Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1613 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (37 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (92 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (169 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (24 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (196 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (23 journals)
    - LAW (981 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (11 journals)

INTERNATIONAL LAW (196 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 171 of 171 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Juridica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of International and Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Afrilex     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Agora International Journal of Juridical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AJIL Unbound     Open Access  
American Business Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
American University International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Annuaire Français de Droit International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Law and Social Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Annual Survey of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Antitrust Chronicle - Competition Policy International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Anuario Colombiano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Derechos Humanos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Español de Derecho Internacional     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Anuario español de derecho internacional privado     Partially Free  
Anuario Iberoamericano de Derecho Internacional Penal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anuario Mexicano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arbitration International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
ASA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asian International Arbitration Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian Journal of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Belli Ac Pacis : Jurnal Hukum Internasional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Berkeley Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Boletin Mexicano de Derecho Comparado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Borderlands Journal : Culture, Politics, Law and Earth     Open Access  
Boston College International & Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Brigham Young University International Law and Management Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
British Yearbook of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Brooklyn Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
California Western International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Yearbook of International Law / Annuaire canadien de droit international     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cape Town Convention Journal     Open Access  
Chicago Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Chinese Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Columbia Journal of Transnational Law     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Commonwealth Law Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Comparative Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Computer Law Review International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary Security Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Cornell International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Corporate Governance An International Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Criterios     Open Access  
Denver Journal of International Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Deusto Journal of Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
European Business Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
European Company Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
European Foreign Affairs Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
European Journal for Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
European Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
European Property Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Fordham International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Foreign Policy Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Jurist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Harvard International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 52)
ICSID Review : Foreign Investment Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Indian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal  
Inter: Revista de Direito Internacional e Direitos Humanos da UFRJ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intergenerational Justice Review     Open Access  
International & Comparative Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 273)
International Area Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Commentary on Evidence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Comparative Jurisprudence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal for Court Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal for the Semiotics of Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Evidence and Proof     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Information Privacy, Security and Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Language & Law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Law in Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Nuclear Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Political Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Private Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Public Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Transitional Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Law: Revista Colombiana de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Planning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Review of Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Review of the Red Cross     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 87)
Israel Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ius Gentium     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Jerusalem Review of Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Biosecurity Biosafety and Biodefense Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of European Competition Law & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of International Dispute Settlement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of International Economic Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of International Political Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of International Trade Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Law, Policy and Globalization     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Liberty and International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Private International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal on the Use of Force and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Legal Issues of Economic Integration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Leiden Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
LEX     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
London Review of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Loyola University Chicago International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maastricht Journal of European and Comparative Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Maryland Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Melbourne Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Michigan State International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Netherlands International Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Netherlands Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
New Zealand Journal of Public and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
New Zealand Yearbook of International Law, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Northwestern Journal of International Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Northwestern Journal of International Law & Business     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Notre Dame Journal of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Oromia Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pace International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Paix et Sécurité Internationales     Open Access  
Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Polar Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Public and Private International Law Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recht der Werkelijkheid     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of European Community & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revista de Derecho de la Unión Europea     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Direito Brasileira     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de la Secretaría del Tribunal Permanente de Revisión     Open Access  
Revista Facultad de Jurisprudencia     Open Access  
Revista Tribuna Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Videre     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue québécoise de droit international / Quebec Journal of International Law / Revista quebequense de derecho internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Santa Clara Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SASI     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
South African Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South Carolina Journal of International Law and Business     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Stanford Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Syracuse Journal of International Law and Commerce     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
TDM Transnational Dispute Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tilburg Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Transnational Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Uniform Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
University of Miami Inter-American Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Utrecht Journal of International and European Law     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law     Free   (Followers: 5)
Virginia Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 5)
Washington University Global Studies Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wisconsin International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of VAT/GST Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Trade and Arbitration Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Yale Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 18)
Yearbook of International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Yearbook of International Humanitarian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Zeitschrift für Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Zeitschrift für das Privatrecht der Europäischen Union - European Union Private Law Review / Revue de droit privé de l'Union européenne     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für öffentliches Recht     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Zeitschrift für Zivilprozess International     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of International Political Theory
Number of Followers: 21  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1755-0882 - ISSN (Online) 1755-1722
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1141 journals]
  • Remarks from the Outgoing Editor
    • Authors: Patrick Hayden
      Pages: 2 - 3
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 2-3, February 2021.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T10:23:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220970389
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Remarks from the Incoming Editor
    • Authors: Anthony F Lang
      Pages: 4 - 6
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 4-6, February 2021.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T10:24:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220969716
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Teaching as Amor Mundi
    • Authors: Natasha Saunders
      Pages: 7 - 8
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 7-8, February 2021.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T10:24:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220969713
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Patrick Hayden /pætrik heidεn/
    • Authors: Gurchathen Sanghera
      Pages: 9 - 10
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 9-10, February 2021.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T10:22:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220972134
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Political friendship: Gardens, bees and Patrick Hayden
    • Authors: Gabriella Slomp
      Pages: 11 - 13
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 11-13, February 2021.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T10:22:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220972133
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Cosmopolitan Global Politics
    • Authors: Richard Beardsworth
      Pages: 14 - 15
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 14-15, February 2021.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T10:24:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220969717
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Conversations in international political theory
    • Authors: Kate Schick
      Pages: 16 - 17
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 16-17, February 2021.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T10:22:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220970574
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Of Camus and Rebels
    • Authors: Chamsy el-Ojeili
      Pages: 18 - 19
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 18-19, February 2021.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T10:24:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220969720
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Mimetic rivalry in practice: The case of Kosovo
    • Authors: Aidan Hehir, Claudio Lanza
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we advance a framework that highlights the relational nature of rivalry emergence and its ongoing manifestations, before illustrating this framework in practice through an analysis of the rivalry between Serbs and Albanians over the issue of Kosovo. We argue that the locus of rivalry lies in the inherently social character of human desire and the destructive reciprocity elicited by human mimetic behaviour. The manner in which rivals portray their plight, and legitimise their cause, is, we argue, a function of their desire to acquire that which they imagine the other has. As such, rather than adhering to the conventional view that rivalries are characterised by difference, we argue that rivals share a set of common goals/desires. Thus, though rivalries are characterised by mutual antipathy – and the attendant devotion to constructing self-serving myths – this is but a superficial manifestation of an underlying mimetic dynamic. To focus only on how myths are constructed and instrumentally employed, is not sufficient when seeking to explain the persistence of rivalries. Rather, we must understand the underlying desires the respective rivals seek to fulfill through the proliferation of these myths if we are to truly understand the nature of the rivalry.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T11:07:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17550882211010201
       
