Subjects -> POLITICAL SCIENCE (Total: 1097 journals)
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    - INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (148 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCES: GENERAL (35 journals)

POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 201 - 281 of 281 Journals sorted alphabetically
Eastern Review     Open Access  
Economia Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Economic and Regional Studies / Studia Ekonomiczne i Regionalne     Open Access  
Ecopolítica     Open Access  
eJournal of eDemocracy and Open Government     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
El Banquete de los Dioses     Open Access  
Electoral Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Encuentro     Open Access  
Entramados y Perspectivas     Open Access  
Environment and Planning C : Politics and Space     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Estudios digital     Open Access  
Estudios Políticos     Open Access  
Estudos Avançados     Open Access  
Ethical Theory and Moral Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Ethics & Global Politics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ethics & International Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Éthique publique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Études internationales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Eunomia. Rivista semestrale del Corso di Laurea in Scienze Politiche e delle Relazioni Internazionali     Open Access  
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Integration Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
European Journal for Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of American Culture     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Cultural and Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Government and Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
European Journal of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
European Journal of Political Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
European Journal of Political Research : Political Data Yearbook     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Politics and Gender     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
European Politics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
European Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
European Union Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Evaluation and Program Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Exchange : The Journal of Public Diplomacy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fascism     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Federal Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Federalism-E     Open Access  
Fédéralisme Régionalisme     Open Access  
FEU Academic Review     Open Access  
Financial Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Foreign Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Foreign Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Foro Interno. Anuario de Teoría Política     Open Access  
French Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Frontiers in Political Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gaceta Laboral     Open Access  
Genocide Studies International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Geopolítica(s). Revista de estudios sobre espacio y poder     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geopolitics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geopolitics under Globalization     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
German Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
German Politics and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Germinal : Marxismo e Educação em Debate     Open Access  
Gestão & Regionalidade     Open Access  
Ghana Journal of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ghana Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Global Affairs     Hybrid Journal  
Global Change, Peace & Security: formerly Pacifica Review: Peace, Security & Global Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 273)
Global Discourse : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Current Affairs and Applied Contemporary Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Global Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Global Public Policy and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Global Societies Journal     Open Access  
Global Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Global South, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Global Studies Quarterly     Open Access  
Göç Dergisi     Full-text available via subscription  
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government : Annual Research Journal of Political Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Government and Opposition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Granì     Open Access  
Group Processes & Intergroup Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Hague Journal of Diplomacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Hegel Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hic Rhodus : Crisis capitalista, polémica y controversias     Open Access  
Histoire Politique : Revue du Centre d'histoire de Sciences Po     Open Access  
Historia i Polityka     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History of Communism in Europe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hommes & Migrations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
HONAI : International Journal for Educational, Social, Political & Cultural Studies     Open Access  
Horyzonty Polityki     Open Access  
Human Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Human Rights Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Human Rights Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Icelandic Review of Politics and Administration     Open Access  
Idäntutkimus     Open Access  
identidade!     Open Access  
Identities : Journal for Politics, Gender and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
IDP. Revista de Internet, Derecho y Politica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ids Practice Papers     Hybrid Journal  
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies     Open Access  
Indes : Zeitschrift für Politik und Gesellschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Index on Censorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
India Quarterly: A Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
India Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Indialogs : Spanish Journal of India Studies     Open Access  
Innovation Policy and the Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Innovations : Technology, Governance, Globalization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Insight on Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
InSURgência : revista de direitos e movimentos sociais     Open Access  
Intelligence & National Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Interdisciplinary Political Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Interdisziplinäre Zeitschrift für Südasienforschung     Open Access  
Interest Groups & Advocacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Interfaces Brasil/Canadá     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Area Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Communication of Chinese Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Critical Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Gramsci Journal     Open Access  
International Interactions: Empirical and Theoretical Research in International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal : Canada's Journal of Global Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of African Renaissance Studies - Multi-, Inter- and Transdisciplinarity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Children's Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Diplomacy and Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of E-Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Electronic Government Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Environmental Policy and Decision Making     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Human Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 415)
International Journal of Intercultural Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Law and Politics Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Peace Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Press/Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Social Quality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal on Minority and Group Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Migration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
International Migration Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
International Negotiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 121)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 254)
International Political Science Abstracts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Political Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
International Quarterly for Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Regional Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
International Relations of the Asia-Pacific     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Review of Public Policy     Open Access  
International Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 86)
International Socialism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Spectator : Italian Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Studies Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Studies Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
International Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Theory: A Journal of International Politics, Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Irish Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Israel Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Italian Political Science Review / Rivista Italiana di Scienza Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Italian Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
IZA Journal of Development and Migration     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Izquierdas     Open Access  
Japan Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Japanese Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
JAWI     Open Access  
JCMS : Journal of Common Market Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Jewish Culture and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
JICSA : Journal of Islamic Civilization in Southeast Asia     Open Access  
JISIP-UNJA : Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik Fisipol Universitas Jambi     Open Access  
JKAP (Jurnal Kebijakan dan Administrasi Publik)     Open Access  
Journal Exit-Deutschland. Zeitschrift für Deradikalisierung und demokratische Kultur     Open Access  
Journal for Deradicalization     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal for Peace and Justice Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal for Peace and Nuclear Disarmament     Open Access  
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of African Conflicts and Peace Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of APF Command and Staff College     Open Access  
Journal of Borneo-Kalimantan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Catholic Social Thought     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Chinese Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Chinese Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Civil Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Cold War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Conflict Resolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Journal of Conflict Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Contemporary East Asia Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Contemporary European Research     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Contemporary European Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Current Chinese Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

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Environment and Planning C : Politics and Space
Number of Followers: 45  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2399-6544 - ISSN (Online) 2399-6552
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Toxicities that matter: Slow bureaucracy and polluting temporalities in a
           southern Italian city

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: A Raffaele Ippolito
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper deconstructs toxicity through a juxtaposition of a conventional epidemiological approach to pollutants and the lived experience of a highly polluted residential area next to the largest steel production plant in Europe. An ethnographic analysis of toxicity in Taranto illustrates the complexity of various temporal scales through which toxic chemicals contribute to new biological, political and moral balances. Attuning to the slow experiences of pollution is fundamental to shed light on the processes moulding aspirations to environmental justice within the community. In particular, law and bureaucracy imbue pollutants with experiential legitimacy, allowing them to be seen, contested and collectivized. I focus on the residents’ and workers’ dissonant experiences with the bureaucratic system to illustrate how their encounter with asbestos has profoundly shaped toxic exposure to less bureaucratically visible shapeshifting pollutants, thus contributing to a diffused sense of political resignation.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T03:44:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221107517
       
  • Border practices and border games

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: William Walters
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T03:30:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221108628
       
  • The local state’s repertoires of governance strategies for the urban
           commons. Nuancing current perspectives

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      Authors: Iolanda Bianchi
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Theorists of the commons appear to have rather siloed, ideologically driven understandings of the repertoires of governance strategies enacted by the state in the emergence and development of commons. Neo-institutionalists tend to see the state as a supportive institution, while neo-Marxists generally see the state as either antagonistic and/or co-optative. This article sets its research in the dense and contested urban context, and examines the repertoires of governance strategies adopted by the local state in the emergence and development of the urban commons. By engaging with relational state theory, it aims to help nuance the theory of the urban commons–local state relationship. It does so by carrying out a comparative analysis of two cases of urban commons located in Barcelona. For each case, it delves into the variations, ambiguities and complexities of the repertoires of governance strategies enacted by the local state in its emergence and development. The article concludes that, as suggested by relational state theory, the boundaries between the types of governance strategies that the local state takes on are more nuanced than is perhaps reflected in the literature. These repertoires may well overlap, evolve throughout time and apply selectively to different urban commons.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-12T06:30:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221108333
       
  • The social vs. commercial ‘Dingpolitik’ of microlending. Mapping the
           glocal issue trajectory of a ‘messy object’

