Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1613 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (37 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (92 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (169 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (24 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (196 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (23 journals)
    - LAW (981 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (11 journals)

INTERNATIONAL LAW (196 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 171 of 171 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Juridica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of International and Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Afrilex     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Agora International Journal of Juridical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AJIL Unbound     Open Access  
American Business Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
American University International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Annuaire Français de Droit International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Law and Social Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Annual Survey of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Antitrust Chronicle - Competition Policy International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Anuario Colombiano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Derechos Humanos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Español de Derecho Internacional     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Anuario español de derecho internacional privado     Partially Free  
Anuario Iberoamericano de Derecho Internacional Penal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anuario Mexicano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arbitration International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
ASA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asian International Arbitration Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian Journal of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Belli Ac Pacis : Jurnal Hukum Internasional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Berkeley Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Boletin Mexicano de Derecho Comparado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Borderlands Journal : Culture, Politics, Law and Earth     Open Access  
Boston College International & Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Brigham Young University International Law and Management Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
British Yearbook of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Brooklyn Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
California Western International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Yearbook of International Law / Annuaire canadien de droit international     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cape Town Convention Journal     Open Access  
Chicago Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Chinese Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Columbia Journal of Transnational Law     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Commonwealth Law Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Comparative Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Computer Law Review International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary Security Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Cornell International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Corporate Governance An International Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Criterios     Open Access  
Denver Journal of International Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Deusto Journal of Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
European Business Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
European Company Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
European Foreign Affairs Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
European Journal for Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
European Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
European Property Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Fordham International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Foreign Policy Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Jurist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Harvard International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 52)
ICSID Review : Foreign Investment Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Indian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal  
Inter: Revista de Direito Internacional e Direitos Humanos da UFRJ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intergenerational Justice Review     Open Access  
International & Comparative Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 273)
International Area Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Commentary on Evidence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Comparative Jurisprudence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal for Court Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal for the Semiotics of Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Evidence and Proof     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Information Privacy, Security and Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Language & Law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Law in Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Nuclear Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Political Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Private Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Public Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Transitional Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Law: Revista Colombiana de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Planning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Review of Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Review of the Red Cross     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 87)
Israel Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ius Gentium     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Jerusalem Review of Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Biosecurity Biosafety and Biodefense Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of European Competition Law & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of International Dispute Settlement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of International Economic Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of International Political Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of International Trade Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Law, Policy and Globalization     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Liberty and International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Private International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal on the Use of Force and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Legal Issues of Economic Integration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Leiden Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
LEX     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
London Review of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Loyola University Chicago International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maastricht Journal of European and Comparative Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Maryland Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Melbourne Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Michigan State International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Netherlands International Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Netherlands Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
New Zealand Journal of Public and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
New Zealand Yearbook of International Law, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Northwestern Journal of International Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Northwestern Journal of International Law & Business     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Notre Dame Journal of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Oromia Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pace International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Paix et Sécurité Internationales     Open Access  
Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Polar Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Public and Private International Law Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recht der Werkelijkheid     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of European Community & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revista de Derecho de la Unión Europea     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Direito Brasileira     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de la Secretaría del Tribunal Permanente de Revisión     Open Access  
Revista Facultad de Jurisprudencia     Open Access  
Revista Tribuna Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Videre     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue québécoise de droit international / Quebec Journal of International Law / Revista quebequense de derecho internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Santa Clara Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SASI     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
South African Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South Carolina Journal of International Law and Business     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Stanford Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Syracuse Journal of International Law and Commerce     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
TDM Transnational Dispute Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tilburg Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Transnational Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Uniform Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
University of Miami Inter-American Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Utrecht Journal of International and European Law     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law     Free   (Followers: 5)
Virginia Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 5)
Washington University Global Studies Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wisconsin International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of VAT/GST Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Trade and Arbitration Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Yale Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 18)
Yearbook of International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Yearbook of International Humanitarian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Zeitschrift für Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Zeitschrift für das Privatrecht der Europäischen Union - European Union Private Law Review / Revue de droit privé de l'Union européenne     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für öffentliches Recht     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Zeitschrift für Zivilprozess International     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
European Journal of International Law
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.694
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 251  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0938-5428 - ISSN (Online) 1464-3596
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [415 journals]
  • Editorial: Peer Review – Institutional Hypocrisy and Author Ambivalence;
           EJIL Roll of Honour; 2020 EJIL Peer Reviewer Prize; Letters to the Editors
           – A Note from EJIL and I•CON; Legal/Illegal; 10 Good Reads; In This
           Issue; A Bumper Review Section
    • Pages: 1187 - 1208
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chab008
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Letters to the Editors
    • Authors: Azaria D.
