Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

History (General) (45 journals)

Showing 1 - 41 of 41 Journals sorted alphabetically
AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"     Full-text available via subscription  
ArcHistoR     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asclepio     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal for the History of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Canadian Bulletin of Medical History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
Cuadernos de Historia Contemporánea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture & History Digital Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
El Futuro del Pasado     Open Access  
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Geschichte und Gesellschaft : Zeitschrift für Historische Sozialwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Gladius     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Histoire de la Recherche Contemporaine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
História & Ensino     Open Access  
Histories     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
History and Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
History of Geo- and Space Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
History of Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
History of the Human Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
History Workshop Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
HOPOS : The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
HoST - Journal of History of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Maritime History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of the History of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of History and Future     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medieval Monastic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Planning History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the History of Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Law and History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Medievalista online     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Memini. Travaux et documents     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sabretache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Source: Notes in the History of Art     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Speculum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Sport History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Storia delle Donne     Open Access  
TAWARIKH : Journal of Historical Studies     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Geschichtsdidaktik     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
History of the Human Sciences
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.498
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0952-6951 - ISSN (Online) 1461-720X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Verdicts on Hans Eysenck and the fluxing context of British psychology

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      Authors: David Pilgrim
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      An account is provided of the historical context of the work one of the best-known figures in British psychology in the 20th century, Hans Eysenck. Recently some of this has come under critical scrutiny, especially in relation to claims of data rigging in his model of smoking and morbidity, produced from the 1960s to the 1980s. The article places that controversy, and others associated with Eysenck, in the longer context of the shifting forms of epistemological and political legitimacy within British psychology in the past hundred years. Eysenck was both lionised and disparaged during his life and after his death. This account explores that ambiguity in order to discern the challenge for British psychology to maintain disciplinary coherence. An understanding of this fluxing historical picture is guided by the meta-theoretical resource of critical realism.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-01-06T05:54:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221143888
       
  • A diagrammatics of race: Samuel George Morton's ‘American Golgotha’
           and the contest for the definition of the young field of anthropology

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      Authors: Marianne Sommer
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      Between the last decades of the 18th century and the middle of the 19th century, something of paramount importance happened in the history of anthropology. This was the advent of a physical anthropology that was about the classification of ‘human races’ through comparative measurement. A central tool of the new trade was diagrams. Being inherently about relations in and between objects, diagrams became the means of defining human groups and their relations to each other – the last point being disputed between the monogenists and the polygenists. James Cowles Prichard, a proponent of the comparative historical approach, was able to do without images in his pioneering Researches Into the Physical History of Man of 1813, but the third edition, which appeared in five volumes between 1836 and 1847, was richly illustrated with ‘ethnic types’ and skulls, including diagrams. What was happening is a process I engage with in detail for Samuel George Morton, who collected and distributed human skulls as lithographs in Crania americana (1839) and Crania aegyptiaca (1844). Along with the paper skulls travelled detailed instructions of how to look at them through a set of lines and to set their individual parts in relation to each other as well as to those of other types. Drawing on Johann Friedrich Blumenbach and Peter Camper, the Crania thus played a pivotal role in establishing what I call a diagrammatics of race – a diagrammatics that became overtly political with Types of Mankind (1854), which was written in Morton's honour by Josiah Nott and George Gliddon.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-01-05T06:37:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221136771
       
  • Tracing the career arc of Joost A. M. Meerloo: Prominence, fading, and
           premonitions of menticide

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      Authors: William Douglas Woody
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      This article traces the career arc of Dutch psychoanalyst Joost A. M. Meerloo by examining his biography and his psychology of interrogation and confession. His life story, particularly his experiences during the German occupation of the Netherlands and his escape to England during World War II, shaped his views on these issues, as well as his rise to prominence as an expert on these topics in the United States. His psychoanalytic perspectives on interrogation and confession, including false confession, reflected the zeitgeist of the First Wave of Cold War interrogation tactics and related scholarship. His career as a scholar of interrogation faded with the study of distinct interrogation tactics used by communists during the Korean War, the emergence of experimental social psychology, and a growing cohort of scholars who rejected his psychoanalytic views in favor of more contemporary approaches. For these reasons, his work remains undervalued, increasing the risks that today’s scholars will fail to recognize his larger contributions and his warnings about vulnerability and psychologists’ roles in military interrogations. The article reviews the rise and fall of the career of Joost A. M. Meerloo as a scholar of Cold War interrogation, including his contributions and his unheeded warnings about vulnerability and psychologists’ roles in military interrogations.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-12-21T06:13:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221121227
       
