Subjects -> LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCES (Total: 392 journals)
    - DIGITAL CURATION AND PRESERVATION (13 journals)
    - LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION (1 journals)
    - LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCES (378 journals)

DIGITAL CURATION AND PRESERVATION (13 journals)

Showing 1 - 7 of 7 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acervo : Revista do Arquivo Nacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archival Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archival Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Archives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
ESARBICA Journal : Journal of the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Branch of the International Council on Archives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Archival Organization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Library & Archival Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
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Archival Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.745
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 65  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1389-0166 - ISSN (Online) 1573-7500
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Archives, linked data and the digital humanities: increasing access to
           digitised and born-digital archives via the semantic web

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      Abstract: Abstract Mass digitisation and the exponential growth of born-digital archives over the past two decades have resulted in an enormous volume of archives and archival data being available digitally. This has produced a valuable but under-utilised source of large-scale digital data ripe for interrogation by scholars and practitioners in the Digital Humanities. However, current digitisation approaches fall short of the requirements of digital humanists for structured, integrated, interoperable, and interrogable data. Linked Data provides a viable means of producing such data, creating machine-readable archival data suited to analysis using digital humanities research methods. While a growing body of archival scholarship and praxis has explored Linked Data, its potential to open up digitised and born-digital archives to the Digital Humanities is under-examined. This article approaches Archival Linked Data from the perspective of the Digital Humanities, extrapolating from both archival and digital humanities Linked Data scholarship to identify the benefits to digital humanists of the production and provision of access to Archival Linked Data. It will consider some of the current barriers preventing digital humanists from being able to experience the benefits of Archival Linked Data evidenced, and to fully utilise archives which have been made available digitally. The article argues for increased collaboration between the two disciplines, challenges individuals and institutions to engage with Linked Data, and suggests the incorporation of AI and low-barrier tools such as Wikidata into the Linked Data production workflow in order to scale up the production of Archival Linked Data as a means of increasing access to and utilisation of digitised and born-digital archives.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • A survey on email visualisation research to address the conflict between
           privacy and access

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      Abstract: Abstract Emails, much like communicative genres such as letters that predate them, are a rich source of data for researchers, but they are replete with privacy considerations. This paper explores the resulting friction between privacy concerns and email data access. Studies of email can often be centred on understanding patterns of behaviour and/or relationships between people or groups, and, as such, embody risks of disclosing private information. This is further amplified in humanities research which is concerned with the individual, their work and the circumstances that influence them. Furthermore, previous studies have expounded upon the benefits of visualisations for researching email data, a method which has been reported both as a path to addressing known concerns, as well as, introducing new concerns in privacy. The spectrum of methodologies leave archivists and curators of email data in a quandary, unable to balance accessibility with privacy. The research presented in this paper contributes a systematic approach to examining the relationship between email visualisation research and privacy. It presents a categorisation of email visualisation attributes, and a graded scale of privacy, to be used in conjunction as a framework for interrogating existing research and their associated email collections. The paper aims to instigate the first steps in concretely situating the extent to which research can take advantage of or is challenged by privacy conscious data management.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Digital critical archives, copyright, and feminist praxis

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      Abstract: Abstract With the continued proliferation of digitized materials, critical attention to the ideologies informing the creation of digital archives remains crucial. How are digital archives made and what are their goals' How do different participants in the process work together in collaborative teams towards shared ideals' This paper outlines the methodological and political considerations that underlie the creation of a critical digital archive of historical and born-digital materials relating to 20th-century publishing history, The Modernist Archives Publishing Project (MAPP). Here we outline the archival practices and critical ethos that have informed the collaborative creation of MAPP by an international team of scholars, archivists, cultural institutions, students, and copyright estate holders. We address issues of selection that arise in creating a critical digital archive; feminist critical metadata practices; and our approaches to workflow and copyright; and conclude with an example of an archival document type in which the issues of feminist critical curation and copyright collide.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Archives and the Digital World

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      PubDate: 2022-08-05
       
  • Correction to: Introduction: challenges and prospects of born-digital and
           digitized archives in the digital humanities

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      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • US–soviet fisheries research during the cold war: data legacies

