Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

History (General) (45 journals)

Showing 1 - 41 of 41 Journals sorted alphabetically
AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"     Full-text available via subscription  
ArcHistoR     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asclepio     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal for the History of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Canadian Bulletin of Medical History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Cuadernos de Historia Contemporánea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture & History Digital Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
El Futuro del Pasado     Open Access  
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Geschichte und Gesellschaft : Zeitschrift für Historische Sozialwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Gladius     Open Access  
Histoire de la Recherche Contemporaine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
História & Ensino     Open Access  
Histories     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
History and Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
History of Geo- and Space Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History of Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
History of the Human Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
History Workshop Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
HOPOS : The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
HoST - Journal of History of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Maritime History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of the History of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of History and Future     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medieval Monastic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Planning History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the History of Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Law and History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Medievalista online     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Memini. Travaux et documents     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval     Open Access  
Sabretache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Source: Notes in the History of Art     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Speculum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Sport History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Storia delle Donne     Open Access  
TAWARIKH : Journal of Historical Studies     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Geschichtsdidaktik     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
History Workshop Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.278
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 36  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1363-3554 - ISSN (Online) 1477-4569
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Editorial: New Editors

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      Authors: Davin A.
      Pages: 1 - 3
      Abstract: With this issue, seven new editors join the collective of History Workshop Journal, significantly enlarging our expertise. We’re delighted to welcome them:
      PubDate: Mon, 06 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab030
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • The Scattering: a Family History for a Floating World

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      Authors: Moran J.
      Pages: 4 - 28
      Abstract: This essay is an experiment in family history, inspired by a journey to scatter my father’s ashes on Scattery – the island in the Shannon estuary where my grandmother was born and raised. It explores how my family’s story illuminates the history of small Irish islands and of two much bigger islands, Ireland and Britain. Island stories replay in microcosm, and with great intensity, broader narratives of Irish and British history since the famine. But they also muddy these narratives with the idiosyncratic, granular experiences of a precise and bounded place. They put human flesh and bones on abstract nouns like family, community, modernity, emigration and exile. In every island story – Scattery as my father’s idyllic land of endless summer, Ireland as the home of sturdy children and happy maidens, Britain as proud island nation taking back control of its borders – lies a fantasy of homogeneity and readability. Even the smallest islands have multilayered histories; and then, as they disperse their peoples across the world as small islands do, those histories keep multiplying. Our journey back to the island may have begun as a search for origins but it ended up revealing the heterogeneity and unrecoverability of the past.
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab015
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Women and Stews: the Social and Material History of Prostitution in the
           late medieval Southern Low Countries

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      Authors: Haemers J.
      Pages: 29 - 50
      Abstract: AbstractThis article explores the social background and material culture of an understudied medieval brothel, the private ‘stew’, the most common type of brothel in the Southern Low Countries, where public brothels were rare. The fifteenth-century lease contracts of private stews contain information about the stew's size, economic value, and ambiance, suggesting the advantageous social position of some of the women who sold sex and providing inspiration to English brothel keepers. The absence of public brothels in the Low Countries reflected both a tolerance for prostitution and the relative freedom enjoyed by women in this region.
      PubDate: Tue, 09 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab024
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Emotions and the German Peasants’ War of 1524–6

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      Authors: Roper L.
      Pages: 51 - 81
      Abstract: AbstractThis article addresses the questions of the history of emotions to the German Peasants' War of 1524-5. The biggest popular uprising in Western Europe before the French Revolution, it overturned lordship in wide areas of Germany and beyond for about three months. It transformed the character of the Reformation as Luther condemned the peasant rebels. The revolt followed an emotional arc, shaped as much by the seasons as it was by the logic of revolution. The article argues that historians need to understand emotions and emotional cycles to understand how revolutions begin and unfold.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab020
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Radical Commemoration, the Politics of the Street, and the 150th
           Anniversary of the Paris Commune of 1871

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      Authors: Forster L.
      Pages: 83 - 105
      Abstract: AbstractThe memory of the Paris Commune of 1871 has long been summoned as an example of urban revolutionary struggle. In 2011 a Parisian street art collective, RaspouTeam, produced a series of commemorative installations across Paris to mark the 140th anniversary of the Commune. They intended the project to make an explicit link between the politics of the Paris Commune of 1871, and the politics of public space in the twenty-first century city. 2021 marks the 150th anniversary of the Commune. In the last decade the struggle to halt the encroachment of capital upon community and the demand for democratic public spaces (as called for by the Communards of Paris) have remained at the forefront of urban political projects. As pseudo-public open spaces and corporate-owned urban areas present new battlegrounds for economic and social justice protests in cities across the globe, the anniversary of the Paris Commune offers an opportunity to reflect on how and why we remember radical urban resistance of the past, and to ask whether doing so has the potential to arm us for the struggles of today.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab018
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • The Spectre of Abnormality: Deaf Education and the Poetics of Contestation
           at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

