Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

History (General) (45 journals)

Showing 1 - 41 of 41 Journals sorted alphabetically
AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"     Full-text available via subscription  
ArcHistoR     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asclepio     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal for the History of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Canadian Bulletin of Medical History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Cuadernos de Historia Contemporánea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture & History Digital Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
El Futuro del Pasado     Open Access  
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Geschichte und Gesellschaft : Zeitschrift für Historische Sozialwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Gladius     Open Access  
Histoire de la Recherche Contemporaine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
História & Ensino     Open Access  
Histories     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
History and Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
History of Geo- and Space Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History of Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
History of the Human Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
History Workshop Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
HOPOS : The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
HoST - Journal of History of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Maritime History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of the History of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of History and Future     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medieval Monastic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Planning History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the History of Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Law and History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Medievalista online     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Memini. Travaux et documents     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval     Open Access  
Sabretache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Source: Notes in the History of Art     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Speculum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Sport History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Storia delle Donne     Open Access  
TAWARIKH : Journal of Historical Studies     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Geschichtsdidaktik     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Planning History
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.258
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1538-5132 - ISSN (Online) 1552-6585
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Review of Kristin Poling, Germany’s Urban Frontiers: Nature and History
           on the Edge of the Nineteenth-Century City

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Brian Ladd
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T04:41:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132221102149
       
  • Book Review

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      Authors: John R. McNeill
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T04:33:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132221095040
       
  • Making a Self-Reliant Citizen: Technocracy, Rural Redevelopment and the
           Etawah Pilot

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      Authors: Deepa Ramaswamy
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      The essay traces the trajectory of India’s first rural development program, the Etawah Pilot program from 1948, which became part of the country’s first five-year plans in 1951 with the support of the US government and the Ford Foundation. With a focus on the project’s two central actors, US architect-planner Albert Mayer and Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, the essay argues that the Etawah Pilot program was a modernizing experiment in citizen assimilation that became a trans-national model for postwar development aid with the international architect-planner as the traveling technocrat set to develop expertise for newly independent nations.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T07:18:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132221081766
       
  • How the Working-Class Home became Modern, 1900-1940

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      Authors: Arijit Sen
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T02:14:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132221091489
       
  • Rethinking Placemaking in The City Creative

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      Authors: Andrés F Ramírez
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T09:23:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132221091495
       
  • A Floral Nation: Warren H. Manning, Civic Horticulture, and the Didactic
           Cityscape

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      Authors: Kevan Klosterwill
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      Warren H. Manning developed a distinctive approach to civic horticulture that recurred throughout his career as a city planner, calling for educational plantings beyond limited educational gardens to encompass streets, neighborhoods, school and college campuses, and entire park systems. These plantings, supported by printed media, were resources for citizens to educate themselves, improve their own home grounds, and in turn participate in the improvement of the community’s civic landscape as a whole. Manning’s approach brought together village improvement, amateur naturalist societies, schoolyard gardening, and his own experience designing arboreta with the Olmsted firm.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T04:53:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211067713
       
  • The Dismantling of Growth Management in Florida': The Consistency
           Mandate, Policy Change, and Institutional Realignment

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      Authors: Evangeline R. Linkous
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      In 1985, Florida established a groundbreaking approach to growth management and intergovernmental relations, which the state’s 2011 Community Planning Act is widely described as ending. This paper presents a history and institutional analysis of policy changes for the State’s core consistency doctrine. It concludes that the CPA did not end growth management since Florida retains the mandate for local planning consistent with state growth management criteria and subject to state review. However, it does formalize diminished state authority over local planning. Florida’s current institutional arrangement for planning involves an assertive state rule-making stance, but shifts planning responsibility to local governments.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T12:42:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132221082652
       
  • Saving the Shaker Lakes: How an Alliance between Two Wealthy Suburbs and
           Cleveland’s Black Mayor Stopped the Clark Freeway

