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POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 281 of 281 Journals sorted alphabetically
Stato, Chiese e pluralismo confessionale     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Strategic Survey     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Středoevropské politické studie / Central European Political Studies Review     Open Access  
Studia Białorutenistyczne     Open Access  
Studia Orientalia Electronica     Open Access  
Studia z Polityki Publicznej     Open Access  
Studies in Conflict & Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 385)
Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Indian Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Studies of Transition States and Societies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Swiss Political Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
TalTech Journal of European Studies     Open Access  
Tangent     Hybrid Journal  
Tapestries : Interwoven voices of local and global identities     Open Access  
TEKA of Political Science and International Relations     Open Access  
Temas de Nuestra América. Revista de Estudios Latinoaméricanos     Open Access  
Temas y Debates     Open Access  
Temiminós Revista Científica     Open Access  
Tensões Mundiais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teoría y Praxis     Open Access  
Terra : Revista de Desarrollo Local     Open Access  
Territories : A Trans-Cultural Journal of Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Territory, Politics, Governance     Hybrid Journal  
Terrorism and Political Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 304)
Textos y Contextos     Open Access  
The African Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The American Prospect     Free  
The Black Scholar     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Economist - Leaders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
The Economist - United States     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
The Journal of Legislative Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Latin Americanist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Political Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Review of Black Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Review of International Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
The Round Table: The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Washington Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Theoria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Theory & Event     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Third World Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Third World Thematics : A TWQ Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Thought and Practice : A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya     Open Access  
Thunderbird International Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Tijdschrift voor HRM     Open Access  
Tla-Melaua : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Torun International Studies     Open Access  
Totalitarismus und Demokratie : Zeitschrift für internationale Diktatur- und Freiheitsforschung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
TRaNS : Trans-Regional-and-National Studies of Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Transformation: Critical Perspectives on Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Transnational Legal Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trayectorias Humanas Trascontinentales : TraHs     Open Access  
Trenzar : Revista de Educación Popular, Pedagogía Crítica e Investigación Militante     Open Access  
TRIM. Tordesillas : Revista de investigación multidisciplinar     Open Access  
Turkish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Twentieth Century Communism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Twentieth-Century China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ufahamu : A Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Undergraduate Journal of Politics and International Relations     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Universidad de La Habana     Open Access  
Universitas : Revista de Filosofía, Derecho y Política     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Utilitas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Utopia y Praxis Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Violence Against Women     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Vlast' (The Authority)     Open Access  
WEDANA : Jurnal Kajian Pemerintahan, Politik dan Birokrasi     Open Access  
West African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
West European Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Whitehall Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wirtschaftsdienst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
World Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Future Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
World Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 164)
World Today, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Youth and Globalization     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Friedens- und Konfliktforschung ZeFKo : Studies in Peace and Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Politikwissenschaft : Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Vergleichende Politikwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Култура / Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Управление / Upravlenie     Open Access  
Філософія та політологія в контексті сучасної культури (Philosophy and Political Science in the Context of Modern Culture)     Open Access  

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The Review of International Organizations
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.327
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1559-744X - ISSN (Online) 1559-7431
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Aid and institutions: Local effects of World Bank aid on perceived
           institutional quality in Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract Motivated by the lack of sub-national empirical evidence on the relationship between aid and institutional development, this study explores the local effects of World Bank aid on perceived institutional quality in African aid receiving countries. We combine geo-referenced data on the subnational allocation of World Bank aid projects to Africa over the 1995–2014 period with geo-coded survey data for 73,640 respondents across 12 Sub-Saharan African countries. The empirical results, which are robust across a wide range of specifications as well as to using alternative identification strategies, suggest a positive impact of World Bank aid on citizens’ expressed willingness to abide by key formal institutions. This applies for overall World Bank aid, but as may be expected, the estimated effects are more pronounced when restricting our attention to projects focusing on institution building. Notably, the observed effects concern finalized projects, not projects still under implementation, highlighting that institutional change is a slow process.
      PubDate: 2022-11-25
       
  • WHO approves' Relative trust, the WHO, and China’s COVID-19
           vaccines