  • On the global politics of “decency” and
           “restraint”
    • Authors: Christopher Peys
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This essay offers a review of both Roach’s Decency and Difference: Humanity and the Global Challenge of Identity Politics and Steele’s Restraint in International Politics. Exploring the concept-driven modes of analysis employed in each of these two texts, this essay investigates how Roach and Steele theorize the moral, socio-psychological, and political struggles inherent to the notions of decency and restraint. This review is not only devoted to understanding Roach’s and Steele’s respective arguments about how global politics has been conditioned by the tensions inherent to decency and restraint but, also, to reflecting on how these two scholars suggest we deal—theoretically and practically—with the complexities of these two notions in today’s world. At a time when various forces of indecent, unrestrained behavior have arguably led to an exclusionary politics of identity, rancor, and enmity, Roach’s and Steele’s books demonstrate—conceptually, empirically, and normatively—how we can understand the global politics of decency and restraint, as well as how people(s) around the world can begin to take more dignified steps in a just, democratic direction.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-04-10T12:25:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17550882211008941
       
  • Pufendorf and Leibniz on duties of esteem in diplomatic relations
    • Authors: Andreas Blank
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      The striving for self-worth is recognized as a driving force in international relations; but if self-worth is understood as a function of status in a power hierarchy, this striving often is a source of anxiety and conflict over status. The quasi-international relations within the early modern German Empire have prompted seventeenth-century natural law theorists such as Samuel Pufendorf and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz to reflect about this problem. In his De statu imperii Germanici (1667), Pufendorf regards the power differences and dependencies between the Reichsstände to be an expression of the deficits of constitutional structure of the Empire—a structure that, in his view, causes internal division because it leads to distorted practices of esteem between the estates. Against Pufendorf, Leibniz argues De jure suprematus ac legationis (1671) that political actors such as the German princes who are not Electors could fulfill functions under the law of nations such as forming confederations and peace keeping. Incoherently, however, Leibniz excludes less powerful estates such as the Imperial cities and the Hanseatic cities from the ensuing duties of esteem. This shortcoming, in turn, is arguably remedied in Pufendorf’s later considerations concerning duties of esteem in diplomatic relations.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T06:23:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17550882211002225
       
