Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

History (General) (45 journals)

Showing 1 - 41 of 41 Journals sorted alphabetically
AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"     Full-text available via subscription  
ArcHistoR     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asclepio     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal for the History of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Canadian Bulletin of Medical History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
Cuadernos de Historia Contemporánea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture & History Digital Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
El Futuro del Pasado     Open Access  
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Geschichte und Gesellschaft : Zeitschrift für Historische Sozialwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Gladius     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Histoire de la Recherche Contemporaine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
História & Ensino     Open Access  
Histories     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
History and Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
History of Geo- and Space Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
History of Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
History of the Human Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
History Workshop Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
HOPOS : The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
HoST - Journal of History of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Maritime History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of the History of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of History and Future     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medieval Monastic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Planning History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the History of Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Law and History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Medievalista online     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Memini. Travaux et documents     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sabretache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Source: Notes in the History of Art     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Speculum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Sport History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Storia delle Donne     Open Access  
TAWARIKH : Journal of Historical Studies     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Geschichtsdidaktik     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
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International Journal of Maritime History
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.19
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0843-8714 - ISSN (Online) 2052-7756
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • The ionosphere: Undermining Britain's imperial power: Wireless and its
           impact on geopolitics and naval operations (1919–1927)

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      Authors: Peter Garland
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Ahead of Print.
      The transition of sea power from the battleship-dominated Royal Navy of the First World War to the carrier-dominated United States Navy of the Second is a much discussed topic in current historiography. This article investigates a small but important part of that transition, elements of which have been previously researched but where important connections have not been made and where, in current British historiography, the full picture has perhaps been hidden behind the achievements of one man – Guglielmo Marconi. The contribution of wireless to the transition of sea power had its roots in the immediate aftermath of the First World War. This research reveals that it involved a somewhat clandestine effort by the United States Navy to undermine British dominance in global communications, at that time based on submarine cables. It reveals how Britain's imperial obligations and a post-war need for greater control over their communications by Britain's colonies also contributed to undermining the Royal Navy position. By a thorough review and new interpretations of existing historiography, plus some additional archive material, this work identifies connections between geography, economics, technology and political will that were key in the United States Navy attaining a superior post-war position in wireless technology. It shows how these connections enabled the United States Navy to benefit from Marconi's discovery of the practical use of short-wave radio.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2023-01-06T06:41:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221145772
       
  • Shipping activities and marine education during the colonial era in Korea,
           1910–1945

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      Authors: S. June Kim
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Ahead of Print.
      As Korea's economy has developed swiftly over the past few decades, its shipping industry has grown so rapidly that in 2021 it was the seventh largest ship-controlling country in the world. Some have argued that Japanese colonial rule caused the rapid growth of Korea's economy. This article analyses shipping activities and marine education from 1910 to 1945 to confirm the origin of the modern shipping industry in Korea. After reviewing the arguments on the role of colonial rule in the development of shipping during the colonial period, the article reconstructs the development process of the Chosen Yusen Corporation as the sole ocean-going shipping company during the colonial period. The role of marine education is then discussed in relation to cultivating human capital for the shipping industry. This article might help with understanding that colonial rule itself cannot bring about the development of a former colonial country after liberation.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2023-01-03T11:48:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221145528
       
  • Letter of the President of the Executive Board of the International
           Maritime History Association

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      Authors: Ingo Heidbrink
      Pages: 521 - 523
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 521-523, November 2022.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221141627
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • The Anglo-Dutch lake' Johannes de Laet and the ideological origins of
           the Dutch and English West Indies

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      Authors: Michiel van Groesen
      Pages: 561 - 575
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 561-575, November 2022.
      This article explores the intellectual origins of the Anglo-Dutch Caribbean by focusing on the Leiden humanist Johannes de Laet (1581–1649). De Laet, born in the Southern Netherlands, had strong religious and kinship ties to the London merchant community. In the early 1620s, when he became one of the founding directors of the Dutch West India Company, his extensive intelligence network enabled him to develop into the leading chronicler of Dutch ambitions and achievements in the Atlantic world. De Laet's two main publications are contemporary masterpieces, but they are surprisingly underrepresented in current scholarship in Atlantic history, even though they are at the roots of the sugar and slave societies that the English established on Barbados and across the Caribbean from the 1640s onwards. English diplomats and intellectuals recognized the significance of De Laet's ideas. In September 1641, on the eve of the Civil War, Parliament invited the Leiden humanist to Westminster to instruct them in matters of trade and colonisation in the Western hemisphere.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142258
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • The role and intensity of export tariffs in trade policy: Scandinavia,
           1780–1870