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      Authors: Virginia P. Dawson
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      In the 1960s, the suburbs of Cleveland Heights and Shaker Heights protested the routing of an Interstate highway through their historic park. Known as the Clark Freeway, I-290 was meant to connect downtown Cleveland with the newer suburbs located beyond the city’s outer beltway. Fearing irreparable damage to their communities, a group of garden club women and a committee of citizen activists brought pressure on county, state, and federal officials to delay route selection. However, only after Cleveland Mayor Carl Stokes joined the fight, did Governor James Rhodes summon the political will to cancel the highway.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-04-22T03:45:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132221084659
       
  • Down the Vertical Refuse Chutes in Singapore High-rise Living

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      Authors: Belinda Yuen, Jane M. Jacobs
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      In the first three decades of post-independence (1960–1990), Singapore underwent a radical housing transition into high-rise, high-density housing that required technical innovation to manage new scales and heights of household waste. Drawing on perspectives from urban political ecology, three questions are examined: What were the key challenges of household waste management policy and technology across this period' Who were the key actors and development partners' What was the environmental and social rationale for everyday waste management, and how did it change over time' We discern a pattern of innovation, which was driven by intersecting challenges around accessibility, affordability and adoption.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T01:18:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132221085948
       
  • Échelon, Quincunx, Quadrangle: The Olmsted Firm and Campus Planning in
           the Early Decades of Vassar College

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      Authors: Yvonne Elet
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      Frederick Law Olmsted and his sons were America’s foremost campus planners, whose multidisciplinary skill set and collaborative practices enabled them to envision and realize comprehensive plans for campuses, much as they did for their better-known parks and suburban communities. This article contributes a new campus case study to Olmsted firm history. There have long been unsubstantiated reports that F. L. Olmsted designed the bucolic Hudson Valley campus of Vassar College, although the source of Vassar’s early designs has remained unclear. Drawing on unpublished archival materials, this article traces three generations of the Olmsted firm at Vassar, revealing that it was John Charles Olmsted—whose important oeuvre remains to be fully distinguished—who fundamentally shaped Vassar’s central campus. This narrative elucidates the planning processes of this small, progressive woman’s college in its formative decades, and addresses the shifting role of the landscape architect in American campus design in the late nineteenth- and early twentieth centuries.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T06:25:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132221081531
       
  • Planned Obsolescence' The Role of the Town Common in the Making of
           Savannah’s Urban Plan

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      Authors: David W. Gobel
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      The colonial town common of Savannah, Georgia, played a vital role in the city’s history. It enabled public surveyors in the late 18th and early 19th century to expand the celebrated urban plan of streets and public squares that had been initiated by the city’s founder, James Oglethorpe. Its fortuitous role as an expansion zone, however, does not appear to have been intended from start as some have supposed. Instead, Savannah’s town common, like others of its time, was an unscripted, liminal space serving multiple, undesignated functions. This paper investigates its intended and actual use and its gradual disappearance
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T04:06:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211073471
       
  • Corrigendum to Cleaning Streams in Cook County, IL: Forest Preserves,
           Water Pollution, and Interwar Environmentalism in the Chicago Region

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      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T11:02:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132221081283
       
  • The American Road: Highways and American Political Development,
           1891–1956

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      Authors: Bruce E. Seely
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-03-12T12:58:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132221079231
       
  • Between Anticipative and Iconic: Re-imaging the Emirati Villa and its
           Spatial Assemblages

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      Authors: Mamun Rashid, Dilshad R. Ara
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      This article chronicles the evolution of the UAE’s (United Arab Emirates) residential architecture from its pre-urban beginnings in the dwellings of semi-nomadic tribes and coastal merchants to the ‘iconic' villas of the present. A temporal framing of traditional planning practices, including the collaborative roles of Sheikhs and transnational actors (in global and citywide planning networks), provides a narrative about Emirati houses from the pre-oil era (pre-1950s) to the post-federation era (post-1970s). This mapping of housing transitions is useful because previous research in the UAE’s tribal-modern context has largely ignored continuities and contingencies. The discursive relationship between past and present, top-down planning and user-driven bottom-up practice can contribute to a more nuanced understanding of urban development that does not blindly accept dominant views of iconic forms or planning histories.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T01:36:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211061816
       
