Subjects -> RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (Total: 749 journals)
    - BUDDHIST (14 journals)
    - EASTERN ORTHODOX (1 journals)
    - HINDU (6 journals)
    - ISLAMIC (148 journals)
    - JUDAIC (22 journals)
    - OTHER DENOMINATIONS AND SECTS (4 journals)
    - PROTESTANT (22 journals)
    - RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (500 journals)
    - ROMAN CATHOLIC (32 journals)

PROTESTANT (22 journals)

Showing 1 - 18 of 18 Journals sorted alphabetically
Baptist Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Biblica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Christianity & Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Holiness : An International Journal of Wesleyan Theology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Asian Christianity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jahrbuch für Christliche Sozialwissenschaften     Open Access  
PentecoStudies: An Interdisciplinary Journal for Research on the Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Protestantismo em Revista     Open Access  
Reflective Practice : Formation and Supervision in Ministry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Reformation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Reformation & Renaissance Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Review & Expositor     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Review of Ecumenical Studies Sibiu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue Biblique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Revue de Qumran     Full-text available via subscription  
Studies in Christian Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Theology Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Review & Expositor
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0034-6373 - ISSN (Online) 2052-9449
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • I. Biblical studies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cory R. Barnes
      Pages: 150 - 151
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Volume 120, Issue 1-2, Page 150-151, May 2023.

      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-10-28T11:57:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231196974a
      Issue No: Vol. 120, No. 1-2 (2023)
       
  • I. Biblical studies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Richard Anthony Purcell
      Pages: 152 - 153
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Volume 120, Issue 1-2, Page 152-153, May 2023.

      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-10-28T11:57:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231196974b
      Issue No: Vol. 120, No. 1-2 (2023)
       
  • I. Biblical studies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dustin M. Rigsby
      Pages: 154 - 155
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Volume 120, Issue 1-2, Page 154-155, May 2023.

      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-10-28T11:57:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231196974c
      Issue No: Vol. 120, No. 1-2 (2023)
       
  • II. Historical/theological studies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Heewon Jin, LeAnn Snow Flesher
      Pages: 155 - 157
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Volume 120, Issue 1-2, Page 155-157, May 2023.

      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-10-28T11:57:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231196974d
      Issue No: Vol. 120, No. 1-2 (2023)
       
  • II. Historical/theological studies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michael Smith, LeAnn Snow Flesher
      Pages: 157 - 158
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Volume 120, Issue 1-2, Page 157-158, May 2023.

      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-10-28T11:57:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231196974e
      Issue No: Vol. 120, No. 1-2 (2023)
       
  • II. Historical/theological studies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nathaniel J. Napier
      Pages: 159 - 160
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Volume 120, Issue 1-2, Page 159-160, May 2023.

      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-10-28T11:57:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231196974f
      Issue No: Vol. 120, No. 1-2 (2023)
       
  • II. Historical/theological studies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nathan Hays
      Pages: 160 - 162
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Volume 120, Issue 1-2, Page 160-162, May 2023.

      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-10-28T11:57:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231196974g
      Issue No: Vol. 120, No. 1-2 (2023)
       
  • A big, big house(hold): John 14:1–7 as a response to Roman imperial
           violence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Arthur M. Wright
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.
      In antiquity, the entire Roman Empire itself was imagined as a household, with its inhabitants obedient children to their symbolic father, the emperor. The language and the literary context of John 14:1–7 suggest significant interplay with this way of conceptualizing the empire. The Fourth Gospel imitates imperial structures with its household imagery, in which God takes the place of “Father” and believers as “children.” The community of believers is thus imagined as an alternative household to Caesar’s empire, one with its own unique values and priorities. In this article, I suggest that Johannine believers are engaged in imperial negotiation by imagining themselves as an alternative household living under threat of imperial violence. Whereas traditional interpretations of John 14 that equate “my Father’s house” with “heaven” suggest an escapist strategy, in which believers will one day be whisked safely out of their imperial context, this interpretation suggests a more nuanced strategy of negotiating imperial power from within. The divine response to the threat of imperial violence is to establish a beloved household of God.
      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T11:28:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231195387
       
