Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

History (General) (45 journals)

Showing 1 - 41 of 41 Journals sorted alphabetically
AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"     Full-text available via subscription  
ArcHistoR     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asclepio     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal for the History of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Canadian Bulletin of Medical History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Cuadernos de Historia Contemporánea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture & History Digital Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
El Futuro del Pasado     Open Access  
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Geschichte und Gesellschaft : Zeitschrift für Historische Sozialwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Gladius     Open Access  
Histoire de la Recherche Contemporaine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
História & Ensino     Open Access  
Histories     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
History and Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
History of Geo- and Space Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History of Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
History of the Human Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
History Workshop Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
HOPOS : The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
HoST - Journal of History of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Maritime History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of the History of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of History and Future     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medieval Monastic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Planning History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the History of Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Law and History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Medievalista online     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Memini. Travaux et documents     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval     Open Access  
Sabretache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Source: Notes in the History of Art     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Speculum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Sport History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Storia delle Donne     Open Access  
TAWARIKH : Journal of Historical Studies     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Geschichtsdidaktik     Hybrid Journal  
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Journal Cover
Comparative Studies in Society and History
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.585
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 54  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0010-4175 - ISSN (Online) 1475-2999
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • CSS volume 64 issue 2 Cover and Front matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 4
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S0010417521000475
       
  • CSS volume 64 issue 2 Cover and Back matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 4
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S0010417521000487
       
  • Editorial Foreword

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      Pages: 259 - 262
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S0010417522000093
       
  • Can Muslims Drink' Rumi Vodka, Persianate Ideals, and the Anthropology
           of Islam

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      Authors: Tamimi Arab; Pooyan
      Pages: 263 - 299
      Abstract: Shahab Ahmed’s What Is Islam' The Importance of Being Islamic (2016) challenges Islamic Studies scholars, (art) historians, and anthropologists to reconsider theoretical frameworks underpinning historical and ethnographic research. This article addresses Ahmed’s concerns that studies of Islam often conceptually privilege orthodoxy, by including drinking and intoxication as worthy of close attention in examining the history and the anthropology of Islam. The case of Wine Shop the Philosopher, run by a former Afghan refugee in The Hague and Amsterdam, is presented after establishing the comparative and interdisciplinary relevance of alcohol consumption in studies of Islam and Muslims. Ahmed’s conceptual framework is used and assessed in comparison with the wine shops’ contemporary pluralist reality by exploring the idealized boundaries of Persianate culture and Islam in dialogues between Persian-speaking interlocutors. It is argued that alcoholic drinks lend themselves to competing gastro-nationalisms and prompt ethnolinguistic tensions between and within groups with Turkish, Moroccan, Iranian, and Afghan backgrounds in the Netherlands. The focus on diverse, coexisting and clashing drink regimes, in conclusion, allows us to deconstruct dichotomies between sober Muslims and European drinkers, African and Asian believers and European unbelievers, and refugees and citizens.
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S001041752200007X
       
  • The Sufi and the Sickle: Theorizing Mystical Marxism in Rural Pakistan

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      Authors: Raza; Shozab
      Pages: 300 - 334
      Abstract: In worlds of difference, how might certain unities be forged for liberation' This paper pursues this question from the vantage-point of the dialectical tension between Marxism and religion. While some scholars have noted parallels between the two, philosophers of critical realism have aimed to establish a deeper equivalence between Marxism and religion. This paper, however, considers how an equivalence may be forged by subaltern actors in the context of political struggles—how a religious Marxism might look as a theoretical and political practice. I do this by historically reconstructing the life of Sufi Sibghatullah Mazari, a locally influential communist from Pakistan who equated Sufism with Mao-inflected Marxism. Born into a poor farming family from South Punjab, he would go on to lead peasant movements against “feudal” landlords (jagirdars) during the 1970s and be recruited into the Mazdoor Kisan Party, the country’s historically largest communist party, which drew inspiration from Mao Tse-tung. Sibghatullah’s introduction to Maoist thought and practice, especially its emphasis on a vernacular-driven communist universalism, led him to comparatively reflect on circulating insurgent Sufisms and their own universalist possibilities. Maoism and Sufism’s shared universalist elements then allowed him to equate the two: an equivalence he centered on the concept of Truth (Haqiqat). Sibghatullah also expressed this “mystical Marxism” in his political practice, as he mentored revolutionary Sufi disciples, recruited Sufi-inflected mullahs into the communist party, built alternative insurgent mosques, and even challenged the tribal and patriarchal “honor” codes, practices that, in undermining landlordism’s hegemony over Islam, threatened its reproduction.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S0010417522000068
       