  • Tocqueville and the Ostroms

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      Authors: Sarah J. Wilford
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      Although it is commonplace for political scientists to draw upon historical thinkers and the ‘great books’ of the past, the practice of using historical works as reference points for contemporary issues remains under-investigated. To address this practice, this article is positioned at the crossroads of social science and intellectual history. By examining the relationship of political economists Elinor and Vincent Ostrom with Alexis de Tocqueville, the article demonstrates some of the potential risks incurred by social scientists drawing on historical thinkers. After exploring the similarities between the Ostroms and Tocqueville, it identifies three key pitfalls of the Ostroms’ ‘Tocquevillian’ rhetoric. These pitfalls result in obscuring meaning and overlooking philosophical insights, both of which detract from the Ostroms’ project. Insights from the field of intellectual history are offered. A final section presents a key example of Vincent Ostrom overlooking Tocqueville's thought where Tocqueville's insights were directly applicable to his work. The article parses political science's relationship with the past and offers a critique that is applicable beyond Tocqueville and the Ostroms.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-12-02T06:28:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221129960
       
  • The sciences of love: Intimate ‘democracy’ and the eugenic development
           of the Marathi couple in colonial India

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      Authors: Rovel Sequeira
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      This article studies the eugenic theories of Marathi sexological writer and novelist Narayan Sitaram Phadke, and his attempts to domesticate the modern ideal of the adult romantic couple as a yardstick of ‘emotional democracy’ in late colonial India. Locating Phadke's work against the backdrop of the Child Marriage Restraint Act (1929) and its eugenicist concerns, I argue that he conceptualized romantic love as an emotion and a form of sociability central to the state's biopolitical schemes of ensuring modern coupledom but as exceeding the state's capacity to rationally order Indian sex life. Consequently, he crafted literary supplements like the bildungsroman to circulate ‘English’ idioms of emotional and corporeal intimacy in Marathi; his novels domesticated eugenic sexology for its ‘vernacular’ audiences by advocating caste-bound romantic love as the blueprint for Indian marital coupling. As exemplified by Phadke's work, an emerging Marathi discourse of love demarcated a space for the young couple to operate as a vehicle of interpersonal openness within the constraints of the upper-caste joint family. By outlining the parameters of this Brahmanical aesthetic discourse, I show that the couple became the locus of a self-styled ‘democratic’ form of emotional attachment aimed at developing a necessary dynamism within endogamous caste-based marital arrangements without radically transforming them. The science performed through the Marathi novel in the 1920s and 1930s consequently explains the increasing prominence of romantic love as a form of developmental ‘democratic’ discourse at a time when both romantic love and democracy-in-practice were widely experienced as absent from Indian society.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T08:12:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221134469
       
  • ‘Intelligible to the mind and pleasing to the eye’: Mapping out
           kinship in British family directories (1660–1830)

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      Authors: Stéphane Jettot
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      Peerages and baronetages were successful commercial directories sold by a number of prominent London booksellers from the beginning of the 18th century. They provided an account of most titled families (peers as well as baronets). As serial publications, they were intended for a larger public in need of identification tools in a context of expanding urban sociability and of major recomposition within the elites. In these pocket books, there were no longer the elaborate tree diagrams that had ornamented most of the visitation books of the College of Arms, and which still could be found among ancient family papers. This transition was required for technical, commercial, and also ideological reasons. The selling point for publishers was to provide an up-to-date account of the ‘modern’ families, which could be better achieved through alphabetical listings, biographical discourses, or tabular charts. However, this formal reconfiguration led to many criticisms. These family directories were accused of compromising the dignity of titled families. The idea of a lost Golden Age when ancient lineages had been exhibited on stone, wooden panels, or vellum regained some appeal among social commentators. After 1760, with the renewal of radicalism and the onset of the age of revolutions, tree thinking came to be rehabilitated, but was also reinvented to better defend and naturalise social hierarchies. In this context, trees were increasingly used as powerful national emblems and less as dynastic emblems. The changing fortunes of family trees in 18th-century British prints enable us to reflect on the ideological aspects of the visualisation of kinship.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T06:54:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221119056
       