  • Arcadia for Everyone' The Social Context of Garden Suburbs in the U.S

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      Authors: Emily Talen
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      Garden suburbs are a particular type of residential development that flourished in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, in the U.S. and globally. Using census data of 283 garden suburbs in the U.S., I investigated the exclusivity of the garden suburb by looking at income, housing value, race, and age. I found that garden suburbs had more Whites, single-family housing, and higher family income in all time periods. Income levels were significantly higher whether the comparison was between garden suburbs and the immediately surrounding area (1mile), or between garden suburbs and a wider context.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T11:37:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211073520
       
  • From “Citizen Jane” to an Institutional History of Power and Social
           Change: Problematizing Urban Planning’s Jane Jacobs Historiography

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      Authors: Stefan Norgaard
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      Conventional wisdom frames scholar and activist Jane Jacobs as a skeptical housewife, heterodox/dissident critic, or common-sense neighborhood resident. Yet a comprehensive archival review of Jacobs’ professional engagement with philanthropy and urban-development organizations reveals instead an activist scholar-leader in a larger, well-funded movement that must be understood in its time and place. Institutional partnerships shaped and informed Jacobs’ most noted projects, and her counsel, in turn, shaped urban-development grantmaking. An historical assessment of Jacobs’ ideas, and of social change more broadly, should examine not just individuals, but also supporters, organizations, and paradigms.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T04:19:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211070512
       
  • Overpromising Technocracy’s Potential: The American-Yugoslav Project,
           Urban Planning, and Cold War Cultural Diplomacy

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      Authors: Tracy Neumann
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      From the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s, the Ford Foundation funded an urban planning exchange between American academics and Yugoslav urban planners as something of a test case in transferring American planning technology to the socialist world. The American-Yugoslav Project was one of several international urban development projects the Ford Foundation pursued at mid-century as part of its Cold War-era cultural diplomacy efforts. The largely unsuccessful technology transfer at the center of the American-Yugoslav Project was a contributing factor to the Foundation’s retreat from international urban development and provides a case study in how one-size-fits-all development models falter when challenged by real-world conditions.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T01:40:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211060041
       
  • Visions, Plans, and Schemes: Reconstructing African American St. Louis
           after the 1927 Tornado

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      Authors: Andrew Hurley, Eliza Murray
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the conflicting claims on urban redevelopment in the aftermath of the 1927 St. Louis tornado. In the Finney Avenue District, a nascent middle-class African American neighborhood, residents saw the post-tornado rebuilding program as an opportunity for civic improvement through the construction of new schools and housing. This grass-roots vision, however, ran up against the objectives and machinations of efficiency-minded city planners and profit-seeking developers. A micro-analysis of the rebuilding process sheds light on the racial politics of early 20th century urban redevelopment as well as the role of natural disasters in reshaping the urban landscape.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-02-13T10:14:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211067182
       
  • Journal of Planning History

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      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      PubDate: 2022-02-08T12:23:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211046229
       
  • The Geography of Poverty

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      Authors: Stephanie Ryberg-Webster
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T05:05:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211054456
       
  • Ivory Tower Thinking

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      Authors: William W. Cutler
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T06:36:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211043111
       
  • Cleaning Streams in Cook County, IL: Forest Preserves, Water Pollution,
           and Interwar Environmentalism in the Chicago Region

