Subjects -> POLITICAL SCIENCE (Total: 1097 journals)
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    - POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)
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POLITICAL SCIENCE (898 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 601 - 281 of 281 Journals sorted alphabetically
Polar Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Policy & Governance Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Policy and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Policy Design and Practice     Open Access  
Polis : Investigacion y Análisis Sociopolitico y Psicosocial     Open Access  
Polisemia     Open Access  
Polish Political Science Review     Open Access  
Politai     Open Access  
Politeja     Open Access  
Política     Open Access  
Política común     Open Access  
Política y Cultura     Open Access  
Política y Gobierno     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Política, Globalidad y Ciudadanía     Open Access  
Political Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Political Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Political Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Political Insight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Political Research Exchange     Open Access  
Political Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Political Science Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Political Science Research and Methods     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Political Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Political Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Políticas de la Memoria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Politics & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Politics and Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Politics and the Life Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Politics in Central Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Politics, Groups, and Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Politics, Philosophy & Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Politics, Religion & Ideology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Politiikka     Open Access  
Politik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Politika : Jurnal Ilmu Politik     Open Access  
Politique et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Politische Vierteljahresschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Politologija     Open Access  
Polity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Populism     Full-text available via subscription  
Post-Soviet Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Pouvoirs     Full-text available via subscription  
Presidential Studies Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Problems of Post-Communism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Produção Acadêmica     Open Access  
Progress in Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Przegląd Politologiczny     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PS: Political Science & Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
PSAKU International Journal of Interdisciplinary Research     Hybrid Journal  
Public Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Pyramides     Open Access  
Québec français     Full-text available via subscription  
Race & Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Raven : A Journal of Vexillology     Hybrid Journal  
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Recherches sociographiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Redescriptions : Political Thought, Conceptual History and Feminist Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Refleksje. Pismo naukowe studentów i doktorantów WNPiD UAM     Open Access  
Reflexion Politica     Open Access  
Refuge : Canada's Journal on Refugees / Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés     Open Access  
Region : Regional Studies of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Regional & Federal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Regional Formation and Development Studies     Open Access  
Regional Research of Russia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Regional Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Regional Studies Journal     Open Access  
Regional Studies, Regional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Regulation & Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Religion and Human Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Representation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Research & Politics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Resilience : International Policies, Practices and Discourses     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Review of African Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Review of Environmental Economics and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Review of Evolutionary Political Economy     Hybrid Journal  
Review of Faith & International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Review of International Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Review of International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Review of Middle East Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Review of World Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Revista Ágora     Open Access  
Revista Agulhas Negras     Open Access  
Revista Amauta     Open Access  
Revista Ambivalências     Open Access  
Revista Aportes para la Integración Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Revista Argentina de Ciencia Política     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Ciência Política     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Desenvolvimento Regional     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Humanas     Open Access  
Revista Compolítica     Open Access  
Revista de Administração IMED     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Ciencia Politica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Derecho     Open Access  
Revista de Direito Sociais e Políticas Públicas     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Hispánicos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Revista de Estudios Políticos     Open Access  
Revista de Estudos e Pesquisas sobre as Américas     Open Access  
Revista de Estudos Institucionais     Open Access  
Revista de Filosofía y Teoría Política     Open Access  
Revista de Humanidades     Open Access  
Revista de Investigações Constitucionais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de la Facultad de Derecho y Ciencias Políticas     Open Access  
Revista del CESLA     Open Access  
Revista Desenvolvimento Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista do CEAM     Open Access  
Revista dos Estudantes de Públicas : REP     Open Access  
Revista Economía y Política     Open Access  
Revista Educação e Políticas em Debate     Open Access  
Revista Eletrônica do Curso de Direito - PUC Minas Serro     Open Access  
Revista Epistemologias do Sul     Open Access  
Revista Española de Ciencia Política     Open Access  
Revista Espirales : Revista para a integração da América Latina e Caribe     Open Access  
Revista Finanzas y Política Económica     Open Access  
Revista Ibero-Americana de Estratégia     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Pensamiento Político     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Relaciones Públicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Latinoamericana de Antropología del Trabajo     Open Access  
Revista Maracanan     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Análisis Político y Administración Pública     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Politicas y Sociales     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Opinión Pública     Open Access  
Revista Neiba, Cadernos Argentina Brasil     Open Access  
Revista Nuevo Humanismo     Open Access  
Revista Orbis Latina     Open Access  
Revista Política Hoje     Open Access  
Revista Política y Estrategia     Open Access  
Revista Processus de Políticas Publicas e Desenvolvimento Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Psicologia Política     Open Access  
Revista Republicana     Open Access  
Revista Sinais     Open Access  
Revista Sul-Americana de Ciência Política     Open Access  
Revista SURES     Open Access  
Revista Textos Graduados     Open Access  
Revista Uruguaya de Ciencia Política     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue Française de Civilisation Britannique     Open Access  
Revue Gouvernance     Open Access  
Revue Interventions économiques     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue Sciences Humaines     Open Access  
Rhetoric & Public Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
RIPS. Revista de Investigaciones Politicas y Sociologicas     Open Access  
Rocznik Integracji Europejskiej     Open Access  
RUDN Journal of Political Science     Open Access  
Rule of Law and Anti-Corruption Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Russian Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Russian Politics & Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
SAIS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
School of Public Policy Publications     Open Access  
Scottish Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scottish Journal of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Secrecy and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Security and Human Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Security Dialogue     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Seqüência : Estudos Jurídicos e Políticos     Open Access  
Serbian Studies: Journal of the North American Society for Serbian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
SINTESA : Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik     Open Access  
SİYASAL / Journal of Political Sciences     Open Access  
Slovak Journal of Political Sciences     Open Access  
Small Wars & Insurgencies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253)
Small Wars Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Social Identities: Journal for the Study of Race, Nation and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Social Inclusion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Movement Studies: Journal of Social, Cultural and Political Protest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Social Philosophy Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Social Research : An International Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Science Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Social Sciences in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Service Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Socialism and Democracy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Socialist Studies / Études Socialistes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sociedad y Discurso     Open Access  
Society     Open Access  
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Soft Power     Open Access  
Somatechnics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sospol : Jurnal Sosial Politik     Open Access  
Soundings : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
South Asia Multidisciplinary Academic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
South East European University Review (SEEU Review)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South European Society and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Southeast Asian Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Southeast European and Black Sea Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Southeastern Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Special Operations Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
SPICE : Student Perspectives on Institutions, Choices & Ethic     Open Access  
Sprawy Narodowościowe     Open Access  
Środkowoeuropejskie Studia Polityczne     Open Access  
Stability : International Journal of Security and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
State Politics & Policy Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Statistics and Public Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Stato, Chiese e pluralismo confessionale     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Politics, Philosophy & Economics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.764
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 23  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1470-594X - ISSN (Online) 1741-3060
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Seeming incomparability and rational choice

