Subjects -> POLITICAL SCIENCE (Total: 1097 journals)
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    - INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (148 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCES: GENERAL (35 journals)

POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 601 - 281 of 281 Journals sorted alphabetically
Polar Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Policy & Governance Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Policy and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Policy Design and Practice     Open Access  
Polis : Investigacion y Análisis Sociopolitico y Psicosocial     Open Access  
Polisemia     Open Access  
Polish Political Science Review     Open Access  
Politai     Open Access  
Politeja     Open Access  
Política     Open Access  
Política común     Open Access  
Política y Cultura     Open Access  
Política y Gobierno     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Política, Globalidad y Ciudadanía     Open Access  
Political Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Political Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Political Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Political Insight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Political Research Exchange     Open Access  
Political Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Political Science Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Political Science Research and Methods     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Political Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Political Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Políticas de la Memoria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Politics & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Politics and Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Politics and the Life Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Politics in Central Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Politics, Groups, and Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Politics, Philosophy & Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Politics, Religion & Ideology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Politiikka     Open Access  
Politik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Politika : Jurnal Ilmu Politik     Open Access  
Politique et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Politische Vierteljahresschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Politologija     Open Access  
Polity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Populism     Full-text available via subscription  
Post-Soviet Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Pouvoirs     Full-text available via subscription  
Presidential Studies Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Problems of Post-Communism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Produção Acadêmica     Open Access  
Progress in Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Przegląd Politologiczny     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PS: Political Science & Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
PSAKU International Journal of Interdisciplinary Research     Hybrid Journal  
Public Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Pyramides     Open Access  
Québec français     Full-text available via subscription  
Race & Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Raven : A Journal of Vexillology     Hybrid Journal  
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Recherches sociographiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Redescriptions : Political Thought, Conceptual History and Feminist Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Refleksje. Pismo naukowe studentów i doktorantów WNPiD UAM     Open Access  
Reflexion Politica     Open Access  
Refuge : Canada's Journal on Refugees / Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés     Open Access  
Region : Regional Studies of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Regional & Federal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Regional Formation and Development Studies     Open Access  
Regional Research of Russia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Regional Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Regional Studies Journal     Open Access  
Regional Studies, Regional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Regulation & Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Religion and Human Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Representation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Research & Politics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Resilience : International Policies, Practices and Discourses     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Review of African Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Review of Environmental Economics and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Review of Evolutionary Political Economy     Hybrid Journal  
Review of Faith & International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Review of International Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Review of International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Review of Middle East Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Review of World Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Revista Ágora     Open Access  
Revista Agulhas Negras     Open Access  
Revista Amauta     Open Access  
Revista Ambivalências     Open Access  
Revista Aportes para la Integración Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Revista Argentina de Ciencia Política     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Ciência Política     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Desenvolvimento Regional     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Humanas     Open Access  
Revista Compolítica     Open Access  
Revista de Administração IMED     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Ciencia Politica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Derecho     Open Access  