      Pages: 1209 - 1210
      Abstract: Dear Editors,
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chab009
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • The Articles on State Responsibility and the Guiding Principles of Shared
           Responsibility: A TWAIL Perspective
    • Authors: Chimni B.
      Pages: 1211 - 1221
      Abstract: This article argues, from the perspective of third-world approaches to international law (TWAIL), that the limitations of the Guiding Principles on Shared Responsibility (hereinafter ‘Guiding Principles’) stem from the very fact that their drafters did not contest the Articles on Responsibility of States for Internationally Wrongful Acts (ARSIWA). Therefore, before advancing a critique of the Guiding Principles, this article questions certain aspects of ARSIWA. It argues that ARSIWA tends to overlook the distinction between primary and secondary rules; does not take into account the thick and structured relations between corporations and the state in formulating the rule on attribution; completely neglects the principle of special and differential treatment (SDT) in framing secondary rules of state responsibility; and gives a negative connotation to the erga omnes principle. As a result, ARSIWA cannot do justice to weak states. Since the Guiding Principles merely seek to supplement ARSIWA, they fail to address key issues, including the shared responsibility of state and non-state actors, such as multinational corporations, for the violation of human rights and environmental norms and the application of SDT principles in determining shared responsibility.
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chab004
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • On the Benefit of Reinventing the Wheel: The Notion of a Single
           Internationally Wrongful Act
    • Authors: Gasbarri L.
      Pages: 1223 - 1234
      Abstract: This article is a critical reaction to the 2020 EJIL Foreword titled ‘Guiding Principles on Shared Responsibility in International Law’. It focuses on Principle 3, concerning a ‘single internationally wrongful act’, and it is divided into its constitutive elements: the meaning of same conduct (Section 2), the attribution to multiple persons (Section 3), the breach of obligations (Section 4) and the indivisible injury (Section 5). The main criticism is that the Guiding Principles make things more complex than they already are. The established principles of international responsibility provide simpler and more effective answers. This is particularly the case for Principle 3, which concerns multiple responsibilities arising from the same conduct. There are two main elements through which the Guiding Principles on Shared Responsibility seek to provide guidance in the case of a plurality of internationally responsible persons. First, they employ the comprehensive notion of an internationally wrongful act, while ARSIWA and ARIO distinguish between the two elements of attribution of conduct and the breach of an obligation. Second, the Guiding Principles consider the injury to be a constitutive element included in the definition of shared responsibility, while ARSIWA and ARIO only employ it in the context of reparation and countermeasures. There are no actual benefits coming from these attempts of clarification.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa083
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • The Guiding Principles on Shared Responsibility in International Law: Too
           Much or Too Little'
    • Authors: Lanovoy V.
      Pages: 1235 - 1247
      Abstract: The Guiding Principles on Shared Responsibility aim to ‘substantiate the existing rules of the law of international responsibility’ as they are codified in the International Law Commission’s 2001 Articles on the Responsibility of States for Internationally Wrongful Acts and the 2011 Articles on the Responsibility of International Organizations. This article examines the contribution of the Guiding Principles to the law of international responsibility and analyses some of their more controversial features, where the Guiding Principles seek to significantly expand the scope of the existing rules and, conversely, where they could have been much more ambitious.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa085
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Liability In Solidum in the Law of International Responsibility: A Comment
           on Guiding Principle 7
    • Authors: Murray O.