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      Authors: Henric Häggqvist
      Pages: 576 - 596
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 576-596, November 2022.
      Export taxation holds a particular place within trade policy, especially so during the mercantilist era. While governments tried to ensure consistent export surpluses, they would at the same time put tariffs on those goods, possibly impeding export growth. This article quantifies export duties in Denmark and Sweden during close to a century, to analyze which intensity they had over time and which role they played within trade policy. The article finds that these taxes were at times rather high, particularly on raw materials partly reserved for domestic use or refinement. The fiscal dimension of export taxation clearly played an important role as well, as revenue needs often delayed the removal of tariffs. One conclusion is that the regulation of exports presents an interesting case of political conflict, between promoting growth and filling state coffers.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142259
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • The subjectification of the nineteenth-century maritime spectator:
           Shipboard diaries as maritime history

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      Authors: Felicity Jensz, Eeva Langeveld, Henrike Steltner, André Krischer
      Pages: 597 - 613
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 597-613, November 2022.
      In contrast to shipboard journals of the eighteenth century, which often served the function of providing ‘objective’ information for scientific and political networks, shipboard diaries of the nineteenth century reveal a discursive change in which there is a subjectification of the journey. This subjectification, we argue, is evident in the ways in which fee–paying passengers used such diaries as a way to make sense of their experiences of being at sea. Here we examine the 1829 journal of James A. Gardner on his travels aboard a ship from Britain to Australia. We focus on how Gardner described trial scenes on board in the confined space of the ship and his fantasies of the potential of Australian land for settler–colonists. These two aspects of the subject–orientated nineteenth century shipboard diary illuminate how the sea influenced and nurtured contemporaneous British ideas of entertainment, moral codes and hierarchies, as well as colonial ideologies.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142260
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • The Royal Naval Dockyard in Bermuda: Use of a novel biological indicator
           and historical photographs for measuring local sea-level rise

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      Authors: Philippe M. Rouja, Craig W. Schneider, Dominique Rissolo, Steve M. Blasco, Vid Petrovic, Eric Lo, Mandallas A. Lightbourne, Wendy S. Tucker, Falko Kuester
      Pages: 634 - 657
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 634-657, November 2022.
      The authors explore a novel interdisciplinary approach to researching, collecting and communicating local site-specific data on recent sea-level rise using persistent black-zone biotic levels evident on historical coastal stone structures by a stable community of cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) at the Royal Naval Dockyard in Bermuda. Photographs taken at the Dockyard in 1870, 2007 and 2017 show an upward shift in this living cyanobacterial community. A spatio-temporal digital twin computed from historical and contemporary photo assets was created to test the viability of these black-zone lines as a proxy for sea-level-rise measurements in Bermuda. Black-zone cyanobacteria are highly sensitive to sea-level rise and, over long timescales, comparative imagery of black zones could present a proper indicator of average sea-level rise.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221143297
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Beyond Trawlertown: Memory, Life and Legacy in the Wake of
           the Cod Wars by Jo Byrne

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      Authors: Søren Byskov
      Pages: 675 - 677
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 675-677, November 2022.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142539
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Piracy in World History by Stefan Eklöf Amirell, Bruce
           Buchan and Hans Hägerdal, eds.

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      Authors: John Coakley
      Pages: 677 - 679
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 677-679, November 2022.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142539a
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Maritime Kent through the Ages: Gateway to the Sea by Stuart
           Bligh, Elizabeth Edwards and Sheila Sweetinburgh, eds.

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      Authors: Helen Doe
      Pages: 679 - 681
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 679-681, November 2022.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142539b
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: North Eurasian Trade in World History, 1660–1860: The
           Economic and Political Importance of the Baltic Sea by Werner Scheltjens

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      Authors: Maarten Draper
      Pages: 681 - 684
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 681-684, November 2022.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142539c
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: The Power of Persuasion: Becoming a Merchant in the 18th
           Century by Lucas Haasis

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      Authors: Gijs Dreijer
      Pages: 684 - 685
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 684-685, November 2022.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142539d
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Convicts: A Global History by Clare Anderson