  • Scientific Ghostwriting in the Amazon' The Role of Experts in the
           Lawsuit against Chevron in Ecuador

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      Authors: Kirsch; Stuart
      Pages: 335 - 362
      Abstract: In 2011, lawyers for the Chevron Corporation filed a civil suit against an aqueous geochemist under federal racketeering and corruption laws. They claimed that the geochemist and her colleagues had ghostwritten significant portions of a report attributed to a court-appointed expert in Ecuador, although the accusation was subsequently withdrawn. The original case addressed the environmental impact of Chevron’s operations in lowland Ecuador, the subject of a $9 billion judgment against the oil company. This article treats legal transcripts and depositions as examples of life writing to examine the contribution of experts to environmental litigation. It adds to recent scholarship on the instability of scientific authorship by comparing different forms of ghostwriting. Whereas the pharmaceutical industry employs ghostwriters to conceal the potentially harmful consequences of its products, the scientists contributing to the case against Chevron sought to make the company’s environmental impacts visible. The company undermined confidence in the legal proceedings in Ecuador by criticizing the experts for the plaintiffs rather than their data, preventing people whose lives and livelihoods have been affected by oil contamination from collecting the judgment against Chevron. This corporate strategy may have a chilling effect on the willingness of environmental scientists and other expert witnesses to provide evidence against powerful corporations. There is a need for better accounting of scientific research undertaken in support of environmental litigation, especially given the high stakes of legal contests like this one, in which corporate fortunes, human lives, and the fate of the environment are contingent on their technical expertise.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S0010417522000020
       
  • Naming Others: Translation and Subject Constitution in the Central
           Highlands of Angola (1926–1961)

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      Authors: Dulley; Iracema
      Pages: 363 - 393
      Abstract: This paper proposes an ethnographic theorization of the relationship between naming, translation, and subject constitution via the analysis of forms of interpellation in colonial Angola. It engages critically with systemic/structural renderings of colonial society that portray social positions as oppositional to argue for a deconstructive approach attentive to historical disjunctions between naming and social positioning. Dwelling on core signifiers in Portuguese and Umbundu, the paper describes the iterative chain of substitutions through which subjects have been constituted, that is, reduced and transformed. For instance, how are the Umbundu status signifiers ocimbundu and ocindele reduced in their respective translations as “black” and “white”' How can translation both re-enact and challenge the constitution of racialized and ethnicized categories of difference' How is this related to transformations in Angolan history' The argument put forth challenges the conventional understanding of social categories in the context of Portuguese colonialism in Angola by arguing that the performativity of naming and translation constitutes subjects via both fixation and displacement. Therefore, the possibility of transformation does not lie in the intentional action of subjects, but in their capacity to operate within the fractures of the relationship between language and society by drawing on disjunctions between signifier and signified, names and social positioning, subjective constitution and sociopolitical context.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S0010417522000056
       
  • The Talat-Tehlirian Complex: Contentious Narratives of Martyrdom and
           Revenge in Post-Conflict Societies

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      Authors: Yenen; Alp
      Pages: 394 - 421
      Abstract: The assassination of Talat Pasha by Soghomon Tehlirian on 15 March 1921 in Berlin, as well as Tehlirian’s trial and acquittal on 2–3 June 1921, have contributed to the formation of conflicting legacies of the Armenian Genocide. Though minuscule in terms of violence and legal ramifications, these events and their reimagination in contentious narratives have shaped a dominant prism of sensemaking in Turkish-Armenian relations. In the imagination of rival groups, Talat and Tehlirian compete for the very same normative categories of hero and victim at once and each are demonized as a villain and perpetrator. Moreover, it is each figure’s embodiment of martyrdom and revenge that explains why their heroizations have proved so enduring and effective across time and space. This mutual framework of sensemaking, which I call the Talat-Tehlirian complex, ultimately denies the chances of historical reconciliation. In terms of its theoretical implications, this case study explains how a martyr-avenger complex can continuously demand solidarity, sustain grievances, and sacralize violence in post-conflict societies. Based on a thick description of what happened in Berlin in 1921 and its contentious narratives across different generations, this paper calls for a transition to a post-heroic age in Turkish-Armenian relations.
      PubDate: 2022-02-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S0010417522000019
       
  • Building Merit: The Moral Economy of the Illegal Wildlife Trade in Rural,
           Post-Socialist Eastern Mongolia