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      Abstract: Abstract In the 1950s, the Soviet Union expanded the range of its fisheries operations into international water traditionally fished by American vessels. In the USA, government officials and fisheries experts alike expressed concerns that the Soviets were overfishing Atlantic stocks, or even potentially engaging in off-shore espionage. Despite these fears, members of the US fisheries management community reached out and engaged with their Soviet counterparts directly. This initial communication led to a series of collaborations between US and Soviet scientific agencies aimed at developing a deeper understanding of marine ecosystems and improving the sustainability of international fisheries. The joint US–USSR research efforts beginning in the 1960s laid the foundation for continued cooperative studies through the 1980s and into the post-Soviet era. This paper uses historical records from the US National Archives and data products currently available on the web to examine the legacy of this Cold War cooperative research program. These materials demonstrate how American and Soviet scientists collaborated to generate and describe data on fisheries. It also considers how they negotiated recordkeeping and data management activities across radically different governmental structures, while also navigating the transition to digital recordkeeping and data exchange. This case offers perspective on the preservation of at-risk ecological records and the continued value of these data in our contemporary world.
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • Keeping it under lock and keywords: exploring new ways to open up the web
           archives with notebooks

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      Abstract: Abstract The UK Government Web Archive (UKGWA) has been archiving government websites since 1996 and now holds regular snapshots of over 5000 sites. Currently, this material can be accessed through browsing or a simple keyword search interface on their website and has also been catalogued in The National Archives’ online catalogue, Discovery. However, the scale of the UKGWA exposes the limits of the current search interface, and there is no facility to understand the archive in aggregate. This article seeks to go beyond the simple keyword search by exploring the data sources available, from APIs to web crawling, for computational analysis of the UKGWA. The article is accompanied by two Python Notebooks which present examples of analysis using each data source. Notebooks lower the technical barriers for the reader to explore and interpret the UKGWA as data, while surfacing the challenges around making web material computationally accessible.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
       
  • Understanding the application of handwritten text recognition technology
           in heritage contexts: a systematic review of Transkribus in published
           research

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      Abstract: Abstract Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) technology is now a mature machine learning tool, becoming integrated in the digitisation processes of libraries and archives, speeding up the transcription of primary sources and facilitating full text searching and analysis of historic texts at scale. However, research into how HTR is changing our information environment is scant. This paper presents a systematic literature review regarding how researchers are using one particular HTR platform, Transkribus, to indicate the domains where HTR is applied, the approach taken, and how the technology is understood. 381 papers from 2015 to 2020 were gathered from Google Scholar, Scopus, and Web of Science, then grouped and coded into categories using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Published research that mentions Transkribus is international and rapidly growing. Transkribus features primarily in archival and library science publications, while a long tail of broad and eclectic disciplines, including history, computer science, citizen science, law and education, demonstrate the wider applicability of the tool. The most common paper categories were humanities applications (67%), technological (25%), users (5%) and tutorials (3%). This paper presents the first overarching review of HTR as featured in published research, while also elucidating how HTR is affecting the information environment.
      PubDate: 2022-06-17
       
  • The impact of the shift to cloud computing on digital recordkeeping
           practices at the University of Michigan Bentley historical library

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      Abstract: Abstract Cloud-based productivity, collaboration, and storage tools offer increased opportunities for collaboration and potential cost-savings over locally hosted solutions and have seen widespread adoption throughout industry, government, and academia over the last decade. While these tools benefit organizations, IT departments, and day-to-day-users, they present unique challenges for records managers and archivists. As a review of the relevant literature demonstrates, issues surrounding cloud computing are not limited to the technology—although the implementation and technological issues are numerous—but also include organization management, human behavior, regulation, and records management, making the process of archiving digital information in this day and age all the more difficult. This paper explores some of the consequences of this shift and its effect on digital recordkeeping at the Bentley Historical Library, whose mission is to “collect the materials for the University of Michigan.” After providing context for this problem by discussing relevant literature, two practicing archivists will explore the impact of the move toward cloud computing as well as various productivity software and collaboration tools in use at U-M throughout the various stages of a standard lifecycle model for managing records.
      PubDate: 2022-06-13
       
  • Swine at the chancery and locks to chests: dispersal, destruction, and
           accumulation of Sicily’s financial archives in the later Middle Ages

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      Abstract: Abstract In the last twenty years, anthropologists, archivists, and historians have dedicated increased attention to the study of archives as objects of research themselves. In so doing, scholars have predominantly examined the emergence and transformations of archives during the early modern age, focusing mostly on political and diplomatic depositories. They have tended to neglect financial archives, which is unfortunate, as—alongside judicial archives—they were probably the largest documentary repositories of the pre-modern world and those that first faced the problem of managing huge masses of documentation. This article discusses the formation and development of the Kingdom of Sicily’s financial archives in the later Middle Ages, arguing that this repository evolved into a collecting archive by the early fifteenth-century, when it preserved not only the records and accounts produced by the central financial administration, but also those from a number of territorial officers and magistracies. This archival turn, I suggest, originated from the fact that the Crown of Aragon’s rulers constantly needed increased incomes to fund bureaucracies and warfare and exercise patronage, and thus needed financial information organized, at hand, and under their control. After briefly discussing the emergence of the financial archive in the thirteenth-century, this essay traces the Crown’s attempts to create a stable repository for storing financial records and accounts and its continuous struggles to prevent documentation from being scattered and dispersed. Finally, it examines the successful strategy that King Alfonso V of Aragon (1416–58), called the Magnanimous, pursued to organize financial documentation and concentrate records and accounts produced by financial administration into a stable building. The essay pays particular attention to the material aspects of preserving records, e.g., the restoration of buildings, construction of chests, and preparation of secure locks that were integral to the emergence of collecting archives for financial documents in the later Middle Ages.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10502-021-09374-z
       
