Subjects -> POLITICAL SCIENCE (Total: 1097 journals)
    - CIVIL RIGHTS (16 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (148 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCES: GENERAL (35 journals)

POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)

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Zeitschrift für Friedens- und Konfliktforschung ZeFKo : Studies in Peace and Conflict
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2192-1741 - ISSN (Online) 2524-6976
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Correction: Friedensbildung otherwise'

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      PubDate: 2024-06-04
       
  • Transnational companies in environmental conflicts: Rio Tinto, anti-mining
           resistance in Serbia, and the contradictions of Europeanization

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      Abstract: Abstract After decades of outsourcing mining activities, Global North governments have begun to domesticate production sites. This strategy aligns with decarbonization goals but also contributes to the emergence of new environmental conflicts and protest movements. The analysis of these movements provides an important insight into the changing shape of transnational rule in the context of resource extraction for the European Green Deal. Building on the approach to reconstruct rule from resistance, we reconstruct the anti-mining resistance movement against a lithium mine in Serbia. Tracing their tactics and addressees, we identify three main conflict actors that the movement is opposed to (the transnational mining company Rio Tinto, the Serbian government, and the European Union (EU)). By addressing these institutions, the protesters do not only constitute a multifaceted conflict constellation around the Jadar project, but they also submit an argument about who can and who is allowed to dictate to others how they ought to behave. While all involved parties play their part, the EU appears more as a structural force during the conflict, preconfiguring the possible conduct of others. Particularly, the accession process places contradictory expectations on Serbia, both enabling and restricting the agency of the government and domestic protest movements. Yet, transnational companies are likely profiting from this constellation in the long run, because the inbuilt contradiction between a commitment to green policies and a pressure to open markets to foreign investments in the context of the accession process is conducive to that end.
      PubDate: 2024-05-21
       
  • Redefining a global Cosmopolitanism: An attempt towards openness as
           a central concept in postcolonial conflict resolution

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      Abstract: Abstract The paper deals with the question whether cosmopolitanism is still a relevant concept for conflict resolution and peacebuilding. First, three common criticisms of cosmopolitanism are addressed, namely that it is Eurocentric, elitist and hegemonic. The paper concludes that these criticisms tend to focus on a limited liberal understanding of cosmopolitanism that does not do justice to the diversity of the concept. A redefinition and renarration of cosmopolitanism from a postcolonial standpoint is therefore necessary. Such a definition can only be an open minimal definition that leaves room for appropriation and localisation. This new, global perspective on cosmopolitanism is then evaluated against the background of conflict resolution in practice. The relevance of the concept becomes apparent when looking at the presence of elitist cosmopolitanism in the field.
      PubDate: 2024-04-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-024-00119-0
       
  • Totalitärer Staat und freie Wirtschaft. Zu den Bedingungen von Freiheit
           in den Nürnberger Industriellenprozessen

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      Abstract: Zusammenfassung Der vorliegende Text analysiert die von den US-Amerikanern nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg durchgeführten Gerichtsverfahren gegen Vertreter der deutschen Industrie. Anders als ein Großteil der existierenden Literatur aus den Bereichen des Internationalen Strafrechts/transitional justice und „Unternehmen und Menschenrechte“ verfolgt er dabei einen analytischen Ansatz und fokussiert die wirtschaftspolitischen Ordnungsvorstellungen, die den Verfahren zugrunde liegen. Dazu richtet die Analyse den Blick auf die Konzepte und Annahmen, anhand derer in den Urteilen die Beweise und Materialien zu Bildern der gewaltvollen Vergangenheit zusammengefügt werden. Anhand einer detaillierten Lektüre der juristischen Argumentation in Bezug auf die Anklagepunkte „Beteiligung am Angriffskrieg“, „Sklavenarbeit“ und „Plünderung“ zeigt der Text, dass die Richter die liberale Trennung von Staat und Wirtschaft als normative Setzung auf die Vergangenheit projizieren und rechtwidriges Verhalten der Unternehmer dort feststellen, wo der totalitäre Staat die Freiheit der wirtschaftlichen Sphäre verletzt. Ähnlich der ordoliberalen Theoriebildung verorten die Verfahren die Ursachen für die mit den Unternehmen assoziierte Gewalt im totalitären Staat und stilisieren im Umkehrschluss die freie Marktwirtschaft zum Garanten einer demokratischen Ordnung. Der Text schließt mit Überlegungen zu den Implikationen dieser Beobachtung für aktuelle Bestrebungen, der Gewalt im Kontext transnationaler Akkumulationsprozesse durch die Etablierung von Menschenrechtspflichten für Unternehmen zu begegnen.
      PubDate: 2024-04-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-024-00117-2
       