Revista de Direito Sociais e Políticas Públicas     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Hispánicos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Revista de Estudios Políticos     Open Access  
Revista de Estudos e Pesquisas sobre as Américas     Open Access  
Revista de Estudos Institucionais     Open Access  
Revista de Filosofía y Teoría Política     Open Access  
Revista de Humanidades     Open Access  
Revista de Investigações Constitucionais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de la Facultad de Derecho y Ciencias Políticas     Open Access  
Revista del CESLA     Open Access  
Revista Desenvolvimento Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista do CEAM     Open Access  
Revista dos Estudantes de Públicas : REP     Open Access  
Revista Economía y Política     Open Access  
Revista Educação e Políticas em Debate     Open Access  
Revista Eletrônica do Curso de Direito - PUC Minas Serro     Open Access  
Revista Epistemologias do Sul     Open Access  
Revista Española de Ciencia Política     Open Access  
Revista Espirales : Revista para a integração da América Latina e Caribe     Open Access  
Revista Finanzas y Política Económica     Open Access  
Revista Ibero-Americana de Estratégia     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Pensamiento Político     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Relaciones Públicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Latinoamericana de Antropología del Trabajo     Open Access  
Revista Maracanan     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Análisis Político y Administración Pública     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Politicas y Sociales     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Opinión Pública     Open Access  
Revista Neiba, Cadernos Argentina Brasil     Open Access  
Revista Nuevo Humanismo     Open Access  
Revista Orbis Latina     Open Access  
Revista Política Hoje     Open Access  
Revista Política y Estrategia     Open Access  
Revista Processus de Políticas Publicas e Desenvolvimento Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Psicologia Política     Open Access  
Revista Republicana     Open Access  
Revista Sinais     Open Access  
Revista Sul-Americana de Ciência Política     Open Access  
Revista SURES     Open Access  
Revista Textos Graduados     Open Access  
Revista Uruguaya de Ciencia Política     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue Française de Civilisation Britannique     Open Access  
Revue Gouvernance     Open Access  
Revue Interventions économiques     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue Sciences Humaines     Open Access  
Rhetoric & Public Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
RIPS. Revista de Investigaciones Politicas y Sociologicas     Open Access  
Rocznik Integracji Europejskiej     Open Access  
RUDN Journal of Political Science     Open Access  
Rule of Law and Anti-Corruption Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Russian Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Russian Politics & Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
SAIS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
School of Public Policy Publications     Open Access  
Scottish Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scottish Journal of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Secrecy and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Security and Human Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Security Dialogue     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Seqüência : Estudos Jurídicos e Políticos     Open Access  
Serbian Studies: Journal of the North American Society for Serbian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
SINTESA : Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik     Open Access  
SİYASAL / Journal of Political Sciences     Open Access  
Slovak Journal of Political Sciences     Open Access  
Small Wars & Insurgencies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253)
Small Wars Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Social Identities: Journal for the Study of Race, Nation and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Social Inclusion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Movement Studies: Journal of Social, Cultural and Political Protest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Social Philosophy Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Social Research : An International Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Science Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Social Sciences in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Service Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Socialism and Democracy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Socialist Studies / Études Socialistes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sociedad y Discurso     Open Access  
Society     Open Access  
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Soft Power     Open Access  
Somatechnics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sospol : Jurnal Sosial Politik     Open Access  
Soundings : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
South Asia Multidisciplinary Academic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
South East European University Review (SEEU Review)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South European Society and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Southeast Asian Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Southeast European and Black Sea Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Southeastern Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Special Operations Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
SPICE : Student Perspectives on Institutions, Choices & Ethic     Open Access  
Sprawy Narodowościowe     Open Access  
Środkowoeuropejskie Studia Polityczne     Open Access  
Stability : International Journal of Security and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
State Politics & Policy Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Statistics and Public Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Stato, Chiese e pluralismo confessionale     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