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper aims to answer a general question: whether an international organization (IO) is able to shape public opinion in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Since the pandemic took hold in early 2020, countries across the globe have switched gear from prevention to vaccination. Most had to not only secure a sufficient supply of vaccines, but also to curb vaccine hesitancy among their populations. Can endorsement by an international organization like the World Health Organization (WHO) enhance a vaccine’s acceptability' Based on a survey experiment conducted in Taiwan, our study leverages the special relationship between China and Taiwan to show that WHO endorsement can induce acceptance of Chinese vaccines among Taiwanese people. However, the effect is found to be contextual in the sense that it only works when people’s trust in the WHO is higher than their trust in the vaccine’s country of origin. Our study not only contributes to the literature of IO legitimacy by empirically showing IOs’ causal effects on public opinion, but also sheds light on how a vaccine’s credibility can be enhanced to promote vaccination uptake.
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
       
  • Kim Moloney. 2022. Who Matters at the World Bank' Bureaucrats, Policy
           Change and Public Sector Governance (Oxford: Oxford University Press)

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      PubDate: 2022-11-19
       
  • At what cost' Power, payments, and public support of international
           organizations

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      Abstract: Abstract The drivers of public support for international organizations (IOs) are multifaceted and contested. Focusing on the US, we argue that citizens weigh elite cues about the financial burden associated with funding IOs and the influence over IOs that such funding yields. Moreover, we identify political ideology as a powerful moderator – theorizing that conservatives should respond more positively to cues about US influence and more negatively to cues about financial costs than liberals. We find support for the core theory, but also counterintuitively find that the negative effect of the cost treatment manifests primarily amongst liberals as opposed to conservatives. A second, pre-registered experiment reveals that conservatives support increasing funding to IOs to secure US influence, and may even support increasing taxes to do so, especially when cued by a co-partisan. By contrast, liberals who learn that funding provides influence prefer to cut funding to IOs, even when cued by a co-partisan.
      PubDate: 2022-10-14
       
  • Publisher Correction to: Managing performance and winning trust: how world
           bank staff shape recipient performance

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      PubDate: 2022-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09465-1
       
  • Correction to: Courtney Hillebrecht. 2021. Saving the international
           justice regime. Beyond backlash against international courts (Cambridge:
           Cambridge University Press)

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      PubDate: 2022-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09463-3
       
  • Courtney Hillebrecht. 2021. Saving the international justice regime.
           Beyond backlash against international courts (Cambridge: Cambridge
           University Press)

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      PubDate: 2022-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09460-6
       
  • Do Voters Reward Politicians for Trade Liberalization' Evidence from
           South Korea

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      Abstract: Abstract Do voters reward politicians for trade liberalization' We examine this question by analyzing voter responses in South Korea to the US-Korea Trade Agreement. Exploiting a change in party positions on the FTA over time, we examine the effects of different party positions on outcomes in the legislative and presidential elections. We find that voters who expect direct gains (losses) specifically from the treaty increase (decrease) support for the pro-trade party. However, voters in export-oriented industries do not reward politicians for a free trade agreement that does not directly affect their well-being. Our analysis of seven waves of individual-level panel survey data also demonstrates that a short-term change in a candidate’s position on the FTA influences voter decisions in the upcoming presidential election. The findings suggest that voter preferences with regard to trade can materialize into voting behavior when voters have a clear ex ante expectation of specific gains or losses from the trade policy.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-021-09442-0
       
  • Expropriation and human rights: does the seizure of FDI signal wider
           repression'

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      Abstract: Abstract Is expropriation - the seizure of assets from foreign investors - a sign of wider repression in host countries' If so, under which circumstances' The relationship between expropriation and human rights has been under-explored in the international relations and international political economy literatures. We argue that domestic repression and expropriation are interrelated: both can be part of a state’s repertoire of coercive activities, the use of these tools reflecting a leader’s insecurity about their power position. Expropriation, however, often attracts widespread media attention, and thus may signal wider repressive acts against citizens, which are typically harder to detect. We present an exploratory analysis using a cross-country sample of seventy-eight non-OECD countries (1960-2006). Results show that expropriation is connected to higher repression, and that the effect is stronger in countries with higher historical human rights protection, which are in the middle of the democracy-autocracy spectrum. Our theoretical and empirical contributions illuminate a relationship between property rights and human rights, and give important insights to understanding state incentives to repress.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-021-09447-9
       
  • Decision-making in international organizations: institutional design and
           performance