  • Cities as nodes of conflict: The role of transnational corporations in
           urban supply chain conflicts

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      Abstract: Abstract Much conflict studies scholarship on cities has focused on post-war urban reconstruction. However, high rates of violence and perceptions of urban insecurity, particularly in Latin America, have diluted the clear distinction between armed conflict and peace. From a different perspective, logistics studies have pointed out the conflictive impacts of goods movement on urban communities where efficient supply chains are the ultimate priority. This contribution offers an explorative reading of the 2021 protests in Colombia (‘paro urbano’) as the manifestation of a conflict in supply chain urbanism, and foregrounds the role of TNCs (transnational corporations) in escalating the conflict. Particularly in the city of Cali, protesters blocked roads and access for businesses for weeks. While contesting the national government and highlighting the extreme urban inequality exacerbated by policies primarily catered to TNCs and direct investments, they employed the role of the city as an essential logistics node as leverage in the conflict.
      PubDate: 2024-04-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-024-00116-3
       
  • Land grabbing, CSR, and the (de)mobilization of resistance

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      Abstract: Abstract As large-scale agricultural investment has been rising, scholars have much investigated the factors that shape contestations against land grabbing. This literature, however, has hardly focused on the role of investing agricultural companies and their corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices so far. Vice versa, there is extensive research on the CSR-contention nexus for mining and other sectors, albeit with contested findings. To contribute to these debates, I apply the opportunities and threats framework from social movement studies to examine how CSR affects local and transnational contention. This is studied in the comparison of two major European agricultural companies that operate in Cameroon (and beyond). The analysis shows a demobilizing effect of timely and substantial CSR practices.
      PubDate: 2024-03-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-024-00115-4
       
  • Conflicts up in the air: cabin crew resistance in Argentina and Portugal
           through the lens of the body

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      Abstract: Abstract We reflect upon labour conflicts over changes in the flagship airlines in Argentina and Portugal through the lens of the body. In our qualitative, empirical study we refer to these changes as part of a global tendency in the civil aviation sector to intensify the workload and undermine occupational health and safety standards. Defining this as “Ryanairisation”, we argue that the flagship airlines are pushed towards a neoliberal labour model. Via an embedded and relational comparison, we want to highlight labour conflicts in transnational corporations as a relevant sub-discipline of peace and conflict studies along two research questions: Firstly, what corporal impact does Ryanairisation have on cabin crew workers in Argentina (Aerolíneas Argentinas) and Portugal (TAP) during the first stages of renationalisation processes' Secondly, how do cabin crew workers resist the impact at the scale of their bodies' To answer both questions, we combine concepts from Social Reproduction Theory (SRT) and materialist state theory. Despite increasing salaries and improving general working conditions in both countries, we see how nationalised companies relied on the intensification of labour and are pushing workers’ very physical and mental boundaries. We aim to highlight less visible conflicts at workplaces, a) at a rather individual level, b) hybrid collaborative workplace action, and c) organised in trade unions via open confrontations. Workers address the encroachment on their boundaries in diverse ways, from individual to organised forms of resistance. We examine how this also became relevant in the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic.
      PubDate: 2024-02-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-024-00113-6
       
  • Publisher Correction to: “Why haven’t you known'”

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      PubDate: 2024-01-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-024-00111-8
       
  • ZeFKo Special Issue editorial: gender approaches to disarmament, arms
           control, peace and conflict

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      PubDate: 2024-01-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-023-00109-8
       
  • ZeFKo special issue appreciation

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      PubDate: 2023-12-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-023-00110-1
       
  • Editorial

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      PubDate: 2023-11-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-023-00108-9
       