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      Authors: Arnoud Lagendijk, Kim Simons
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Microlending (microcredit and microcredit) presents a complex, ‘glocal’ phenomenon meeting social concerns (poverty and community development) versus commercial interests, manifesting a myriad of practices and trends worldwide. This paper elaborates the concept of ‘issue trajectory’, enhanced by topological thinking, to understand the becoming of microlending and to consider possibilities for change. The issue trajectory maps microlending’s proliferation and divergence between 1980 and 2015, using an analytical lens drawing on a combination of the topological dimensions of mutability and mobility and Latour’s Dingpolitik. Using this lens, the study reveals how the continual grounding and proliferation of practices of microlending meet global drives towards standardization and financialization, and how this results in ‘problematization gaps’ between social and commercial aims. Through adaptation as well as confrontation, these gaps bend microlending’s issue trajectory towards new political modalities and publics, and potentially new forms of territorialization.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T04:42:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221106872
       
  • Shadows of the shadow state: Grassroots, refugee-led organizations within
           a multi-scalar and contested resettlement institutional domain

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      Authors: Odessa Gonzalez Benson
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      In discussions of welfare state restructuring, the focus has largely been on institutions that are well established and funded by the state. This study, focusing on the U.S. refugee resettlement institutional domain, theoretically examines organizational entities that are refugee-run and grassroots, and how they fit as peripheral to their larger, state-funded counterparts. Third-order devolution, as conceptualized in this paper, is the extended delegation of social responsibilities from the state and then unto state-contracted organizations of the third sector, and then further unto state-detached organizations of the informal sector. “Informal,” “unofficial,” “quasi”-organizations run by and for refugee communities in these most peripheral levels at the grassroots are forwarded as shadows of the shadow state. That is, pressure is exerted further downward, but without means nor legitimacy, in multiscalar governance of U.S. refugee resettlement. The contestations and relationalities that constitute the shadow state must thus be viewed against a voluntary sector that is heterogeneous, multi-scalar and power-laden, rather than unitary. Theoretical considerations also raise questions about new organizational forms in addressing resettlement and migration, and the tripartite relationship between the state, state-contracted/funded organizations, and state-detached organizations at the grassroots.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T02:07:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221106303
       
  • Cross-border division of labor and China’s border control upon
           Myanmar migrants

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      Authors: Cansong Li, Xiaobo Su
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Border cities in Yunnan, China, have become attractive destinations among Myanmar migrants. Using Ruili as a case study, this paper analyzes China’s border control upon Myanmar migrants to create a cross-border division of labor. It finds that China experiments with a flexible model of border control by allowing Myanmar migrants to cross the border with relative ease and integrate into the local labor market, while denying their rights to civil protection and limiting their mobility to other Chinese cities. This model promotes and regulates the movement of Myanmar migrant workers, constituting a pragmatic order to facilitate the logic of capital accumulation. The cross-border division of labor in production between Ruili and northern Myanmar articulates a spatially uneven structure of capitalist production that creates incentive and hinderance to low-end workers’ transnational migration and, moreover, reflects the Chinese state’s efforts to encourage industrial relocation from the affluent coast to the poor hinterland to address regional disparity.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T12:39:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221106015
       
  • Thanato-geographies of Palestine and the possibility of politics

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      Authors: Mark Griffiths
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article critically examines thanato-geographies of Palestine-Israel and Palestinians and the crucial question of the possibility of politics in the context of sovereign exception. The main argument of the article is that bare life as referent for Palestinians’ lives overstates the subject-making capacities of the sovereign and understates the possibilities of political agency. As a response, the discussion turns to two prominent examples of exception – Israeli checkpoints and the Gaza borderlands – with the aim to keep in sharp focus both the thanatopolitical and that which – whether as complement or counter – exceeds it. Two important correctives arise from such an approach: thanatopolitical formations are i) dependent on broader thanato-geographies of capitalism; and ii) countered by the political agency of those figured as bare life.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T10:59:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221099461
       
  • The politics of co-implementation and their potential in shaping
           egalitarian cities

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      Authors: Angeliki Paidakaki, Xenia Katsigianni, Pieter Van den Broeck
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper contributes to the debate on co-production in planning theory and practice by examining the political agency of non-profit housing actors—here termed “alternative co-producers”—in building an egalitarian city. Drawing from theories of co-production, planning politics, democracy and governance, the paper introduces, theorizes and operationalizes the concept of “co-implementation” as the political moment in which egalitarian cities can be jointly shaped by public authorities, co-producers and the civil society. By egalitarian cities, we mean cities governed by a reinvented democratic arrangement that can better realize policy and planning goals in the direction of “housing for all.” To test the political agency of alternative co-producers in their role as plan co-implementers, the paper relies on empirical evidence from HousingNOLA; a 10-year strategy and implementation plan in post-Katrina New Orleans. By critically examining the politics of HousingNOLA during the first 3 years of its implementation (2015–2018), the paper reveals the political conditions and practices that have favored or hampered co-implementation in New Orleans and that have determined progress in realizing an egalitarian city.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-21T12:26:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221082017
       
  • Spatialising antagonism: A post-foundational analysis of the spatial
           dynamics of violence in nineteenth century Derry

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      Authors: Gary Hussey
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers a post-foundational analysis of the spatial dynamics of inter-communal violence in nineteenth-century Derry city. In doing so, the theoretical category of ‘antagonism’ is mobilised to develop a post-foundational view of the spatial, one that is well-placed to shed an innovative theoretical light on conflict in divided societies and contested spaces. It has recently been recognised that antagonism not only offers a route towards a truly post-foundational approach to the political, but also a consciously post-foundational spatial analysis. Spatialising antagonism at both a theoretical and empirical level helps to bring into further relief the imbrications of space, the political and various modes of violence. Specifically, thinking antagonism spatially in the context of contested spaces such as Derry, underlines the ways through which ontological or foundational violence can be concretised through spatial practices, thereby structuring and driving the spatial dynamics of violence.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T11:25:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221100375
       
  • Without a right to remain: Property’s limits on Portland’s
           self-governing houseless encampments

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      Authors: Stephen Przybylinski
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      With the rise of organized houseless encampments or “tent cities” around the U.S., scholars have begun to address the social-spatial effects of encampments on houseless peoples’ lives. This scholarship has primarily explained the development of organized encampments as an effect of neoliberal modes of governance as municipalities have sought to offload responsibility for caring for the houseless or to discipline houseless people by containing them through the regulative force of the state. Such explanations address the culpability of the state in relation to capital which shapes houseless peoples’ lives. Yet, they leave unaddressed one critical component of houseless encampments: that relations surrounding property ensure that houseless encampment residents remain property-insecure and without a guaranteed right to remain. Through a case study of self-governing houseless encampments in Portland, Oregon, the article advances a relational analysis of property and citizenship to show how self-governing houseless communities are denied key privileges of citizenship that democratic self-governance is intended to realize. In doing so, the case study examines the very tradeoffs houseless encampment residents must make when living in an encampment. The paper ends suggesting that Portland’s encampment model allows us to more clearly see the consequences of establishing collective rights to access property within liberal property systems, and from this, where political and scholarly attention ought to be placed to better protect houseless people through a more democratic right to remain.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T08:33:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221103067
       
  • A close look at the EU–Turkey deal: The language of border
           externalisation