      Pages: 1249 - 1261
      Abstract: The Guiding Principles on Shared Responsibility in International Law seek to address an issue hitherto unresolved in the law of international responsibility: if two or more states or organizations together cause a single harm to a victim, what are the consequences for suit and reparation' Commentators generally counsel against the use of domestic concepts such as ‘solidary liability’ or ‘joint and several liability’ in international law. This comment highlights the role of domestic analogies in the formulation of the Guiding Principles, focusing on two elements: the application of liability in solidum as the key consequence of multiple responsibility (Principle 10), and ‘concerted action’ (Principle 7) as a condition for multiple responsibility. Both of these concepts can be found in many domestic legal systems, but the Principles place differential weight on domestic analogies in the elaboration of Principles 10 and 7: Principle 10 draws useful analogies with the rationale behind liability in solidum in domestic law, while Principle 7 on concerted action does not rely on related domestic concepts. That is likely for good reason. However, responsibility based on concerted action is a novel basis for responsibility in international law, and therefore its justification is all the more important. The justification provided for Principle 7 is not fully convincing, and its scope of application is uncertain. I query whether the exploration of cognate concepts in domestic legal systems may have helped to justify the rationale for, or the scope of, responsibility based on concerted action.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa087
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Shared Non-responsibility in International Law' Defences and the
           Responsibility of Co-perpetrators and Accessories in the Guiding
           Principles
    • Authors: Paddeu F.
      Pages: 1263 - 1275
      Abstract: This comment assesses the approach to the reach of defences beyond the international legal person(s) who is (or are) the author(s) of the internationally wrongful act articulated in Guiding Principle 5 of the Guiding Principles on Shared Responsibility in International Law. It will focus on three main points: (1) whether the choice in respect of the reach of defences in Principle 5 is justifiable for the international legal order; (2) the reach of defences in cases of coercion, where the coerced party may benefit from a defence due to the coercion (in the form of a force majeure defence); and (3) the ‘blindspot’ in the Guiding Principles in relation to defences of accessories, in particular where the conditions for accessorial liability are defined broadly as in the case of Principle 6 on aid and assistance.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa086
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • The Precaution Presumption
    • Authors: Sourgens F.
      Pages: 1277 - 1306
      Abstract: The precautionary principle is a central, if controversial, feature of international legal argument. I explore this controversy through a pluralist lens. What makes the precautionary principle so controversial is that it prevents us from appreciating risk holistically, particularly when appraising responses to policy trilemmas. Instead, claims of precaution focus only on some risks to the exclusion of others. I argue that we can overcome this problem by treating precaution as an evidentiary principle. This approach translates competing precautionary claims into a holistic appreciation of risk in its full factual context. I analyse that existing evidentiary conceptions of precaution (precaution as burden shift and precaution as standard-lowering) do not adequately achieve this goal. I submit that these problems can be overcome when treating precaution as an evidentiary presumption and develop how to formulate it.
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chab006
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • The Aggravating Duty of Non-Aggravation
    • Authors: Ratner S.
      Pages: 1307 - 1342
      Abstract: International law’s duty of non-aggravation requires states to avoid actions that might inflame an international dispute, both to maintain international peace and to preserve the effectiveness of judicial or arbitral proceedings. Yet parties on the receiving end of calls for non-aggravation – whether from the Security Council or a tribunal – have little idea of what conduct they are expected to avoid. This state of affairs is most unfortunate in light of the centrality of this norm to the peaceful resolution of disputes and, in particular, examples of provocative and aggravating acts in recent years. This article attempts to give some meaning to this important, but frustratingly vague, norm of international law. After reviewing current understandings of the duty by political and judicial bodies, it justifies the need for a more specific understanding of non-aggravation. It then develops a set of criteria to distinguish aggravating from non-aggravating acts, a process informed by both existing expectations and the underlying purposes of the norm. Based on these criteria, the article offers a coding scheme of presumptively aggravating and non-aggravating acts. Beyond its relevance for decision-makers, the article seeks to encourage theoretical inquiry into the advantages and disadvantages of vague (or underspecified) norms in the international legal order.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa081
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Appropriate Level of Protection: The Most Misconceived Notion of WTO Law
    • Authors: Rovnov Y.