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      Authors: Arnaud S.
      Pages: 106 - 129
      Abstract: AbstractWhen, during the Revolution, the French government committed to supporting the education of Deaf people, they left it to teachers to determine the methods and contents of this education. Less than a century later, the Ministry of the Interior of the third Republic reformed the teaching in use in most institutions in the direction of methods of pure speech. This moment coincided with the development of new categories to classify children in relation to the educational project, especially ‘backward’ and ‘abnormal’ at the turn of the twentieth-century. While Deaf writers did not oppose the teaching of speech, they soon questioned the legitimacy of this reform, and exposed the threats it posed for the development of Deaf pupils. In addition to examining the stakes and the impacts of the political decision, this paper will analyze the development of a poetics of contestation throughout Deaf writing, as manifested in the adoption of a variety of rhetorical strategies, ranging from irony to critical analysis, in the rewriting of the category of abnormality. This article will show how these years of struggle were also years of emancipation, insofar as the acquisition of language became a poetical and political act.    
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbaa031
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Catholics at Ground Zero: Negotiating (Post) Memory

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      Authors: McClelland G.
      Pages: 130 - 150
      Abstract: AbstractAs atomic eyewitness memory passes on, and the hibakusha (atomic-bomb survivor) population dwindles, their trauma is increasingly communicated and negotiated by new generations. After the hibakusha, various protagonists are picking up the baton to continue telling the story of Nagasaki, some children of hibakusha and others not. More than seventy-five years after the bomb ‘postmemory’ describes the future of memory after the eyewitnesses are no longer present. Marianne Hirsch introduced this term with the aftermath of the Jewish Holocaust in mind to suggest both continuity and rupture. It has subsequently been used in many other contexts. Here postmemory is applied to the communal memorializing of the atomic bomb event in Nagasaki. Processes of imaginative ‘memory work’ co-create postmemory (in Japanese parlance ni-sei/san-sei or second and third-generation discourse), influencing public history via the Catholic and surrounding community. By observing traces of a multifarious history, including Chinese, Korean, and European influences, and through the lens of emerging postmemory, in this article I reconsider the place of Nagasaki in atomic history.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab017
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Gay and Lesbian Liberation in the Low Countries: From Stonewall to Pink
           Pillar

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      Authors: Dupont W.
      Pages: 151 - 173
      Abstract: AbstractThis article examines the legacy of Stonewall in the Netherlands and Belgium, exploring how the gay and lesbian liberation movement resonated with pre-existing activism, national political cultures, and the peculiar structure of civil society in the Low Countries. American influences were real but limited until the later 1970s when the emergence of anti-gay politics in the US fuelled international solidarity under the flag of Stonewall and Gay Pride. The Dutch and Flemish authorities’ willingness to accommodate the mainstream movements early on limited the appeal and effectiveness of confrontational liberationism.
      PubDate: Tue, 09 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab021
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Contested Childhood: Assessing the Age of Young Refugees in the Aftermath
           of the Second World War

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      Authors: Burgard A.
      Pages: 174 - 193
      Abstract: AbstractIn the immediate aftermath of the Second World War, identity documents and proofs of age were often lost or unavailable, bodies and behaviours had been marked by years of malnourishment and persecution, young people had learned to misrepresent their age for the sake of survival, and administrations routinely doubted age claims. The war had profoundly disrupted the system for knowing age that had become central to Western European regimes of recognition and rights such as citizenship, movement, and welfare. Using the resettlement of young Holocaust survivors to Canada after the war as its core case study, this article examines how state administrations, international organizations, and non-governmental organizations competed and struggled to determine age and consequently who should be considered as a child, and how young people themselves were affected by and navigated these struggles. It foregrounds the necessity to further historicize how power structures increasingly used childhood as a category and chronological age as a supposedly objective criterion to grant some lives more legitimacy than others.
      PubDate: Sun, 12 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab016
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Labour History’s Biographical Turn

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      Authors: Chase M; Bensimon F.
      Pages: 194 - 207
      Abstract: AbstractThis translation of Malcolm Chase’s 2010 article explores the opportunity that biography provides to challenge dominant accounts of Chartism, incorporating women and familial networks. Biography has been a discursive strategy of central importance to labour history, challenging historians to communicate beyond the academic milieu, to overcome the restrictions of identity/class politics without dismissing still useful categories, and to go beyond the theoretical division between empiricism and a cultural history marked by the ‘linguistic turn’. Revealing the interplay between agency and social determination, biography can relate the intimate and the personal to the realm of the social and political.
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab022
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Teaching Empire and War: Animating Marginalized Histories in the Classroom