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      Authors: Anna Casaglia, Agnese Pacciardi
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The article discusses the language of border externalisation processes by examining the knowledge that stands as the basis of the EU–Turkey deal and reports on its implementation, placing them in the context of the transformation of the EU border regime. It is the result of a study addressing the language and key concepts that organise border externalisation and its geographic and biopolitical episteme. Our interest lies in the production of knowledge emerging from the EU–Turkey deal, and its effects on both the mainstream discourse on migration and the legitimation and acceptance of violent border management practices. To do this, we offer an interpretation of the textual materials composing the deal as promoting a discourse on migrants that strictly categorises territories and peoples, and establishes geographies of control and hierarchies of deserving and undeserving subjects, by asserting new forms of biopolitical control and care over their bodies. The presentation of research results combines the extraction of keywords and sentences from the documents analysed with an interpretation of their epistemic strength in producing and promoting specific biased Eurocentric narratives on migrants and migration. At the core of the agreement’s texts we find the category of the ‘deserving migrant’ as increasingly defining and circumscribing mobility, and realised in the one-for-one swap policy.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T06:14:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221100149
       
  • Participatory governance in China: ‘Informal public participation’
           through neighbourhood mobilisation

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      Authors: Liu Cao
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Public participation is an emergent feature of urban governance in Nanjing, China. Though introduced to address social conflicts around urban redevelopment, the fact is that government-led public participation did not successfully soothe tensions, but resistance instead played a role like ‘public participation’ which influenced the governing processes. This Chinese case thus requires us to rethink the limitations of Western governance theories in explaining this Chinese story. With the purpose to research urban political studies beyond the West to have more plural and heterodox voices to depict a diversity of urban knowledge, this paper focuses on this heterodox phenomenon in China to understand how Chinese insurgent urbanism reconfigured and made a new form of urban governance. Through critical investigation of public participation in Nanjing, this paper argues that public participation is the buffer that mediates and ‘repairs’ the inconsistencies between different levels of governmental agencies, while also because of this disjointed and stratified administrative feature, resisting by appropriating government policies thus can influence the governing processes and become a way of ‘informal public participation’. By introducing the concept of ‘informal public participation’, this paper’s research findings shed light on governance studies about how participatory governance is made through both governmental approaches and bottom-up insurgent urbanism, and also illustrates how resistance can reshuffle power dominance in urban politics to make a new form of urban governance.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T01:19:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221100914
       
  • Toxic violence in marine sacrificial zones: Developing blue justice
           through marine democracy in Chile

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      Authors: Jeremy Anbleyth-Evans, Manuel Prieto, Jonathan Barton, Ana Garcia Cegarra, Sandor Muslow, Emilo Ricci, Leonardo Campus, Vergara Pinto Francisca
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Marine sacrificial zones are planned areas dedicated to the toxic violence of carbo-chemical port development around the world. In the marine environment in Chile, repeated fisher led new social movements have been raised regarding the need to create laws controlling marine pollution from combined coal power station/extraction complexes and realise participatory blue epistemic justice. A series of case studies from across Chile demonstrate the importance of integrating fisher observations of contamination. Interviews and participatory GIS shows how fisher communities LEK observations can be integrated from Quintero, Mejillones and Coronel, which help generalise about the participatory solutions to the impacts of other coastal industrial complexes. The social protests of 2020–2021 opened up a new space for environmental rights through a successful campaign for a new Chilean constitution, the importance of which is shown by the politization of the violence of these sacrificial zones locally and globally. Differently to the creation of the constitution by the neoliberal dictatorship, the participatory space afforded by a people’s constitution through a plebiscite means that environmental justice concerns can be implemented in concrete form.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T09:44:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221084193
       
  • Mixed signals: Understanding the democratic work of narratives in
           pro-immigrant protests across local policy environments

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      Authors: Alice Huff, Abigail Cooke
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The question of how to alter undemocratic environments from within is a central concern of activists and theorists interested in radical democratic change. Illuminating this issue, geographers and others have studied how immigrant rights activists make claims in hostile environments. This scholarship tends to privilege the work of organizations in national or specific metropolitan contexts. We broaden the discussion by attending to hostility in subnational immigration policy environments across the United States and by comparing the “narrative signals” that protesters send in more and less hostile environments, regardless of organizational affiliation. Results show that narratives are shaped by the environments in which they circulate. In hostile environments, however, narrative signals include a broader variety of justifications than the extant literature emphasizes. In such environments, activists justify protest both with appeals to notions of universal human rights and with more limited articulations of community concerns and specific immigrants’ attributes. We argue that while the type of narrative justifications observed in more hostile local environments can undermine democratic politics, they can also disrupt official orderings and contribute to more robust public formation around immigrant rights. Where dehumanizing policy is sharpest, they can amplify immigrant voices in the public sphere and they can draw in participants who might otherwise see themselves as disconnected from immigrant rights struggles. In shedding new light on the geography of environment-narrative dynamics, this article contributes to ongoing explorations of emplaced experiences of political work and the democratic potential of that work in hostile environments.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T08:38:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221093154
       
  • “Rude and in Defiance of Authority”: Arizona Anti-Mexican American
           Studies Legislation and the Discursive Positioning of the “Rude”
           Student of Color

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      Authors: Gloria Howerton
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article considers a style of civility discourse centered on perceived “rudeness” of youth, particularly youth of color (YOC) and its use as a political strategy that positions YOC as both uncivil and lacking agency. It is constructed as a racialized concept of rudeness that positions YOC as unreliable narrators and problem students whose voices can be dismissed when it comes to educational policy that directly impacts them. I refer to this discourse as “rudeness rhetoric.” It takes on a key role in the (re)production of the school as a political site of white supremacist citizen production. I focus on Arizona politicians’ mobilization of rudeness rhetoric as justification for legislation targeting Tucson Unified School District’s (TUSD) Mexican American Studies (MAS) program for termination. I rely on triangulation of multiple sources and methods, including observation of meetings and the trial concerning the constitutionality of anti-MAS legislation, plaintiff evidence, documents and public statements by politicians, and online commentary concerning MAS. I find that, while politicians and the Arizona Department of Education engaged accusations that MAS promoted anti-white racism, they used rudeness rhetoric to frame the program as harmful, charging that it produced rude students based on protests politicians associated with MAS. Focusing on “rude” YOC allowed politicians to reframe legislative attacks on ethnic studies and move debate over MAS away from racial animus in the legislation. Rather than one explosive moment in which the rudeness rhetoric performed its political work, it snaked throughout multiple venues from political arenas to the courtroom to the media.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T02:39:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221096362
       
  • Infrastructure in times of exception: Unravelling the discourses,
           governance reforms and politics in ‘Building Back Better’ from
           COVID-19

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      Authors: Iain White, Crystal Legacy, Graham Haughton
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      In seeking to counter adverse economic impacts resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, many governments quickly announced major infrastructure stimulus packages alongside a series of governance reforms to speed delivery. Despite significant differences between political, institutional and policy contexts of countries, clear trends emerged, most notably discourses of promise promoting the possibilities of state-led infrastructure allied to reforms to expedite delivery. Using case studies of Australia, Aotearoa-New Zealand and the UK, we draw upon theories of postpolitics and states of exception to explain how these approaches comprise a form of infrastructuralism that both elevates the criticality of infrastructure at the same time as depoliticising infrastructure planning. We argue that the promises of Building Back Better did not constitute the radical rupture from earlier practices initially promised and that in future crises we need to resist the closure of political space that typically accompanies emergency measures and ask ‘what infrastructure, for whom and where'’
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T12:46:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221094678
       
  • The game: Description and analysis of how street vendors keep working on
           the streets of Bogotá despite state intervention

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      Authors: Laura Porras-Santanilla
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Day-to-day management of street vending is much more a matter of starting negotiations, mediating between the interests of distinct groups, and making agreements, than it is about enforcing confusing and at times contradictory legal mechanisms with limited effectiveness. Based on the results of extended fieldwork in a low-income outer locality of Bogotá (Ciudad Bolívar), I will argue that street vendors and state representatives interact around a four-step dynamic known as the ‘game’, which provides them with ‘working stability’ or high degrees of legitimacy, despite frequent arbitrary – and not just discretionary – interventions from the police and other state representatives. In short, the game works as follows: complaints against vendors build-up and interventions take place. Street vendors use different resistance strategies, but tension intensifies, then crisis is reached. As both parties have strong incentives to negotiate, they reach basic coexistence agreements. Vendors fail to comply with the agreements because regulations made to sanitize poverty and to hide the face of misery are rarely applicable. The cycle restarts. I conclude by arguing that efforts to eliminate or limit street vending will not be successful or sustainable until the state makes the political and fiscal commitment to offer substantial employment programs and/or guarantee a minimum income to vulnerable families.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T04:27:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221094145
       
