Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1613 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (37 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (92 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (169 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (24 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (196 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (23 journals)
    - LAW (981 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (11 journals)

INTERNATIONAL LAW (196 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 171 of 171 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Juridica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of International and Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Afrilex     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Agora International Journal of Juridical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AJIL Unbound     Open Access  
American Business Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
American University International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Annuaire Français de Droit International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Law and Social Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Annual Survey of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Antitrust Chronicle - Competition Policy International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Anuario Colombiano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Derechos Humanos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Español de Derecho Internacional     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Anuario español de derecho internacional privado     Partially Free  
Anuario Iberoamericano de Derecho Internacional Penal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anuario Mexicano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arbitration International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
ASA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asian International Arbitration Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian Journal of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Belli Ac Pacis : Jurnal Hukum Internasional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Berkeley Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Boletin Mexicano de Derecho Comparado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Borderlands Journal : Culture, Politics, Law and Earth     Open Access  
Boston College International & Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Brigham Young University International Law and Management Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
British Yearbook of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Brooklyn Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
California Western International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Yearbook of International Law / Annuaire canadien de droit international     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cape Town Convention Journal     Open Access  
Chicago Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Chinese Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Columbia Journal of Transnational Law     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Commonwealth Law Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Comparative Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Computer Law Review International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary Security Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Cornell International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Corporate Governance An International Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Criterios     Open Access  
Denver Journal of International Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Deusto Journal of Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
European Business Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
European Company Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
European Foreign Affairs Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
European Journal for Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
European Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
European Property Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Fordham International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Foreign Policy Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Jurist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Harvard International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 52)
ICSID Review : Foreign Investment Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Indian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal  
Inter: Revista de Direito Internacional e Direitos Humanos da UFRJ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intergenerational Justice Review     Open Access  
International & Comparative Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 273)
International Area Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Commentary on Evidence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Comparative Jurisprudence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal for Court Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal for the Semiotics of Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Evidence and Proof     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Information Privacy, Security and Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Language & Law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Law in Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Nuclear Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Political Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Private Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Public Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Transitional Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Law: Revista Colombiana de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Planning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Review of Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Review of the Red Cross     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 87)
Israel Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ius Gentium     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Jerusalem Review of Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Biosecurity Biosafety and Biodefense Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of European Competition Law & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of International Dispute Settlement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of International Economic Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of International Political Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of International Trade Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Law, Policy and Globalization     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Liberty and International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Private International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal on the Use of Force and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Legal Issues of Economic Integration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Leiden Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
LEX     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
London Review of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Loyola University Chicago International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maastricht Journal of European and Comparative Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Maryland Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Melbourne Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Michigan State International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Netherlands International Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Netherlands Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
New Zealand Journal of Public and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
New Zealand Yearbook of International Law, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Northwestern Journal of International Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Northwestern Journal of International Law & Business     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Notre Dame Journal of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Oromia Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pace International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Paix et Sécurité Internationales     Open Access  
Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Polar Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Public and Private International Law Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recht der Werkelijkheid     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of European Community & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revista de Derecho de la Unión Europea     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Direito Brasileira     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de la Secretaría del Tribunal Permanente de Revisión     Open Access  
Revista Facultad de Jurisprudencia     Open Access  
Revista Tribuna Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Videre     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue québécoise de droit international / Quebec Journal of International Law / Revista quebequense de derecho internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Santa Clara Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SASI     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
South African Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South Carolina Journal of International Law and Business     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Stanford Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Syracuse Journal of International Law and Commerce     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
TDM Transnational Dispute Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tilburg Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Transnational Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Uniform Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
University of Miami Inter-American Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Utrecht Journal of International and European Law     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law     Free   (Followers: 5)
Virginia Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 5)
Washington University Global Studies Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wisconsin International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of VAT/GST Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Trade and Arbitration Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Yale Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 18)
Yearbook of International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Yearbook of International Humanitarian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Zeitschrift für Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Zeitschrift für das Privatrecht der Europäischen Union - European Union Private Law Review / Revue de droit privé de l'Union européenne     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für öffentliches Recht     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Zeitschrift für Zivilprozess International     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Melbourne Journal of International Law
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1444-8602
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [385 journals]
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Territorial sovereignty in cyberspace after 'Tallinn
           manual 2.0'
    • Abstract: Chircop, Luke
      Despite its status as a foundational principle of international law, territorial sovereignty has become contested and controversial in its application to cyberspace. Opportunistic states have exploited this circumstance by carrying out harmful cyber operations on the legal margins, with relative impunity, at the expense of peace and stability in the international system. The Tallinn Manual 2.0 sought to provide some needed clarity to this important legal doctrine. The manual's International Group of Experts unanimously agreed that territorial sovereignty could be violated by cyber operations that caused the permanent loss of functionality to cyber infrastructure or that resulted in physical damage or injury. However, no agreement was reached as to when, if ever, cyber operations below this gravity threshold violated international law. In this context, this article provides a detailed account of when low-intensity or 'below the threshold' cyber operations violate territorial sovereignty. Specifically, it argues that state-sponsored cyber operations that interfere with a target state's data, cyber systems or cyber infrastructure should be viewed as a violation of territorial sovereignty provided that more than de minimis effects are caused.