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Security Dialogue
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.389
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0967-0106 - ISSN (Online) 1460-3640
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Peace that antagonizes: Reading Colombia’s peace process as
           hegemonic crisis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Richard Georgi
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how disruptive political conflicts evolve in peace processes by studying Colombian human rights defenders’ discourses about the peace process with the FARC-EP. While post-conflict scholarship has predominantly discussed violence and societal frictions as caused by legacies of war or flawed peace governance, I focus on the confrontations over political imaginaries that are endemic to peace processes. Through the lens of post-foundational discourse theory, I read the peace process as hegemonic crisis. This allows me to unpack the entanglement of political change and conflict, to which my discussions with human rights defenders allude: On the one hand, the peace agreement opened a political moment, in which it seemed possible to leave behind the hitherto hegemonic imaginary of the conflict as terrorism that had protracted the ‘state of war’; the advocacy for peace with social justice, on the other hand, it restaged historical confrontations with elites of the political right as antagonistic conflict over the meaning of peace. My analysis not only challenges the paradigm of war-to-peace transition, but also defines discursive conditions under which disruptive conflicts turn a peace process into an enduring interregnum, where the dawn of the post-conflict epoch is perpetually deferred and activist lives are threatened.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T05:17:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106221084444
       
  • Archiving as embodied research and security practice

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      Authors: Kodili Henry Chukwuma
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the importance of embodiment in (research on) archival practices on state counter-terrorism policy in Nigeria. In doing so, the article seeks to contribute to the ongoing discussion around methodology and methods in critical security studies and other related fields in international relations by focusing on (researchers’) bodies as sites of knowledge production and intervention. Building on three empirical themes of fragmentation, labelling and gatekeeping that emerged from fieldwork in Abuja, Nigeria, I demonstrate how embodiment operates in active research contexts in the production – and problematization – of in/security. To do this, I draw inspiration from ideas around state archival practice; embodiment in critical security studies, especially as discussed in feminist and postcolonial work; and in/security theory to scaffold my broader methodological approach. A focus on embodiment, the article argues, marks the researcher’s body – and research – as integral to the development of theories and findings about security. At the same time, exploring the ways in which the (researcher’s) body is (re)produced in relation to identity and subjectivity encourages greater reflexivity in our research practice and fieldwork, as we are continually reminded that our work and our words are grounded in the standpoints that we occupy. The article concludes by identifying some useful strategies from my fieldwork for grappling with the challenges and tensions that emerge from bodily encounters in (security) research process.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T08:50:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106221075954
       
  • Security, sexuality, and the Gay Clown Putin meme: Queer theory and
           international responses to Russian political homophobia

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      Authors: Dean Cooper-Cunningham
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      Focusing on the case of ‘Gay Clown Putin’, this article theorizes memes as visual interventions in international politics. While not all memes are political interventions, Gay Clown Putin is an iconic meme that is part of the international response to Russian state-directed political homophobia that emerged after the gay propaganda law was passed in 2013. How it has circulated and the attention it has received make it apt for exploring memes as visual political interventions that challenge national security discourses. Here, I provide three readings of Gay Clown Putin that suggest different possibilities for how the meme might work politically. In so doing, I deepen international relations’ engagement with queer theory by bringing in the politics of play that works through a queer epistemology that embraces deviance. Bringing memes to the study of international security, I show how the collection of images making up the Gay Clown Putin meme provides space for understanding the visual politics of security.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T04:32:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211055308
       
  • ‘Yeah, this one will be a good one’, or Tacit knowledge, prophylaxis
           and the border: Exploring everyday health security decisionmaking

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      Authors: Adam J Ferhani
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      Approaching health security from a practice-theoretical perspective, this article advances our understanding of the everyday and locality in health security decisionmaking, and is guided by the following two questions: How is it determined when a health security threat is likely to be present at a point of entry' What knowledge informs everyday health security decisions at borders' Markedly little is known about health security decisionmaking, though conventional wisdom tells us that health security decisions are based on stringent processes and – importantly – anchored in epidemiological knowledge. The assumed primacy of epidemiological knowledge in health security decisionmaking is well illustrated by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic: evidence-based responses emerged globally following sophisticated epidemiologic investigation. Are health security decisions always rooted in epidemiology' A 12-month period of non-participant observation of Port Health Officers – who, under the auspices of the 2005 International Health Regulations, are responsible for numerous prophylactic measures at the UK border – gives a unique, privileged entry point for understanding the health security decisionmaking process and tells a story that both questions the centrality of epidemiology and foregrounds the role of tacit knowledge and intuition in health security decisionmaking. This article, which draws on insights from the science and technology studies literature on tacit knowledge, shows how observed health risk taxonomies and corollary decisions in prophylactic border security are predicated almost exclusively on hunches and ‘just knowing’ that something ‘doesn’t feel right’.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T12:26:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211066750
       
  • Memoirs of women-in-conflict: Ugandan ex-combatants and the production of
           knowledge on security and peacebuilding