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      Abstract: Abstract International organizations (IOs) experience significant variation in their decision-making performance, or the extent to which they produce policy output. While some IOs are efficient decision-making machineries, others are plagued by deadlock. How can such variation be explained' Examining this question, the article makes three central contributions. First, we approach performance by looking at IO decision-making in terms of policy output and introduce an original measure of decision-making performance that captures annual growth rates in IO output. Second, we offer a novel theoretical explanation for decision-making performance. This account highlights the role of institutional design, pointing to how majoritarian decision rules, delegation of authority to supranational institutions, and access for transnational actors (TNAs) interact to affect decision-making. Third, we offer the first comparative assessment of the decision-making performance of IOs. While previous literature addresses single IOs, we explore decision-making across a broad spectrum of 30 IOs from 1980 to 2011. Our analysis indicates that IO decision-making performance varies across and within IOs. We find broad support for our theoretical account, showing the combined effect of institutional design features in shaping decision-making performance. Notably, TNA access has a positive effect on decision-making performance when pooling is greater, and delegation has a positive effect when TNA access is higher. We also find that pooling has an independent, positive effect on decision-making performance. All-in-all, these findings suggest that the institutional design of IOs matters for their decision-making performance, primarily in more complex ways than expected in earlier research.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-021-09445-x
       
  • Crisis affectedness, elite cues and IO public legitimacy

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      Abstract: Abstract What effects do international crises have on the public legitimacy of International Organizations (IOs)' Deviating from previous research, we argue that such crises make those international organizations more salient that are mandated to solve the respective crisis. This results in two main effects. First, the public legitimacy of those IOs becomes more dependent on citizens’ crisis-induced worries, leading to a more positive view of those IOs. Second, as the higher salience also leads to higher levels of elite communication regarding IOs, elite blaming of the IOs during crises results in direct negative effects on public legitimacy beliefs on IOs. Finally, both the valence and content of the elite discourse additionally moderate the positive effects of crisis-induced worries. Implementing survey experiments on public legitimacy beliefs on the WHO during the COVID-19 crisis with about 4400 respondents in Austria, Germany and Turkey, we find preliminary evidence for the expectations derived from our salience argument. In the conclusion, we discuss the implications of these findings for future research on IO legitimacy and IO legitimation.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-021-09452-y
       
  • Undermining conditionality' The effect of Chinese development
           assistance on compliance with World Bank project agreements

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      Abstract: Abstract Does Chinese development assistance undermine recipient country compliance with DAC aid conditionality' I theorize that Chinese aid provides an outside option that weakens recipient countries’ incentives to comply with conditionality by decreasing their dependence on DAC donors and undermining the ability of DAC donors to credibly commit to the enforcement of aid agreements. I test the theoretical predictions using project-level data on government compliance with World Bank project agreements for a sample of 42 Sub-Saharan African countries from 2000-2014. The empirical analysis finds strong support for the hypothesis that Chinese development assistance decreases the likelihood of recipient country compliance with the conditions specified in World Bank project agreements. The results are robust to alternative measures of Chinese development assistance, potential sources of omitted variable bias, and an instrumental variable estimation strategy.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-021-09443-z
       
  • China and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB): Chinese
           Influence Over Membership Shares'

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      Abstract: Abstract Does China exert influence over the AIIB, including its share allocation, to pursue its interests as many skeptical eyes suggest' What explains the subscription shares a member state has at the AIIB' Building upon existing literature on American influence in international financial institutions, we propose a unique theoretical argument on these questions. While most of the extant literature focuses on the US dispensing patronage to politically-economically proximate states, we suggest that China may not be so inclined. Instead, we theorize that states that are a priori distant from China might obtain higher shares relative to their GDP at the AIIB. We reason that this outcome is due to the benefits China faces in attracting more distant states (the supply side) as well as the political costs more distant states face in joining the AIIB (the demand side). More distant states are likely to demand more shares given their higher costs of membership, and China is inclined to accommodate these demands both for institutional legitimacy and the potential benefit of attracting distant countries closer to itself. Our evidence—from multiple interviews with top policy-makers and statistical analysis—provides robust support for our theoretical arguments.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-021-09441-1
       
  • Global banking and the spillovers from political shocks at the core of the
           world economy

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      Abstract: Abstract When do political shocks in core countries reverberate across the global financial system' We identify cross-border banking as a distinct transmission mechanism for political shocks. Democratic processes that advance (undermine) the interests of the global banking industry in core economies benefit (hurt) countries with closer banking ties to these economies. Empirically, we leverage the unanticipated outcomes of the 2016 US presidential election and the Brexit referendum to identify the role of cross-border banking in transmitting these shocks. We show that US global banks benefited disproportionately from the US election surprise. Accordingly, countries with closer ties to US banks fared relatively better; exposure to US bank flows cushioned the negative effect of the election. Evidence from Brexit reinforces the banking-channel hypothesis. The findings further our understanding of the role of global banks in the international financial order and underscore the need for more research on the political economy of global banking.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-021-09446-w
       