  • Kinship acknowledged and denied: Collecting and publishing kinship
           materials in 19th-century settler-colonial states

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      Authors: Helen Gardner
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      In the second half of the 19th century, anthropology rode the coat-tails of modernity, adopting new printing technologies, following new travel networks, and gaining increasing access to Indigenous people as colonialism spread and new policies were developed to contain and control people in settler-colonial states. The early innovator in kinship studies Lewis Henry Morgan and his two greatest proteges, Lorimer Fison and A. W. Howitt, working respectively in the United States, Fiji, and Australia, epitomised this conflation of governance, technologies of representation, and anthropology. They corresponded on the alterity of kinship systems across increasingly regularised postal routes, and developed new forms of collecting and new diagrammatic representations of kinship using developments at the press. Nineteenth-century kinship studies were focused exclusively on relationships formed through biology and descent, and there was little recognition of kinship making beyond these forms. This was especially significant for Howitt, whose closest Aboriginal interlocutor, Tulaba, claimed him as a brogan (brother), according to Gunaikurnai kinship paradigms. This article tracks the links between the collection and publication of kinship material in the questionnaires and the books of the latter part of the 19th century across the English-speaking world and the outcomes for Indigenous peoples, as arguments for distinctive kinship systems helped define their ‘primitiveness’ and dismissed Aboriginal attempts to forge kinship links across the settler/Indigenous divide.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T05:15:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221125352
       
  • A genealogy of the scalable subject: Measuring health in the Cornell Study
           of Occupational Retirement (1950–60)

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      Authors: Tiago Moreira
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      Increased use of scales in data-driven consumer digital platforms and the management of organisations has led to greater interest in understanding social and psychological measurement expertise and techniques as historically constituted ‘technologies of power’ in the making of what Stark has labelled the ‘scalable subject’. Taking a genealogical approach, and drawing on published and archival data, this article focuses on self-rated health, a scale widely used in population censuses, national health surveys, patient-reported outcome measurement tools, and a variety of digital apps. The article suggests that the first methodological articulation of self-rated health by the investigators of the Cornell Study of Occupational Retirement (1951–58) provides a window into the key epistemic, institutional, and cultural uncertainties about psychological and social measurement, processes of adjustment to ‘old age’, and the capacity of individuals to value their own health. I propose that these uncertainties have become incorporated into extant and operational measurements of health.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T05:13:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221113438
       
  • I never promised you a rose garden.… When landscape architecture becomes
           a laboratory for the Anthropocene

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      Authors: Henriette Steiner
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      In the summer of 2017, wildflower seeds were spread on a large, empty open space close to a motorway flyover just outside Copenhagen, Denmark. This was an effort to use non-mechanical methods to prepare the soil for an ‘urban forest’ to be established on the site, since the flowers’ roots would penetrate the ground and enable the planned new trees to settle. As a result, the site was transformed into a gorgeous meadow, and all summer long Copenhageners were invited to come and pick the flowers. In this article, I critically examine different aspects of this project – including the role of design, the perception of nature–culture relationships, climate change, and flower-picking as an event – in relation to my personal experience of visiting this meadow both on-site and on social media. The different temporalities that clash at the site give rise to conflicting interpretations, and I suggest that the meadow can be seen as a living plant archive of the Anthropocene, both physically and digitally. In doing so, I introduce and critique key conceptual pairs, including archive/death and bloom/decay, suggested by Lee Edelman’s queer cross-reading of Jacques Derrida’s ‘Archive Fever’ and Shakespeare’s Hamlet. I thereby contrast flower motifs pertaining to the cycles of blooming, decay, and nature’s (failed) eternal return in the meadow with the expansive futurity of the digitally mediated archive.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T07:05:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221103077
       
  • How family charts became Mendelian: The changing content of pedigrees and
           its impact on the consolidation of genetic theory