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      Authors: Niklas Frykman
      Pages: 686 - 687
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 686-687, November 2022.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142539e
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: The Battleships of the Iowa Class: A Design and Operational
           History by Philippe Caresse and Bruce Taylor

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      Authors: Rob Huebert
      Pages: 688 - 689
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 688-689, November 2022.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142539f
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Maritime Connections across the North Sea: The Exchange of
           Maritime Culture and Technology between Scandinavia and the Netherlands in
           the Early Modern Period by Asger Nørlund Christensen

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      Authors: Håkan Jakobsson
      Pages: 689 - 692
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 689-692, November 2022.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142539g
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: The Last Slave Ships: New York and the End of the Middle
           Passage by John Harris

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      Authors: Thomas Mareite
      Pages: 692 - 694
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 692-694, November 2022.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142539h
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: London Marine Insurance 1438–1824: Risk, Trade, and the
           Early Modern State by Adrian Leonard

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      Authors: Lewis Wade
      Pages: 694 - 696
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 694-696, November 2022.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T03:19:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221142539i
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Editorial

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      Authors: Cátia Antunes, Michiel van Groesen
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-27T05:19:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221146920
       
  • Henry Breault: Construction of a naval hero

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      Authors: Ryan C. Walker
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Ahead of Print.
      United States Navy sailors are excellent subjects for personal microhistories due to the volume of surviving official documentation in the form of their Official Military Personnel Files. This article deconstructs a grand narrative surrounding Henry Breault, the only enlisted sailor to receive his Medal of Honor while serving aboard a submarine. Breault experienced contemporary enshrinement, a long period of sporadic interest, and a later iconographic construction into a submarine folk hero in the present day. Breault has come to represent unnamed submariners, who are expected to perform in the same fashion with no expectation of similar commendation. It is found that Breault is still representative of sailors, but as an ordinary man who acted in an extraordinary manner when circumstance required. The methodology provides insight into Breault's relationship and connection to greater society as a submariner and as a highly decorated sailor in the interwar period.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-23T07:30:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221145491
       
  • On being portrayed in a foreign port city: The case of British merchants
           and captains in Livorno (circa 1680–1700)

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      Authors: Silvia Papini
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Ahead of Print.
      In the account books of Antonio Franchi (1638–1709), a portraitist at the Medici court, a surprisingly high number of commissions came from British merchants and captains living in the port city of Livorno in the Grand Duchy of Tuscany. Outlining a parallel between Britain's port cities and artworks of the same period, this contribution analyses the reasons why British demand for portraiture became such an important phenomenon in the life of Florentine painters during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Second, it explores the characteristics of portrait-making in Livorno and the identity of the patrons, with a focus on the relations between merchants and captains of the Royal Navy. Lastly, the article takes into consideration the dispersion of most portraits produced in port cities and how this can be linked to maritime and naval careers.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-21T07:35:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221141256
       
  • Forum-shopping pirates' Litigation strategies to address maritime
           plunder in late-medieval Flanders

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      Authors: Niels Fieremans
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Ahead of Print.
      Late-medieval Flanders was a patchwork of jurisdictions. Especially in terms of maritime plunder, different prosecutors and different courts could claim competency. However, where these plunderers appeared or where the plundered claimed their damages mattered significantly. This article investigates how these landlocked courts tried to claim competency over the events happening at sea. What were the consequences of the litigation strategies relating to maritime plunder, and how did plunderers and the plundered deal with these' Especially in medieval Bruges, there was a pragmatic approach towards favouring some of the important merchant communities while using princely institutions to chastise other (deemed harmful) plunderers.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-12-12T09:45:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221138700
       
  • Editorial

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      Authors: Cátia Antunes, Michiel van Groesen
      First page: 519
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-10-11T07:22:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221131721
       
  • Shipwrecks: Their impact on the behavioural patterns of sailors and on
           littoral societies during the age of sail in the western Indian Ocean,
           circa 800–1600