  • Base borders: Militarisation and (post-)colonial bordering in Okinawa

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      Authors: Hidefumi Nishiyama
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article builds on the political geography of islands and emerging research on the relationship between island, border and sovereignty. Today, islands are recognised as crucial sites for the understanding of contemporary border controls. Military bases that were built during earlier colonial periods are increasingly used for transnational migrant detention practices. This article aims to offer another important insight to the politics of borders from an island perspective. Drawing from the case of Okinawa, the article shows how bases on islands themselves produce borders. Fences and lines that encircle the US bases on Okinawa Island cannot be reduced to conventional military off-limits boundaries. They are particular kinds of borders, which I would call ‘base borders’, that continue to divide the island into military and public spaces and demarcate two seemingly territorially bound sovereignties. Base borders are, however, more than the manifestation of extraterritoriality. While they regulate the mobility of local residents, base borders enable military servicemembers to enjoy extraterritorial rights, including the right to avoid being held responsible for a crime they committed outside the bases. In addition to this uneven mobility control, base borders have a function to control local resistance movements through the criminalisation of the base border crossing by protesters and the authorisation of the use of force by security guards. This article closely investigates how base borders function and are used in reality, and in doing so, it uncovers multiple ways in which base borders reproduce colonial relations between the US military (in coordination with Japan) and Okinawa.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T03:15:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221097232
       
  • De-politicising and re-politicising transport infrastructure futures

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      Authors: Crystal Legacy
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The planning for future transport and its infrastructure is deeply political. Yet, how we understand re-politicisation, and what those efforts tell us about what is political in the planning for future cities, remains under explored. One lens through which to explore these acts is to consider the role of urban coalitions in drawing attention to the dominant politics of planning and setting the ground for the re-politicisation of transport infrastructure futures. Drawing on the work of post-foundational scholars Mouffe and Rancière, this paper examines the interplay between de-politicisation and re-politicisation and how two urban coalitions negotiated this landscape in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area during a sustained period of contestation surrounding the proposal of new transport infrastructure. Through this analysis, this paper draws on in-depth interviews with coalition members, transport planners, politicians and engaged citizens to illustrate how these urban coalitions produced a ‘collective will’ and a struggle towards a ‘consensus cure’ in their re-politicising actions. This paper reveals how coalition-led re-politicisation establishes the grounds for the politics to shift on contested future transport proposals and offers insight into the incremental and oftentimes incomplete ways re-politicisation nurtures transformational change.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T09:45:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221092920
       
  • Breathing in and out: Domestic workers high exposure to air pollution in
           Bogota’s public transportation system

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      Authors: Valentina Montoya-Robledo, Laura Iguavita, Segundo López
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      More than 150,000 low-income women perform domestic work in Bogotá, Colombia. They are captive public transit commuters, traveling from low-income to high and middle-income residential sites for work. However, the transport system between these neighborhoods suffers from missing links. Hence, domestic workers spend more time commuting to work relative to any other urban worker in Bogotá. Moreover, the system affects domestic workers’ overall health conditions, where they inhale high doses of air contaminants. In the face of laws and policies in place perpetuating patriarchy, violence, and segregation, these poor and often-racialized women face a conundrum: they must ensure their livelihood facing pervasive health hazards. This paper analyzes the lived realities of domestic workers in terms of their commutes and the environmental hazards they face, depicting grounded legal geography. Fundamentally, it examines how legally constituted housing markets and related transportation infrastructure contribute to highly gendered and class-based geographical divides, placing domestic workers into the spatial and policy periphery and making their bodies disposable, but obliging them to negotiate these divides using inadequate and death-delivering transportation infrastructure. Finally, it reflects on the city’s planning methods that often ignore important gender, social, and economic considerations. Based on a mixed-methods approach, the paper brings material that is not often placed together, including a study of exposure to particulate matter, transportation, and legal analysis, decentering current ontologies by connecting law, environment, public health, gender, and class divides, and grounding legal geography on the daily commuting experiences of domestic workers.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T11:58:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221077810
       
  • Implementation of agrarian reform in North Sumatra, Indonesia: The
           productiveness of institutional fragmentation

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      Authors: Zhe Yu Lee
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past few years, the Government of Indonesia has set out to implement an ambitious goal of formally changing land tenure arrangements on over 20 million hectares of land across the country. In this paper, I analyze the politics surrounding the policy framework’s implementation at the provincial level in North Sumatra. Given variegated meanings of agrarian reform held by different civil society actors as well as the abstract national-level policy framework allowing for multiple types of tenure to be claimed, I show how “ineffective” policy implementation cannot be merely explained by characterizing state institutions as dysfunctional, in part due to how “accurate” claims cannot be ascertained in a self-evident manner. Rather, the invocation and resignification of longstanding commonly accepted communitarian vocabularies provide opportunities for different civil society actors to assert and gain recognition for specific visions of (re)territorializing land and (re)subjectivizing rural populations to challenge longstanding political-economic structures that continue to privilege plantation, mining, and logging interests. As such, contemporary fragmentation of the Indonesian land bureaucracy should not be seen in a negative light. Instead, bureaucratic interactions at the provincial level are decisive modes of articulating and formalizing legitimate visions of land use and rural development as well as defining appropriate economic, environmental, and cultural subjectivities in a non-deterministic manner.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T11:32:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221094912
       
  • Power dynamics in collaborative rural planning: The case of Pematang
           Tengah, Indonesia

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      Authors: Muhammad Taufiq, Suhirman Suhirman, Tubagus Furqon Sofhani, Benedictus Kombaitan
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Starting from the notion that collaborative rural planning focuses on policymaking through authentic dialogue, this article discusses the power dynamics that influence the planning process and product. It was motivated by the presumption that the understanding of collaborative policymaking is not adequate if it only concerns formal deliberation without considering other power dynamics. Booher and Innes’s model of network power in collaborative policymaking (DIAD–Diversity, Interdependence, Authentic Dialogue) and the power cube model of Gaventa were used to analyze the power mechanisms in the formal as well as in the informal arenas. They were applied to the process of village planning in Pematang Tengah, Indonesia, where the agrarian village community, deliberative bureaucrats, and other stakeholders are involved in formulating development rural planning projects. From the analysis a new model was derived, revealing three power mechanisms that are active in three different phases of the collaborative planning process: (I) Figuring out in openness, (II) Herding of public desire, and (III) Forcing of direction. The findings show that power mechanism (II) in the informal arena plays an important role by steering the course of policymaking in the formal arena (I). Power mechanism (III) is active when invisible actors illegitimately change the planning product that the formal deliberation has produced, acting out of self-interest. The analysis of power mechanisms that are active in the whole planning process can help planners in dealing with formal and informal power when developing appropriate planning strategies through a deliberative process.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T03:19:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221092668
       
  • Seeing like a Zone: Privately deputized sovereignty within Toronto’s
           Sanctuary City