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      Authors: Amir Teicher
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers a close examination of a small selection of pedigrees taken from German Mendelian and eugenic scholarship of the 1920s and 1930s. It examines the procedures that became customary for presenting data on human inherited pathologies, as well as the frequent changes in the information content of those charts. Relevant biographical and genealogical data was removed, and important indications regarding the diagnostic methods applied by the investigating scholar were lost, as soon as a pedigree was charted or reproduced. Data on healthy individuals was condensed, leading to an emphasis on the hereditary burden of pathological traits. At times, healthy individuals were entirely omitted, as were exogenous martial partners. These modifications paved the way for further theoretical amendments, including the addition of ‘carrier’ status to chosen individuals along the pedigree. With this addition, these pedigrees changed their ontological status, from empirical records of human reproduction to partially hypothetical illustrations of Mendelian theory itself. This process was complemented by the representation of theoretical genetic models in the format of a human pedigree. A comparison to practices of charting pedigrees still common today suggests that the processes hereby revealed are far from exceptional. In line with the ideas put forward by Ludwik Fleck, they are interpreted as germane to the way scientific ideas are communicated and propagated and to the scientific culture of genetics. The article also offers a refinement to Fleck’s analysis of textbook construction, which highlights the extent to which textbook examples differ from the original data on which they are based.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T03:56:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221107558
       
  • Racial anthropology in Turkey and transnational entanglements in the
           making of scientific knowledge: Seniha Tunakan’s academic trajectory,
           1930s–1970s

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      Authors: Nazan Maksudyan
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      This article situates the trajectory of the academic life of Seniha Tunakan (1908–2000) within the development of anthropology as a scientific discipline in Turkey and its transnational connections to Europe during the interwar period and up until the second half of the 20th century. Relying on the archives of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, the archive of the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, the Politisches Archiv des Auswärtigen Amtes in Germany, and the Prime Ministry's Republican Archives in Turkey, it focuses on the doctoral studies of Seniha Tunakan in Germany and her life as a female PhD researcher in the capital of the Third Reich, as well as her entire research career after her return to Turkey. Through Tunakan's career, the article also provides an analysis of the perpetuation of German race science in the Turkish context, shedding light upon the success of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut für Anthropologie, menschliche Erblehre und Eugenik (Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity, and Eugenics) and its transnational impact.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T06:50:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221096252
       
  • Maps of desire: Edward Tolman's drive theory of wants*

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      Authors: Simon Torracinta
      First page: 3
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      Wants and desires are central to ordinary experience and to aesthetic, philosophical, and theological thought. Yet despite a burgeoning interest in the history of emotions research, their history as objects of scientific study has received little attention. This historiographical neglect mirrors a real one, with the retreat of introspection in the positivist human sciences of the early 20th century culminating in the relative marginalization of questions of psychic interiority. This article therefore seeks to explain an apparent paradox: the attempt to develop a comprehensive theory of ‘why … we want what we want’ in the 1940s by esteemed American ‘neo-behaviorist’ psychologist Edward Tolman – a proponent of a methodology famous for its prohibition on appeals to unobservable mental phenomena. Though chiefly known today for his theory of ‘cognitive maps’, Tolman also sought to map the contours of desire as such, integrating Freudian and behaviorist models of the ‘drives’ to develop a complex iconography of the universal structures of motivation. Close attention to Tolman's striking maps offers a compelling limit case for what could and could not be captured within an anti-mentalist framework, and illuminates an important precursor to theories of motivational ‘affect’ in the postwar cognitive and neurosciences. His work upsets a standard chronology that centers on the ‘cognitive revolution’ of the 1960s, and points to the significance of psychoanalysis to an earlier turn to cognitivism. Tolman concluded his theory pointed ‘in the direction of more socialism’ – a reminder of the politically labile anti-essentialism of behaviorism's commitment to mental plasticity.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-12-13T06:43:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221135852
       
  • Sin embodied: Priest-psychiatrist Asser Stenbäck and the psychosomatic
           approach to human problems

