Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1535 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (37 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (88 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (167 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (171 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (23 journals)
    - LAW (935 journals)
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CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)

Showing 1 - 26 of 26 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Criminal Law Review     Free   (Followers: 9)
Anuario Iberoamericano de Derecho Internacional Penal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bergen Journal of Criminal Law & Criminal Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Berkeley Journal of Criminal Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cambridge journal of evidence-based policing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Derecho Penal y Criminología     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Criminal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Howard Journal of Crime and Justice The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Indonesian Journal of Criminal Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Digital Crime and Forensics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Criminal Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 416)
Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51)
Justitiële verkenningen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Legal and Criminological Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Monatsschrift für Kriminologie und Strafrechtsreform / Journal of Criminology an Penal Reform     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Money Laundering Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
New Journal of European Criminal Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
PROCES     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 459)
Revista Eletrônica de Direito Penal e Política Criminal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SASI     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Sexual Abuse A Journal of Research and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Strafverteidiger     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Te Wharenga : New Zealand Criminal Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tidsskrift for strafferett     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tijdschrift voor Criminologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Criminal Law
Number of Followers: 416  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0022-0183 - ISSN (Online) 1740-5580
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1143 journals]
  • Refusing to Provide a Name and Address and the Common Law Right to Remain
           Silent: Neale v Director of Public Prosecutions [2021] EWHC 658 (Admin)
    • Authors: Neil Parpworth
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T09:45:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220183211016055
       
  • A Beautiful Law for the Beautiful Game' Revisiting the Football
           Offences Act 1991
    • Authors: Geoff Pearson
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.
      This article revisits the operation of the Football (Offences) Act (FOA) 1991 30 years after its enactment. FOA was introduced following recommendations of the Taylor Report 1990 as part of a raft of measures looking to balance spectator safety against the threat of football crowd disorder. Providing targeted and largely uncontroversial restrictions on football spectators, and seemingly popular with police and clubs, FOA criminalises throwing missiles, encroaching onto the pitch and engaging in indecent or ‘racialist’ chanting. It is argued here that FOA has struggled to keep pace with developments in football spectator behaviour and management, that it is increasingly used in a manner unanticipated by the legislators and that it faces new challenges in enforcement as a result of developing human rights law. The FOA may still provide a useful tool for football spectator management, but it needs substantial amendment to remain relevant to the contemporary legal and football landscape.
      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-04-30T08:26:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220183211007269
       
  • A Betrayal of Trust' Back to the Drawing Board for Medical
           Manslaughter
    • Authors: Jonathan Lilleker
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.
      In seeking to provide a solution to the issues raised by medical manslaughter, Wheeler and Wheeler have recently proposed reform by way of a reconceptualised offence based on a breach of a fiduciary duty amounting to a betrayal of trust. This article provides an examination of gross negligence manslaughter, before undertaking a review of the proposals advocated by the authors. Applying the proposed offence to more contemporary cases than initially examined by Wheeler and Wheeler, namely, Misra and Srivastava, Kovvali, Rudling, Rose and Sellu, it is argued that despite the initial appeal of a betrayal of trust test, the proposals advocated by the authors do little to remedy the flaws within the current law.
      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-04-21T06:43:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220183211009319
       
  • Rethinking the Mental Element in Involuntary Manslaughter
    • Authors: Dennis J Baker
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, it is argued that the mental element for gross negligence manslaughter requires subjective fault. It is argued that the negligent conduct is evaluated objectively but does not mean a person cannot be subjectively aware of the fact that he or she is engaging in such conduct. Wilful negligence is not contradictory, because the noun refers to the conduct while the adjective refers to the fault of the wrongdoer. It is submitted the ancient authorities strongly support the theory of that grossness in negligence required subjective fault—and was not referring to the noun.
      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-04-01T09:53:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220183211004068
       
