Subjects -> POLITICAL SCIENCE (Total: 1097 journals)
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POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 281 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Contracorriente     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ab Imperio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Acciones e Investigaciones Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACME : An International Journal for Critical Geographies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Borealia: A Nordic Journal of Circumpolar Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Acta Politica Estica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, European and Regional Studies     Open Access  
Administory. Zeitschrift für Verwaltungsgeschichte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Administrative Science Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 156)
AFFRIKA Journal of Politics, Economics and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Africa Conflict Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Africa Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Africa Intelligence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Africa Renewal     Free   (Followers: 13)
Africa Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
African Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
African Diaspora     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African East-Asian Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
African Journal of Democracy and Governance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
African Renaissance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Yearbook of Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Africa’s Public Service Delivery and Performance Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Afrika Focus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afrique contemporaine : La revue de l'Afrique et du développement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda Internacional     Open Access  
Agenda Política     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agrarian South : Journal of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Akademik Hassasiyetler     Open Access  
Akademik Yaklaşımlar Dergisi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
América Latina Hoy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Communist History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
American Enterprise Institute     Free   (Followers: 3)
American Foreign Policy Interests: The Journal of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 272)
American Political Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 272)
American Political Thought     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
American Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Anacronismo e Irrupción     Open Access  
Anais Eletrônicos do Congresso Epistemologias do Sul     Open Access  
Análise Social     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ankara University SBF Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annales Universitatis Mariae Curie-Sklodowska, sectio M – Balcaniensis et Carpathiensis     Open Access  
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Annual Review of Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Annual Review of Political Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 145)
Anuario Latinoamericano : Ciencias Políticas y Relaciones Internacionales     Open Access  
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Arctic Review on Law and Politics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arena Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Armed Conflict Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Asia & the Pacific Policy Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Asia and the Global Economy     Open Access  
Asia Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Asia-Pacific Journal : Japan Focus     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Regional Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asia-Pacific Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Asian Affairs: An American Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Asian Politics and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Astropolitics: The International Journal of Space Politics & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
AUDEM : The International Journal of Higher Education and Democracy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Audens : revista estudiantil d'anàlisi interdisciplinària     Open Access  
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Australian Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Austrian Journal of South-East Asian Studies     Open Access  
Balcanica Posnaniensia Acta et studia     Open Access  
Baltic Journal of Political Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bandung : Journal of the Global South     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Sciences of Terrorism and Political Aggression     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Beleid en Maatschappij     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BMC International Health and Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Bohemistyka     Open Access  
Boletim Meridiano 47 : Journal of Global Studies     Open Access  
Borderlands Journal : Culture, Politics, Law and Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Political Science Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Brésil(s)     Open Access  
British Journal of Canadian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
British Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 179)
British Journal of Politics and International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
British Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brookings Papers on Economic Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 68)
Bulletin d'histoire politique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Cadernos de Estudos Sociais e Políticos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cadernos de Ética e Filosofia Política     Open Access  
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de Sciences politiques de l'ULg     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
California Journal of Politics and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cambio 16     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cambio : Rivista sulle Trasformazioni Sociali     Open Access  
Cambridge Review of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Canadian Foreign Policy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of European and Russian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Political Science/Revue canadienne de science politique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Caucasus Survey     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Central and Eastern European Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Central Asian Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Central Banking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Central European Journal of Public Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
China : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
China International Strategy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
China perspectives     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
China Review International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
China-EU Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chinese Journal of Global Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Journal of International Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Chinese Political Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Citizenship Education Research Journal (CERJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cittadinanza Europea (LA)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Civil Wars     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Claremont-UC Undergraduate Research Conference on the European Union     Open Access  
Class, Race and Corporate Power     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cold War History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Colección     Open Access  
Commonwealth & Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Comparative Cultural Studies : European and Latin American Perspectives     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 179)
Comparative Politics (Russia)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Comparative Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Complexity, Governance & Networks     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Confines     Open Access  
Conflict and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Conflict Management and Peace Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Conflict, Security & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 268)
Conflicto Social     Open Access  
Congress & the Presidency: A Journal of Capital Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Conhecer : Debate entre o Público e o Privado     Open Access  
Connexe : Questioning Post-Communist Spaces     Open Access  
Constellations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Contemporary Italian Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Japan     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Journal of African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Levant     Hybrid Journal  
Contemporary Political Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Contemporary Review of the Middle East     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Contemporary Security Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Wales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Contenciosa     Open Access  
Cooperation and Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Counterculture Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Criterios     Open Access  
Critical Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Critical Review : A Journal of Politics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Critical Reviews on Latin American Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Critical Studies on Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Cuadernos de Coyuntura     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Gibraltar : Gibraltar Reports     Open Access  
Cuadernos de historia de España     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cuadernos Latinoamericanos de Administración     Open Access  
Cuestiones Políticas     Open Access  
Cultura de Paz     Open Access  
Cultura Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cultural Critique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Cultural Logic : A Journal of Marxist Theory & Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cywilizacja i Polityka     Open Access  
Data & Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
De Europa     Open Access  
Debater a Europa     Open Access  
Decolonization : Indigeneity, Education & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Defence Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Defense & Security Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Democracy & Education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Democratic Communiqué     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Democratic Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Democratization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Democrazia e diritto     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Desafíos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Development and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Digest of Middle East Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Digital Government : Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diplomacy & Statecraft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Diplomatic History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Discurso     Open Access  
Dissent     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Earth System Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East European Jewish Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
East European Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
East/West : Journal of Ukrainian Studies     Open Access  
Eastern African Literary and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal  

