Subjects -> MATHEMATICS (Total: 1013 journals)
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    - GEOMETRY AND TOPOLOGY (23 journals)
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    - MATHEMATICS (GENERAL) (45 journals)
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    - PROBABILITIES AND MATH STATISTICS (113 journals)

PROBABILITIES AND MATH STATISTICS (113 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 98 of 98 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Afrika Statistika     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Applied Mathematics and Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Mathematics and Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Data Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annual Review of Statistics and Its Application     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Applied Medical Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Asian Journal of Mathematics & Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Probability and Statistics     Open Access  
Austrian Journal of Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Biostatistics & Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cadernos do IME : Série Estatística     Open Access  
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal  
Communications in Mathematics and Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communications in Statistics - Simulation and Computation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Communications in Statistics: Case Studies, Data Analysis and Applications     Hybrid Journal  
Comunicaciones en Estadística     Open Access  
Econometrics and Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forecasting     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Foundations and Trends® in Optimization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Applied Mathematics and Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Game Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Geoinformatics & Geostatistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Geomatics, Natural Hazards and Risk     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Indonesian Journal of Applied Statistics     Open Access  
International Game Theory Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Advanced Statistics and IT&C for Economics and Life Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Advanced Statistics and Probability     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Algebra and Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Applied Mathematics and Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Ecological Economics and Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Energy and Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Game Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Mathematics and Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Multivariate Data Analysis     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Probability and Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Statistics & Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Statistics and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Statistics and Probability     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Statistics in Medical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Testing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Iraqi Journal of Statistical Sciences     Open Access  
Japanese Journal of Statistics and Data Science     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Biometrics & Biostatistics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cost Analysis and Parametrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Environmental Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Game Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Mathematical Economics and Finance     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Mathematics and Statistics Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Modern Applied Statistical Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Official Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Quantitative Economics     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Social and Economic Statistics     Open Access  
Journal of Statistical Theory and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Statistics and Data Science Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Indian Society for Probability and Statistics     Full-text available via subscription  
Jurnal Biometrika dan Kependudukan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ekonomi Kuantitatif Terapan     Open Access  
Jurnal Sains Matematika dan Statistika     Open Access  
Lietuvos Statistikos Darbai     Open Access  
Mathematics and Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Methods, Data, Analyses     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
METRON     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nepalese Journal of Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
North American Actuarial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Mathematics, Statistics and Probability Journal     Open Access  
Pakistan Journal of Statistics and Operation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Probability, Uncertainty and Quantitative Risk     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ratio Mathematica     Open Access  
Research & Reviews : Journal of Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Biometria     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Estadística     Open Access  
RMS : Research in Mathematics & Statistics     Open Access  
Romanian Statistical Review     Open Access  
Sankhya B - Applied and Interdisciplinary Statistics     Hybrid Journal  
SIAM Journal on Mathematics of Data Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
SIAM/ASA Journal on Uncertainty Quantification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Spatial Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sri Lankan Journal of Applied Statistics     Open Access  
Stat     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Stata Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Statistica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Statistical Analysis and Data Mining     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Statistical Theory and Related Fields     Hybrid Journal  
Statistics and Public Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Statistics in Transition New Series : An International Journal of the Polish Statistical Association     Open Access  
Statistics Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Statistics, Optimization & Information Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Stats     Open Access  
Synthesis Lectures on Mathematics and Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Theory of Probability and its Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Turkish Journal of Forecasting     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
VARIANSI : Journal of Statistics and Its application on Teaching and Research     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für die gesamte Versicherungswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.212
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2325-0984 - ISSN (Online) 2325-0992
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [424 journals]
  • A Message from the Editors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 861 - 862
      Abstract: In June 2021, JSSAM received its opening impact factor (1.957 for 2020), ranking JSSAM as 46/125 in Statistics and Probability and 29/52 in Social Sciences Mathematical Methods. This ranking is especially gratifying given the relative youth of this journal, and credit should be shared among the dedicated editors (present and emeritus), associate editors, contributing authors, and readership. Truly, the past few years have brought about personal and professional challenges thanks to the coronavirus disease pandemic. Despite this, JSSAM has maintained its high standards, continuing to make great inroads toward its objective of being “the flagship journal for research on survey statistics and methodology” (see About the Journal).
      PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smac020
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Increasing Participation in a Mobile App Study: The Effects of a
           Sequential Mixed-Mode Design and In-Interview Invitation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 898 - 922
      Abstract: AbstractMobile apps are an attractive and versatile method of collecting data in the social and behavioral sciences. In samples of the general population, however, participation in app-based data collection is still rather low. In this article, we examine two potential ways of increasing participation and potentially reducing participation bias in app-based data collection: (1) inviting sample members to a mobile app study within an interview rather than by post and (2) offering a browser-based follow-up to the mobile app. We use experimental data from Spending Study 2, collected on the Understanding Society Innovation Panel and on the Lightspeed UK online access panel. Sample members were invited to download a spending diary app on their smartphone or use a browser-based online diary to report all their purchases for one month. The results suggest that inviting sample members to an app study within a face-to-face interview increases participation rates but does not bring in different types of participants. In contrast, the browser-based alternative can both increase participation rates and reduce biases in who participates if offered immediately once the app had been declined. We find that the success of using mobile apps for data collection hinges on the protocols used to implement the app.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smac006
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Benefits of Adaptive Design Under Suboptimal Scenarios: A Simulation Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1048 - 1078
      Abstract: AbstractTheories have suggested that adaptive survey designs may reduce biases and variances of survey estimates more so than post-survey adjustment. However, previous research has not incorporated practical constraints into theorizing the utility of adaptive design. How would design factors and suboptimal auxiliary information influence the effect of adaptive design' The current simulation considers three separate components in adaptive design: (1) Modeling—how sample cases’ response propensities are predicted by a response propensity model; (2) Operationalization—how researchers decide to differentially allocate recruitment effort to sample cases, and (3) Achievement—the sizes of the changes in response propensities that are achieved by the adaptive strategies. Each component influences the effect of adaptive design on the biases and variances of survey estimates. The simulation study presented here suggests that adaptive designs based on adequate auxiliary information improve survey estimates more so than post-survey adjustment. However, adaptive designs may backfire if the strategies are not correctly designed due to a lack of critical auxiliary variables.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smab051
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Using Smartphones to Capture and Combine Self-Reports and Passively
           Measured Behavior in Social Research