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      Authors: Mir Kamruzzaman Chowdhary
      First page: 524
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Ahead of Print.
      This article begins by investigating the construction techniques of medieval Indian ships to explore the extent to which the building methods were responsible for shipwrecks. Then, the article attends to the impacts of a shipwreck on the minds or behaviour of sailors. A link is drawn between various superstitious beliefs and certain irrational behaviour among sailors in the Indian Ocean and shipwrecks. The dreaded nature of a voyage would often create panic among sailors, which led them to various superstitious beliefs. However, a voyage would also attract many with the promise of adventure. The article also discusses how the atmosphere in the ship played the role of a catalyst in shaping the behaviour of the mariners. Finally, the article explores the ramifications of shipwrecks in littoral societies across the western Indian Ocean. During the medieval period, merchants from different regions and countries whose livelihood depended on the maritime trade settled in port towns. Moreover, littoral people relied on the supply of products from across the oceans for their livelihoods. Therefore, the smooth conduct of shipping was necessary for these coastal people. This article examines how a shipwreck would impact sectors of the littoral society in general and sailors in particular. Although the paucity of sources sets limits on the extent to which these aspects can be reconstructed, a number of contemporary traveller accounts shed light on the situation.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-09-27T05:40:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221128308
       
  • Encompassing the Earth: Magellan's voyage from its political context to
           its expansion of knowledge

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      Authors: Matteo Salonia
      First page: 543
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Ahead of Print.
      Between 1519 and 1522, the Magellan–Elcano expedition completed the first circumnavigation of the world. This contribution offers a new interpretation of the political context leading to the voyage and, in particular, it considers the long history of Portuguese–Castilian rivalry in the Atlantic, reassessing the importance of the Treaty of Alcáçovas (1479). The second part of the article clarifies the objectives and achievements of the voyage, arguing that a reading of primary documents concerning Magellan's reward is necessary in order to understand the rationale behind the northerly route followed across the Pacific. It also sheds light on the momentous changes brought to Europe's geographical and cosmographical frameworks by the realization that all the oceans are one and the shattering of previous limits to human mobility. Finally, the article considers the images of Asian maritime and human geographies produced by one of the few survivors of the voyage, Antonio Pigafetta, in his Relazione, proposing a reading of this text centred around the concept of genuine curiosity, even in a broader context of Iberian empire-building.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T07:53:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221123468
       
  • SIAM: A model for service implementation analysis applied to the impact of
           telegraphy in Macaronesian ports

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      Authors: Rafael Pérez Jiménez, Lidia Aguiar Castillo, Francisco Quintana Navarro
      First page: 614
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Ahead of Print.
      Several factors have been considered to explain the success and pre-eminence of some ports over others, such as geography, telecommunications, taxation or the availability of local goods for trade. This is especially significant in the final period of the nineteenth century and the first years of the twentieth century, which corresponds to the rise of steam navigation and the laying of the world network of submarine telegraph cables. This article presents a model (the Service Implementation Analysis Model or SIAM) that aims to analyse the influence of communications technology within historical models of sea trade. To evaluate this model, the authors propose using a scheme based on technology acceptance models, which perform a cost–benefit comparison, and adding an ex post analysis, so that this study can explain further reasons for the incorporation of these solutions. This analysis is complemented by a series of evaluation factors, which form a feedback system to incorporate scientific advances, regulatory changes, the geostrategic context, and social acceptance or rejection. Using these feedback factors, it is possible to study how the economic model is modified as a function of technological factors within the co-evolution of science and society as inseparable elements. This model has been applied to explain the divergence in the evolution of maritime trade among Macaronesian archipelagos before the Great War. However, it can be directly extrapolated to other cases of historical analysis in which technological evolution played a significant role.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-10-19T06:36:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221128165
       
  • Testing the waters: The creation of Global Privateering, an open access
           database for St Malo's dossiers de prise

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      Authors: Tessa de Boer
      First page: 658
      Abstract: International Journal of Maritime History, Ahead of Print.
      The relevance of privateering-related archives for maritime history and (early modern) history at large has been increasingly recognized in the past decades. This recognition has gone hand in hand with the prominent role that these archives have assumed in some of the largest projects in the digital humanities, such as the Prize Papers project, which facilitates research into these collections and reveals the multiplicity of data that they contain. This article reports on the creation of Global Privateering, a (pilot) project that is striving to create a user-friendly open access database for a set of privateering dossiers from St Malo, France. It has been a collaboration across disciplines – namely, history and information technology – as well as educational establishments, partnering universities and vocational schooling. The creation of this open access maritime database has been a positive experience for all parties involved, as the complementarity of skills and expertise has been evident, and the benefits have been mutual and multiple. This inspires further exploration of such collaborations and the further expansion of the Global Privateering platform.
      Citation: International Journal of Maritime History
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T06:26:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08438714221128160
       
 
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