  • ‘The cruelty of righteous people’: Niebuhr on the urgency of
           cruelty
    • Authors: Brent J Steele
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This paper responds to critics of Reinhold Niebuhr by exploring two themes important for locating his views on cruelty’s emergence in modern society. The first relates to his basic insight into the relationship between individual morality and group loyalty and solidarity. Niebuhr provides a sophisticated argument for such group dynamics in his work, issued in Moral Man, Immoral Society, as well as his essays on race. These also form the basis for his second thematic argument regarding cruelty, the role of ‘righteousness’ as it relates to security and insecurity. Niebuhr’s views on race, I argue, need to be considered more broadly as an example of his views on groups, power, and cruelty. The paper concludes with some modest proposals for thinking about combatting cruelty via Niebuhr’s counsel.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-01-25T09:12:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088221989745
       
  • Reinhold Niebuhr: The law of love and the omnipresence of power
    • Authors: David Clinton
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      The twentieth-century theologian and public intellectual Reinhold Niebuhr frequently employed a formulation confounding to his readers, simultaneously appealing to the loftiest altruism as summed up in his identification of the “law of love” and compelling attention to the grittiest realism as encapsulated in his recognition of a universal struggle for power. This sharp contrast was no careless error on Niebuhr’s part, but rather an insistence on describing in the most sharply contrasting tones the paradoxical character of human nature. In his Christian Realist view fear and a consequent desire for power over others to protect oneself are inescapable components of human existence within history. The human need for community and refusal to be satisfied with anything less than devotion to the wellbeing of others unsullied by self-love are nevertheless also implanted in the human heart, which recognizes that reality extends beyond human history. Niebuhr demanded attention to both.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-01-22T06:13:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220985881
       
  • The international politics of amour propre: Revisiting Rousseau’s place
           in international relations theory
    • Authors: Joshua D King
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Realism, constructivism, and liberal institutionalism share the assumption that states are rational and self-maximizing actors. While these theories disagree as to whether states prioritize military power or economic wealth, they converge around the notion that states pursue these goods rationally and predictably. Complaints against and threats of defection from prominent international security and trade regimes, including NATO and the EU, raise doubts about states’ rationality and predictability. Perhaps these theories’ shared assumption about rational action has become an impediment to understanding state behavior and institutional cooperation. To enrich and to expand the conversation within international political theory, my article turns to Rousseau’s international political thought. Rousseau anticipates central arguments in each of the major traditions of IR theory but locates political self-interest in the sub-rational passion amour propre rather than in reason itself. Rousseau exemplifies a more nuanced way to understand the irrational roots of political motivation and the limits of international order. My paper traces the international implications of amour propre through Rousseau’s key texts on international politics and turns to his “Letter to Philopolis” as a way to re-frame Rousseau’s account of political responsibility.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-01-13T06:31:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220983832
       
  • Asking the fox to guard the chicken coop: In defense of minimalism in the
           ethics of war and peace
    • Authors: Elisabeth Forster, Isaac Taylor
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Dominant normative theories of armed conflict orientate themselves around the ultimate goal of peace. Yet the deployment of these theories in the international sphere appears to have failed in advancing toward this goal. In this paper, we argue that one major reason for this failure is these theories’ use of essentially contested concepts—that is, concepts whose internally complex character results in no principled way of adjudicating between rival interpretations of them. This renders the theories susceptible to manipulation by international actors who are able to pursue bellicose policies under the cover of nominally pacific frameworks, and we show how this happened historically in a case study of the Korean War of 1950–1953. In order to better serve the goals of peace, we suggest, the rules of war should be reframed to simpler, but more restrictive, normative principles.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2021-01-08T06:54:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220985882
       
  • Why read Reinhold Niebuhr now'
    • Authors: Liane Hartnett, Lucian Ashworth
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Reinhold Niebuhr (1892–1971) is perhaps the best known North American theologian of the twentieth century. Over the course of his life he was a Christian socialist, pacifist, a staunch anti-communist, and an architect of vital-centre liberalism. Niebuhr wrote on themes as diverse as war, democracy, world order, political economy and race. So significant was Niebuhr’s intellectual influence that George Kennan once described him as ‘the father of us all’. Indeed, from the thought of Barack Obama to Jimmy Carter, Martin Luther King Jr. to Arthur Schlesinger Jr., Hans Morgenthau to Kenneth Waltz, E.H. Carr to Jean Bethke Elshtain, Niebuhr has helped shape International Relations. Bringing together intellectual historians and international political theorists, this special issue asks whether Niebuhr’s thought remains relevant to our times' Can he help us think about democracy, power, race, the use of force, and cruelty in a moment when ethnonationalism appears ascendant and democracy in decline'
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-12-16T10:53:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220981093
       