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      Authors: Leo Yan
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      We sometimes have to choose between options that are seemingly incomparable insofar as they seem to be neither better than, worse than, nor equal to each other. This often happens when the available options are quite different from one another. For instance, consider a choice between prioritizing either criminal justice reform or healthcare reform as a public policy goal. Even after the relevant details of the goals and possible reforms are filled in, it is plausible that neither goal is better than, worse than, nor equal to the other. Such seemingly incomparable options present a problem for rational choice since it is unclear how an agent might rationally choose between them. What we need are some principles to help govern rational choice when faced with seemingly incomparable options. I here present three such principles. While each principle is individually compelling, I show that they are jointly incompatible. I then argue that the correct response to this inconsistent triad is to reject the principle that rationally censures performing a sequence of choices one knows will result in a suboptimal outcome. The upshot is that when seeming incomparability is involved, an agent can money pump themselves without being less rational for it.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T08:13:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X221100568
       
  • Public discourse and its problems

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      Authors: Michael Hannon
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      It is widely believed that open and public speech is at the heart of the democratic ideal. Public discourse is instrumentally epistemically valuable for identifying good policies, as well as necessary for resisting domination (e.g. by vocally challenging decision-makers, demanding public justifications, and using democratic speech to hold leaders accountable). But in our highly polarized and socially fragmented political environment, an increasingly pressing question is: Do actual democratic societies live up to the ideal of inclusive public speech' In this essay, I explore Maxime Lepoutre's defense of discursive democracy from the challenge of defective public discourse. I argue that political ignorance, dogmatism, and social fragmentation present more formidable challenges to discursive democracy than Lepoutre acknowledges.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T07:28:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X221100578
       
  • Why not anarchism'

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      Authors: Jason Brennan, Christopher Freiman
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Recent debates over ideal theory have reinvigorated interest in the question of anarchy. Would a perfectly just society need—or even permit—a state' Ideal anarchists such as Jason Brennan, G.A. Cohen, Christopher Freiman, and Jacob Levy argue that strict compliance with justice obviates the need for a state. Ideal statists such as David Estlund, Gregory Kavka, and John Rawls think that coercive political institutions serve indispensable functions even in ideal conditions. This paper defends ideal anarchism. Our argument begins by describing a camping trip inspired by Cohen that illustrates why an anarchist form of cooperation is more intrinsically desirable than the statist alternative. After detailing Rawls's ideal theory and Estlund's “nonconcessive” moral theory, we argue—contrary to Rawls, Estlund, and Kavka—that large-scale societies without moral imperfection do not need a state.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T05:23:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X221098098
       