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      Authors: Devon EA Curtis, Florence Ebila, Maria Martin de Almagro
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      The limitations of conventional accounts of security and peacebuilding drawing upon the ‘expert’ knowledge of military elites, policymakers and civil society representatives have been widely recognized. This has led security and peacebuilding policymakers, including through the United Nations Women, Peace and Security agenda, to search for alternative forms of knowledge, such as memoirs, photographs or oral histories, that better reflect lived experiences within local communities. Building on existing work on memoirs as knowledge production artefacts and on feminist security studies, this article demystifies experiential security knowledge through an analysis of three memoirs written by women ex-combatants in Uganda. We argue that while the memoirs offer complex and contradictory narratives about women ex-combatants, they are also the products of transnational mediated processes, whereby the interests of power translate complex narratives into consolidated representations and sturdy tropes of the abducted African woman ex-combatant. This means that although the three memoirs provide some hints as to transformative ways of thinking about security and peace, and offer dynamic accounts of personal experiences, they also reflect the politics of dominant representational practices.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T04:44:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211064040
       
  • The impact of (counter-)terrorism on public (in)security in Nigeria: A
           vernacular analysis

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      Authors: Akinyemi Oyawale
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the impact of (counter-)terrorism on public (in)security in Nigeria through engaging with non-elite understandings of ongoing conflicts in the northeast. Through 41 in-depth interviews carried out during a four-month fieldwork exercise with internally displaced persons in Nigeria, the article contributes to current (counter-)terrorism research on Nigeria and Africa by examining the lived experiences of non-traditional security ‘practitioners’, thus enriching current debates about ‘deepening’ and ‘broadening’ the security concept within critical security studies. The images of security that emerge show that the public in Nigeria adopt two main discursive devices, that is, a story and an interpretative repertoire, to discursively position themselves in relation to Boko Haram, the state and societal discourses and practices. Two discourses are prominent, namely a ‘(counter-)terrorist people’ discourse and a ‘kafir’ or ‘infidel’ discourse, which are constructed around ‘ethnic’ and ‘religious’ identities. This vernacular study of public understandings of (counter-)terrorism in Nigeria achieves three primary objectives: (i) it serves to invigorate debates around the meaning and practice of (in)security in Nigeria, (ii) it expands public (in)security debates on Africa, and (iii) it enriches vernacular research debate through foregrounding the experiences of groups and individuals who experience insecurity in their everyday lives.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T07:19:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211063796
       
  • Threats, deportability and aid: The politics of refugee rentier states and
           regional stability

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      Authors: Nicholas R Micinski
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      In 2012, 2016 and 2018–2019, Pakistan threatened to expel Afghan refugees and in 2015, 2016 and 2019, Kenya threatened to demolish the Dadaab camp and expel Somali refugees. Following the threats, the governments extracted more than $300 million aid, combined. Why did these states succeed in extracting aid despite their relatively weak status and not bordering the target of their blackmail' This article first situates refugee expulsion within the literature on refugee policies, migration diplomacy and refugee rentier states. Second, in two cases – Somalis in Kenya and Afghans in Pakistan – I show how states used the threat of expulsion to construct and leverage the deportability of their refugee communities as a foreign policy tool. States used the legal uncertainty around deportability to channel threats and violence toward refugees, but the primary audience of the threats were not refugees, but the international community. Officials in Kenya and Pakistan used threats paired with six-month or one-year delays as negotiation tactics to extract aid. Surprisingly, states that were generous hosts to refugees become strategically important because of their role in providing regional stability, which turned otherwise weak states into important allies that could threaten expulsion and extract aid from superpowers.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-08-26T10:58:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211027464
       
  • A call to arms: Hero–villain narratives in US security discourse

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      Authors: Alexandra Homolar
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      The rhetoric leaders use to speak to domestic audiences about security is not simply bluster. Political agents rely upon stories of enmity and threat to represent what is happening in the international arena, to whom and why, in order to push national and international security policy agendas. They do so for the simple reason that a good story is a powerful political device. This article examines historical ‘calls to arms’ in the United States, based on insights from archival research at US presidential libraries and the United States National Archives. Drawing on narrative theory and political psychology, the article develops a new analytic framework to explain the political currency and staying power of hero–villain security narratives, which divide the world into opposing spheres of ‘good’ and ‘evil’. Shifting the conceptual focus away from speakers and settings towards audience and affect, it argues that the resonance of hero–villain security narratives lies in the way their plot structure keeps the audience in suspense. Because they are consequential rhetorical tools that shape security policy practices, the stories political agents tell about security demand greater attention in the broader field of international security studies.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T02:33:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211005897
       
