendencies of observers influence their behavioral intentions through the mediating effect of the emotions of anger and contempt. The first two studies confirmed the proposed model with discrimination incidents reported against “returnees from Wuhan” and “returning workers from Hubei.” Study 3 further manipulated the attribution tendencies of observers, providing empirical evidence for the causality from attribution tendencies to emotions, confirming the validity of the model. These findings enrich the cognitive (attribution)–emotion–action model, further enhancing our understanding of the role of third parties in intergroup conflicts, with implications for the management of people’s emotions and behaviors in social crises.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-01-13T11:12:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302211062367
       
  • Erratum

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      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T06:33:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302211058238
       
  • “Sincere White people, work in conjunction with us”: Racial
           minorities’ perceptions of White ally sincerity and perceptions of ally
           efforts

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      Authors: Mason D. Burns, Erica L. Granz
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Social justice movements often consist of both targets of bias (e.g., Black people) and nontarget allies (e.g., White people). However, little is known about what factors shape minorities’ perceptions of allies and their ally behaviors. Across four studies, we investigated Black participants’ perceptions of Whites’ motives to engage in ally behaviors. In Study 1, we found that Black participants perceived nontarget allies as both highly internally and externally motivated, suggesting ally motives may be ambiguous to Black perceivers. Studies 2–4 examined the effect of Black participants’ suspicion of Whites’ motives on perceptions of White allies’ sincerity and support for their ally efforts. As predicted, suspicious Black participants perceived White ally protestors, confronters, and political candidates as less sincere than similar Black targets and, in turn, were less supportive of White allies’ efforts. Discussion focuses on how perceived motives of White allies impact perceptions of allies and their ally efforts.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T08:43:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302211059699
       
  • Differences in attitudes toward terrorists: Type of terrorist act,
           terrorist ethnicity, and observer gender and cultural background

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      Authors: Inna Levy, Nir Rozmann
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      To explore the interrelationship between terrorist acts, terrorist ethnicity, and observer gender and cultural background in Israel, we recruited 211 participants aged 19–75 years. The majority were male (63%). As for the ethnic and religious cultural background, 40% were Jewish, 40% Druze, and 20% Muslim. The participants answered questions about their demographic characteristics, read three scenarios of terrorist acts, addressed attitudes toward terrorists, and suggested the length of imprisonment. We manipulated the type of act (shooting and killing/burning religious institutions/throwing stones at cars) and terrorist ethnicity (Arab/ Jewish). The results indicate significant main effects of the manipulated variables regarding attitudes toward terrorists. Also, Muslim Arab participants expressed more negative attitudes in cases of Jewish terrorists than Arab terrorists, whereas Jewish participants expressed more negative attitudes toward Arab terrorists than Jewish terrorists. Druze participants did not differentiate between Arab and Jewish terrorists. Furthermore, in cases of Arab perpetrators, Jewish participants suggested imprisonment terms 2.4 times longer than in cases of Jewish perpetrators. The discussion addresses the findings in the context of social identity theory and dual social identification. Regarding practical implications, the findings imply the need for education and training on ethnic bias among policymakers and practitioners.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T05:43:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302211040112
       
  • Motivated team innovation: Impact of need for closure and epistemic
           authority

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      Authors: Annalisa Theodorou, Stefano Livi, Arie W. Kruglanski, Antonio Pierro
      Abstract: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Ahead of Print.
      New members are important sources of innovative perspectives in groups. However, it can be very difficult for newcomers’ ideas to be heard. It is likely that group members with high (vs. low) levels of need for closure (NFC) are more resistant to newcomers’ innovative ideas. Moreover, when group epistemic authority (EA) is high, members should “freeze” on the group’s ideas, regardless of the newcomer’s EA. In contrast, when group EA is low, members would be expected to “seize” the ideas proposed by newcomers with high EA. Study 1 confirmed that high (vs. low) NFC group members are more resistant to newcomers’ innovative ideas. In Study 2, in high NFC groups, evidence was obtained for seizing but not freezing. In Study 3, for group members with heightened NFC, both freezing and seizing results were obtained. Findings suggest that both NFC and EA play important roles in receptivity to newcomers’ ideas.
      Citation: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T05:38:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13684302211038055
       
 
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