  • “I’m also prepared to not find me. It's great when I do, but it
           doesn't hurt if I don't”: crip time and anticipatory erasure for
           disabled archival users

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      Abstract: Abstract Using data collected through semi-structured interviews with disabled archival users, this article foregrounds disabled people's relationships with time, specifically to pasts and representations thereof in archival material. It illustrates the ways in which disabled people use their knowledge of how disability is understood—in archives and in society—to anticipate their erasure in archival material. First, focusing on the past, this data illustrates the prevalence of disability stereotypes, tropes, and limited perspectives within the records that document disabled people. Second, in witnessing such representations (or lack thereof), disabled researchers described how they are affectively impacted in the present moment: witnessing the violence of the past is emotionally difficult for many disabled people researching their histories. Third, using past experiences of archival erasure, interviewees described coming to expect and anticipate future absences—anticipation as an affective mode helped them prepare to encounter forms of erasure, to protect themselves against possible harms, and to hope for something different, all of which reflects their experiences of how disability is understood in society. This data reflect the way anticipation is a central facet of crip time—the multiple ways that disabled people experience time, pace, and temporal moments—to show how disabled people feel through multiple temporal landscapes and approach historical and archival representation.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10502-021-09372-1
       
  • Critical archival theory and the Caribbean’s neoliberal archival
           turn

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      Abstract: Abstract This article draws attention to the present-day transnational rise of state archives in the Greater Caribbean. It takes as a case study the Dominican Republic’s National Archives System (NAS) and National General Archives (AGN), which opened in 2008 and 2011, respectively, to signal a Caribbean neoliberal archival turn and interrogate the data politics behind these institutions’ neoliberal promises of equality, progress, and freedom. Intersecting Critical Archival Theory and Critical Caribbean Studies, the article pushes for a new critical archival theory of color that draws from scholarship centering the erasure of histories of enslavement and the hyper-masculinization of white colonial privilege. In doing so, it advocates for a decolonial practice of public archives demanding that archivists and archive users reckon with these archives’ historical role in powering anti-Black racism and structural oppression.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10502-021-09377-w
       
  • Classified records and the archives

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      Abstract: Abstract Records designated as classified at the time of their creation form a very significant part of public records produced by state and public administration bodies in a broad sense. At the same time, they represent a significant part of historical source production a part of which should be permanently preserved in the relevant public archives. Their information content and informative value for future historical science is in many cases highly qualitatively superior. However, the phenomenon of classified records, including at least minimum possible access to them is also of fundamental relevance to contemporary society and the maintaining of a functioning quality democracy. Very often, however, what is missing is a deeper debate over records classification as such. For example, how do intelligence services manage their records' Are they being arbitrarily destroyed' Do they remain classified unnecessarily and for too long' The legal systems of most countries, including those with advanced democratic systems, now exert minimum real pressure on the declassification of once classified material. The following comparative study addresses the phenomenon of records classification and their declassification in some developed democracies with advanced archival systems; it also focuses on some of the features of the system’s post-1945 historical development, particularly in the United States of America, the United Kingdom, partly also in France, Germany, Sweden, and adds a look at the situation in the Czech Republic representing one of the post-communist countries in Central Europe. The study uses the specific examples of the USA and the United Kingdom to demonstrate in what respects archives and historians can act as an important factor in the process of management and declassification of classified records, and how they can also be an important element of democracy in this sense.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10502-021-09370-3
       
  • The train from Dunvegan: implementing the United Nations Declaration on
           the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in public archives in Canada

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      Abstract: Abstract The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) was published in 2007. By posing a right to self-determination, the UNDRIP opens a path to redefining Indigenous peoples’ place in the international community. This paper considers how public archives in Canada can address the implementation of the UNDRIP and engage with Indigenous peoples to find new pathways to reanimate and promote the cultures and identities of Indigenous peoples.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10502-021-09373-0
       
  • Introduction: challenges and prospects of born-digital and digitized
           archives in the digital humanities

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      PubDate: 2022-05-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s10502-022-09396-1
       