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 863 - 885
      Abstract: AbstractWith the ubiquity of smartphones, it is possible to collect self-reports as well as to passively measure behaviors and states (e.g., locations, movement, activity, and sleep) with native sensors and the smartphone’s operating system, both on a single device that usually accompanies participants throughout the day. This research synthesis brings structure to a rapidly expanding body of literature on the combined collection of self-reports and passive measurement using smartphones, pointing out how and why researchers have combined these two types of data and where more work is needed. We distinguish between five reasons why researchers might want to integrate the two data sources and how this has been helpful: (1) verification, for example, confirming start and end of passively detected trips, (2) contextualization, for example, asking about the purpose of a passively detected trip, (3) quantifying relationships, for example, quantifying the association between self-reported stress and passively measured sleep duration, (4) building composite measures, for example, measuring components of stress that participants are aware of through self-reports and those they are not through passively measured speech attributes, and (5) triggering measurement, for example, asking survey questions contingent on certain passively measured events or participant locations. We discuss challenges of collecting self-reports and passively tracking participants’ behavior with smartphones from the perspective of representation (e.g., who owns a smartphone and who is willing to share their data), measurement (e.g., different levels of temporal granularity in self-reports and passively collected data), and privacy considerations (e.g., the greater intrusiveness of passive measurement than self-reports). While we see real potential in this approach it is not yet clear if its impact will be incremental or will revolutionize the field.
      PubDate: Mon, 27 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smab035
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Exploring the Feasibility of Recruiting Respondents and Collecting Web
           Data via Smartphone: A Case Study of Text-To-Web Recruitment for a General
           Population Survey in Germany