  • Lost in space: feminist considerations of space security

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      Abstract: Abstract Recognition of the need to promote women’s participation “in” space is growing, yet ideological structures that shape space activities and governance remain heavily manned. A review of cumulated scholarship identifies many strands of masculinity that dominate thinking about space, including concepts of peace and security embedded in the Outer Space Treaty. The overarching theme is the absence of female bodies, experiences, and values. Linking the implications of this absence to the decades-long intractability of efforts to enhance arms control in outer space, I argue a need to add in not only women, but feminist approaches to peace, security, and disarmament. Drawing inspiration from the achievements of antiwar feminists in other areas of disarmament, I demonstrate the value that women’s experiences of the continuum of violence, human vulnerability, and practices of care can bring to understandings of space security and diplomacy. But ultimately, this essay is a call for action. From security to science, technology, resources, and settlement, the future of humanity is increasingly stretching into outer space. It is time to mobilize the many strands of feminist thinking on these issues, both in theory and in practice.
      PubDate: 2023-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-023-00107-w
       
  • Untold stories: exploring the link between the illicit proliferation and
           possession of weapons and gender-based violence in Lebanon

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      Abstract: Abstract There is a gap in understanding in both academic and policy circles concerning how the illicit and uncontrolled proliferation and possession of small arms and light weapons (SALW) compounds gender-based violence (GBV) in Lebanon. This paper addresses this gap by investigating the correlation between the two, presenting original research based on interviews with GBV associations and a survey with women survivors of weapons-related violence. The conclusions show clear thematic correlations and suggest ways in which future research could add to this initial study.
      PubDate: 2023-10-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-023-00106-x
       
  • The African Union’s Silencing the Guns: between stereotyping and
           owning gender roles

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      Abstract: Abstract Following the motto “African Solutions for African Problems”, the African Union (AU) fosters its agency as a regional actor on gender policies. The Silencing the Guns campaign represents one example. Here, the AU attempts to link gender, peace and security policies. Taking the AU’s motto into account, this research explores to what degree Silencing the Guns is driven by the understanding of gender roles linked to African Feminisms, and to what degree gender assumptions of other feminist traditions are embedded. With the help of hypervisibility as a concept, stereotypes will be put into the context of Silencing the Guns. To answer the research question, a mixed-methods approach is applied for data collection. The results clearly indicate references to African feminist theories such as Womanism. In particular, these results help introduce a discussion around epistemological power hierarchies in feminist discourse defining what (harmful) gender stereotypes are for whom. Although there is a common understanding among most of the feminist researchers that gender is a social construct influenced by socio-cultural contexts, the socio-cultural context of the Global North seems to be the universal departure point to investigate gender stereotypes. However, leaving out the various socio-cultural contexts in the Global South that shape gender as a social construct distorts the knowledge about how gender stereotypes function in different societies. Consequently, the main output of this research is a call to rethink the universal claim on how gender stereotypes are defined and interpreted and to urgently encounter multiple decolonial approaches of epistemology, methodology and ontology.
      PubDate: 2023-08-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-023-00103-0
       
  • Experts, activists, and girl bosses of the nuclear apocalypse: feminisms
           in security discours

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      Abstract: Abstract Having long been regarded as irrelevant to the high politics of foreign affairs, feminism and gender equality have in recent years gained increased attention in international security debates, including discussions about nuclear weapons policy. Several governments have adopted official feminist foreign policy postures, international security institutions have launched inquiries into gender equity and representation, and a myriad of security actors have enthusiastically embraced the language of women’s empowerment. Mapping the various modes of purported feminist practice on display in the nuclear policy field, we find that being “pro women” has become a sought-after rhetorical asset on both sides of the nuclear weapons debate. Reflecting wider trends in the corporate world, constituents of the nuclear weapons industry have increasingly embraced liberal feminist language and workplace diversity goals. These practices, we suggest, have helped challenge the perception of the nuclear industry as overly masculine, aiding recruitment to, and overall political legitimation of, the nuclear weapons enterprise. This development is significant because it functions to undercut the association between feminism and opposition to nuclear weapons, thus complicating efforts to advance arms control and disarmament through feminist interventions.
      PubDate: 2023-05-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-023-00100-3
       
  • Correction to: Using digitally mediated methods in sensitive contexts:
           a threat analysis and critical reflection on data security, privacy, and
           ethical concerns in the case of Afghanistan

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      PubDate: 2023-05-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-023-00101-2
       