  • Sanctuary as democratic non-cooperation

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      Authors: Patti Tamara Lenard
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Across North America, Europe and Latin America, multiple sub-state jurisdictions have declared themselves to be migrant “sanctuaries”. By adopting sanctuary status, sub-state jurisdictions signal their welcoming attitude towards migrants as well their opposition to the state-level policies that target them for exclusion. In this article, I examine the place of sanctuary in the broader literature of political resistance and opposition in democratic states, and then whether it can be justified all things considered. I locate my examination in the political theory of federalism, to identify an expectation of cooperation – which, it appears, sanctuary jurisdictions are refusing to accept, usually with respect to immigration enforcement efforts. I refer to this form of opposition as “democratic non-cooperation” and identify its key features. I describe a “cooperation continuum”, to suggest that non-cooperation takes four main forms – evasion, non-engagement, disruption and obstruction – which I describe both in general terms and in relation to sanctuary practices in particular. Finally, I observe that the form of opposition that sanctuary is, is not limited to sanctuary: that is, there are other cases of this form of opposition in other policy domains, and moreover, not all of the objectives taken by those who deploy this form of opposition are progressive. Ultimately, this article's central contribution is to fleshing out modes of opposition in democratic spaces in general, by examining the morality of sanctuary actions taken around the world.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T05:23:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X221098001
       
  • Who cares what the people think' Public attitudes and refugee
           protection in Europe

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      Authors: Martin Ruhs
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      This paper discusses why and how public attitudes should matter in regulating asylum and refugee protection in rich democracies, with a focus on Europe. Taking a realistic approach, I argue that public views constitute a soft feasibility constraint on effective and sustainable policies towards asylum seekers and refugees, and that a failure to take seriously and understand the attitudes of the host country’s population can have a very damaging effect on refugee protection and migrants’ rights in practice. Bringing together insights from political philosophy, the politics of asylum, and research on public attitudes, I develop my argument by discussing why ‘what the people think’ should matter in asylum and refugee polices; how public views can and should matter given the well-known challenges with measuring attitudes and policy preferences; and what the prevailing public views might mean for the reform of asylum and refugee policies in Europe.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T07:27:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X221085701
       
  • Only libertarianism can provide a robust justification for open borders

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      Authors: Christopher Freiman, Javier Hidalgo
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      This paper argues that libertarianism—and only libertarianism—can vindicate immigration's status as a human right whose protection is morally required in nearly all circumstances. Competing political theories such as liberal egalitarianism fail to rule out significant immigration restrictions in a range of realistic conditions. We begin by outlining the core tenets of libertarianism and their implications for immigration policy. Next, we explain why arguments that appeal to alternative principles are unable to provide robust justification for open borders. We conclude by considering whether our argument vindicates libertarianism or undermines open borders.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-22T06:50:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X221091278
       
  • The problem of equal moral status

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      Authors: Zoltan Miklosi
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      A central puzzle of contemporary moral and political philosophy is that while most of us believe that all or almost all human beings enjoy the same moral status, human beings possess the capacities that supposedly ground moral status to very unequal levels. This paper aims to develop a novel strategy to vindicate the idea of moral equality against this challenge. Its central argument is that the puzzle emerges only if one accepts a usually unstated theoretical premise about value and the proper response to value. The premise holds that if the presence of a valuable property warrants a certain kind of response towards its bearers, then every variation in the degree to which the property is present necessarily constitutes a reason for a corresponding variation in the response that is warranted towards its bearers. It argues that despite its intuitive appeal, the premise is not plausible as a general view about the proper way of responding to value, and as a view about responding to the value of rational beings in particular. It proposes an account of the proper manner of valuing rational beings that supports a distinctive version of the so-called threshold approach to justifying equal moral status.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T06:32:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X221091285
       
  • Domination and democratic legislation

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      Authors: Sean Ingham, Frank Lovett
      First page: 97
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Republicans hold that people are unfree if they are dominated, that is, if others have an insufficiently constrained ability to frustrate their choices. Since legislation can frustrate individuals’ choices, republicans believe that the design of legislative institutions has consequences for individual freedom. Some have argued that if legislative institutions are democratic, then they need not be sources of domination at all. We argue this view is incorrect: the introduction of legislative authority, even if democratically organized, always creates a new site of domination. However, republicans can defend democratic procedures as the best means of minimizing the degree to which citizens are dominated, subject to the constraint of equalizing everyone’s freedom. We formulate and prove this claim within a simple model of legislative authority and domination.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T01:37:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X211072272
       