  • The significance of the wounds of Jesus in the Fourth Gospel

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dorothy A. Lee
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.
      In the resurrection narratives of John 20–21, the wounds of the risen Jesus serve a number of important functions. They work as markers of revelation, enabling disciples to recognize the identity of the crucified one in the risen one. They are symbols of colonialism and imperialism, creating solidarity between Jesus and the victims of such abuse and suffering. They are cultic symbols of sacrifice and purification, linked to the Johannine motif of Jesus as the Temple and sacrificial Lamb of God whose death on the cross effects cleansing, taking away the world’s sin. The wounds are also figures of new life and peace, forged ironically through violence and death, signs of triumph and glory. The wounds of the Johannine Jesus thus spell the end of what they embody: suffering and its healing, violence and its peaceful resolution, death and its defeat.
      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T11:26:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231196609
       
  • Jesus and violence during Tabernacles: Wit, mercy, and accountability in
           John 7–8

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sherri Brown
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.
      John 7–8 narrates Jesus’s dialogues with his opponents and the crowds during the annual Jewish festival of Tabernacles. Through this sensory backdrop, Jesus makes exceptional claims both for himself and for how God’s people should respond (e.g., 8:12). Across John’s narration of Jesus’s public ministry, Jesus challenges mainstream closedness by opening covenantal relationship with God to all those who can respond accordingly to what God as Father is doing in this world through Jesus who is Christ and Son. Such confrontation peaks in John 7–8 through a particularly violent interaction between Jesus’s radical acceptance and the resulting discontent in those who prefer the status quo. At the heart of this conflagration, the intrusive encounter between Jesus and the woman ensnared by the Pharisees (7:53–8:11) models a call for mercy and unity in community amid conflict. Despite the textual instability of its foundation, this passage must be given its due as an alternative of mercy to the violence that surrounds it in the final form of John’s Gospel. The presence of this passage in John’s canonical narrative presents a powerful antidote to the chaotic violence that surrounds it.
      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T10:55:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231200557
       
  • After the pain: A sermon on John 20:19–20

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Latonya Latrice Agard
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.
      In the Gospel of John, readers encounter a community of believers who gather behind locked doors even after they have heard Jesus is alive. What can one make of their actions' Why are they not rejoicing, spreading the good news' Something is amiss. Jesus is alive, but the disciples are terrified and appear uncertain about what to do next. Using a trauma-informed hermeneutic, I interpret the actions, words, and apparent mood of the disciples in John 20: 19–20 as symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Jesus’s visible scars testify to his pain and prove that the person in the room is the same person who hung on the cross. In a similar vein, the scars, visible and invisible, of trauma survivors tell stories of unimaginable horror. Many people who survive traumatic events manage to integrate their experiences without prolonged injury to their mental health. For others, however, this is not the case. Fragmentation, not integration, characterizes their post-trauma narratives. Is there any escape for those who live in this prison' For John, the answer, the healing, is in the Risen One. Ultimately, Jesus’s scars speak life and bring hope to a community haunted by loss.
      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T10:52:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231198177
       