  • Hacking migration control: Repurposing and reprogramming deportability

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      Authors: Anja K Franck, Darshan Vigneswaran
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      What sort of political actors are international migrants' This article approaches this question by studying how migrants move between legality and illegality. We have struggled to understand the political content of this behaviour, because we have viewed it as either an attempt to gain the state’s acceptance as quasi-citizens or an attempt to autonomously subvert the state. However, migrants are more ambivalent political actors than either of these perspectives suggest. We argue that the political content of migrants’ efforts to move between legality and illegality can be better understood as a form of ‘hacking’: the ‘repurposing’ of institutionalized forms of political status in ways that compel the ‘reprogramming’ of systems of control. In order to develop this argument empirically, we draw on ethnographic research on the governance of migration between Myanmar and Malaysia.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-04-07T09:47:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0967010621996938
       
  • Negotiating detention: The radical pragmatism of prison-based resistance
           in protracted conflicts

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      Authors: Julie M Norman
      First page: 95
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      Critical prison studies have demonstrated how states use imprisonment and detention not only to punish individuals, but also to quell dissent and disrupt opposition movements. In protracted conflicts, however, the use of mass incarceration and unlawful detention often backfires on states as politically motivated prisoners exert their relevance by making imprisonment itself a central issue in the wider conflicts. Rather than retreating to the margins, prisoners have taken back prison spaces as loci of resistance, forcing both state authorities and their own external parties to engage with them seriously as political actors. This subversion of the prison space is not automatic, however; as this article demonstrates, prisoners have exerted the most influence on both authorities and their own factions when they have combined pragmatism and radicalism through multilevel strategies such as establishing praxes for self-education and organizing; using everyday non-compliance to challenge prison administrators; and occasionally, engaging in hunger strikes that exert boomerang pressure from external factions and solidarity networks on state authorities. Drawing from the case studies of Israel–Palestine, Northern Ireland and South Africa, this research shows how these radically pragmatic tactics create a ‘trialectic’ interaction between prisoners, state authorities and external networks, forcing direct and indirect negotiations regarding prisoners’ rights, and, at times, influencing broader conflict dynamics.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-01-27T11:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0967010620970521
       
  • Intelligence and radicalization in French prisons: Sociological analysis
           bottom-up

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      Authors: David Henri Scheer, Gilles Chantraine
      First page: 112
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      In the context of the fight against Islamist radicalization in France, prison intelligence rapidly developed from 2015 through the gradual creation of a dedicated service and a specific corps of professionals. This professionalization of prison intelligence work has deeply transformed the prison administration. This article aims to describe and analyse these transformations on the basis of an ethnographic study conducted in radicalization assessment units, which are specific units set up to assess prisoners who have committed or are suspected of committing crimes linked to radical Islam. We shall describe how the guards, probation officers, psychologists and educators participating in assessing the prisoners adapt to the new, encroaching presence of the intelligence mission. We shall analyse the forms of collaboration and competition between this staff and the prison intelligence officers. Lastly, we will examine criticism of the intelligence activity in the radicalization assessment units voiced by various professionals. The interpenetration of the assessment work and the intelligence mission – which are formally distinct missions – produces a specific type of knowledge relating to radicalized prisoners: a reproduction of certain representations or ‘profiles’.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-07-09T02:34:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211004824
       