      Pages: 1343 - 1377
      Abstract: Simple and elegant as a theoretical concept, an appropriate level of sanitary or phytosanitary protection (ALOP) has proven complicated to implement in World Trade Organization (WTO) dispute settlement. While the Appellate Body has insisted that ALOP must be defined with sufficient precision to apply the relevant provisions of the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement), ‘high or conservative’ remains as precise a formulation of ALOP as one can get. Despite the Appellate Body’s clear guidance that SPS measures are not to be confused with ALOP, panels – including the Appellate Body – have routinely mistaken one for the other. The most to suffer has been Article 5.5 of the SPS Agreement, which prohibits ‘arbitrary distinctions’ in ALOPs applied ‘in different situations’. By substituting differences in SPS measures for differences in ALOPs and finding two different situations, i.e. two ALOPs, where there is only one, the jurisprudence has eviscerated this provision of its meaning and converted it into a peculiar version of the least-trade-restrictive-measure requirement. This article takes stock of the panel and Appellate Body jurisprudence on ALOP and offers some thoughts, de interpretatione ferenda, on the direction that future jurisprudence should take.
      PubDate: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa080
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • When Global Becomes Municipal: US Cities Localizing Unratified
           International Human Rights Law
    • Authors: Haddad H.
      Pages: 1379 - 1399
      Abstract: International human rights law is most efficacious when it is both incorporated into domestic law and translated into local contexts. Yet, cities as independent implementers of unratified international law have received limited scholarly attention. This article examines such renegade municipal localization of international law through an analysis of San Francisco and Los Angeles’s binding ordinances implementing the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) – a treaty to which the United States in not a party. The analysis demonstrates that municipal ordinances in US charter cities are robust legal mechanisms that can help actualize human rights in large urban populations, despite national inaction. Nonetheless, municipal localization of unratified international law – in both the content of the ordinances and their implementation over time – is driven predominantly by local context and city politics rather than conformity to the international treaty on which the ordinances are based. While this importantly demonstrates that unratified international law can be made relevant to cities, the insularity of local ordinances can also result in limited accountability for non-implementation and the ordinances evolving apart from international treaty developments.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa082
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Piracy: A Treasure Box of Otherness
    • Authors: Zar M.
      Pages: 1401 - 1428
      Abstract: This article explores the connection between maritime and digital piracy, and pursues the thought that the common moniker is more than a rhetorical flourish. Golden Age maritime piracy (1650–1730) and today’s piracy in cyberspace are by no means identical; there is no one ideal form of piracy. And yet, pirates of the literal and virtual high seas share a crucial feature: their social role as others. Piracy itself is a social function; its content is otherness. Dominant accounts of piracy note its character as a mode of resistance, but frame that resistance as either economic or political. Neither of these explanations of piracy’s resistance is sufficient on its own. The comparison of Golden Age maritime piracy with current digital piracy is telling, because what these two modes of piracy have in common is the way they highlight the relationship between capital and the state system. In other words, piracy’s political attack is not simply an assault on the idea of sovereignty, but rather a more specific critique of the way the system of sovereign states advances the interests of capital. The legal treatment of piracy, making it the pillar of universal jurisdiction, highlights the particular threat that piracy presents to the world order: the crime is political because it is an affront to the economic-political alliance that is capitalism, old or new.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa084
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Roaming Charges: COVID Autumn
    • Pages: 1429 - 1432
      Abstract: We deal in EJIL with the world we live in – often with its worst and most violent pathologies, often with its most promising signs of hope for a better world. But, inevitably, since our vehicle is scholarship, we reify this world. Roaming Charges is designed not just to offer a moment of aesthetic relief, but to remind us of the ultimate subject of our scholarly reflections: we alternate between photos of places – the world we live in – and photos of people – who we are, the human condition. We eschew the direct programmatic photograph: people shot up; the ravages of pollution or the latest group photograph of ICJ judges.
      PubDate: Tue, 27 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chab010
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Camilo Barcia Trelles in and beyond Vitoria's Shadow (1888–1977)
    • Authors: de la Rasilla I.