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      Authors: Natalie B. Vena
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      In 1916, the Forest Preserve District of Cook County began acquiring land to create a natural retreat for Chicagoans in that booming metropolitan region. Since district officials acquired many properties along county streams, water pollution soon interfered with their mission of creating an urban wilderness for recreational pleasure. To address the problem, in 1931, county leaders appointed the Clean Streams Advisory Committee that collaborated with forest preserve staff members to pressure polluters to clean-up their operations and to persuade enforcement agencies to prosecute ongoing offenders. They also lobbied the Public Works Administration to earmark New Deal funding for sewage treatment in Cook County. Their efforts suggest that early activism against water pollution in American cities emerged not only from efforts to ensure clean drinking water, but also struggles to protect nature. The interwar campaign to clean forest preserve streams anticipated the goals of the federal Clean Water Act (1972) to make all American waterways fishable and swimmable. The movement also preceded the burst of anti-pollution activism that historians have documented in U.S. suburbs after WWII and laid the groundwork for postwar efforts to mitigate water pollution in Cook County.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-12-24T04:50:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211046219
       
  • From Community Coalitions to City Hall: Shaping Policy in Chicago With
           Mayor Harold Washington

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      Authors: Robert Giloth
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      Today’s cities are seeking more social equity—a response in part to police violence, pandemic disparities, and the racial wealth gap. Activists, planners, and local government reformers are looking for bold examples of equity planning—single initiatives and multi-faceted equity plans. The mayoral administration of Harold Washington in Chicago (1983–1987) shows how a grassroots electoral campaign combined with participatory policy development produced the Chicago Works Together (CWT) Development Plan—that promoted jobs, neighborhoods, and citizen participation. This article recounts the development of CWT and examines the impacts of CWT for Chicago and equity planning.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-12-22T12:04:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211050890
       
  • If We Knew Then: A Postscript to the Kerner Report

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      Authors: Rick Loessberg
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      The Kerner Report, which examined why 1967s rioting occurred, is one of America’s most important works on race and the inner city. Yet, for many, a belief exists that it has been ignored and represents a lost opportunity. Knowing now how the report was received, is there anything that could have been done to produce a more influential report' To answer this question, this article utilizes recent interviews with key Kerner Report participants. Such information not only expands our knowledge about the report, but given recent proposals to create new Kerner-type commissions to address today’s disparities, it possesses additional relevance.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-12-21T11:46:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211047560
       
  • “For the Contrary View”: Reconsidering the Early Anti-Zoning
           Decisions”

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      Authors: Francine S. Romero
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      When the 1926 Euclid v. Ambler decision found municipal zoning valid under the U.S. Constitution, previous state cases opposing the practice were overruled and subsequently almost forgotten. This investigation analyzes those early State Supreme Court cases to determine systematically the basis of these rejections. After constructing a contextual background of the legal arguments that could have been used by the judges, I assess cases to determine which were used, and find a dominance of concern regarding land use segregation justified by municipalities through an “aesthetics” defense. I conclude by considering links between these cases and current controversies.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-11-20T08:21:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211047544
       
  • The Invention of Rivers: Alexander’s Eye and Ganga’s Descent

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      Authors: Nora L. Schwaller
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-11-09T03:59:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211046901
       
  • Shaping the Metropolis: Institutions and Urbanization in the United States
           and Canada

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      Authors: Jake Wegmann
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-11-09T03:18:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211046231
       
  • Reforesting the City: Profiles in Resilience and Recovery

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      Authors: Geoffrey L. Buckley
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-11-08T04:09:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211046224
       
  • Hidden Influences: Exploring the Red Castle Restorations During the
           Italian Colonization of Libya

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      Authors: Aida M. Ejroushi
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines alterations made to the Red Castle in Tripoli during Italy’s colonization of Libya between 1911 and 1943. Italian architects completed two projects which both restored the castle and altered its design through the construction of a tunnel that cuts through the historic site and joined sections of the coastal road (Lungomare Conti Volpi). Using a new visual analysis of the structures, this study argues that traditional Roman architecture influenced changes to the castle, which included elements found in preexisting Roman structures. The implications of these interventions within the context of historic preservation and colonialism are also explored.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-11-08T03:59:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211043338
       
  • “The Cultural Prehistory of Modern Suburbia, in Fantasy”

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      Authors: Andrew Whittemore
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-11-08T02:37:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211043115
       