        1 2 3 4 5 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Critical Social Policy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.204
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 45  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0261-0183 - ISSN (Online) 1461-703X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Book Review: Dissenting Social Work: Critical Theory, Resistance and
           Pandemic by Paul Michael Garrett

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christine Morley
      Pages: 552 - 555
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 552-555, August 2022.

      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T09:46:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221101161a
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Neoliberal Securitisation and Symbolic Violence: Silencing
           Political, Academic and Social Resistance by Masoud Kamali

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Maria Moberg Stephenson
      Pages: 555 - 557
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 555-557, August 2022.

      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T09:47:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221101161b
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: The Criminalisation of Social Policy in Neoliberal Societies
           by Elizabeth Kiely and Katharina Swirak

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hanna-Kaisa Hoppania
      Pages: 557 - 559
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 557-559, August 2022.

      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T09:47:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221101161c
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: The Next Welfare State' UK Welfare After COVID-19 by
           Christopher Pierson

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Norman Ginsburg
      Pages: 559 - 560
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 559-560, August 2022.

      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T09:47:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221101161d
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: The Invention of the ‘Underclass’: A Study in the
           Politics of Knowledge by Loïc Wacquant

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephen J Crossley
      Pages: 560 - 562
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 560-562, August 2022.

      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T09:47:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221101161e
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Responsibilising young benefit recipients: Income management and financial
           capability in New Zealand

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Louise Humpage, Shelley Bielefeld, Greg Marston, Zoe Staines, Michelle Peterie, Philip Mendes
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      New Zealand recipients of the Youth Payment and Young Parent Payment, who are disproportionally Indigenous Māori and sole mothers, must participate in ‘Money Management’. This form of income management restricts spending, monitors financial transactions and requires compulsory budgeting education. Drawing on interviews with Money Management participants, Youth Service mentors and policymakers, this article argues that Money Management aims to responsibilise young people through conditional welfare, rather than improve their long-term financial capability as articulated. This becomes obvious through analysis of how Money Management ignores: 1) New Zealand financial literacy education policy developments, 2) the literature on best practice in financial literacy education and how values about money and wealth are shaped by 3) Māori world views and 4) gendered norms. The article concludes that states should take more responsibility, by increasing social security incomes and better regulating the financial, labour and housing markets, to ensure the financial capacity of their citizens.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T06:51:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221106923
       
  • The banality of state violence: Institutional neglect in austere local
           authorities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ed Kiely, Rosalie Warnock
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Theorisations of state violence under austerity have been criticised for their imprecision. In response, this article introduces the concept of institutional neglect: a specific modality of structural violence. We argue that institutional neglect occurs when state services deny care to eligible clients. This is a normative claim which locates an obligation to care in the body of the state. Through case studies of two local authority-run care services in the UK, we identify three banal, quotidian techniques of neglect: delay, deferral, and diversion. We emphasise that care is not necessarily an antidote to violence; instead, care and violence are increasingly entangled within state bureaucracies under austerity.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T06:50:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221104976
       
  • Teaching social policy as if students matter: Decolonizing the curriculum
           and perpetuating epistemic injustice