      Pages: 1433 - 1449
      Abstract: Credited with having fostered the renaissance of Francisco de Vitoria and the School of Salamanca in international law circles in the interwar period, Camilo Barcia Trelles has largely fallen into oblivion along with most Spanish international law professors of the Spanish Civil War generation. The first part of this article provides an outline of the long career of Barcia Trelles against the background of the radically transformed domestic and international context of the interwar years and the aftermath of World War II in both Spain and Europe. The second part surveys three key themes of Barcia Trelles’ 60-year long contribution to the study of international law and international politics. First, it analyses his early interest in the process of regionalism in Latin America and the role of North American foreign policy in the region. This is followed by an analysis of Barcia Trelles’s attention to the study of the Spanish classics of international law during the interwar period, and, finally, by an overview of his approach to the study of international law in the light of international politics during the Cold War. The conclusion briefly engages with the legacy of Barcia Trelles’ life and works in the European tradition of international law.
      PubDate: Mon, 05 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chab001
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • The Cradle of International Law: Camilo Barcia Trelles on Francisco de
           Vitoria at The Hague (1927)
    • Authors: Lesaffer R.
      Pages: 1451 - 1462
      Abstract: In 1926, James Brown Scott invited the Spanish international lawyer Camilo Barcia Trelles to lecture at the 1927 Hague Academy of International Law on the contribution of the Spanish internationalists of the 16th century to the development of international law. With his lecture series on Francisco de Vitoria, Barcia Trelles fulfilled the hopes Scott had of enlisting an ally in his crusade to the Spanish origins of international law. Through their respective writings, the two international lawyers from both sides of the Atlantic co-produced the myth which situates the oldest roots of the ‘science of international law’ with Vitoria and the School of Salamanca and which has to this day largely obscured the contribution of late-medieval jurisprudence. This article analyses the methodological and intellectual moves Barcia Trelles made to construe Vitoria as the original founder of international law and detach him from his medieval sources.
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chab002
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Camilo Barcia Trelles on the Meaning of the Monroe Doctrine and the Legacy
           of Vitoria in the Americas
    • Authors: Scarfi J.
      Pages: 1463 - 1475
      Abstract: This article explores three important dimensions of the work and trajectory of Camilo Barcia Trelles: his understanding of the Monroe Doctrine; his vision and contribution to the debates in Latin America and the United States over intervention and the codification of American international law; and how his own understanding of the intellectual legacy of Francisco de Vitoria shaped his views and approaches to these topics. The article argues that Barcia Trelles provided a Spanish Americanist version of international law in the Americas, according to which, following the Spanish conquest of America and Vitoria’s important contribution to international law, a irreversible division began to emerge between the two Americas, that is, the Latin American and US traditions of international law, especially since the US Declaration of Independence, the collapse of the Spanish Monarchy and the independence of the Spanish American republics.
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chab003
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Camilo Barcia Trelles on Francisco de Vitoria: At the Crossroads of Carl
           Schmitt’s Grossraum and James Brown Scott’s ‘Modern International
           Law’
    • Authors: Beneyto J.
      Pages: 1477 - 1492
      Abstract: Carl Schmitt’s The Nomos of the Earth in the International Law of the Jus Publicum Europaeum (1950) undertook a re-interpretation of the modern origins of the discipline of international law, placing Vitoria at its pivot, as the Spanish international law professor Camilo Barcia Trelles (1888–1977) had done before. Barcia’s work had a strong influence on some of the seminal pieces on international law and geopolitics that Schmitt wrote in the period from 1941 to 1950. This was the case for Schmitt’s historical mythology of the opposition between sea and earth and its juridical consequence, his doctrine of the Grossraum, which had as its basis Barcia’s account of the Monroe Doctrine, and also of Schmitt’s critique of the ‘discrimination of war’ formalized in the Kellogg–Briand Pact. According to Barcia, the exclusion of European powers from the American continent by the United States as a rising hegemon was transformed – thanks to its domination of the sea – into the global reach of a world police power. Barcia did not agree with Brown Scott’s transformation of international law through American liberal internationalism into ‘modern international law’. While Brown Scott and Schmitt were competing for two opposing vernaculars of the discipline in search for a new definition and to shape it, Barcia was instrumental in the opposed efforts of these two apparently very dissimilar representatives of international law by ushering Vitoria into their service.