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      Authors: sasha skaidra
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Scholarship is split between seeing the Sanctuary City movement in a progressivist light of anti-border civil society movements, or, viewed as another iteration of citizenship controls. Critics point out how Sanctuary Cities, wherein municipalities provide services regardless of immigration status, do little to guarantee security for undocumented peoples who are at constant risk of deportation. Those who are optimistic about the movement’s emancipatory potential celebrate Sanctuary Cities’ ability to challenge the policing of migration. Why are the interpretations of Sanctuary City policies so polarized' I argue Sanctuary City literature suffers from trying to resolve the contradictions of state-based citizenship, devolving the challenge to the city, thus obscuring how state officials, business, and civil society actors can each possess local sovereignty control over urban space. My paper develops the metric of ‘private deputized sovereignty’ to trace how local policy discretion can implement or contest control over citizenship enforcement powers. I investigate how ‘private deputized sovereignty’ emerges from zoning technology inherent to urban spatial production. Conceptually, I introduce ‘seeing like a zone’ as a heuristic to challenge methodological nationalism and cityism which assume sovereignty resides with corporeal structures. In applying zoning analysis to Toronto’s Sanctuary City policy, the paper identifies economic and sanctuary zones where jurisdictional exceptions empowers local authorities, civil society, and/or private actors to either grant amnesty or exile migrants. Toronto being located within an immigrant federal state and being a global city offers a case for multiscalar analysis where migrants’ well-being and harm depends on the ‘privately deputized sovereign’s’ zoning choices in workplaces, healthcare, schools and the street.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T07:12:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221078496
       
  • The afterlives of urban megaprojects: Grounding policy models and
           recirculating knowledge through domestic networks

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      Authors: Gabriel Silvestre, Guillermo Jajamovich
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper interrogates and expands understandings of agency in processes of knowledge circulation by focusing on actors switching their position from the demand-side to the supply side of policy knowledge. In doing so, we contribute to recent debates about the importance of accounting to other scales beyond the local–global binary that dominates the policy mobility literature and to the politics of policy translation and dissemination. Emphasis is given to the performative role of domestic actors and their practices in localising mobile policies of urban regeneration in ‘gateway cities’ while leveraging and recirculating knowledge within their national contexts. Conceptualised as policy brokers and policy entrepreneurs, such actors are attuned to the local dynamics and able to distil context-specific lessons that are sensitive to national regulatory frameworks, funding and political contingencies. We focus on two urban megaprojects of waterfront regeneration in Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro that introduced new practices of land monetisation while making use of inter-referencing, drawing on in-depth interviews with policy actors and archival material. We argue that an attention to ‘follow the reformatted model’ reveals how policy models mutate as they conform to contextual factors and to particular interests. The analysis of such processes allows us to transcend the local–global dichotomy and to trace multiscalar connections between multiple projects.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T03:25:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221082411
       
  • How do cities challenge patterns of demand' Characterising the local
           governance of climate change in Nordic cities

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      Authors: Jesse Schrage, Kristin Kjærås
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Meeting international climate targets will require deep and rapid shifts in urban demand patterns. While the literature has emphasized the role played by cities in the response to climate change, it remains unclear whether or how urban-level interventions actually affect possibilities for low-carbon living, and contribute to the re-configuration of everyday practices. In this paper, we use a social practice lens to understand how, and to what extent a range of Nordic cities target everyday demand patterns in the development of low-carbon policies. Contemporary demand-side approaches have been critiqued for their focus on the provision of low-carbon technologies and individual-level interventions. Instead, we argue that understanding how measures target and intervene in everyday practices provide a relevant lens for approaching the success of low-carbon interventions. Using an intervention-in practice-framework to understand urban interventions, we find that current measures rely heavily on non-committal measures in the domains of mobility and housing and forms of household self-governance. This paper concludes by discussing the policy implications of taking a practice view in developing climate interventions in urban setting, arguing that such perspective broadens the range of governance approaches adopted by cities to govern a reduction of urban emissions.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T10:12:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221083238
       
  • Competing climate spectacles in the amplified public space

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      Authors: Eleanor Johnson, Håvard Haarstad
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The climate change debate is finding new expressions through political protests and demonstrations, during which a plurality of climate narratives emerges. While protests such as Extinction Rebellion have had a strong physical manifestation, involving many people showing up in concrete locations, they have also been facilitated and mediated virtually. In this paper, we examine the spectacle generated when divergent discourses on climate change compete for attention in spaces that are simultaneously urban and virtual. The paper is based on empirical evidence from events surrounding London Fashion Week 2019, focusing on the political mobilization by Extinction Rebellion Boycott Fashion (XRBF) and other groups. Discussing this changing nature of urban protest spectacle, we point to the emergence of an ‘amplified public space’ shaped at the intersection of material and virtual spaces of the city. Both the fashion industry and XRBF employ techniques of spectacle in their strategies to advance their respective climate change and sustainability narratives. We argue that XRBF, in particular, has managed to influence the climate change debate by strategically staging spectacular protest events that are both facilitated and played out in virtual space.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T05:24:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221082406
       
  • I had no idea that Europe had internal borders: Migrants’ ‘secondary
           movements’ before the EU internal border regime

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      Authors: Silvia Aru
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper looks at the so-called ‘secondary movements’, namely, migrants’ unauthorized movements across Member States of the European Union (EU). Over the past few years, secondary movements have become a main concern on the EU political agenda because they seem unstoppable, despite the more rigid migration regime designed at different levels to manage them. Secondary movements are a relatively understudied topic within the vast critical migration debate on border regimes. This paper bridges this gap by looking at unauthorized movements within Europe on two levels. Firstly, it explores them by focusing on the emergence, conceptualization and embodiment of the term ‘secondary movements’ within the EU agenda; secondly, it sheds light on this kind of movement from the migrants’ perspective. Based on empirical research carried out along the Italian–French border and in Rome from September 2018 to December 2018, this paper aims to highlight the tensions between unauthorized mobilities and the EU asylum system, which forces migrants to stay in (or move to) specific countries without taking into consideration their personal plans. Thanks to a bottom-up perspective, this analysis shows how complex migrants’ reasons for movements are and it sheds a necessary light on how EU asylum policies and border control mechanisms influence migrants’ journey without stopping them. Reading the border regime of Ventimiglia through the lens of ‘secondary movements’ allows for a more nuanced account of the systems of power within which this EU internal border regime takes form.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T12:29:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221082383
       
  • Easier said than done' Involving citizens in the smart city

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      Authors: David Sweeting, Jessica de Alba-Ulloa, Mario Pansera, Alex Marsh
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Much of the smart cities literature urges greater citizen participation in smart city innovation. However, there is often little consideration given to how citizens might be more meaningfully involved in the processes of governance around smart cities, what enables their involvement, or what might need to change in order to facilitate their participation. Taking an institutional perspective, this paper seeks to move this aspect of the smart city debate forward. Using Mexico City as an exemplar, it examines the broader institutions of urban governance within which citizen-oriented smart city activities operate, identifying those which help and hinder citizen participation. It then considers the extent to which unhelpful institutions are embedded, and to what extent they are amenable to change to allow successful smart city participation initiatives to flourish. Our argument is that when considering citizen participation in smart city activities we need to attend more closely to the institutions which represent their context and the extent to which those institutions can be changed, where necessary, to create a more conducive environment. Many institutions will be beyond the reach of local actors to change or to deinstitutionalise; thus involving citizens in the smart city is ‘easier said than done’.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-06T07:55:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221080643
       
  • Stewardship practice and the performance of citizenship: Greening
           tree-pits in the streets of Berlin

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      Authors: Jens Lachmund
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Hands-on activities of shaping and maintaining urban public green spaces, in short, “stewardship,” have become a flourishing field of civic engagement. It is the aim of this article to find out how citizenship is enacted in the everyday practice of stewardship, and how such an analysis can benefit from theories of “material participation” and “practice.” It explores this theme through a case study of the greening of tree-pits in Berlin. The article asks: (1) how people, through their doing of stewardship, engage with the tangible places that they take care of, and (2) how connections between stewardship, its focal places, and other practices shape and sustain wider public concerns. Thereby, it identifies three intersecting and materially grounded “civic nexuses of practices,” which each imply specific constructions of citizenship: civic neighboring, managed volunteering, and political mobilization. It explores how each of these nexuses emerges from the convergence of practices around the tree-pit, and probes the tensions and conflicts that they entail. In contrast to authors who have either cherished stewardship as a form of citizen empowerment, or, in line with Foucauldian governmentality studies, as the formation of governable citizen-subjects, the article emphasizes the politically ambiguous dynamics through which stewards practice their citizenship.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T12:30:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211070204
       