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      Authors: Hakan Seckinelgin
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Calls for the decolonization of education at all levels of education in the UK have gained new momentum since the murder of George Floyd on 25 May 2020 in Minneapolis and the subsequent Black Lives Matter demonstrations throughout the US and the UK. In this article I focus on the reactions to demands for the decolonization of the curriculum in my own department, Social Policy, at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). I argue that understanding the reactions of academic staff to student demands is informative about the nature of the problem. The article provides a contribution to discussions on decolonization on two fronts: (a) it highlights the internal dynamics of engagement with student demands in the context of a Higher Education Institution (HEI) and (b) the academic responses to students’ demands reveal an underlying mechanism that reproduces the status quo in the teaching of Social Policy.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T01:06:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221103745
       
  • ‘I’m not going anywhere near that': Expert stakeholder challenges in
           working with boys and young men regarding sex and sexual consent

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrea Waling, Alexandra James, JACKSON FAIRCHILD
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores findings from 23 expert stakeholder interviews on working with cisgender heterosexual men and boys in the fields of gendered violence prevention, relationships and sexuality education (RSE), sexual health, sport, and emotional and mental well-being. It focuses on how organisations and individual consultants navigate political and social tensions when working with boys and young men. Findings from these interviews note several significant challenges and barriers stakeholders face in implementing programs designed to support cisgender, heterosexual boys and young men, particularly in areas of sex, sexual health and wellbeing. These include 1) broader questions as to who is responsible for teaching about sex, relationships, and sexuality; 2) the lack of public support in running programs about sex and sexuality, 3) uncertainty as to the best settings to engage boys and young men, and 4) hostility or lack of engagement with program content. We highlight the implications of these challenges for policy and practice, as well as recommendations for how to address some of these issues.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T06:36:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221103817
       
  • Adequate for whom' Reflections on the right to adequate housing from
           fieldwork on Roma inclusion in Italy

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      Authors: Silvia Cittadini
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      The definition of 'adequate housing', a term widely used in the protection of the related right and the development of housing policies, has never been fully questioned, despite the acknowledged importance of shelter for the well-being of the individual beyond its physical function. This article analyses the weaknesses of the current definition of this term through the findings of reflexive fieldwork conducted in Italy with Roma targeted by inclusion policies in the housing sector. Departing from the analysis of the impact of anti-gypsyism in the Italian policy context, the interviews highlight how policies constructed around ideas of adequacy focused solely on the physical structure of the dwelling contribute to the neglect of the variety of social, cultural, economic and emotional factors that affect housing choices, leading to the failure of initiatives aimed at providing adequate housing solutions.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T05:08:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221103570
       
  • The national and moral borders of the 2016 French law on sex work: An
           analysis of the ‘prostitution exit programme’

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: CALOGERO GIAMETTA, HÉLÈNE LE BAIL
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      The 2016 law on prostitution in France introduced the so-called Swedish model approach to sex work, which, at the national level, criminalises those who purchase sex rather than the sex workers themselves. Alongside the repressive character of the law, lawmakers introduced a number of social policy measures through the implementation of a ‘prostitution exit programme’. Whilst some pioneering research has sought to evaluate the impact of penalising the clients of sex workers, no survey has yet focused on the outcomes of prostitution exit programmes. Based on qualitative data, including interviews with sex workers and grassroots organisations, this article aims to analyse how the programme was implemented and its overall outcomes. The interviews we conducted shed particular light on the fact that the implementation of the programme is impacted on by the application of restrictive migration policies.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T05:31:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221101167
       
  • COVID-19 and (mis)understanding public attitudes to social security:
           Re-setting debate

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michael Orton, Sudipa Sarkar
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      The Covid-19 pandemic has seen emerging debate about a possible shift in ‘anti-welfare commonsense’ i.e. the orthodoxy previously described in this journal as solidifying negative public attitudes towards ‘welfare’. While a shift in attitudes might be ascribed to the circumstances of the crisis it would still be remarkable for such a strongly established orthodoxy to have changed quite so rapidly. It is appropriate, therefore, to reflect on whether the ‘anti-welfare’ orthodoxy was in fact as unequivocal as claimed' To address this question, challenges to the established orthodoxy that were emerging pre-pandemic are examined along with the most recently available survey data. This leads to discussion of broader issues relating to understanding attitudes: methodology; ‘messiness’ and ambivalence of attitudes; attitudes and constructions of deservingness; and following or leading opinion. It is argued that the ‘anti-welfare’ orthodoxy has always been far more equivocal than claimed, with consequent implications for anti-poverty action and re-setting debate.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T05:26:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221091553
       