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 886 - 897
      Abstract: AbstractThe widespread usage of smartphones, as well as their technical features, offers many opportunities for survey research. As a result, the importance and popularity of smartphone surveys is steadily increasing. To explore the feasibility of a new text-to-web approach for surveying people directly via their smartphones, we conducted a case study in Germany in which we recruited respondents from a mobile random digit dialing sample via text messages that included a link to a web survey. We show that, although this survey approach is feasible, it is hampered by a number of issues, namely a high loss of numbers at the invitation stage, and a high rate of implicit refusals on the landing page of the survey.
      PubDate: Mon, 29 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smab006
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Perceived Burden, Focus of Attention, and the Urge to Justify: The Impact
           of the Number of Screens and Probe Order on the Response Behavior of
           Probing Questions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 923 - 944
      Abstract: AbstractWeb probing is a valuable tool to assess the validity and comparability of survey items. It uses different probe types—such as category-selection probes and specific probes—to inquire about different aspects of an item. Previous web probing studies often asked one probe type per item, but research situations exist where it might be preferable to test potentially problematic items with multiple probes. However, the response behavior might be affected by two factors: question order and the visual presentation of probes on one screen versus multiple screens as well as their interaction. In this study, we report evidence from a web experiment that was conducted with 532 respondents from Germany in September 2013. Experimental groups varied by screen number (1 versus 2) and probe order (category-selection probe first versus specific probe first). We assessed the impact of these manipulations on several indicators of response quality, probe answer content, and the respondents’ motivation with logistic regressions and two-way ANOVAs. We reveal that multiple mechanisms push response behavior in this context: perceived response burden, the focus of attention, the need for justification, and verbal context effects. We find that response behavior in the condition with two screens and category-selection probe first outperforms all other experimental conditions. We recommend this implementation in all but one scenario: if the goal is to test an item that includes a key term with a potentially too large lexical scope, we recommend starting with a specific probe but on the same screen as the category-selection probe.
      PubDate: Sat, 12 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smaa043
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • A Dynamic Survival Modeling Approach to the Prediction of Web Survey
           Breakoff

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 945 - 978
      Abstract: AbstractRespondents who break off from a web survey prior to completing it are a prevalent problem in data collection. To prevent breakoff bias, it is crucial to keep as many diverse respondents in a web survey as possible. As a first step of preventing breakoffs, this study aims to understand breakoff and the associated response behavior. We analyze data from an annual online survey using dynamic survival models and ROC analyses. We find that breakoff risks between respondents using mobile devices versus PCs do not differ at the beginning of the questionnaire, but the risk for mobile device users increases as the survey progresses. Very fast respondents as well as respondents with changing response times both have a higher risk of quitting the questionnaire, compared to respondents with slower and steady response times. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of these findings for future practice and research in web survey methodology.
      PubDate: Sat, 12 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smab015
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Capture–Recapture Estimation of Characteristics of U.S. Local Food Farms
           Using a Web-Scraped List Frame

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 979 - 1004
      Abstract: AbstractThe emerging sectors of agriculture, such as organics, urban, and local food, tend to be dominated by farms that are smaller, more transient, more diverse, and more dispersed than the traditional farms in the rural areas of the United States. As a consequence, a list frame of all farms within one of these sectors is difficult to construct and, even with the best of efforts, is incomplete. The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) maintains a list frame of all known and potential U.S. farms and uses this list frame as the sampling frame for most of its surveys. Traditionally, NASS has used its area frame to assess undercoverage. However, getting a good measure of the incompleteness of the NASS list frame using an area frame is cost prohibitive for farms in these emerging sectors that tend to be located within and near urban areas. In 2016, NASS conducted the Local Food Marketing Practices (LFMP) survey. Independent samples were drawn from (1) the NASS list frame and (2) a web-scraped list of local food farms. Using these two samples and capture–recapture methods, the total number and sales of local food operations at the United States, regional, and state levels were estimated. To our knowledge, the LFMP survey is the first survey in which a web-scraped list frame has been used to assess undercoverage in a capture–recapture setting to produce official statistics. In this article, the methods are presented, and the challenges encountered are reviewed. Best practices and open research questions for conducting surveys using web-scraped list frames and capture–recapture methods are discussed.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smab008
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Questionnaire Complexity, Rest Period, and Response Likelihood in
           Establishment Surveys