      PubDate: Sun, 3 Jan 2021 20:38:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Reaping the whirlwind: The norm of reciprocity and the
           law of aerial bombardment during World War II
    • Abstract: Bennett, John
      Despite the intense controversy surrounding the Allied bombing campaign during World War II, the extant scholarship lacks a detailed description of the law of war concerning aerial bombing as that law existed during the conflict - a remarkable gap in the research, considering the attention that has been devoted to this topic. This paper presents a brief history of the evolution of the law of war concerning aerial bombardment prior to and during World War II. The law of war in this period was shaped primarily by the norm of reciprocity, and this norm is critical to understanding how the Allies conceived of the bombing campaign. The norm of reciprocity had several functions deserving of examination: the norm, as a moral intuition, instilled a psychological motive for the Allied peoples to support the bombing, provided a framework of values to legitimate that support and then channelled that support into a policy perceived as legally just. The norm of reciprocity was central to legal justifications for the bombing campaign.

      PubDate: Sun, 3 Jan 2021 20:38:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - The use of force and international law [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Garwood-Gowers, Andrew
      Review(s) of: The use of force and international law, by Christian Henderson (Cambridge University Press, 2018) 440 Pages. Price AUD127.95 (Hardback) ISBN 9781107036345.

      PubDate: Sun, 3 Jan 2021 20:38:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - New Publications in International Law
    • PubDate: Sun, 3 Jan 2021 20:38:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - MJIL Prize for Outstanding Scholarship in
           International Law
    • PubDate: Sun, 3 Jan 2021 20:38:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Law of the sea and investment protection in deep
           seabed mining
    • Abstract: Pecoraro, Alberto
      An essential feature of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea ('UNCLOS') is the designation of the seabed beyond national jurisdiction ('the Area') as the 'common heritage of mankind', with the creation of the International Seabed Authority ('ISA') to allocate mining rights therein. The only private persons that may conclude a contract with the ISA and conduct extractive activities in the Area are those which are sponsored by their state of nationality or control. Currently, among those contractors, there are various corporations owned by nationals from states other than their sponsor. UNCLOS and its related instruments impose certain direct obligations on sponsoring states, including a duty of due diligence to ensure that deep-sea miners respect their own obligations owed to the ISA. This may require the frequent adaptation of national legislation to attain, for example, higher levels of environmental protection. This article suggests that international investment law is relevant to the relation between the contractor and its sponsoring state. Arguably the contractors' foreign shareholders are investors protected by international investment law, and deep-sea mining activities may constitute, in certain circumstances, an investment in the territory of the sponsoring state. In fact, investment tribunals have flexibly interpreted the investment treaty requirement of territoriality, upholding their jurisdiction over investments that are inclusive of transactions located beyond host state borders. However, it is unclear how international norms protecting investments might be interpreted and applied in the peculiar context provided by the common heritage of mankind.

      PubDate: Sun, 3 Jan 2021 20:38:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Was the colonisation of Australia an invasion of
           sovereign territory'
    • Abstract: Nicholson, Rowan
      This article presents a reassessment of the British colonisation of Australia from the internal perspective of the international law of the period. After a discussion of the value of using historical doctrine in this way, the article introduces three positions that might be taken on the peoples who were perceived as the least 'civilised' by Western international lawyers. These have not always been distinguished in the literature. The 'preclusive' position, according to which these peoples were incapable of sovereignty, is rejected as inconsistent with state practice. Although it does not prove feasible to eliminate either of the other two possibilities, the 'naturalist-legislative' and 'contractual' positions, they lead to similar results. On this basis it is concluded, not with complete certainty but with a high degree of confidence, that before colonisation the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of Australia were sovereign within their territories in the strict sense of international law. It is also concluded that describing colonisation as an 'invasion' of sovereign territory accords with the doctrinal language of the period. In these respects, historical international law, despite being shaped by and in the interests of Western colonisers, agrees with language used today by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. In the course of this reassessment, the article offers insights of broader application into the role of customary norms and the legal status of pre-colonial non-Western entities.

      PubDate: Sun, 3 Jan 2021 20:38:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - A review of the international law commission's
           guidelines on the protection of the atmosphere
    • Abstract: Mayer, Benoit
      The International Law Commission ('ILC') adopted a set of 12 Draft Guidelines on the protection of the atmosphere on first reading in 2018. This project, led by Special Rapporteur Shinya Murase, could have provided the first authoritative interpretation of the general international law applicable, in particular, to climate change. Yet, the work of the ILC on the topic largely failed to comprehend the relevant rules. This review reveals numerous shortcomings of the Draft Guidelines and makes suggestions for the second reading.