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chab005
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • ‘The War Rages On’: Expanding Concepts of Decolonization in
           International Law
    • Authors: Storr C.
      Pages: 1493 - 1506
      Abstract: The Battle for International Law is a forceful collection that addresses the seismic challenges to the international legal order posed by the formal decolonization movements of the mid-20th century. The editors borrow from Reinhart Koselleck to frame the decades between the Bandung Conference in 1955 and the declaration of a New International Economic Order in 1974 as a Sattelzeit, or ‘bridging period’, between two eras of Western domination. The concept provides a coherent, flexible frame for a strong field of 19 chapters, organized around concepts, institutions, protagonists and regional perspectives emblematic of the period in question. At a time when exhibitionist defences of colonialism and imperialism are resurgent, this collection’s solidarist restatement of key themes of Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL) and Marxist international law is timely. However, in reproducing international law’s long-critiqued statist concept of decolonization, the editors effectively consign the politics of decolonization to the past, and to the South. This does not reflect contemporary debates on the meaning of decolonization as an on-going struggle with material and epistemic dimensions. As a result, the volume leaves a crucial question open for consideration: How might contemporary international lawyers conceive of their relationship to decolonization, understood not as an era of the 20th century, but as an unresolved challenge for the 21st'
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa090
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Can International Law Survive a Rising China'
    • Authors: Chesterman S.
      Pages: 1507 - 1520
      Abstract: The founding myth of international law is the sovereign equality of its member states. How, then, can and should it accommodate the rise of one potential hegemon and the decline of another' This review essay discusses an important new book by Cai Congyan, of Xiamen University, that tries to reconcile an international rule of law with rising powers in general and the rise of China in particular. The larger theoretical project is less successful than a more immediate one, which is describing and explaining China’s instrumentalist approach to the rule of law at the domestic and international levels. Though the tone of the book is assured and reassuring, Cai’s diplomacy at times leaves some interesting questions unanswered – and a few crucial ones unasked. It is, nonetheless, essential reading for anyone seeking to understand how China sees and uses international norms and institutions.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa089
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Belgium and the Fabrication of the International Legal Discipline
    • Authors: d’Aspremont J.
      Pages: 1521 - 1530
      Abstract: In recounting the interventions of Belgian lawyers in the institutionalization of the discipline of international law at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, Vincent Genin’s Le laboratoire belge du droit international offers new materials and documentary evidence of the complicity between the construction of the international legal discipline and the colonial project. Taking his cue from Martti Koskenniemi’s Gentle Civilizer, Genin has produced a biographical and agent-based historicization of an unprecedented archival rigour, allowing international lawyers, and especially Belgian international lawyers, to take another hard look at the dark roots of their tradition.
      PubDate: Mon, 05 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa091
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Twenty-Five-Years of Dugard’s International Law: A Lasting
           Impression
    • Authors: de Wet E.
      Pages: 1531 - 1535
      Abstract: In 2018, the fifth edition of Dugard’s International Law: A South African Perspective (hereinafter Dugard’s International Law) was published. When the book was first published in 1994, a few months after the country’s first democratic elections, the 372-page publication essentially provided a retrospective on the role and relevance of international law in South Africa before the advent of democracy. In so doing, it followed the structure of traditional textbooks on international law, illuminating the basic principles of international law with reference to the main sources of international law over the course of 20 chapters. Simultaneously, the analysis was placed within the context of South African state practice, judicial decisions and legislation on international law (at vii). By the fifth edition published in 2018, the book had developed into 26 chapters (comprising 878 pages) that also took account of some developments at the African Union level (ch. 13).
      PubDate: Mon, 05 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa094
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • The Legal Order
    • Authors: Fontanelli F.
      Pages: 1537 - 1544
      Abstract: RomanoSanti. The Legal Order. Ed.CroceMariano. New York: Routledge, 2017 [1917–1918]. Pp. xxiii, 145. £84 (Hardback); £31.19 (Paperback). ISBN: 9781138280991
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa092
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Whiggish International Law: Elihu Root, the Monroe Doctrine, and
           International Law in the Americas
    • Authors: Dunstan S.