  • Revelation through violence' Jesus in the Temple in John 2:13–22

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alicia D. Myers
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.
      John’s version of Jesus’s temple entrance is remarkable for its depiction of Jesus wielding a whip and driving out animals and people from the precincts. Focusing on the violence of Jesus’s “righteous anger,” some interpreters have used John 2:13–22 to justify violence in God’s name throughout history. Others push back against such readings by mitigating or ignoring the violence of Jesus’s actions. This article seeks to find a middle ground by focusing on ancient understandings of what happens when holiness is profaned. Using 2 Maccabees as a comparison, I argue John 2:13–22 presents Jesus’s arrival in the temple as a clash caused by holiness breaking out. This presentation emphasizes Jesus’s identity as God’s glory made flesh and plays into ancient audience expectations in 2:13–17. In 2:18–22, however, Jesus undercuts these assumptions by predicting his own death and resurrection. Rather than endorsing violence, then, John 2:13–22 is better understood as a type of bait and switch, in which the narrative emphasizes Jesus’s identity, the problem he faces in the world, and the surprising way God responds. Instead of spreading violence, Jesus receives it upon his own body, thus revealing God’s inviolability that results in life for those who will receive it.
      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-09-27T11:31:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231199503
       
  • “It is advantageous for you that one man should die for the people and
           not that the whole nation should perish” (John 11:50): A reassessment of
           Caiaphas’s argument from expediency

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lidija Novakovic
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I examine the declaration, “It is advantageous for you that one man should die for the people and not that the whole nation should perish” (John 11:50), which the high priest Caiaphas makes at the Sanhedrin’s deliberations about the necessity of Jesus’s execution. I argue that despite the narrator’s appreciative comment that Caiaphas “did not say this on his own, but, because he was high priest that year, he prophesied that Jesus was about to die for the nation, and not for the nation only, but that he may also gather into one the scattered children of God” (John 11:51–52), the evangelist does not endorse the argument from expediency that Caiaphas advocates. Jesus’s death in John is beneficial for others not because the reasoning “one for many” is morally justifiable but because Jesus freely lays down his life. This redefinition of the redemptive significance of Jesus’s death on the cross also implies the futility of violence because the execution of Jesus did not bring about the non-violent end that Caiaphas hoped for. After all, the Romans did come and destroy the city of Jerusalem and its temple. Thus, the death of Jesus in the Fourth Gospel is beneficial for all God’s people, but this act is not the result of the verdict of the Jewish leaders to put Jesus to death but of Jesus’s own decision to give his life for others.
      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-09-27T11:28:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231195634
       
  • Editorial introduction: Violence and responses to violence in the Gospel
           of John

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alicia D. Myers
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-09-22T11:42:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231200558
       
  • Words about books

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Scott C. Ryan
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-09-15T10:42:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231196974
       
  • A word from a seminarian . . . The grace of hearing and remembering

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sara Acosta
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.
      First Samuel 1:1-20 is a multifaceted text, rich with ancient history and modern significance. A nuanced look at the passage’s cultural, theological, and pastoral contexts can equip laity and clergy alike to counsel women experiencing infertility grief, honoring the text while turning to a hermeneutic alternative to a dominant Deuteronomistic view.
      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-09-14T10:54:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231197823
       
  • Hearing the non-violence in a silent departure (John 8:59 and 10:39)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Josiah D. Hall
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.
      The provocative exchanges between Jesus and his interlocutors in John 8 and 10 both climax in the interlocutors rejecting Jesus’s claims and seeking to stone him before tersely describing Jesus’s escape from a premature death: in John 8:59, Jesus hides himself and departs from the temple, whereas in John 10:39, he merely departs. These enigmatic descriptions of departure create “narrative silences.” Considering ancient expectations for violent divine retribution against those who failed to recognize and honor a deity’s manifestation, I argue these “narrative silences” would have provoked an ancient audience to anticipate violent divine judgment. John, however, subverts this expectation. While maintaining that Jesus’s departure from the temple, and, later, from the world, are divine judgment in the form of the removal of the divine presence, John nevertheless presents this judgment as distinctively non-violent. This non-violent divine judgment in turn furthers the Gospel’s aim of convincing the audience to accept the Gospel’s claim that Jesus is the enfleshed divine presence.
      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-09-14T10:51:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231197429
       