  • ‘The Impossible Possibility of Love’: Reinhold Niebuhr’s
           Thought on Racial Justice
    • Authors: Liane Hartnett
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Love has been long lauded for its salvific potential in U.S. anti-racist rhetoric. Yet, what does it mean to speak or act in love’s name to redress racism' Turning to the work of the North American public intellectual and theologian, Reinhold Niebuhr (1892–1971), this essay explores his contribution to normative theory on love’s role in the work of racial justice. Niebuhr was a staunch supporter of civil rights, and many prominent figures of the movement such as James Cone, Jesse Jackson, Martin Luther King Jr., J. Deotis Roberts and Cornel West drew on his theology. Indeed, Niebuhr underscores love’s promise and perils in politics, and its potential to respond to racism via the work of critique, compassion, and coercion. Engaging with Niebuhr’s theology on love and justice, then, not only helps us recover a rich realist resource on racism, but also an ethic of realism as antiracism.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-12-14T07:59:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220979003
       
  • Re-reading Niebuhr’s The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness:
           The crisis of democracy in an interdependent world then and now
    • Authors: Lucian M Ashworth
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Reinhold Niebuhr’s The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness is one of the key English-language texts in the post-war settlement literature of the early 1940s. This article analyses the book on three interconnected levels: the nature of the argument made by Niebuhr in the book, its place in the broader post-war settlement literature of the early 1940s, and its relevance to the current problems of right-wing populism and the climate crisis. While the main theme of the book is the necessity and impossibility of democracy, it shares with the work of Isaiah Bowman and David Mitrany a concern for the tension between the state and interdependence. The deepening of this tension since has helped keep Niebuhr relevant, although his initial distinction between the children of light and the children of darkness has been complicated by both populism and the climate crisis.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-12-14T07:59:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220979728
       
  • From revolutionary Paris to Nootka Sound to Saint-Domingue: The
           international politics and prejudice behind Wollstonecraft’s theory of
           the rights of humanity, 1789–91
    • Authors: Eileen Hunt Botting
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Against the background of the international political crises generated by the early phase of the French Revolution at Nootka Sound in 1790 and in Saint-Domingue in 1791, Mary Wollstonecraft developed a capacious political theory of the “rights of humanity.” She pushed beyond narrow post-revolutionary European constructions of “the rights of man” which ignored or excluded “the poor,” “Indians,” “African slaves,” and “women.” While closely following the international politics of the French Revolution, Wollstonecraft developed the core arguments of A Vindication of the Rights of Men (1790) and A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792). Her key philosophical innovation was to publicly universalize the conceptual scope of rights, such that rights were no longer—implicitly or explicitly—solely the legal entitlement of propertied white European men, but rather the moral and political entitlement of the whole of humanity across nations. Yet she rhetorically contradicted and philosophically limited the cross-cultural universalism of her theory of equal rights by punctuating her arguments with Western Protestant and Orientalist stereotypes of Eastern despotism. Consequently, international politics and international prejudice shaped Wollstonecraft’s theory of equal rights and her application of it to peoples and cultures beyond those of Western Protestant Europe.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-12-14T07:58:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220978432
       
  • Reinhold Niebuhr and the Christian realist pendulum
    • Authors: Vassilios Paipais
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Reinhold Niebuhr is widely acknowledged as the father of Christian realism and a staunch critic of pacifism. In a famous exchange with his brother H. Richard in The Christian Century, Niebuhr defended the necessity of entering the fray of battle to combat evil as opposed to opting for non-violent detachment that ultimately usurps God’s authority to decide on final matters. Niebuhr, however, never endorsed an aggressive Just War doctrine. Striving to reconcile the Christian command of love with the harsh realities of power resulting from universal sinfulness, Niebuhr emphasised the necessity of negotiating the distance between the two extremes of a pendulum swinging from Christian pacifism to the endorsement of interventionist policies. Rather than this being an expression of the ambiguity of his moral convictions, this paper argues that it is a product of his sensitivity to applying contextual moral and political judgement as an exercise of theological responsibility.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-12-10T10:20:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220979001
       