  • Female dependents, individual customers and promiscuous digital personas:
           The multiple governing of women through the Australian social security
           couple rule

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      Authors: LYNDAL SLEEP
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues that women social security recipients are governed by multiple political rationalities through the couple rule in Australia. It focuses on different periods of development of the couple rule – its inception within women's only payments of the 1970s, it's ‘de-gendering’ with the Social Security Act 1991 (Cth), and its current intersections with the digitisation of social security administration. It shows that different governing tools emerged across time to govern women through their relationships, but did not replace each other. Rather, the result is that women are now multiply governed by these seemingly contradictory rationalities. Women are governed as dependents by welfarist rationality through expectations of frugality and fidelity to a paternal state. They are governed as independent individuals through neo-liberal political rationalisations of ‘choice’. In addition, through algorithmic governmentality, women are constituted and reconstituted into a possibly promiscuous digital persona using information which is abstracted from women's daily lives. Through each of these modes of governing, the patriarchal assumptions of the couple rule endure.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T05:26:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221089265
       
  • Eviscerating equality: Normative whiteness and Conservative equality
           policy

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      Authors: Irene Gedalof
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      This article draws on the insights of narrative analysis to critically review recent changes to UK government equality policy through three examples: the announcement of a new equality strategy, changes to the governance of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), and the establishment and report of the Sewell Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities. I argue that these policy initiatives and the narratives justifying them signal moves to further weaken the UK government’s formal commitments to protections against discrimination. This involves not only the familiar argument in favour of a limited, liberal model of individual equality of opportunity, but is also about bolstering normative whiteness in the face of growing calls for a reckoning with the UK’s legacy of colonialism, slavery and deep-seated racial inequalities.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T07:08:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221093788
       
  • Navigating multiple pandemics: A critical analysis of the impact of
           COVID-19 policy responses on gender-based violence services

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      Authors: Tara Mantler, C. Nadine Wathen, Caitlin Burd, Jennifer C. D. MacGregor, Isobel McLean, Jill Veenendaal
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 illustrated what governments can do to mobilise against a global threat. Despite the strong governmental response to COVID-19 in Canada, another ‘pandemic’, gender-based violence (GBV), has been causing grave harm with generally insufficient policy responses. Using interpretive description methodology, 26 interviews were conducted with shelter staff and 5 focus groups with 24 executive directors (EDs) from GBV service organizations in Ontario, Canada. Five main themes were identified and explored, namely that: (1) there are in fact four pandemics at play; (2) the interplay of pandemics amplified existing systemic weaknesses; (3) the key role of informal partnerships and community support, (4) temporary changes in patterns of funding allocation; and (5) exhaustion as a consequence of addressing multiple and concurrent pandemics. Implications and recommendations for researchers, policy makers, and the GBV sector are discussed.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T06:53:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221088461
       
  • ‘The Left will find that it has bought a Trojan Horse’: The dialectics
           of universal basic income

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David James Hogg
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in basic income proposals. While this is not an entirely new phenomenon, what is different about the current discourse is the Left’s wholehearted embrace of what has traditionally been seen as a conservative social policy in Britain. It is my contention that UBI is potentially a dangerous policy for the Left, in that it risks undermining the – admittedly imperfect – welfare protections already in existence. This paper draws on Marxist political economy in order to demonstrate how the emancipatory potential of UBI has been somewhat overstated by some of its Leftist supporters, while a discussion of the neutrality of the State is important in considering how this ‘shape-shifting social policy' is likely to be implemented in practice.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T06:53:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221092151
       
  • Contractual controls and pragmatic professionalism: A qualitative study on
           contracting social services in China

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      Authors: Jie Lei, Tian Cai, Chak Kwan Chan
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      This study used the contracting projects of a district branch of the Women's Federation in Guangzhou as case examples to demonstrate both the Chinese state's contractual controls over social work organisations (SWOs) and the pragmatic response strategies of SWOs and professionals. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seventeen participants, including local officials of the Women's Federation and social workers from contracted SWOs. It was found that with the ultimate goal of consolidating the legitimacy of the Communist Party of China, the Women's Federation's dual role in politics and service provision had led to normative, managerial, technical and relational controls over SWOs. SWOs and professionals were generally submissive to these controls, but they employed diverse coping strategies, including compliance, bargaining, transformation and investment in personal relationships. The interactions within the contractual relationship created a pragmatic professionalism that embraced dominant political ideologies, employed de-politicising techniques, and personally depended on individual officials.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T06:52:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221089009
       