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1005 - 1023
      Abstract: AbstractResponse burden has been a concern in survey research for some time. One area of concern is the negative impact that response burden can have on response rates. In an effort to mitigate negative impacts on response rates, survey research organizations try to minimize the burden respondents are exposed to and maximize the likelihood of response. Many organizations also try to be mindful of the role burden may play in respondents’ likelihood to participate in future surveys by implementing rest periods or survey holidays. Recently, new evidence from a study of cross-sectional household surveys provided an interesting lens to examine burden. The evidence demonstrated that those sampled in two independent surveys are more likely to respond to the second survey if the first survey was more difficult to complete, and that this effect was not significantly influenced by the rest period in between the two surveys. These findings are compelling, and since the mechanisms influencing response in household and establishment surveys differ in important ways, a similar examination in an establishment survey context is warranted. To accomplish this, data are used from the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Overall, our research finds that prior survey features such as questionnaire complexity (or burden), prior response disposition and rest period are significantly associated with response to subsequent surveys. We also find that sample units first receiving a more complex questionnaire have significantly higher probabilities of response to a subsequent survey than do those receiving a simpler questionnaire first. The findings in this paper have implications for nonresponse adjustments and identification of subgroups for adaptive design data collection.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smab017
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • An Adaptive Mode Adjustment for Multimode Household Surveys

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1024 - 1047
      Abstract: AbstractMultimode data collection has emerged as a common approach for conducting household surveys in the United States. A number of different data collection schemes have been investigated, with an emphasis on collecting as many respondents by the Web prior to going to paper data collection to reduce costs. Despite this, little research has been conducted on the approaches to weighting data from multimode surveys. The typical approach assumes that all respondents should be treated the same regardless of mode even though it is well known that the response patterns by mode vary substantially. We examine an adaptive mode adjustment to address these differences and propose an imbalance measure to help determine the adjustment factor using ideas from responsive design. We then compare the effects of the alternative weighting method in two recent sequential mixed-mode surveys and show it appears to reduce bias while only slightly increasing variances of the estimates.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smab034
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Testing for Phases of Dropout Attrition Using Change-Point Hazard Models

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1079 - 1097
      Abstract: AbstractWhile web-based surveys are a convenient research tool, the ease of dropping out in the online setting has become a growing issue in ensuring data quality. One theory is that dropout, or attrition, occurs in phases that can be generalized to phases of high dropout and phases of stable use. In order to detect these phases, survey dropout is considered as a time-to-event outcome and tests within change-point hazard models are introduced. Here, we apply the multiple change-point exponential model and extend the single change-point Weibull model to account for multiple change-points. We also introduce a likelihood ratio test to aid in determining the number of distinct phases, using Monte Carlo simulations of the null hypothesis of no attrition phases or change-points against the alternative hypothesis that distinct attrition phases exist (at least one change-point). The performances of these change-point hazard models are compared using both a simulation study and also with application to survey data on patient cancer screening preferences, as well as compared to previous work with discrete models.
      PubDate: Fri, 17 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smab030
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • A Note About the Definition of Response Propensity for Survey Nonresponse

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1098 - 1106
      Abstract: AbstractNonresponse propensities play a central role in unit nonresponse adjustments from both design and model-based perspectives, but are often not clearly defined because of lack of clarity about the variables on which the propensities are conditioned. A definition of response propensity for the purpose of nonresponse adjustments is proposed, where the conditioning is restricted to include the variables measured in the survey as well as design and auxiliary variables measured for respondents and nonrespondents. The proposed definition is justified from both design-based and model-based perspectives. The role of the missing at random assumption is discussed for both perspectives, for cross-sectional surveys and longitudinal surveys with attrition.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smab014
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Reducing Variance with Sample Allocation Based on Expected Response Rates
           in Stratified Sample Designs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1107 - 1120
      Abstract: AbstractThis paper demonstrates that the sample allocation that takes the expected response rates (ERRs) into account has certain advantages over other approaches in terms of reducing the variances of the estimates. The performance of the ERR allocation is assessed within the framework of stratified sampling by comparing the resulting variances with those obtained using the classical procedure of proportional-to-stratum size (PS) allocation and then applying poststratification. The main theoretical tool is asymptotic calculations using the δ-method, which are complemented with extensive finite sample evaluations using various combinations of specific population parameters. The main finding was that within a stratified sample design, ERR allocation leads to lower variances than PS allocation, not only when the response rates are correctly specified but also under a wide range of conditions where the response rates can only be approximately specified in advance.
      PubDate: Mon, 09 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jssam/smab021
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2021)
       
 
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