  • Political equality, plural voting, and the leveling down objection

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      Authors: David Peña-Rangel
      First page: 122
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      I argue that the consensus view that one must never level down to equality gives rise to a dilemma. This dilemma is best understood by examining two parallel cases of leveling down: one drawn from the economic domain, the other from the political. In the economic case, both egalitarians and non-egalitarians have resisted the idea of leveling down wages to equality. With no incentives for some people to work hard social productivity will likely decline, further lowering people's wages and thus leaving everybody all-things-considered worse off as a result—hence “never level down.” On the other hand, however, the argument against leveling down does not appear to pass muster in the political sphere: denying political equality in the form of “one person, one vote” (OPOV), for example, by giving a higher share of voting power to people with, say, more education seems straightforwardly objectionable, even if such a voting scheme would improve the outcomes of all people, including those who are ultimately left with fewer votes. Thus, a fundamental tension arises: we can either endorse the widely-affirmed “never-level-down” thesis, which says that sacrificing people's well-being exclusively for the sake of promoting equality can never be the right thing to do, or we can endorse the principle of “one person, one vote.” But we cannot do both. I defend this dilemma against a view I call the compatibility view: roughly, that because OPOV is strictly necessary to advance some weighty, non-egalitarian interest people have, accepting OPOV as a principle of justice is compatible with one's rejection of leveling down.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:46:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X221087470
       
  • A market failures approach to justice in health

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      Authors: L. Chad Horne, Joseph Heath
      First page: 165
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      It is generally acknowledged that a certain amount of state intervention in health and health care is needed to address the significant market failures in these sectors; however, it is also thought that the primary rationale for state involvement in health must lie elsewhere, for example in an egalitarian commitment to equalizing access to health care for all citizens. This paper argues that a complete theory of justice in health can be derived from a commitment to correcting market failure, or in other words promoting Pareto-efficiency, in the domain of health. This approach can address familiar problems around access to care, as well as problems related to resource allocation and rationing (including resource allocation between generations), the control of health care costs, and the foundations of public health. Egalitarian theories of justice in health cannot make sense of the depth and pervasiveness of state involvement in health and health care; only a theory rooted in the need to correct market failure can.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T06:31:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X221089670
       
  • The puzzle of competitive fairness

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      Authors: Oisin Suttle
      First page: 190
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      There is a sense of fairness that is distinctive of markets. This is fairness among economic competitors, competitive fairness. We regularly make judgments of competitive fairness about market participants, public policies and institutions. However, it is not clear to what these judgments refer, or what moral significance they have. This paper offers a rational reconstruction of competitive fairness in terms of non-domination. It first identifies competitive fairness as a distinctive claim, advanced within markets in turn characterized as antagonistic, instrumental and procedural. It distinguishes competitive fairness from a number of familiar ideals with which it might be confused: legitimate expectation, equality of opportunity, sporting fairness and economic efficiency. While many exponents likely assume competitive fairness can be explained in terms of one of these ideals, in each case there are significant objections to doing so. Instead, the paper argues that the most promising justification of competitive fairness is under the republican ideal of non-domination, which can reconstruct many of the intuitive judgments of competitive fairness that we make in particular cases. However, it concludes, this explanation makes it difficult for exponents to continue to emphasize competitive fairness, given diverse other risks of domination, and to other values, in markets.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T12:11:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X221082260
       
  • Commons, Communes, and Freedom

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      Authors: Harrison Frye
      First page: 228
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Private property rights involve coercion against non-owners in their enforcement. As critics of private property point out, this coercion involves a restriction on freedom. Sometimes, such critics suggest that collective property expands rights of access, and therefore expands freedom relative to private property. Does this follow' This paper argues no. To make this argument, I look at two particular forms of collective property: open-access commons and closed-access communes. Both may give rise to potential threats to freedom. This does not mean that collective property never expands freedom relative to private property. It only means we cannot infer from the fact that collective property rules extend rights of access that collective property expands freedom. The upshot is a need to pay more attention to how different property rights work in practice.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T04:32:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X221079055
       
  • The brain drain as exploitation

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      Authors: Paul Bou-Habib
      Abstract: Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Ahead of Print.
      When skilled individuals emigrate from developing states to developed states, they leave a burdened state behind and bring their valuable human capital to a state that enjoys vast advantages by comparison. Most of the normative debate to date on this so-called ‘brain drain’ has focused on the duties that skilled emigrants owe to their home state after they emigrate. This article shifts the focus to the question of whether their host state acquires special duties toward their home state and argues for an affirmative answer to that question. After identifying the conditions under which ‘exploitative free-riding’ can occur, the article shows that the brain drain is a case of exploitation that gives rise to special duties of compensation for developed host states.
      Citation: Politics, Philosophy & Economics
      PubDate: 2021-08-06T08:51:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1470594X211027259
       
 
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