  • Policy paradoxes and the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme: How
           welfare policies impact resettlement support

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      Authors: Hannah Haycox
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      The Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme (VPRS) comprised the UK government's primary response to persons forcibly displaced by the Syrian civil war. Recipients were granted immediate recourse to public funds and a locally-based 12-month integration support plan, designed at the discretion of practitioners. Drawing on forty in-depth interviews with refugees and practitioners in two areas with contrasting local approaches, this article explores the tensions that emerged when broader central government policies (distinct from the VPRS), intersected with resettlement support in recipients’ lives. Two current welfare reforms are identified and evaluated as having impacted resettled families’ housing experiences: firstly; the Two-Child Limit and secondly; the Benefit Cap. The article demonstrates how the financial precarity produced by both policies undermined local practitioners’ resettlement support. In doing so, the article challenges dominant policy narratives of exceptionality, locating those resettled within the routinised systems of precarity and conditionality embedded in the welfare system.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:43:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221088532
       
  • The politics of job retention schemes in Britain: The Coronavirus Job
           Retention Scheme and the Temporary Short Time Working Compensation Scheme
           

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      Authors: Jay Wiggan, Chris Grover
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      The UK Government's introduction of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) in March 2020 was pitched as unprecedented. Yet, during the 1970s and 1980s, UK governments also operated wage subsidy job retention schemes. Indeed, despite their professed liberal market orientation, Thatcher's radical right Conservative governments presided over the expansive Temporary Short Time Working Compensation Scheme (TSTWCS) between 1979 and 1984. Drawing upon the work of Gallas (2016), we contend this embrace of wage subsidy schemes by Conservative governments almost 40 years apart emanate from a class politics focused on securing the subordination of labour. In our analysis, the TSTWCS is understood as a mechanism to dampen disquiet with the early Thatcher Government's project to restore employer dominance. And the CJRS is a mechanism to preserve the labour market relations of domination and exploitation successfully embedded by the Conservatives in the 1980s.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-08T05:45:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221086515
       
  • The administration of harm: From unintended consequences to harm by design

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      Authors: Alex Broom, Michelle Peterie, Katherine Kenny, Gaby Ramia, Nadine Ehlers
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Harm is a recurring theme in the social sciences. Scholars in a range of empirical areas have documented the deleterious outcomes that at times emerge from social structures, institutions and systems of governance. Yet these harms have often been presented under the rubric of ‘unintended consequences’. The outcomes of systems are designed to appear devoid of intentionality, in motion without any clear agency involved, and are thus particularly adept at evading accountability structures and forms of responsibility. Drawing insights from decades of social theory – as well as three illustrative examples from Australia's health, welfare and immigration systems – this article argues that many social structures are in fact intended to cause harm, but designed not to appear so. In presenting this argument, we offer a theoretical framework for conceptualising harm as actively administered. We also challenge scholars from across the social sciences to reconsider the partially depoliticising narrative of ‘unintended consequences’, and to be bolder in naming the intended harms that permeate social life, often serving powerful political and economic interests.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-08T05:45:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221087333
       
  • Visibilising the climate in social policies in Barcelona: Connections in
           the urban context

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      Authors: Joana Díaz-Pont
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      The paper aims to identify whether the interdependencies between climate action and social policies in the urban context are visible and, if so, in what areas and through what framings. Using a content analysis approach, it compares framings of the news on social policies in Barcelona over the course of a year. The results show that climate action is constructed discursively as an isolated issue, with its own logics and complexities, and with few references to other social policy areas. It also reveals that references to climate change in other social policy areas do not operate as framings. The paper claims that discursive strategies that separate climate change policy from other social policy areas can invisibilise the connections that operate between these policies, links that are key for pursuing the UN's Sustainable Development Goals, especially in the urban context.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T06:12:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221089010
       
  • The status of homelessness: Access to housing for asylum-seeking migrants
           as an instrument of migration control in Italy and Sweden