      Pages: 1545 - 1551
      Abstract: RossiChristopher R.. Whiggish International Law: Elihu Root, the Monroe Doctrine, and International Law in the Americas.Leiden: Brill Nijhoff, 2019. Pp. 271. €99. ISBN: 9789004389182
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa088
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Feminist Dialogues on International Law: Successes, Tensions, Futures.
    • Authors: O’Rourke C.
      Pages: 1551 - 1557
      Abstract: HeathcoteGina. Feminist Dialogues on International Law: Successes, Tensions, Futures.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. Pp. 256. £60. ISBN: 9780199685103
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa096
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Law and the Political Economy of Hunger.
    • Authors: Peters A.
      Pages: 1557 - 1561
      Abstract: ChadwickAnna. Law and the Political Economy of Hunger.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. Pp. 256. £70. ISBN: 9780198823940
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa097
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Regulatory Integration Across Borders: Public–Private Cooperation in
           Transnational Regulation
    • Authors: Van Den Meerssche D.
      Pages: 1561 - 1567
      Abstract: SchmidtRebecca. Regulatory Integration Across Borders: Public–Private Cooperation in Transnational Regulation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. Pp 258. £85.00. ISBN: 9781108426787
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa102
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • The Process of International Legal Reproduction: Inequality,
           Historiography, Resistance
    • Authors: Zarbiyev F.
      Pages: 1568 - 1571
      Abstract: ParfittRose. The Process of International Legal Reproduction: Inequality, Historiography, Resistance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019. Pp. 534. £95. ISBN: 9781316515198
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa103
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Natural Resources and Human Rights: An Appraisal
    • Authors: Sattorova M.
      Pages: 1571 - 1576
      Abstract: GilbertJérémie. Natural Resources and Human Rights: An Appraisal.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. 224. £70. ISBN: 9780198795667
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa098
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Research Handbook on Foreign Direct Investment
    • Authors: Schneiderman D.
      Pages: 1576 - 1583
      Abstract: KrajewskiMarkus and HoffmanRhea Tamara (eds). Research Handbook on Foreign Direct Investment. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2019. Pp. 744. £235. ISBN: 9781785369841
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa099
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Contractual Renegotiations and International Investment Arbitration: A
           Relational Contract Theory Interpretation of Investment Treaties.
    • Authors: Ho J.
      Pages: 1583 - 1588
      Abstract: FlorouAikaterini. Contractual Renegotiations and International Investment Arbitration: A Relational Contract Theory Interpretation of Investment Treaties.Leiden: Brill, 2020. Pp. 250. €116. ISBN: 9789004407466
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa093
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Contributory Fault and Investor Misconduct in Investment Arbitration.
    • Authors: Shirlow E.
      Pages: 1588 - 1597
      Abstract: JarrettMartin. Contributory Fault and Investor Misconduct in Investment Arbitration.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019. Pp. 202. £85. ISBN: 9781108481403
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa101
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Figuring Victims in International Criminal Justice: The Case of the Khmer
           Rouge Tribunal.
    • Authors: Schwöbel-Patel C.
      Pages: 1597 - 1603
      Abstract: ElanderMaria. Figuring Victims in International Criminal Justice: The Case of the Khmer Rouge Tribunal.Abingdon: Routledge, 2018. Pp. 195. £31.19. ISBN: 9781138242302
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa100
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Affective Justice: The International Criminal Court and the Pan-Africanist
           Pushback.
    • Authors: Lovat H.
      Pages: 1603 - 1610
      Abstract: Maxine ClarkeKamari. Affective Justice: The International Criminal Court and the Pan-Africanist Pushback.Durham, NC:Duke University Press, 2019. Pp. 384. $29.95. ISBN: 9781478006701
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chaa095
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • We Grow Accustomed to the Dark
    • Authors: Dickinson E.
      Pages: 1611 - 1611
      Abstract: We grow accustomed to the Dark —When Light is put away —As when the Neighbor holds the LampTo witness her Good bye —
      PubDate: Tue, 27 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chab007
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 4 (2021)
       
 
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