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      Authors: Maguire A; Gupta D.
      Pages: 208 - 225
      Abstract: AbstractHow can we teach ‘forgotten’ histories of war and empire in the classroom, responding to urgent needs to ‘decolonize’ the curriculum and pedagogic practice' This article reflects on an exercise in pedagogical experimentation – a ‘widening participation’ project based upon a series of workshops – to demonstrate a more global and ‘messy’ understanding of the role of empire in the First and Second World Wars and their commemoration. We discuss the role of students and teachers as co-producers of knowledge, engaging with race and colonialism in the classroom, and the intervention of such work in the project of ‘decolonizing’ curricula.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab023
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Raw Material: UNHCR’s Individual Case Files as a Historical Source,
           1951–75

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      Authors: Gatrell P.
      Pages: 226 - 241
      Abstract: AbstractThis article contributes to the emerging field of refugee history by inviting a consideration of the extensive holdings of the Records and Archives Division of the Geneva-based Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). It focuses on a sample of confidential case files created in the quarter-century following the launch of UNHCR to determine whether an individual was eligible for recognition and thus for protection and assistance under the 1951 UN Refugee Convention. The postwar international refugee regime was selective and biased towards refugees of European origin, but UNHCR increasingly engaged with non-European refugees, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. A close study of the case files concerning refugees in different sites of displacement raises questions about the power vested in the new institution and the circumstances in which refugees sought access to UNHCR. Against the backdrop of Cold War and decolonization the article also engages with issues around the archive, ‘access’ and ‘disclosure’: not only the terms of the encounter between refugees and officialdom, but the privileged access of scholars to confidential records and by extension to material that discloses intimate aspects of refugee lives.
      PubDate: Mon, 04 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab019
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Mining Men: Reflections on Masculinity and Oral History during the
           Coronavirus Pandemic

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      Authors: Peirson-Webber E.
      Pages: 242 - 250
      Abstract: AbstractThe COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted our ability to undertake oral history research as it is traditionally understood, where interviewer and interviewee are in dialogue with each other in a shared physical setting. Reflecting on experiences conducting twenty-seven remote interviews with former British mineworkers, this article explores how meaningful interviews can be produced with certain groups via video conferencing software and over the telephone. While some of the observational benefits of in-person interviewing were lost, there were gains in terms of the comfort of interviewees and interviewer alike. The reciprocity of video conferencing software went some way to disrupt the power dynamics of oral history interviews. Likewise, interviewees seemed more self-reflexive and willing to discuss sensitive topics when talking via online video-conferencing platforms than over the telephone, or inperson. My experience demands that we rethink orthodox methodological advice concerning best practice. The remote oral history interview can allow access to groups who are hard to reach, and offers a means through which vulnerable interviewees can regain some sense of identity and agency in a time of social dislocation.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab012
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Four Lives, Two Cars, and a Colony

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      Authors: Lewis S; Bickers R.
      Pages: 251 - 256
      Abstract: AbstractPrompted by the closure of archives and new ways of working during lockdown, Su Lin Lewis and Robert Bickers find an unexpected intersection in their own family histories. Photographs of their grandparents were taken a decade and a hundred miles apart but betray parallel histories of migration, war, and social aspiration amid the decolonization of Malaya and the birth of a new Malaysia. The car is a symbol of social mobility both forwards and up, in a colony whose wealth of natural resources helped fuel the postwar explosion of the global middle class. This piece reminds us that even when we are confined to our homes, with albums as our archives, we can also find new possibilities in the banality of everyday social histories, perhaps richer when woven together.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab025
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Unequal Britain

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      Authors: Alexander S.
      Pages: 257 - 263
      Abstract: ThanePat, Divided Kingdom, a History of Britain, 1900 to the Present, Cambridge University Press, 21018
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab027
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Utopian Universities

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      Authors: Patel J.
      Pages: 264 - 271
      Abstract: Utopian Universities: a Global History of the New Campuses of the 1960s, ed. PellewJillTaylorMiles, Bloomsbury Academic, London, 2020, 400 pages, ISBN 978-1-350-13863-6.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab029
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Malcolm Chase (1957–2020)

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      Authors: Bensimon F; McWilliam R.
      Pages: 272 - 281
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab028
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Ken Weller (1935–2021)

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      Authors: Goodway D.
      Pages: 282 - 287
      PubDate: Tue, 05 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab026
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
  • Corrigendum

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      Pages: 288 - 288
      Abstract: Agnes Arnold-Forster, ‘Racing Pulses: Gender, Professionalism and Health Care in Medical Romance Fiction’, History Workshop Journal 91, pp. 157–181, doi:10.1093/hwj/dbab011
      PubDate: Wed, 25 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hwj/dbab013
      Issue No: Vol. 92 (2021)
       
 
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