  • Archival traditions in Latin America

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper surveys archival traditions coexisting in Latin America and identifies key moments in the region's development of archives and archival practices. First, different record-keeping practices in pre-Hispanic communities are identified. Second, an Iberian conception of the archive is described in the case of colonial archival practices between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. Third, changes resulting from independence movements and the subsequent arrival of the Latin archival tradition are documented. Fourth, the emergence of an Ibero-American archival tradition is posited, which is State-sponsored and institutional and the product of a postwar context. Lastly, the turns and shifts these traditions are experiencing due to social conflict and transformations taking place in the region since the late twentieth century are presented, associated with marginal practices and with close attention being paid to users.
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s10502-022-09393-4
       
  • “Humans and records are entangled”: empathic engagement and emotional
           response in archivists

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      Abstract: Abstract There is growing awareness in archival communities that working with records that contain evidence of human pain and suffering can result in unsettling emotions for archivists. One important finding of this work, however, is the considerable variability in not only the nature of responses, but also the nature of records that provoke emotional responses. Using in-depth qualitative interviews with 20 archivists from across Canada and one from the United States, and employing grounded theory methodology, this study sought to better understand the nature of emotional responses and factors associated with distress. Archivists described a wide range of reactions including shock, intrusive thoughts, profound senses of anger, sadness and despair, and ultimately at times disrupted functioning in personal and occupational spheres. One factor that has been associated with increasing vulnerability to distress in other occupational groups is empathic engagement, which is understood to have two elements: a vicarious emotional process and a cognitive process. This article explores the impact of personal connections and the nature of empathic engagement between archivists, donors, community researchers, and the records themselves on emotional response.
      PubDate: 2022-05-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s10502-022-09392-5
       
  • How can we make born-digital and digitised archives more accessible'
           Identifying obstacles and solutions

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      Abstract: Abstract Access to data is seen as a key priority today. Yet, the vast majority of digital cultural data preserved in archives is inaccessible due to privacy, copyright or technical issues. Emails and other born-digital collections are often uncatalogued, unfindable and unusable. In the case of documents that originated in paper format before being digitised, copyright can be a major obstacle to access. To solve the problem of access to digital archives, cross-disciplinary collaborations are absolutely essential. The big challenges of our time—from global warming to social inequalities—cannot be solved within a single discipline. The same applies to the challenge of “dark” archives closed to users. We cannot expect archivists or digital humanists to find a magical solution that will instantly make digital records more accessible. Instead, we need to set up collaborations across disciplines that seldom talk to each other. Based on 21 interviews with 26 archivists, librarians and other professionals in cultural institutions, we identify key obstacles to making digitised and born-digital collections more accessible to users. We outline current levels of access to a wide range of collections in various cultural organisations, including no access at all and limited access (for example, when users are required to travel on-site to consult documents). We suggest possible solutions to the problems of access—including the ethical use of Artificial Intelligence to unlock “dark” archives inaccessible to users. Finally, we propose the creation of a global user community who would participate in decisions on access to digital collections.
      PubDate: 2022-03-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10502-022-09390-7
       
  • Zines as community archive

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      Abstract: Abstract Zines are self-published, do-it-yourself booklets that have a long history as tools for activism in social movements. While archival studies has already explored the collection and preservation of zines as cultural artefacts, this article explores the capacity for zines to act as a form of community archive. The article examines See You at the Paradise, a zine co-created with Norfolk Island community members for a research project focused on Kingston and Arthur’s Vale Historic Area. Drawing on Michelle Caswell’s six principles of community archive discourse—participation, shared stewardship, multiplicity, activism, reflexivity, valuing affect—we analyse the extent to which zines and zine-making, as product and process, can be understood as community archive. In doing so, we propose collaborative reminiscence as a seventh principle. The article finds that zines, as community archive, work to strengthen the presence of marginalised voices in dominant historical narratives while also offering an important resource for community-building and political resistance.
      PubDate: 2022-03-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s10502-022-09388-1
       
  • Social media as part of personal digital archives: exploring users’
           practices and service providers’ policies regarding the preservation of
           digital memories

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      Abstract: Abstract After more than a decade of usage, social media have become a virtual environment where meaningful content is created and kept, highlighting its potential to become part of personal digital archives. This study investigates users’ attitudes and preservation practices related to digital memories created on social media. Survey findings highlighted how users seem to consider these items as meaningful digital traces to document important events of their lives, and a potential inherent part of their personal archives. However, results show how this attitude does not seem to be supported by adequate preservation strategies. After analysing social media platforms’ policies in relation to users’ preservation practices, we advocate for raising more awareness among both users and service providers regarding the risks posed by the ephemerality of the digital world and the need for specific provisions that go beyond the short-term retention of data and look to the future and potential use of what appears to be considered an inherent part of individuals’ personal archives.
      PubDate: 2022-01-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10502-021-09379-8
       
 
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