      PubDate: Sun, 3 Jan 2021 20:38:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Lacking conviction: Is the international criminal
           court broken': An organisational failure analysis
    • Abstract: Guilfoyle, Douglas
      There is a widespread sense that something in the International Criminal Court ('ICC') needs fixing. This prompts questions including: is it broken, who is responsible, and how is it to be fixed' This article avoids the discourse of a 'crisis in international criminal law' in favour of the literature on organisational failure. This literature focuses on the role of environment, structure and leadership in organisational performance. In particular, this paper posits that the ICC is embroiled in a fiasco, defined as a situation in which a public organisation's policy choices result in unintended political consequences. As a fiasco unfolds, the organisation at its centre, and its defenders, may seek to ascribe responsibility or displace blame. This article thus: examines the case that the ICC is failing in its core mission and assesses whether common defences of the Court fairly ascribe responsibility or constitute blame-displacement; and examines the extent to which the ICC's leadership is responsible for the present fiasco. It then considers whether the ICC Assembly of States Parties can rehabilitate its supervisory function to assist in fixing the Court. Finally, it cautions against the use of managerialist techniques in fixing the Court and proposes instead the cultivation of an ethic of modesty.

      PubDate: Sun, 3 Jan 2021 20:38:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Shell companies and exposing beneficial ownership:
           Testing the boundaries of the international commitment to fight corruption
           
    • Abstract: Gillis, Matilda
      Corporate vehicles are used by corrupt actors because they obscure the real person, the 'beneficial owner', behind transactions, thereby enabling the evasion of anti-corruption laws and regulations. This paper argues that while the Australian and international communities have addressed the misuse of corporate vehicles and their role in facilitating transnational corrupt activity, they have not done so in a meaningful way. Shell companies, in particular, continue to function as an 'iron curtain', behind which corrupt activity is hidden. This paper nevertheless proposes that this deficiency can be rectified and a culture of compliance at the international level built.

      This paper first explores the current international legal response to this particular issue in the transnational corruption space and demonstrates that there is a significant disconnect between states' rhetorical commitment to fight the use of corporate vehicles in corrupt transactions and their practical implementation of anti-corruption measures. This paper uses Australia as a case study to illustrate this argument. It then engages with the possible reasons for the disconnect between rhetoric and practice, proposing that the disconnect largely flows from flaws in the international legal obligations themselves rather than from the actions of states. This paper suggests a way to meaningfully engage with the issue. It advocates for the adoption of a strategy of 'strategic privatisation', a development within the law in the broad area of transnational anti-corruption regulation, and for the application of that strategy to the narrower issue of the exploitation of corporate vehicles.

      PubDate: Sun, 3 Jan 2021 20:38:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - The material costs of claiming international human
           rights: Australia, Adani and the Wangan and Jagalingou
    • Abstract: Young, Stephen M
      This article presents a materialist account of Indigenous peoples' international legal human rights claims. It argues that appeals to the global legal system as well as pluralistic approaches to Indigenous peoples' rights depend on international law to make a convincing case and yet fail to account for the material construction of human rights claimants as subjects of international law. To explain this intervention, this article theorises that when international human rights law and national laws clash, human rights claimants constitute and transform themselves into international legal subjects and become identifiable Indigenous peoples. In support of this international legal constructivist approach to Indigenous peoples' human rights claims, this article re-articulates the development of Indigenous peoples as subjects that emerged from international law and then examines the development of Australia's native title regime. An exposition of international and then state laws reveals that the codification of different standards for participation enables those who subject themselves to international law as Indigenous peoples to claim human rights. It then provides a case study on the Wangan and Jagalingou Family Council, which constructed itself as Indigenous peoples to assert human rights, as they engage with Australia's native title regime in the case against Adani Mining Pty Ltd's Carmichael Coal Mine and Rail Project. A central aspect of this argument is that becoming identifiable Indigenous peoples through claiming human rights provides benefits as well as potentially deleterious political, economic and legal costs.

      PubDate: Sun, 3 Jan 2021 20:38:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Regulating collective resources under multilateral
           treaties: The decision in whaling in the antarctic ('Australia v Japan')
    • Abstract: Strain, Nicola
      With Japan's recent announcement of its withdrawal from the International Whaling Commission, it is timely to reconsider what can be learned from the International Court of Justice's decision in Whaling in the Antarctic (Australia v Japan) ('Whaling') on the regulation of collective resources. The Court's approach to the collective resources issue in Whaling may indicate a more activist role for the Court, beyond the traditional sphere of bilateral dispute resolution. This article considers whether Whaling demonstrates a move towards providing a mechanism for regulation of state conduct under multilateral treaties, moving towards a more domestic style of administrative review, by analysing certain aspects of the Court's procedural and evidential approach. In light of the parties' submissions, previous jurisprudence of the Court as well as other international tribunals' jurisprudence, the analysis of this dispute suggests that the Court may be willing to move to a more 'regulatory' role in reviewing state decision-making. However, the Court missed an opportunity to clearly define its role in reviewing state decisions that affect collective resources. The Court failed to provide clear reasoning for its developing a 'review' role, likely as a result of its reliance on the parties' agreement on the approach. As such, Whaling provides only limited guidance on whether the Court will continue to provide such a role in the regulation of collective resources.

      PubDate: Sun, 3 Jan 2021 20:38:12 GMT
       
 
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