  • The Lockerbie Aircraft Bombing Case and the Final Appeal
    • Authors: Robert Shiels
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.
      The only person against whom a charge of murder was proved in regard to the Lockerbie bombing case in 1988 had an appeal against conviction refused. A subsequent referral of the case back for further consideration by appellate judges was abandoned by the appellant. He was released on the statutory ground of compassion due to his imminent death. The appeal was revived after further investigation and fresh evidence and referred to the criminal appeal court for Scotland.
      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-03-10T09:52:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220183211000568
       
  • Unfitness to Plead, Insanity and the Law Commission: Do We Need a
           Diagnostic Threshold'
    • Authors: James Mason
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines one aspect of the new test of effective participation at trial proposed by the Law Commission of England and Wales. This proposal aims to replace the current criteria for fitness to plead originating from Pritchard and developed more recently in M (John). Specifically, this article offers a critical examination of the Commission’s refusal to incorporate a so-called ‘diagnostic threshold’ within their proposed test. After reviewing the arguments for and against this decision, attention is drawn to the clear presence of diagnostic thresholds within other areas of law, such as the mental condition defence of insanity. Overall, the Commission’s proposals are a vast improvement upon the archaic rules of present day, and, contrary to the views of some scholars, their decision to omit a diagnostic criterion is no exception to this. In fact, the implications of this decision reach far beyond the particular context of unfitness proceedings and ultimately cast doubt on the significance of diagnostic thresholds in all areas of law. By focusing exclusively on the relationship between unfitness to plead and the defence of insanity, this piece demonstrates how both tests can be reformulated so as to avoid any explicit reference to a diagnostic criterion.
      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-02-19T10:05:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0022018321995430
       
  • Redrawing the Boundaries: The Adequacy of the Sexual Offences Act in
           Addressing Female Sexual Offending
    • Authors: Jeremy Robson, Lucy Newman, Andrew O’Hagan
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.
      Discussion around sexual offending traditionally focuses on the notion of male offenders and female victims. In this article, we argue that there is clear evidence that females commit offences and that males are often the victims of these offences. We discuss the evidence for this and the impact it has on the victims of these offences. We argue that the processes which have informed policy in this area have dismissed this class of offending and as a result the Sexual Offences Act and associated policies do not provide a clear enough framework for the prosecution of these offenders. We present some suggestions for how this lacuna could be addressed.
      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-01-18T10:02:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0022018320984451
       
  • A Sexual Harm' HIV Transmission, ‘Biological’ GBH and Ancillary
           Sentencing Provisions in England and Wales
    • Authors: Cameron Giles
      First page: 209
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the scope and meaning of ‘sexual harm’ within the context of ancillary sentencing orders in England and Wales. It argues that the statutory definition provided in the Sexual Offences Act 2003, recently replicated in the Sentencing Act 2020, does not extend to the transmission of sexually communicable infections and that, subsequently, it is inappropriate for Sexual Harm Prevention Orders to be imposed with the aim of preventing transmissions of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). It suggests that recent case law reinforces this point and that the questions this raises reflect the broader need for further scrutiny of the aims and purposes of sentencing, and criminalisation more generally, in instances of STI transmission.
      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-02-08T09:36:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0022018321991097
       
  • Should Mistaken Consent Still Be Consent' In Defence of an Incremental
           Understanding of Consent in the Sexual Offences Act 2003
    • Authors: Isabella Glendinning
      First page: 223
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.
      The article considers the recent case of R v Lawrance [2020] EWCA Crim 971 and the way in which the courts are deciding to interpret the concept of freedom under s. 74 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003. It is argued that the case shines a light upon the lacuna present in the Act with regards to deception and consent, identified by academics when the Act was promulgated. It is suggested that the definition of consent lacks clarity as courts have struggled in its application. The resulting ‘so closely connected’ test developed in the cases of R (on the application of Monica) v DPP [2018] EWHC 3508 (Admin); [2019] QB 1019 and R v Lawrance [2020] EWCA Crim 971 is not an adequate solution to the problem of deception and consent and potentially muddies the waters further. The article offers a potential solution that might better uphold the ambition of protecting sexual autonomy while adhering to the concept of fair-labelling.
      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-03-25T09:21:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0022018321998239
       