  • Time will tell: Defining violence in terrorism court cases

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      Authors: Tasniem Anwar
      First page: 130
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      Calculating the potential risk of future terrorist violence is at the core of counter-terrorism practices. Particularly in court cases, this potential risk serves as legitimization for the preemptive criminalization of suspicious (financial) behaviour. This article argues that the preemptive temporality seen in such court cases is a practice of ‘sorting time’ and producing distinct legal definitions around future violence. Building on postcolonial and feminist scholarship on temporality, the article examines preemptive temporality as the material, embodied and multiple engagements with time that are enacted in terrorism court cases. Through the use of empirical data obtained from court observations, court judgements and interviews with legal practitioners, accounts of empirical temporalities are traced to illuminate other forms of violence that until now have been overshadowed by the dominant (and relatively unchallenged) perception of future terrorist threats that is enacted in the courtroom. In this way, the article makes two important contributions. First, it advances the theoretical debate on preemptive security through an examination of how legal and security practices co-produce temporality by defining future terrorist violence. Second, it contributes empirically by showing how temporality is constructed in multiple ways, paying specific attention to temporalities resisting dominating perceptions of future terrorist violence.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-08-17T10:57:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211013716
       
  • Policing with the drone: Towards an aerial geopolitics of security

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      Authors: Francisco Klauser
      First page: 148
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores in empirical detail the air-bound expectations, imaginations and practices arising from the acquisition of a new police drone in the Swiss canton of Neuchâtel. The study shows how drones are transforming the ways in which the aerial realm is lived as a context, object and perspective of policing. This tripartite structure is taken as a prism through which to advance novel understandings of the simultaneously elemental and affective, sensory, cognitive and practical dimensions of the aerial volumes within, on and through which drones act. The study of the ways in which these differing dimensions are bound together in how the police think about drones and what they do with them enables the development of an ‘aerial geopolitics of security’ that, from a security viewpoint, approaches interactions between power and space in a three-dimensional and cross-ontological way.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-03-18T11:03:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0967010621992661
       
  • Expecting the exceptional in the everyday: Policing global transportation
           hubs

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      Authors: Martin Nøkleberg
      First page: 164
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      There has been considerable scholarly interest regarding the notion of exceptionality, i.e. how and under what conditions extraordinary powers and measures are justified in the name of security. Exceptional threats are now omnipresent in the security discourse of the aviation and maritime industries, and this influences the everyday working environment. Taking Norwegian airport and port security as its point of departure, this article analyzes how security and policing agencies perceive, experience, and respond to the exceptional as part of their everyday practice. Drawing on extensive interview material with security agencies, it reveals how agencies construct strategies to cope with the consequences of exceptionality that arise from heightened (in)security and vulnerability. This article demonstrates that instrumental logic in risk management is one crucial strategy, but evidence also reveals the importance of the human dimension in security practices, as the emotional aspect of security consciousness is a part of the everyday life of security agencies. Closely associated with this is the emergence of mechanisms of active resistance that provide excitement and alleviate boredom.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-06-15T02:32:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211007066
       
  • Technical ecstasy: Network-centric warfare redux

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      Authors: Manabrata Guha
      First page: 185
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      How can we think about modes of martial operability that are responsive to the transformative conditions engendered by the information age' This article assumes an exploratory stance and reconsiders the theory of network-centric warfare (NCW) in concert with some elements of Gilbert Simondon’s work. It suggests that the Simondonian concepts of individuation, transduction and information, coupled with his understanding of technical objects, help us shift our focus from the platform-centric to the network-centric, thus enabling us to reengage with the theory of NCW in a manner that is responsive to the information age.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-03-30T09:17:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0967010621990309
       
  • The technological obstructions of asylum: Asylum seekers as forced
           techno-users and governing through disorientation

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      Authors: Martina Tazzioli
      First page: 202
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      This article deals with the technologies and apps that asylum seekers need to navigate as forced hindered techno-users in order to get access to asylum and financial support. With a focus on the Greek refugee system, it discusses the multiple technological intermediations that asylum seekers face when dealing with the cash assistance programme and how asylum seekers are obstructed in accessing asylum and financial support. It explores the widespread disorientation that asylum seekers experience as they navigate un-legible techno-scripts that change over time. The article critically engages with the literature on the securitization and victimization of refugees, and it argues that asylum seekers are not treated exclusively as potential threats or as victims, but also as forced hindered subjects; that is, they are kept in a condition of protracted uncertainty during which they must find out the multiple technological and bureaucratic steps they are requested to comply with. In the final section, the article illustrates how forced technological mediations actually reinforce asylum seekers’ dependence on humanitarian actors and enhance socio-legal precarity.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-08-26T10:57:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211026080
       