  • A Niebuhrian pacifism for an imperfect world
    • Authors: Jeremy Moses
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article considers the role that might be played by the political thought of Reinhold Niebuhr in contemporary debates over pacifism. It begins with an overview of Niebuhr’s changing position on pacifism, showing how his early commitment to anti-war principles gradually faded over time and was replaced with a pragmatic approach to just war thinking in his later life. The article then considers whether this drift away from pacifism necessarily means that there is nothing in Niebuhrian Christian realism for contemporary pacifist thought. Drawing on Niebuhr’s critique of perfectionist liberalism, it argues that an imperfect and non-absolute pacifism that accepts the permanent possibility of political violence but refuses to offer moral endorsement to such violence can offer a viable political position in current debates on war and peace, particularly in opposition to just war approaches.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-12-04T01:00:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220978996
       
  • Law and virtue in a post-sovereign “Commonwealth:” Neil MacCormick and
           the political theory of constitutional pluralism
    • Authors: Hugo Canihac
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This paper reconstructs the political thought of the Scottish legal philosopher, and eventually MEP, Sir Neil MacCormick (1941–2009), the founder of “constitutional pluralism,” one of the most influential legal theories of the European union today. It argues that his legal theory is underpinned by a coherent and original political theory of post-sovereignty. But, contrary to many current interpretations, this article argues that normatively, constitutional pluralism is not a purely liberal theory. Neither is it inherently illiberal, as has been contended. Instead, this article spells out the hybrid institutional design imagined by N. MacCormick and inspired by the thought of D. Hume, as well as the lineaments of an ethical theory of post-sovereignty he developed. So doing, while I will argue that it ultimately leads to a kind of republican cosmopolitanism, the political theory of constitutional pluralism is shown to open up an important, if not fully developed, avenue to escape some shortcoming commonly associated with post-sovereignty.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-11-26T05:59:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220975812
       
  • The Concept of the Kurdish Political
    • Authors: Jason Dockstader, Rojîn Mûkrîyan
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Recently, some have read Turkish political developments from the perspective of Carl Schmitt’s political theory. This paper aims to modify aspects of these readings and offer in response a Schmittian answer to the Kurdish question. By applying Schmitt’s conceptual framework, this paper argues that the Kurds, especially in their struggles for autonomy and independence, can be viewed as fulfilling Schmitt’s criterion for tellurian partisanship and forming an at least nascent constituent power. We argue that Turks and Kurds are enemies in Schmitt’s explicitly political sense. They constitute a threat to each other’s political existence. The Kurds exhibit the behavior of a Schmittian people or nation. They fight, against Turks, for their political existence. They aim to govern themselves, and so instantiate the de facto attributes of state sovereignty. They thus seek to constitute themselves as a free and independent people, thereby achieving a genuine political existence in the Schmittian sense.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-10-29T10:32:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220966345
       
  • What is a minor international theory' On the limits of ‘Critical
           International Relations’
    • Authors: Nicholas Michelsen
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues that ‘Critical International Relations’, often counterpoised to ‘mainstream IR’, has come to function as a major theoretical category in its own right. It argues that critique involves ‘minor theorising’, defined as the practice of disturbing settled theoretical assumptions in the discipline. The article examines the role and significance of ‘minor theories’ in the context of ongoing debates about Critical IR. It argues that critique is defined by context, and is politically and ethically ambiguous. The article concludes that the scope for critique could be advanced if the terms ‘Critical IR’ and ‘Critical IR Scholar’ are dropped from scholarly parlance.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-10-07T06:16:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220956680
       
  • Conceptualising peace and its preconditions: The anti-Pelagian imagination
           and the critical turn in peace theory
    • Authors: Sophia Dingli
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the conceptualisations of peace and its preconditions manifested in the critical turn in peace theory: bottom-up approaches which begin with particular contexts and postulate diverse local actors as integral to the process of peace-building. This article argues that the turn is at an impasse and is unable to address the crucial charge that its conceptualisation of peace is inconsistent. To explain the persistence of inconsistency and to move us forward, the article analyses, evaluates and responds to the turn through the lens of Nicholas Rengger’s work on the anti-Pelagian imagination in political theory. This is defined as a tendency to begin theorising from non-utopian, anti-perfectionist and sceptical assumptions. Through this examination the article argues that the critical turn is anti-Pelagian but not consistently so because it often gives way to perfectionism, adopts naïve readings of institutions and postulates demanding conceptions of political agency and practice. This inconsistency with its own philosophical premises makes the turn’s conceptualisation of peace and its preconditions incoherent. Finally, the article sketches an alternative account of peace which draws upon a number of anti-Pelagian scholars and mobilises Rengger’s particular defense of anti-Pelagianism. The suggested alternative, the article argues, provides us with a more coherent theory of peace and a way out of existing dead ends.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-08-25T04:26:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220951592
       