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      Authors: Waters; Hedwig A.
      Pages: 422 - 445
      Abstract: This article describes the development of the moral economy of merit among the fishermen and rural poor of Dalai Village, Magtaal soum, Mongolia. In 1971, the historian E. P. Thompson used the term “moral economy” to describe a popular consensus on what was considered right and wrong in economic behavior, arguing that its provocation motivated the eighteenth-century English poor to engage in crowd-based political action. In contemporary, post-socialist eastern Mongolia, the rural poor have constructed a pervasive local discourse on what is considered legitimate (“merit-making” or buyantai) versus what is illegitimate in economic behavior that morally-condones their illegal wildlife procurement, selling, and smuggling activities. The political contexts of these case studies are compared in order to detail a similar political-economic progression: (1) the recent market liberalization of the commons, sparking moral outrage amongst those classes newly disadvantaged through this shift to the market; and (2) the formation of an anti-profiteering moral discourse among these classes, designed to limit the ability of others to economically capitalize off of these circumstances. Comparing the case studies, the moral economy is manifested as exchange practices involving commons-marked goods that distribute their benefits among the participants, envisioned as thereby promoting group wellbeing rather than the uneven accumulation by individuals.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S0010417522000081
       
  • Putting Neoliberalism in a Place: A Memory Site, Urban Restructuring, and
           Property’s Entanglements in Chile

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      Authors: Murphy; Edward
      Pages: 446 - 477
      Abstract: This paper analyzes a housing project in Santiago, Chile that now lies in ruins and has become a contested memory site. The project was once an ambitious, modernist project that housed former squatters during Salvador Allende’s socialist presidency (1970–1973) and its demise has subsequently become emblematic of the violent processes of neoliberal urban restructuring that marked the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet (1973–1990). Yet efforts to memorialize the site also contain within them certain silences and elisions, gaps which can help to reveal the complex, embedded nature of liberal property relations in Chile. These relations underscore certain dynamics through which squatters have historically been able to gain housing rights and a foothold in the city. They also provide a key location through which to better understand the specific contours of neoliberalism’s trajectory, including its haunted forms of ruination, its points of tension, its limits, and the making of its counterpublics.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S0010417522000044
       
  • The Things They Carried (and Kept): Revisiting Ostalgie in the Global
           South

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      Authors: Schwenkel; Christina
      Pages: 478 - 509
      Abstract: The rich body of literature on the cultural legacies of East Germany has privileged white German perspectives on material culture at the expense of non-white and non-European encounters with socialist things. In shifting the spatial lens to the global South, and to the foreign students and workers who lived for extended periods in East Germany, I trouble the implicit whiteness in the study of GDR cultural memory. Popular identification with GDR goods extended beyond the borders of Germany to newly decolonized countries that were the beneficiaries of the GDR’s solidarity policies. Using the example of Vietnam, I challenge formulations of Ostalgie as a site of white German memory production only, highlighting consumption of East German products by racialized foreign Others. In examining the objects that Vietnamese migrants amassed and transported back to Vietnam, and their subsequent use and circulation through today, I offer a different take on the temporal and spatial relationship between people and commodities, one that assigns value and agency to imported socialist things. In contrast to reunified Germany, where socialist-era goods were deemed disposable and obsolete, in Vietnam, East German products did not lose their utility and associations with modernity. The essay argues for a more inclusive exploration of memory and approach to Ostalgie that takes seriously the alternative logics of time, space, and materiality that informed the circuits of consumption, trade, and meaning of GDR things.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S0010417522000032
       
  • “A question of bank notes, cars, and houses!” Matchmaking and the
           Moral Economy of Love in Urban China

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      Authors: Pettier; Jean-Baptiste
      Pages: 510 - 536
      Abstract: Chinese practices of matchmaking have been controversial for over a century. Their continued transformations reveal a complex nexus of sentimental and material dimensions in the marriage-decision process at the heart of the negotiations between families and in their selections of proper candidates. This interplay between personal sentiments, concrete considerations, and the desire for success makes marriage controversial, as “love” is claimed and proclaimed at the same time. Moral debates around materialism, which have reverberated through the public sphere over the last decade, show how “love” acts as a tool of social reproduction while it also expresses sincere aspirations for an emotionally satisfying life. In comparative perspective, the complex of romantic love examined here reveals a recent, original synthesis of the tradition of parental arrangement and the political question of the place of love in modernity. The paper elucidates one of the contradictions within Chinese society today: the family remains central, but wider trends of individualization continue to unfold. A multifaceted understanding of love clarifies how it can bind families together while it also discourages others from pursuing romance.
      PubDate: 2022-02-03
      DOI: 10.1017/S0010417521000499
       
 
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