  • Represented but not always heard: an analysis of the progress of gender
           equality at the United Nations through the lens of the Treaty on the
           Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons

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      Abstract: Abstract Gender inequality has always been a structural problem at the United Nations. The voices of women as well as those of non-binary people and marginalised communities have always been present but often never truly heard. The elevation of some female perspectives has not remedied the fact that the voices of most women and disadvantaged groups remain secondary to the traditionally male-oriented narrative of politics and power that is the foundation of the UN system. This paper interrogates the progress of incorporating feminist and humanitarian concerns in UN processes through the lens of the 2017 UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW)—heralded as the first “gender-sensitive” international nuclear weapons agreement. The paper will draw from different points of criticisms within feminist international relations theory to argue that women’s representation in multilateral negotiation processes does not constitute positive progress towards their interests if gender-sensitive disarmament policies are not implemented.
      PubDate: 2023-04-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-023-00095-x
       
  • ‘Why haven’t you known'’

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      Abstract: Abstract This article critically examines the character and extent of transoceanic solidarity in feminist anti-nuclear activism. Drawing on archival research into a British-based solidarity network, Women Working for a Nuclear Free and Independent Pacific (WWNFIP), the article centralises the rhetorical question ‘Why Haven’t You Known'’ demanded by Māori activist Titewhai Harawira of her British audience in 1986, and extends it to contemporary scholars of feminist anti-nuclear activism. The article makes three main empirical claims. First, the WWNFIP archive pushes Indigenous women from across the Pacific into the limelight as experts and teachers, with British-based counterparts playing a supportive role. Second, the archive foregrounds Indigenous knowledge claims about nuclear colonialism and correspondingly represents decolonisation as essential to nuclear abolition. Thirdly, solidarity is shaped in ambivalent ways by these knowledge claims, which simultaneously evoke sisterly closeness and the discomfort of potential white allies. Overall, WWNFIP’s relatively successful construction of transoceanic solidarity, notwithstanding some ambiguities and limitations, points to the crucial relationship between knowledge and solidarity. The case study not only offers some valuable lessons for contemporary efforts to forge anti-nuclear solidarities but also disrupts dominant accounts of feminist anti-nuclear activism, past and present.
      PubDate: 2023-02-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-023-00091-1
       
  • Rethinking the beginning of the ‘nuclear age’ through telling
           feminist nuclear stories

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      Abstract: Abstract Bringing a feminist perspective to the global politics of nuclear weapons not only allows us to expand who and what counts as worthy of study in nuclear politics, but also contests core ideas and narratives that have shaped the literature to date. This paper asks how telling feminist nuclear stories rooted in an understanding of the everyday impacts of nuclear weapons challenges the traditional nuclear history. The standard history of ‘the bomb’ focuses on the military-industrial development of the Manhattan Project in the context of World War II, focusing on the figure of the elite male scientist as embodying the unique moral dilemmas of a new ‘nuclear age’. Feminist stories of the development of the first atomic weapons can instead illuminate the marginalised bodies and expansive, everyday harms of the development of nuclear weapons technology, altering both the timeline and the space of nuclear politics.
      PubDate: 2022-12-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-022-00082-8
       
  • Abolition, not arms control: against reinforcing nuclear weapons through
           “reform”

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite decades of persistent threats and harms caused by nuclear weapons, arms control continues to be the dominant paradigm through which to address the bomb, rather than disarmament. Drawing parallels with police and prison “reforms,” this article explores how arms control operates as a system of reform that reifies rather than liberates us from nuclear weapons. The article outlines how arms control steps that provide further support for and investments in nuclear weapons lead us away from disarmament, not toward it. It will also look at how diversity-related reforms co-opt communities into the nuclear-industrial complex, rather than work to transform that complex. The article posits that the abolition of nuclear weapons is the only adequate answer to the dangers posed by nuclear weapons, and suggests drawing upon the lessons from feminist, queer, and antiracist struggles against other institutions of state violence to achieve nuclear abolition.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42597-022-00080-w
       
 
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  Subjects -> POLITICAL SCIENCE (Total: 1097 journals)
    - CIVIL RIGHTS (16 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (148 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCES: GENERAL (35 journals)

POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)

We no longer collect new content from this publisher because the publisher has forbidden systematic access to its RSS feeds.
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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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