  • De-colonizing the political ontology of Kantian ethics: A quantum
           perspective
    • Authors: Laura Zanotti
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the relevance of ontological assumptions for justifications of agency and ethics. It critiques Kantian ethics for being based upon an ontological imaginary that starts from the substantialism of Newtonian physics. Substantialism shapes Western political philosophy’s view about who we are as subjects and how the world works. In this ontological imaginary, validation of ethics is based upon universality and abstractions. Furthermore, Kantian ethics underscores an anthropocentric and theocratic vision of how to govern societies. I argue Kantian criteria are not only insufficient to make good choices but are also conducive to wrong ones, since they elicit self-appeasement in international intervention, and contribute to the conceptual repertoire of coloniality. I propose that an ontology of entanglements opens possibilities for overcoming the shortcomings of an ethos based upon abstractions and possibly for correcting some of its moral failures. In a quantum ontological imaginary, the validation of ethical choices relies instead upon the exploration of the apparatuses we deploy, as well as upon careful situational evaluation. Specific practices, rather than an abstract humanity, are the referents for devising such ethos. This position, I argue, resonates with the critical project of decoloniality and its acknowledgment of the political salience of ontological imaginaries.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-08-19T05:22:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220946777
       
  • The balance of power and the power struggles of the polis
    • Authors: Kevin Blachford
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      The balance of power is fundamental to the discipline of international relations, but its accuracy in explaining the historical record has been disputed. For international relations, balance of power theory represents a distinct approach which details the behaviour of states to counter hegemonic threats within an anarchic system. This article reimagines the balance of power tradition by highlighting its early modern foundations. Through providing a historical contextualization of the balance of power, this article shows how republican thinkers sought to balance against concentrations of power in order to safeguard political liberty. Early modern republics grappled with the challenge of maintaining a division of power within the polis in a co-constitutive relationship with the international. A republican polis could not secure liberty if under external domination or if the polis itself expanded to imperial proportions. Imperial expansion and the martial politics this entailed have traditionally been understood as incompatible to the safeguarding of political liberty. Recognizing this republican influence can uncover the co-constitutive connections between the internal power dynamics of the polis and the international sphere.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-07-21T10:56:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220942876
       
  • John Stuart Mill and the practice of colonial rule in India
    • Authors: David Williams
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      John Stuart Mill’s justification for British rule in India is well known. Less well known and discussed are Mill’s extensive writings on the practice of British rule in India. A close engagement with Mill’s writings on this issue shows Mill was a much more uncertain and anxious imperialist than he is often presented to be. Mill was acutely aware of the difficulties presented by the imperial context in India, he identified a number of very demanding conditions that would have to be met if Britain’s imperial mission was to be successful, and he was very troubled by the dangers posed to this mission from politics in Britain. Toward the end of his life, Mill become much more pessimistic about the progressive possibilities of British colonialism, in part because of what he thought had happened after the transfer of British rule from the East India Company to the British state. A focus on Mill’s arguments about the practice of British rule in India goes some way to providing a more nuanced account of what Mill thought about colonialism.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-02-08T06:03:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088220903349
       
  • The lex of the Earth' Arendt’s critique of Roman law
    • Authors: Shinkyu Lee
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      How political communities should be constituted is at the center of Hannah Arendt’s engagement with two ancient sources of law: the Greek nomos and the Roman lex. Recent scholarship suggests that Arendt treats nomos as imperative and exclusive while lex has a relationship-establishing dimension and that for an inclusive form of polity, she favors lex over nomos. This article argues, however, that Arendt’s appreciation occurs within a general context of more reservations about Rome than Roman-centric interpretations admit. Her writings show that lex could not accommodate the agonistic spirit and Homeric impartiality that helped the Greeks achieve human greatness and surpassing excellence. Arendt also points out that Roman peace alliances occurred at the expense of disclosive competition among equals and assumed some form of domination. Indeed, although Arendt appreciates lex’s relationship-establishing aspect, she is undoubtedly critical of anti-political practices accompanying lex, manifested when the Romans required enemies’ submission to terms of peace the Romans themselves set. In the end, Arendt’s statements regarding nomos and lex highlight the fundamental challenge in free politics: balancing the internal demand of agonistic action with the external need to expand lasting ties.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2020-01-02T01:01:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219898237
       
 
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