  • From policy mobility to top-down policy transfer: ‘Comfortization’ of
           Russian cities beyond neoliberal rationality

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      Authors: Maria Gunko, Daniela Zupan, Larissa Riabova, Yulia Zaika, Andrey Medvedev
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      As cities around the world increasingly seek to brand themselves as comfortable and liveable places, policies aimed at enhancing the quality of the urban environment are becoming more important. Scholars interpret this development as evidence of reinforced urban entrepreneurialism and neoliberalization. The current paper focuses on comfortable city policies in Russia, where political, social and economic transformations were often depicted as the ‘Eastern branch’ of the global neoliberalization project. It draws on field data from a case study of two cities in the Russian Arctic. By focusing on locations far away from global nodes, where the ideas of a comfortable city originally took shape, we trace and analyse policy mutations and local adjustments of such policies, as well as the related rationalities and policymaking dynamics. Our findings speak to the literature on policy mobility by questioning the focus on cities as entrepreneurial actors and the depiction of comfortable city policies as mere vehicles of neoliberalism. In Russia, what began with the introduction of entrepreneurial, globally circulating comfortable city policies incrementally turned into a top-down political project that cannot be easily explained – neither by neoliberal rationality nor by the legacies of urban planning and development.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T07:14:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221081688
       
  • The making of low-carbon urbanism: Climate change, discursive strategy,
           and rhetorical decarbonization in Chinese cities

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      Authors: Yunjing Li, George C. S. Lin
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Existing studies of the incorporation of climate mitigation into urban governance are concerned overwhelmingly with the material aspects of low-carbon urbanism. Emphasis is placed upon the measurable, quantifiable, and technical characteristics of carbon, whereas the (uneven) leverage of its rhetoric value across different state spaces/scales is largely overlooked. This paper engages with ongoing theoretical enquiries through a study that applies a discursive-analytical perspective to examining the rise of low-carbon cities (LCCs) and the actual practicing of rhetorical decarbonization strategies in Shenzhen, China. The making of the LCC is found to be incentivized by the perceived symbolic value and enabling power of the climate agenda in attracting higher-level government supports, maintaining local collations, and enticing international attention and investment. This enabling power depends on the interpretive flexibility within decarbonization discourse and the manipulation of the discourse to justify involuntary socio-economic changes. Findings of this research call for greater attention paid to the overlooked discursive dimensions of low-carbon urbanism as the constitutive elements of ongoing global urban transformation processes.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T09:34:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544221077446
       
  • The urban political never sleeps: A framework for tracing emergent
           counter-responses to depoliticisation

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      Authors: Mohamed Saleh, Ward Rauws
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Responding to contemporary mechanisms of depoliticisation, some marginalised groups create political arenas independent from the State. The paper analyses how these groups utilise ‘cracks’ in the political landscape to forge counter-publics which transform unequal power structures. Positing that depoliticisation is always incomplete, an analytical framework is presented for understanding how ‘the political’ emerges and evolves in unexpected spaces of everyday life. The framework serves as a means to overcome some of the limitations of Rancière’s political ontology to operationalise in empirical research through integrating his notions with an understanding of self-organisation based on complexity science. Drawing on empirical research in Egypt, the paper demonstrates how the fusion between public spaces and online networks created a precondition for counter-publics to gradually revitalise local urban politics. The paper concludes with analytical considerations for inclusive city-makers who aim to engage productively with the transformative potential of such emergent counter-publics.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T03:15:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211070200
       
  • Electoral politics, gentrification, and strategic use of contested place
           identities in Toronto’s Portuguese neighbourhood

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      Authors: Koki Takahashi
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article uses the lens of electoral politics to improve understanding of political dynamics in an ethnic neighbourhood undergoing gentrification, corresponding to Ward 18 and its antecedents in the City of Toronto. This ward has been populated by Portuguese immigrants and their descendants since the 1960s. Since the 1990s, gentrification has corresponded to a decrease in the Portuguese population alongside a proliferating, diverse mix of new arrivals. This article tackles the question of how gentrification affects electoral politics in this traditionally ethnic neighbourhood. In the history of Toronto’s municipal elections, a first-generation Portuguese Canadian candidate first appeared on the ballot in 1978; a decade later, the ward elected another first-generation Portuguese Canadian to the city council. In 2014, the third and most recent of them pursued her candidacy while recognizing the changed demographic and cultural circumstances of the neighbourhood existing as two places within a single urban space. Competing against a candidate with no cultural affiliation to the Portuguese Canadian community, the incumbent won by a narrow margin through appealing to out-group residents, while respecting and cherishing the Portuguese residents, or her robust electoral base. This electoral mirroring of the current condition of this urban space has implications for understanding the relationships between gentrification, urban ethnic minorities, and electoral politics; ethnicity is consolidated through electoral campaigns and mobilized as a useful and handy political tool, and both ethnic-based and non–ethnic-based place identities are strategically utilized for electoral politics in an ethnic neighbourhood undergoing gentrification.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T04:19:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211072650
       
  • Making space for competition: The rationalities of contemporary regional
           development

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      Authors: Andreas Öjehag-Pettersson
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Taking as its starting premise that we have a politics of space because space is political at the level of ontology, this article investigates how the governing of regional development is guided by a set of prominent political rationalities that revolve around the notions of competition and competitiveness. To this end, I mobilise the Foucauldian framework of governmentality to provide empirical illustrations drawn from a 5-year long research project concerning globalisation in Swedish sub-national regions. These illustrations show how regions are governed through rationalities that stress adaptability, attraction, environment and sustainability as well as leadership in order to prevail in their inevitable competition for vital resources. I argue that as these chains of rationale are put into motion in the contemporary politics of space, they not only promote specific and particular ways of developing regions, but also displace certain practices and objects from the realm of the political to the realm of a natural order. I therefore conclude that current expressions of the politics of space have strong tendencies to deny its own political foundations. Instead, competition and competitiveness are inscribed as naturally occurring features in social relations, thereby elevating their importance in the creation of new sub-national spaces.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T01:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211067813
       
  • Repoliticising national policy mobilities: Resisting the Americanization
           of universal healthcare

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      Authors: Colin Lorne
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Policy mobilities scholarship has comprehensively challenged the methodological nationalism and rational orthodoxies of policy studies. Contributing to recent debates on policy mobilities and post-politics, this paper examines how struggles over the ‘national’ shape policy on the move. Focussing on attempts to embed accountable care models across the English National Health Service (NHS), I consider how ‘integration’ has been mobilised as a seemingly irresistible solution to the failures of market-orientated healthcare reforms in times of austerity. Yet, I foreground how campaigners slowed down the local contracting of accountable care through repoliticising circulating policy as the ‘Americanization’ of the NHS. The paper emphasises the ongoing, yet shifting and politically contested, role of the state and national spatial imaginaries in the making and translating of globally mobile policy. Rethinking the times and spaces of politics and policy in the current conjuncture, I conclude by warning of the limits of nostalgia for the post-war national welfare state when pushing for universal healthcare as a right for all.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-11T04:57:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211068724
       
  • Transnational circuits of policy knowledge and discursive migration. The
           formation and transformation of planning policies in Argentina