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      Authors: Enrico Giansanti, Annika Lindberg, Martin Joormann
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Homelessness and other forms of destitution among asylum-seeking migrants are currently on the rise across Europe, as migrants’ access to social rights, including housing, has been restricted through repressive migration policies, fuelled by the welfare nationalism and chauvinism that surge among European states. This article explores the largely overlooked homelessness experienced by migrants seeking asylum in two different geographic and political contexts: Italy and Sweden. Building on research conducted over six years, including interviews with state officials, social and NGO workers, and testimonies of asylum-seeking migrants, we trace the logics and effects of policies that not only fail to deliver minimum welfare provisions to asylum-seeking migrants, but which produce and use homelessness as a way of controlling this group. The implications for asylum-seeking migrants include racialised discrimination, class-based and poverty-related health issues, and other harms, which are the direct result of policies that render access to fundamental social rights, including housing, into instruments of migration control.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:04:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221078437
       
  • Which capital do you mobilise' How bureaucratic encounters shape
           jobseekers’ social and cultural capital in France and Germany

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      Authors: Hadrien Clouet, Carolin Freier, Monika Senghaas
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Based on participant observations in the French and German public employment services (PES), this article proposes a new way of analysing bureaucratic encounters following Bourdieu’s capital theory. We show that caseworkers who are supposed to support jobseekers into employment, force the allegedly needy jobseekers to accumulate capital, but only in its cultural or social form, and never both at the same time. While there are national differences in the accumulation process, the findings highlight the coexistence of two different strategies: accumulation of cultural capital for a long-term and stable return to employment or accumulation of social capital for a short-term and temporary access to employment. Caseworkers attribute different importance to each type of capital, which results in an uneven distribution that reproduces inequalities through social policy services.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T07:31:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221084082
       
  • News media representations of people receiving income support and the
           production of stigma power: An empirical analysis of reporting on two
           Australian welfare payments

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      Authors: Sonia Martin, Timothy Schofield, Peter Butterworth
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      People receiving working-age income support payments are often stigmatised as morally and/or behaviourally deficient. We consider the role of the media, as a potential source of structural stigma, in perpetuating negative characterisations of people in receipt of either the Disability Support Pension (DSP) or unemployment benefits (Newstart) during a major period of welfare reform in Australia. Newspaper articles (N = 8290) that appeared in Australia’s five largest newspapers between 2001 and 2016, and referenced either payment were analysed. We found an increased use of fraud language associated with the DSP, which coincides with increased political and policy focus on this payment. We conclude that in a period of increasing political concern with welfare reform, media coverage of welfare recipients is a form of stigma power, acting discursively as symbolic violence.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-02-03T04:50:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183211073945
       
  • It Shouldn't Happen Here: Colonial and racial discourses of deservingness
           in UK anti-poverty campaign

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      Authors: Alexandra Wanjiku Kelbert
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      In September 2012, Save the Children UK launched the It Shouldn't Happen Here campaign, to raise awareness of the incidence of poverty amongst British children, and raise funds for the charity's UK programmes. Shortly after the launch, SCUK experienced severe media and political backlash, as primarily centre and right-wing commentators described the campaign as a political stunt, and sought to discredit, deny and depoliticise the claims that severe child poverty ‘happens here’. Drawing on interviews with former staff, and an analysis of the media response, this article explores the ways in which the campaign and the ensuing backlash were embedded in a set of colonial and racialized discourses around ‘who is poor’ and who is deserving/undeserving both in Britain and globally. Crucially, the findings from this study raise important challenges to the recent reintroduction of questions of race (as whiteness) in populist discussions around class and poverty.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T01:38:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221075960
       
  • A critical systems evaluation of the introduction of a ‘discharge to
           assess’ service in Kent

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      Authors: Erica Wirrmann Gadsby, Gerald Wistow, Jenny Billings
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Discharge to Assess (D2A) models of care have been developed to expedite the process of discharging hospital patients as soon as they are medically fit to leave, thereby improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system. This article focuses on the implementation of a D2A model in Kent, England, which formed a case study for a European research programme of improvements in integrated care for older people. It uses the Critical Systems Heuristics framework to examine the implementation process and focuses in particular on why this improvement project proved to be so difficult to implement and why the anticipated outcomes were so elusive. The analysis highlights the value in using critical systems thinking to better evaluate integrated care initiatives, in particular by identifying more explicitly different stakeholder perspectives and power relationships within the system and its decision environment.
      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T12:04:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183211065028
       
  • Book Review: Agents of Reform. Child Labor and the Origins of the Welfare
           State by Elisabeth Anderson

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      Authors: Jane Humphries
      First page: 550
      Abstract: Critical Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T05:39:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02610183221101161
       
 
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