  • How the City Survey’s Redlining Maps Were Made: A Closer Look at
           HOLC’s Mortgagee Rehabilitation Division

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      Authors: Todd M. Michney
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      The infamous “security maps” made in the 1930s by the Home Loan Owners’ Corporation (HOLC), rating supposed mortgage lending risk in urban neighborhoods across the United States, have long been considered the quintessential expression of racist redlining policy. However, a number of misunderstandings and unwarranted speculations about how these maps were made and used have proliferated. Using previously unexamined correspondence, this article establishes that HOLC could not have used the maps for loan denials, did share them with the Federal Housing Administration but not with private industry, and highly improvised their production with numerous methodological inconsistencies, including with regard to race.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T09:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211013361
       
  • Comparing Mid-century Historic Preservation and Urban Renewal through
           Washington, D.C.’s Alley Dwellings

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      Authors: Rebecca Summer
      First page: 132
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      Some understand mid-century, neighborhood-scale preservation to be a reaction to the destructive impacts of urban renewal. In Washington, D.C., however, neighborhood-scale preservation predated urban renewal. This article investigates the factors that influenced the implementation of both practices in the early 1950s, shedding light on later decisions in other cities, when the strategies were more commonly combined. A focus on the contrasting fates of alley dwellings in Georgetown and Southwest demonstrates that the built environment mattered little on its own; the scale of building conditions, geographies of race, and prevalence of private investment dictated the differential implementation of these planning approaches.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-03-23T08:55:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1538513221997797
       
  • A strategy for the seventies: Circular A-95 and US regional planning

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      Authors: Carlton Basmajian, Nina David
      First page: 159
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      In 1982, President Ronald Reagan issued Executive Order 12372, revoking a relatively obscure publication issued by the Office of Management and Budget in 1969, Circular No. A-95. One of many policy changes that were part of a broad effort to rebalance how power was shared between the federal government, the states, and municipalities, Reagan’s pen stroke ended what for many planners had been a critical piece of urban policy during the 1970s. Part of President Lyndon Johnson’s 1960s Great Society programs, an era when federal assistance to state and local governments in support of domestic policy increased significantly, A-95 had established a coordination and review process that local governments receiving federal funding for planning development projects would be required to follow. The program was designed to force local governments to engage in more comprehensive regional coordination. For the next 12 years, almost every planner across the country, at some point or another, worked within the A-95 process. But researchers who examined A-95 during its short life struggled to produce solid evidence of its effectiveness. Absent a clear metric of the program’s success or failure, the history and legacy of the A-95 program has since been largely neglected. This paper explores the history of Circular A-95, a booklet issued by the US Office of Management and Budget to guide the implementation of the Intergovernmental Cooperation Act of 1968. We argue that the rules contained in the A-95 circular should be understood as an effort to create a framework for regional planning. Using primary documents and secondary literature, we conclude that the program deserves to be re-read as an important attempt to use federal power to establish a pragmatic national planning policy in the United States in the latter half of the 20th century.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-11-08T03:32:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211047520
       
  • Rethinking and Reshaping Public Space: The Fascinating Story of a Moment
           and Movement in Urban Design in New York City

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      Authors: Claire Nelischer
      First page: 186
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.
      The Invention of Public Space: Designing for Inclusion in Lindsay’s New York documents a transformative period of experimentation in public space design in New York City from 1966 through 1973, under the mayoralty of John Lindsay. Combining rich archival research with captivating storytelling, the book sheds light on this time in which emerging ideas about psychology, participation, and politics were integrated into the design of public environments. It makes a compelling argument for the importance of this time and place in spurring a broad rethinking of the very concept of public space as a site of democracy, participation, and self-actualization.
      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-09-20T11:59:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211046222
       
  • Book Review: Design for the Crowd: Patriotism and Protest in Union Square

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      Authors: Gus Wendel
      First page: 191
      Abstract: Journal of Planning History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Planning History
      PubDate: 2021-11-08T02:15:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15385132211046228
       
 
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