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      Authors: Rodrigo Alves Rolo, Martijn Duineveld, Kristof Van Assche
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      We analyse the migration of academic and policy discourses that contributed to (de)legitimise the formation of planning policies in Argentina since the 1950s. We focus on the communicative/collaborative rationality discourses emanating from Anglo-American academic circles that played a role in the revival of the Argentine planning system between 2004 and 2015. We adopt an evolutionary approach to policy travel and policy learning, deploying the concepts of discursive migration and discursive configuration to better understand how ideas, people and goods/resources reinvent themselves when transnationally circulating policy knowledge takes root locally. The migration process in Argentina led to the reinforcement of prevalent coordination mechanisms, redirecting concerns and conflicts into governance structures already existing, involving players already present and forms of expertise already dominant. The migrating collaborative discourse (self) transformed in relation to the receiving governance environment, becoming an effective compliance-gaining technique, while national actors found ways to engage and discipline provinces they depended on more than before.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-09T11:15:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211068295
       
  • Managing service hubs in Miami and Osaka: Between capacious commons and
           meagre street-level bureaucracies

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      Authors: Geoffrey DeVerteuil, Matt Marr, Johannes Kiener
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      As key sites of governance and poverty management, service hubs are conspicuous inner-city clusters of voluntary sector organizations that serve vulnerable urban populations, including people grappling with homelessness, substance abusers and mental illness. In this paper, we frame service hubs as potentially embodying capacious commons on the one hand, and meagre street-level bureaucracies on the other, reconstituting Lipsky’s individual focus to embrace the agency level. We use a comparative case study approach, focussing on two service hubs – Kamagasaki in Osaka and Overtown in Miami – to show how organizations in each combined, in various ways, the two logics in practice. The results suggest that service hubs acted more as ‘managed commons’, but with some tendencies towards street-level bureaucracy. This conversation between the commons and street-level bureaucracies, and its comparative application to the voluntary sector within service hubs, serve as our primary conceptual and empirical contributions, respectively. We conclude by considering how the two logics overlapped and created hybridized models of poverty management.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T03:58:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211069747
       
  • The declining appeal of mega-events in entrepreneurial cities: From Los
           Angeles 1984 to Los Angeles 2028

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      Authors: John Lauermann
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Mega-events appear to be losing their appeal as tools for urban development. Events have long been funded by local governments on the promise that they can act as a catalyst for economic growth. But constituents and leaders are questioning that approach, disrupting the relationship between municipalities and global sports institutions. These political shifts are analyzed with a comparative study of Olympic planning and urban politics in American cities, from the Los Angeles 1984 Olympics to present-day preparations for the Los Angeles 2028 Olympics (during this period, Olympic planning also occurred in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and Salt Lake City). The paper examines the development, mobility, and contestation of an “LA model” of mega-event planning, which emphasizes municipal fiscal conservativism, and which has provided a political rationale for city leaders to invest in mega-events. The travels of the model illustrate the evolving role of mega-events in the political economy of entrepreneurial cities.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T01:02:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211066101
       
  • The political geographies of strategic partnerships: City deals and
           non-deals

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      Authors: Ilppo Soininvaara
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses the changing relations and deal making processes between the State of Finland and Finnish cities in the context of the so-called partnership approach in regional development. Within the partnership approach, the state apparatus and cities are figuratively posited as equal partners, though this equality has not been achieved in practice. The approach, promoted by consecutive Finnish governments, is analysed as an active mode of territorial politics that aims to capture or produce certain forms of urbanisation. These strategic partnerships are analysed by utilising the so-called regional cities, a group of smaller Finnish cities, as a case study. The article looks at how different participants, interviewed state officials and mayors of the regional cities, evaluate and frame the partnership approach. While the interviewees often regard the partnership approach as a functional mode of interaction and development, in practice, it creates and solidifies spatial categories and further contributes to the justification of instances of spatial selectivity. It becomes evident that deal making as a mode of regional development policy relies on hierarchisation and categorisation reflecting wider trends in state spatial transformation. The article argues that while failing to address the needs of smaller cities, the deal making process is nevertheless manifest in terms of demonstrative politics and so-called non-deals where deal making practices are constantly upheld but without clear content.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T09:53:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211064743
       
  • Dispossession by municipalization: Property, pipelines, and divisions of
           power in settler colonial Canada

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      Authors: Jeremy J. Schmidt
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      In Canada, Indigenous activists and scholars critique municipalization as a threefold process that subverts Indigenous authority to the state, then delegates forms of state authority to Indigenous peoples, and concludes by asserting that delegated authority satisfies the terms of Indigenous self-determination. This article centers municipalization in two steps that connect it to how Canada divides power regarding foreign and domestic affairs. The first examines the history of municipalization and its evolution alongside changes in Canadian federalism. The second examines dispossession by municipalization to show how state divisions of power facilitate extraction of value from land. It uses a case where the federal government considered creating new, privatized reserves of Indigenous land explicitly to facilitate oil pipelines. Together, these support an argument that municipalization is not only a powerful language of critique, but critical to understanding the on-going production of settler colonial space.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T12:31:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211065654
       
  • Towards a care perspective on waste: A new direction in discard studies

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      Authors: Justin Chun-Him Lau
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the development and theoretical orientation of the scholarship on waste in discard studies. It shows how three major streams of research in the literature conceptualise waste: as a resource and property, a risk and a source of prosperity. Each of these theoretical framings of waste points to a specific type of politics and temporality. However, all three tend to be inadequate in balancing the discussion of ‘waste’ with a discussion of the ‘stewardship’ of discarded objects, emphasising instead the potential value generation or transformation of waste. Consequently, research on waste tends to exclude ways to live with the waste materials that cannot always be transformed away easily. Drawing inspiration from feminist science and technology studies, this article argues that the analytical lens of care, which highlights the ‘affective engagement in space’, ‘the ethics of care’ and ‘interdependency’, may further the existing studies of waste by inspiring us to imagine a politics of inclusion and the temporality of slowness.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T07:42:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211063383
       
  • Manufacturing mandates: Property, race, and the criminalisation of
           trespass in England and Wales

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      Authors: Samuel Burgum, Helen Jones, Ryan Powell
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper focuses on a recent public consultation to criminalise trespass in England and Wales. Through an analysis of the consultation discourse and documentary evidence, we argue that the government has used this process to manufacture a mandate for criminalisation. We show how the construction of democratic support has been achieved by: Pre-coding responses in the initial call for evidence; distorting evidence in the response; and utilizing ‘state simplifications’ which foreground hostile and racist sentiments whilst presenting sedentarisation as in the ‘best interests’ of nomadic communities. While the 2018/19 consultation is only the most recent in a long history of civilising offensives against Gypsy-Travellers, as well as other ‘unfixed’ communities, this particular move to criminalise trespass and attack nomadic heritage is also further evidence of the UK government’s steady formalization of property ownership: moving away from considering property ‘use’ on the ground towards an abstracted registration system de-rooted from place. This denies long-standing rights to roam and non-normative modes of inhabitation, thereby pushing property relations in a direction that rarely benefits those on the housing margins. We foreground an alternative to criminalisation, pointing towards a recent pragmatic, bottom-up policy of ‘negotiated stopping’ in Leeds in northern England. This builds upon dialogue and cooperation in avoiding costly and disruptive eviction and criminalisation processes, but also potentially creates spaces and opportunities for more positive urban encounters with difference.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-25T02:49:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211067381
       
  • COVID “death pits”: US nursing homes, racial capitalism, and the
           urgency of antiracist eldercare