  • The woman saved from stoning: An answer to scapegoats and scapegoating

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer Garcia Bashaw
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.
      According to René Girard, Jesus is the scapegoat to end all scapegoats. The Gospels reveal that his voluntary death as an innocent scapegoat unmasks the scapegoating process in which human societies participate and frees humanity from its power. Jesus’s passion is not the only episode from the Gospels that provides an antidote to scapegoating. In the story of the woman saved from stoning (John 8:2-11), Jesus calms a scapegoating storm, de-escalates a mob, and thwarts the scapegoaters. Jesus removes the scapegoat target from the woman’s back and focuses attention where it belongs: on the wrongs of the accusers. In his interactions with the woman, Jesus frees her from blame and treats her like a human being made in the image of God, not an object to be used. Jesus offers a glimpse into how to create a future without scapegoating, a future in which we turn our gazes to our own sins and treat those who are marginalized and targeted for blame not as scapegoats but as image-bearers worthy of love.
      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-09-14T10:49:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231197200
       
  • On the list and at the well: Finding encouragement in Christ’s
           acknowledgment and ministry

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sarah Boberg
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.
      This narrative is a personal account of the author’s experience as a called woman minister and her being included on Mike Law’s recent list in support of a Constitutional Amendment for the SBC not to “affirm, appoint, or employ a woman as pastor of any kind.” Using the text of John 4, the author identifies the encouragement the Samaritan woman found in Christ’s acknowledgment of her and in sending her as a witness and how the Samaritan woman’s experience connects to the author’s own experience of encouragement found in her call and ministry.
      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-09-14T10:40:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231197204
       
  • A word about . . . violence in a pluralistic age: Constraints and
           opportunities for Christians

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Caleb O. Oladipo
      First page: 10
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.
      The challenges presented by the current global culture of violence are baffling. Humanity faces these unprecedented challenges that have origins in sacred texts containing violent events. “Spiritualizing” these events is not the solution to dealing with the problems they present. Christians should be prepared to doubt the texts that promote violence as a part of faithfulness to God. This article suggests the opposite of faith is not only doubt, but also fear. Christians demonstrate a cheap relationship with sacred texts when they fail to challenge traditional interpretations. A more mature approach is to embrace alternative, if unfamiliar, interpretations of sacred texts rather than hold on to orthodoxy that is beloved but unloving. Christians should see the texts that seem to justify violence or encourage war as a message requiring humanity to struggle against such violence to transform the world around them nonviolently. The Church of the twenty-first century has optimal opportunity for building harmonious relationships with people of other faiths, which will require a multifaceted approach to understanding God in a pluralistic age.
      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-10-18T05:54:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231203871
       
  • “Put your sword back into its sheath”: A Johannine approach to
           nonviolent resistance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrew J. Byers
      First page: 29
      Abstract: Review & Expositor, Ahead of Print.
      The Gospel of John challenges the use of violence in both the exercise of power and in resistance to power. This article identifies how power is used in John, discusses who uses it, and examines how power is complicated or inhibited within the narrative. God and the Logos are introduced in the Prologue as the Gospel’s most powerful figures, yet their power is resisted. The Jewish leaders (often co-identified with “the Jews”) hold sociocultural power, though it is limited by Rome. The Empire looms in the background until the passion narrative, in which Roman power is relativized to the power of the empire of God. Cosmic evil co-opts Rome and the Jewish leaders and serves as the most dominant force arrayed against Jesus in the Fourth Gospel, even if constrained. Jesus’s power is superior, yet he exercises self-restraint. The article then explores the resistance practices to dominant power by the Jewish leadership, Peter, then Jesus, focusing on the arrest and (quasi-)trial in John 18. While “the Jews” resort to violence by colluding with Rome, Peter assaults with a sword then denies Jesus. Although greater in power than the arresting party and judicial authorities, Jesus responds to threats with nonviolence, undermining an imperial imagination sustained by ideologies of violence and death.
      Citation: Review & Expositor
      PubDate: 2023-10-18T05:28:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00346373231201522
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.239.2.192
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-