  • Intentionally Overcharged' R v Thacker & Ors [2021] EWCA Crim 97
    • Authors: Beatrice Krebs
      First page: 232
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-04-19T07:41:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220183211008679
       
  • Prosecuting Victims of Modern Slavery and Trafficking: Does s 45 of the
           Modern Slavery Act 2015 Have Retrospective Effect': R v CS [2021] EWCA
           Crim 134
    • Authors: Neil Parpworth
      First page: 236
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-04-07T08:08:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220183211006552
       
  • A Question of Fact Not Intent: No Requirement to Prove that D Intended the
           Touching To Be Sexual for the Purposes of Sexual Assault: Attorney
           General’s Reference (No 1 of 2020) [2020] EWCA Crim 1665; [2021] 1 Cr
           App R 15
    • Authors: Samantha Pegg, Mark Thomas
      First page: 240
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T06:59:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220183211009012
       
  • Admissibility of Conclusive Grounds Decisions and s 45 of the Modern
           Slavery Act 2015: Director of Public Prosecutions v M [2020] EWHC 3422
           (Admin)
    • Authors: Sean Mennim
      First page: 244
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T07:00:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220183211008680
       
  • Criminalising Cyberflashing: Options for Law Reform
    • Authors: Clare McGlynn, Kelly Johnson
      First page: 171
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we examine the phenomenon of cyberflashing, outlining its prevalence, harms, and victim-survivors’ experiences. We then consider the extent to which English criminal law currently applies to this form of sexual abuse. We argue that although cyberflashing can be prosecuted in England and Wales, this is only in very limited circumstances; the existing law is confusing, piecemeal, has significant omissions, and consequently prosecutions are extremely unlikely. As such, the current criminal law in England and Wales is failing victim-survivors of cyberflashing. Due to its prevalence, its harmful impacts and similarities with other criminalised forms of sexual violence, comprehensive law reform, which appropriately addresses cyberflashing as a sexual offence, is now critical. Accordingly, we examine legislation in other jurisdictions where criminal laws targeting cyberflashing have been adopted, and provide recommendations for law reform: specifically, we recommend the development of a new criminal offence that purposely targets cyberflashing in all its forms.
      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2020-11-16T06:07:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0022018320972306
       
  • Not ‘Very English’ - on the Use of the Polygraph by the Penal System
           in England and Wales
    • Authors: Kyriakos N Kotsoglou, Marion Oswald
      First page: 189
      Abstract: The Journal of Criminal Law, Ahead of Print.
      One of the most striking developments in the penal system in England and Wales is the increasing use of the polygraph by probation services. Despite severe criticism from scientific institutions and academic discourse, the legal order increasingly deploys the long-discredited polygraph in order to extract adverse statements from released offenders. Our article is structured as follows: First, we summarise the statutory and regulatory framework for the current use of the polygraph in the monitoring of sex offenders released on licence, and the proposed expansion of the polygraph testing regime as set out in the Domestic Abuse Bill and the Counter-Terrorism and Sentencing Bill respectively. We then review our findings in respect of governing policies and procedures uncovered by our FOI-based research, highlighting the concerning lack of consistency in respect of both practice and procedure. In the subsequent sections we set out the main arguments deployed by polygraph proponents, and posit our view that none of these arguments can withstand scrutiny. We conclude by proposing a moratorium on any further use of the polygraph by the State, in order to thoroughly evaluate its effect on the integrity of the legal order, human rights and, more generally, the Rationalist aspirations of the penal system. In addition, and given already existing law, we propose a process of independent oversight and scrutiny of the use of the polygraph in licence recall decisions and other situations impacting individual rights, especially police investigations triggered by polygraph test results.
      Citation: The Journal of Criminal Law
      PubDate: 2020-12-02T09:59:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0022018320976284
       
 
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