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      Authors: Shiloh Krupar, Amina Sadural
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Rampant COVID-19 outbreaks in US nursing homes have presented a massive biosecurity problem for the nation, bringing into stark relief the racialized stratification of eldercare administration and long-term care. This paper, by foregrounding the ways racial capitalism drives the chronic devaluation of nursing home residents and staff, provides an overview of how racism and ageism operate geographically through political ecologies of COVID in relation to the organization of the nursing home industry, medical scarcity, long-term care labor, and pandemic response to elderly populations. The inventory tracks some of the ways nursing homes condition race-based futures by arranging eldercare populations, workers, and spaces for extraction, abandonment, and blame for the pandemic. In doing so, it demonstrates the need for more equitable forms of aging and more just institutions of eldercare that put the social welfare of the aged, especially that of BIPOC elders and caregivers, above corporate compliance and financial performance that reproduce racial hierarchy and white supremacy in US healthcare. The article concludes by engaging with Black feminist data analytics and several policy efforts that challenge the structurally racist conditions of caregiving, pandemic response, and securitized segregation of the aged.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T11:52:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211057677
       
  • Geographies of revolution: Prefiguration and spaces of alterity in Latin
           American radicalism

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      Authors: Federico Ferretti
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper discusses geographies of revolution and their potentialities for providing new notions of space to critical, subaltern and decolonial geopolitics. It does so by addressing a virtually unknown case, that is works of Cuban revolutionary and geographer Antonio Nuñez–Jiménez (1923–1998), especially his 1959 Geografía de Cuba. This book was published during the revolutionary period, after the fall of dictator Fulgencio Batista and before the 1961 official ‘socialist’ turn of the new (authoritarian) Castroist regime. According to respected scholarship, the original inspiration of the Cuban revolution was democratic and anticolonialist, and its initial components quite heterogeneous. My argument is twofold. Firstly, I contend that revolutions occur independently from narrow ideological labels that were imposed later, and geographies of revolution express their performative potentialities for prefiguring new worlds independently from the (re)establishment of post-revolutionary states. Secondly, I suggest that Jiménez’s elaborations on the Cuban Monte as a (revolutionary) space of alterity can nourish decolonial geopolitics which are alternative to European ideas of bounded territoriality. Corresponding to the rough and ‘uncivilised’ hinterland where historical experiences of Indio and Afro-Cuban insurgences took place, the Monte became a concept defining subversion and alterity through Jiménez’s claims that these early insurgences found their continuators in the nineteenth-century anticolonial fighters and in the 1950s guerrillas. By addressing Jiménez’s original writings, which were never translated into English, I also extend current literature rediscovering critical and radical geographies beyond their Northern and Anglo-American ‘core’.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T11:51:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211063163
       
  • Who will man the rigs when we go'” transnational demographic fever
           dreams between Qatar and Texas

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      Authors: Danya Al-Saleh
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The educational project of producing engineers in Qatar is uniquely embedded in global capitalism, particularly as a field closely tied to the development of the oil and gas industry, the military and logistics spaces across the Gulf. Over the past two decades, U.S. universities based in the region have become significant spaces where new generations of managerial engineering labor are educated. Drawing on 18 months of institutional ethnographic research, I examine Texas A&M University at Qatar’s (TAMUQ) role in managing the gender demographics of Qatari engineering labor and the experiences of students navigating these institutional mechanisms. The increasing number of women studying at Texas A&M’s engineering branch campus are publicly celebrated by the university as the embodiment of progress in Qatar. At the same time, TAMUQ has worked to mitigate the feminization of engineering through outreach activities that present engineering as a masculine patriotic endeavor. To unpack these contradictory tendencies, I build on the feminist concept of “demographic fever dreams.” Through an examination of contradictory population-based anxieties about Qatari engineering students, I argue that a U.S. land-grant university is a participant and driver of fantasies and fears regarding the future of racialized and gendered labor hierarchies and fossil-fueled capitalism in the Gulf. In doing so, this article offers a grounded feminist intervention to examine the connections between transnational education, U.S. hegemony, and the fossil fuel industry.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T09:30:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211063205
       
  • Institutional straddling: Negotiating micro-governance in Hanoi’s
           new urban areas

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      Authors: Danielle Labbé, Gabriel Fauveaud
      First page: 933
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The rise and spread of commercially built residential projects in East and Southeast Asia has attracted growing scholarly attention since the 1990s. This scholarship has notably explored how the private production of new residential developments has altered urban governance across the region. However, few studies have analyzed how private corporate actors’ new roles in city-making processes shape governance logics at the neighborhood scale. This paper begins to fill the gap by exploring the governance dynamic of three new urban areas (NUAs) built on the edge of Hanoi in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Our analysis builds on a conceptualization of local state-linked organizations in East and Southeast Asia as “straddlers” Relying on interviews with local community leaders and homeowners, we find that the privatization of urban space production has not sidelined residents and government from micro-local politics in Hanoi. Instead, conflicts between homeowners and developers over land uses, property rights, and management practices and responsibilities have led to a repositioning of the old socialist neighborhood administrative apparatus to accommodate the governance of NUAs. The self-protection response of NUA homeowners during these conflicts played a key role in this process. By deploying what we call institutional straddling, these people forged a new mode of neighborhood governance that weaves together the neighborhood administration apparatus inherited from socialism and new residential property self-management bodies.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T04:55:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211055471
       
  • Noxious deindustrialization: Experiences of precarity and pollution in
           Scotland’s petrochemical capital

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      Authors: Lorenzo Feltrin, Alice Mah, David Brown
      First page: 950
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article introduces the concept of “noxious deindustrialization”—employment deindustrialization in areas where significantly noxious industries are still operating—and explores some implications of this paradox by studying community–industry relations in the Scottish petrochemical town of Grangemouth. In the heyday of “Boomtown Grangemouth” during the first three decades after World War II, there existed an implicit social contract between the local industry and community in which male fenceline residents had widespread access to secure and well-paid employment in the factories, but the community had to accept the related pollution and hazards. This social contract gradually declined since the late 1970s due to a combination of automation, rising qualification barriers and associated long-range recruiting, and outsourcing to a partially itinerant workforce. For the Grangemouth community, this trend led to the current situation of employment deindustrialization coupled with the continuing exposure to the socioenvironmental damage and hazards engendered by operating petrochemical plants. We argue that noxious deindustrialization—with its dystopian corollaries of rising inequality and precarity, cumulative environmental degradation, and loosening community ties—is happening both globally and in local areas and that Grangemouth is a dramatic example of noxious deindustrialization on a local level, where the phenomenon has put a strain on community–industry relations.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-18T04:03:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211056328
       
  • Micropolitical practices of multispatial metagovernance in rural Denmark

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      Authors: Jens Kaae Fisker, Pia Heike Johansen, Annette Aagaard Thuesen
      First page: 970
      Abstract: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Research on governance, network governance and metagovernance has shown how the practice of governing involves a diversity of actors in and beyond the state. Much attention has been paid to the role of powerful state and non-state actors while less consideration has been directed at less visible and marginalised actors who are recognised as participants but whose agency is rarely subjected to in-depth research. In this article, we address this lack by studying the micropolitical practices of place-based self-governing networks in the Danish countryside and their role in governing rural places. Our theoretical point of departure is Bob Jessop’s notion of multispatial metagovernance which we seek to enhance by considering marginalised actors around the edges of the state apparatus. Our findings suggest that these marginalised and overlooked actors are not just subjected to governance but actively partake in shaping the governance landscape by enveloping rural places for self-governance in four distinct ways: (1) subverting municipal micro-technologies of power; (2) filling the void created by scalar fixes; (3) keeping local organising efforts fluid and opaque to outsiders and (4) orchestrating strategically selective cooperation with extra-local actors. Without downplaying asymmetries of power and their influence on governance outcomes, we conclude that metagovernance and collibration are not just prerogatives of the powerful. Generating adequate understandings of such practices is therefore only possible if we consider the full breadth of involved actors without taking for granted that outcomes are always decided in advance by the powerful. The study that the article reports on shows one of the ways in which this task may be approached empirically.
      Citation: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T09:43:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23996544211057088
       
 
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