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      Authors: Eve-Riina Hyrkäs
      First page: 31
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      Combining theological and medical perspectives is indispensable for the historical study of the interconnections between mind, body, and soul. This article explores these relations through the history of Finnish psychosomatic medicine, and uses published and archival materials to examine the intellectual biography of the Finland-Swedish theologian turned psychiatrist Asser Stenbäck (1913–2006). Stenbäck's career, which evolved from priesthood to psychiatry and politics, reveals a great deal about the tensions between religion and medicine, the spiritual and scientific groups that impinged upon psychosomatic medicine, and ideas on how health and Christian morality were interconnected. The biographical approach is adopted to unearth the values encoded in medical concepts, and through this, to point towards another, underexplored dimension of the health–religion relationship. In addition to their emotional aspect, religious doctrines are intended to organise life and give it meaning. Stenbäck's ideas tied these experiential and normative spheres together by defending an irrationalist substratum of the world in the secular age of medicine. His work illustrates how the inner experience of faith can become both medically and politically purposive. It is worth combining these perspectives in historical research as well in order to better understand how the theological, medical, and political worlds are in dialogue when it comes to human problems.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T11:38:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221101450
       
  • Religion and civilization in the sociology of Norbert Elias:
           Fantasy–reality balances in long-term perspective

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      Authors: Andrew Linklater
      First page: 56
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      Many sociologists have drawn attention to the puzzling absence of a detailed discussion of religion in Elias’s investigation of the European civilizing process. Elias did not develop a sociology of religion, but he did not overlook the importance of beliefs in the ‘spirit world’ in the history of human societies. In his writings such convictions were described as fantasy images that could be contrasted with ‘reality-congruent’ knowledge claims. Elias placed fantasy–reality balances, whether religious or secular, at the centre of the analysis of how societies have dealt with collective fears that arise in response to largely uncontrolled conditions. He located religious orientations within a broader framework of analysis regarding fantasy–reality balances in the first human groups and in current state-organized societies. Elias stressed how balances changed in ‘civilized’ societies with the rise of the natural sciences. But his writings emphasized the continuing influence of fantasy images in technologically sophisticated societies, particularly in the context of national and international power struggles. His analysis of how fantasy images acquired considerable influence under conditions of fear is important for studies of social responses to global challenges including climate change. Connections with Weber’s sociology of religion point the way to theoretically informed empirical research on balances between fantasy and reality-congruence in a tumultuous and unpredictable era.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T11:38:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221094677
       
  • Cybernetics in the Republic

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      Authors: Michele Kennerly
      First page: 80
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      Plato's Republic lurks in cybernetics, a word popularly attributed to US American mathematician Norbert Wiener (1894–1964). In his accounts of how he came up with it, however, Wiener never mentions Plato, though he does note it was formed from the ancient Greek word kubernētēs (navigator). Among the earliest popular books about the cybernetics craze are three published in France, and their authors show a special interest in the origin of cybernetics. In something like learned rebukes to Wiener, all three books credit Plato with significant use of kubernē-based terms. This article presents evidence, one, that Wiener knows well he has chosen a word with a Platonic history and, two, that Wiener deems the technical and social climate of ancient Athens (and of the Republic) instructive only as an anti-model for the mid-20th-century United States and so does not feel compelled to associate cybernetics with Plato. Instead, Wiener focuses on the challenges cybernetics and automation pose for his own engineering-oriented, capitalist, multiracial, democratic republic. Wiener's decisions not to use Plato as an authorizing force and not to put ancient Athens on a pedestal merit recognition, since subsequent writers link ancient Athens with cybernation via a presumption that cybernation will enable and fully democratize the sort of leisure activities, including thinking and participation in public life, deemed by some to be emblematic of ancient Athens.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-12-21T06:13:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221134478
       
  • For or against the molecularization of brain science': Cybernetics,
           interdisciplinarity, and the unprogrammed beginning of the Neurosciences
           Research Program at MIT