  • Foreign aid and judicial autonomy

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      Abstract: Abstract Foreign aid donors increasingly embrace judicial autonomy as an important component of advancing democracy and promoting investment abroad. Recipient governments also recognize the importance of judicial reform for improving the investment climate at home. However, developing countries often lack the necessary state capacity that would enable them to implement these reforms. We argue that recipient countries that lack the state capacity to undertake reforms on their own turn to donors, who readily assist in judicial reforms via targeted democracy and governance interventions. At the same time, we suggest that the external assistance matters less for recipients that are able to implement judicial reforms by themselves. We employ an instrumental variable model to test this argument in a global sample of aid-eligible countries.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-021-09439-9
       
  • Bureaucratic capacity and preference attainment in international economic
           negotiations

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      Abstract: Abstract What determines states’ ability to influence the contents of international institutions' Extant scholarship on international economic negotiations highlights the importance of political and economic capacity in negotiations. In this article, we argue that another structural source of negotiating power has been overlooked: bureaucratic capacity. Building on in-depth interviews with a large sample of international economic negotiators, we develop a theory of how differences in bureaucratic capacity can give states advantages in bilateral negotiations. We test our theory on a dataset of bilateral investment treaties. To measure preference attainment, we combine a unique repository of states’ public negotiating mandates called model treaties and the texts of finalized investment treaties to compute the verbatim distances between states’ stated preferences and the treaties they negotiate. We then show that states with greater bureaucratic capacity than their counterparts tend to achieve higher preference attainment in investment treaty negotiations. Our results have important implications for scholarship on international negotiations and for policy-makers engaged in investment policy reform.
      PubDate: 2022-09-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09475-z
       
  • Measuring precision precisely: A dictionary-based measure of imprecision

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      Abstract: Abstract How can we measure and explain the precision of international organizations’ (IOs) founding treaties' We define precision by its negative – imprecision – as indeterminate language that intentionally leaves a wide margin of interpretation for actors after agreements enter into force. Compiling a “dictionary of imprecision” from almost 500 scholarly contributions and leveraging insight from linguists that a single vague word renders the whole sentence vague, we introduce a dictionary-based measure of imprecision (DIMI) that is replicable, applicable to all written documents, and yields a continuous measure bound between zero and one. To demonstrate that DIMI usefully complements existing approaches and advances the study of (im-)precision, we apply it to a sample of 76 IOs. Our descriptive results show high face validity and closely track previous characterizations of these IOs. Finally, we explore patterns in the data, expecting that imprecision in IO treaties increases with the number of states, power asymmetries, and the delegation of authority, while it decreases with the pooling of authority. In a sample of major IOs, we find robust empirical support for the power asymmetries and delegation propositions. Overall, DIMI provides exciting new avenues to study precision in International Relations and beyond.
      PubDate: 2022-09-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09476-y
       
  • The state does not live by warfare alone: War and revenue in the long
           nineteenth century

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      Abstract: Abstract Previous research shows that wars contributed to the expansion of state revenues in the Early Modern period and in the twentieth century. There are, however, few cross-national studies on the long nineteenth century. Using new unbalanced panel data on wars and public revenues from 1816 to 1913 for 27 American and European countries, this article provides new evidence that military conflicts very rarely triggered lasting increases in public revenues during those years. We argue that the uneven diffusion of military innovations reduced the probability that international wars would be sufficiently intense to push state actors to seek additional resources. Moreover, the distinction between international and civil wars was blurred by the opportunities for non-state actors to mobilize military forces comparable to those of the state. Therefore, only very intense international and civil wars had a lasting impact on state revenues, but such conflicts were extremely rare, both in Europe and the Americas.
      PubDate: 2022-09-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09477-x
       
  • Susan Park. 2022. The Good Hegemon: US Power, Accountability as Justice,
           

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      PubDate: 2022-08-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09474-0
       
  • Julia C. Morse. 2022. The Bankers’ Blacklist: Unofficial Market
           Enforcement and the Global Fight Against Illicit Financing. (Ithaca:
           Cornell University Press) Michele Riccardi. 2022. Money Laundering
           Blacklists. (New York: Routledge) Nkechikwu Valerie Azinge-Egbiri. 2021.
           Regulating and Combating Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing: The Law
           in Emerging Economies. (New York: Routledge)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-06-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09466-0
       
 
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