  • Resettling Afghan and Iraqi interpreters employed by Western armies: The
           Contradictions of the Migration–Security Nexus

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      Authors: Sara de Jong
      First page: 220
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      This article develops a novel analytical framework for capturing the multiple, competing configurations that the migration-security nexus invokes in discourse and practice, combining insights from critical migration and security scholarship. The framework’s application is illustrated with an empirical case study of the protection and relocation of Afghan and Iraqi former local interpreters and other locally employed civilians working for Western armies. The analysis demonstrates that locally employed civilians (LECs) are simultaneously considered security actors in the East and security risks in the West, the ‘best and brightest’ causing brain drain and potential terrorists when crossing borders, both ‘model migrants’ and threats to western values. By uncovering the nexus’s multiple configurations and its contradictions, the framework supports the project of denaturalizing the migration-security nexus, while also showing that the discourses and practices justified through its various configurations include the legitimation of border violence and the denial of protection to migrants.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-12-02T08:47:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211050811
       
  • Motioning the politics of security: The primacy of movement and the
           subject of security

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      Authors: Jef Huysmans
      First page: 238
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      The article explores challenges that giving conceptual primacy to movement poses for thinking the politics of security. In security studies, there has been an intense interest in mobile phenomena and the nature of security techniques that seek to control, contain or steer them. However, when exploring how these mobile phenomena bear upon conceptions of politics and their contestation, the analytics tend to turn back to more static or sedentary categories and reference points. Against this background, the article develops an analytical framework for security and its politics that gives conceptual primacy to movement. Giving conceptual primacy to movement implies three key moves: (a) changing lines from enclosures and connectors to pathways; (b) shifting from understanding movement through positions and nodes to the continuity of movement; and (c) displacing architectural and infrastructural readings of the relations between movements with readings of continuously unfolding confluences of movements moving in relation to one another. Applying these three moves displaces conceptions of movement as border crossings and networked connections with the notion of entangling movements moving in relation to one another. One of the implications for security studies is that taking such a point of view challenges the use of ‘the subject of security’, understood in terms of state sovereignty and the positioning of differential security claims hooked into group identity, as a key device for making security politically meaningful and contested. The article concludes that giving conceptual primacy to movement invites security studies not to limit itself to studying the politics of movement but to also incorporate a motioning of politics.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-11-06T08:24:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211044015
       
  • Modular sovereignty and infrastructural power: The elusive materiality of
           international statebuilding

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      Authors: Jutta Bakonyi
      First page: 256
      Abstract: Security Dialogue, Ahead of Print.
      This article uses the example of the Mogadishu International Airport zone and takes a spatio-temporal lens to explore how (sovereign) power unfolds in international interventions that aim at building a sovereign state. I show that the Mogadishu International Airport zone emerges as an elastic frontier zone that contradicts the sovereign imaginary intervenors aim to project and undermines many of the taken-for-granted boundaries that states tend to produce. The Mogadishu International Airport and similar zones emphasize the centrality of logistics and circulation in interventions, but also point towards their temporal and liminal character. Modularity became the material answer to the demand to secure circulation while adapting to the rapid rhythm and short timeframes of statebuilding. Modular designs enable the constant adaptation of the intervention terrain, allow intervenors to deny their power and imprint and facilitate the commercialization of supply chains and intervention materials. Sovereign power that operates through such zones becomes modular itself. It is exercised as an adaptable, in parts exchangeable, and highly mobile form of power that operates through crises and emergencies. The spaces and materials created by modular forms of sovereign power remain elusive, but nonetheless stratify experiences of power and security.
      Citation: Security Dialogue
      PubDate: 2021-11-19T11:15:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09670106211051943
       
 
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