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      Authors: Youjung Shin
      First page: 103
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      It was no accident that the first neuroscience community, the Neurosciences Research Program (NRP), took shape in the 1960s at MIT, the birthplace of cybernetics. Francis O. Schmitt, known as the founding father of the NRP, was a famous biologist and an avid reader of cybernetics. Focusing on the intellectual and institutional context that Schmitt was situated in, this article unveils the way that the brain was conceptualized as a distinct object, requiring the launch of a new research community in the US. In doing so, this article moves beyond the dominant narratives on the triumph of molecularization of the brain at the beginning of neuroscience. Instead, it argues that what brought researchers together in the name of neuroscience was not just a molecule but an aspiration to develop biological theories of the brain/mind, which resonated with biologists in a postwar context and was materialized through support for basic research. The article highlights the tension over the computerization and molecularization of the brain, which shaped the interdisciplinary gathering of neuroscientists in the context of growing interest in basic research. Thereby, this article reveals the rise of theoretical concerns in brain science that reflect the distinct desires and concerns of biologists in the US at an intellectual and institutional level. By revisiting the launch of the NRP with a focus on Schmitt, the article sheds light on the historical contingencies in launching the new community as neuroscience in the US and their meaning for the locality and transiency of (inter)disciplinarity in brain science.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T07:12:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221116260
       
  • Against well-being: A critique of positive psychology

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      Authors: Luciano E. Sewaybricker, Gustavo M. Massola
      First page: 131
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      More than two decades after his seminal paper ‘Subjective Well-Being’, Ed Diener wrote that he substituted happiness with well-being to obtain scientific credibility. Are the arguments echoed in positive psychology rigorous enough to justify this substitution' This article focuses on the historical examination of the word happiness, covering the lexical universes of ancient Greek, Latin, and English, seeking to identify the connections between them. We found that arguments for such substitution are sustained by a fragile appreciation of the semantic depth of happiness. Although it favors quantification, the current understanding of well-being obliterates the plurality of the debate about happiness and the recognition of other ideals of life. Thus, we conclude that well-being and happiness are semantically close, but conceptually, metaphysically, and empirically distinct, demanding, as objects, particular investigations.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-09-19T04:54:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221114733
       
  • Reviewer Acknowledgement 2022

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      First page: 149
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-12-20T06:40:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951221146115
       
  • Modern European sexological and orientalist assimilations of medieval
           Islamicate ‘ilm al-bah to erotology

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      Authors: Alison M. Downham Moore
      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses the term erotology, which was applied to medieval Islamicate ‘ilm al-bah (the science of coitus), as well as other world traditions of sexual knowledge, by European sexologists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who contrasted it with their own forms of inquiry into sexual matters in the modern field of sexual science. It argues that the homogenisation and minimisation of all ancient and non-European forms of medical knowledge about sex, even one as substantial as the ‘ilm al-bah tradition, supported a particular story about the origins of sexology's own emergence as a new and unprecedented biomedical and scientific way of knowing, characterised by an opposition assumed between sexuality and religion, by a view of sexual variations as perversions or pathologies, and by a view of Arabs and Muslims as sexually excessive. The article focusses on French, English, German, Austrian, and Italian sources of the 19th century that discussed the history of sexual medicine, relating these accounts to recent attempts to historicise sexology. It considers how forms of colonial hierarchy and exoticist views of non-European cultures impacted the dismissal of ‘ilm al-bah among European sexual scientists and how they may continue to exert an influence on forms of modern historical inquiry that are not attentive to scholarship on medieval Islamicate sexual medicine.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2021-12-09T01:01:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09526951211056152
       
  • Erratum to Babbage among the insurers: Big 19th-century data and the
           public interest

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: History of the Human Sciences, Ahead of Print.
      Wilson, D.C.S. (2019) ‘Babbage among the insurers: Big 19th-century data and the public interest’ History of the Human Sciences 31: 129–153. doi: 10.1177/0952695118818978SAGE Publishing regrets that, in this article, published in the December 2018 issue of History of the Human Sciences, the following corrections are made:On p 132, under heading ‘Introduction’, ‘The projectile power of the mind section explores’ will read as ‘The section entitled ‘The projectile power of the mind’ explores’‘Charles Babbage, actuary section explores’ will read as ‘The section after, explores’‘Section V examines’ will read as ‘The section entitled ‘Public data politics’‘sections The actuary as archivist and The law of mortality,’ will read as ‘the final two sections’On p 133, under heading ‘Babbage and Edmonds’, ‘(see §IV, below)’ should read as ‘(see p.137, below)’The online version of this article has been corrected.
      Citation: History of the Human Sciences
      PubDate: 2019-11-15T06:51:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0952695119890982
       
 
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