Subjects -> RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (Total: 749 journals)
    - BUDDHIST (14 journals)
    - EASTERN ORTHODOX (1 journals)
    - HINDU (6 journals)
    - ISLAMIC (148 journals)
    - JUDAIC (22 journals)
    - OTHER DENOMINATIONS AND SECTS (4 journals)
    - PROTESTANT (22 journals)
    - RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (500 journals)
    - ROMAN CATHOLIC (32 journals)

HINDU (6 journals)

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 Journals sorted alphabetically
Electronic Journal of Vedic Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Dharma Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Religions of South Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Similar Journals
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International Journal of Hindu Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.247
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1574-9282 - ISSN (Online) 1022-4556
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Preparing for the Past, Packaged for the Present: The Brahma Kumaris,
           Meditation, and a Self-(Help) Styled Monasticism

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      Abstract: Abstract The Brahma Kumaris are a Hindu religious movement whose membership consists almost exclusively of women and whose devotional practices revolve around notions of purity and celibacy. They also hold a cyclical apocalyptic eschatology, believing that the world will end in utter disaster in the near future, just as it has done in countless times past. In order to achieve their religious goals with respect to the apocalypse, the Brahma Kumaris must engage in recruitment on a massive scale. This article examines the marketing of the Brahma Kumaris. It argues that, in order to usher in the end of the world and spare others a painful post-apocalyptic fate, the Brahma Kumaris host a number of retreats and programs aimed at attracting the public to their movement. These retreats and programs, however, have little to do with celibacy and apocalypticism, but instead focus on self-help, stress reduction, and increasing self-confidence. The article examines the ways that the Brahma Kumaris brand their determinedly ascetic, apocalyptic, and predestinarian movement as a meditative tradition which offers self-help tools for the frenzied modern public. It also considers how scholars should theorize about the marketing of religious groups that have a radically different set of internal theologies than those they present to the public.
      PubDate: 2024-02-29
       
  • Nīr-Kṣīr Viveka: Discerning the Truth of Spirituality in Gandhi’s
           Thought and Actions

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      Abstract: Abstract In his work, Arvind Sharma daringly asserts the fundamental place of spirituality in Mohandas K. (“Mahatma”) Gandhi’s personal life and social and political activism. Sharma avoids any theoretical frameworks to elucidate Gandhi’s spirituality; but rather, he takes the reader through events in Gandhi’s life, his personal practices, and political actions that had synthesized the spiritual and political through living the apparent paradox of a saint-politician. Critiques of Gandhi’s spiritual practices attest to the fact that he remains a challenge to scholars as well as practitioners of nonviolence who seek to separate his political theories, nonviolent strategies, and social concerns from his spiritual commitments. Sharma claims that discerning the truth of his life—mixed as nīr (political, social, mundane) and kṣīr (spiritual, service, love, quest to see God)—mandates not ignoring his “Mahatma side” (kṣīr), the primary source of his fearlessness and strength (mental, physical, and public), notwithstanding many critiques that may render it as only an aberration.
      PubDate: 2024-02-27
       
  • Natalie Lang, Religion and Pride: Hindus in Search of Recognition in La
           Réunion.

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      PubDate: 2024-02-26
       
  • Ute Hüsken, Vasudha Narayanan, and Astrid Zotter, eds., Nine Nights of
           Power: Durgā, Dolls, and Darbārs. SUNY Series in Hindu Studies.

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      PubDate: 2024-02-23
       
  • Steven W. Ramey, ed., Hinduism in 5 Minutes. Religion in Five Minutes
           series.

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      PubDate: 2024-02-23
       
  • Hindu Apologist or Modern Reformer' Arvind Sharma on Hindu Women

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      Abstract: Abstract Using a case study of Arvind Sharma’s thinking on striyaḥ (women), a subject he claims he has not written about aside from the topic of sati, this essay analyzes the epigrams and prefaces found in his fifteen edited books on women as a point of departure to tease out his larger scholarly project: not only to understand why India became colonized and Hinduism moribund, but also how to overcome their lingering effects without alienation from past culture. Toward this end, the essay focuses on how Sharma tackles stereotypes by restoring complexities to the historical record, using the multiple methods of religious studies, taking on the mantle of engaged scholar as a “threshold response,” and entering the public sphere on issues of justice and affirmative action. Juxtaposition of pivotal events recorded in his autobiography with these scholarly discussions suggests that his cryptic insights on women’s history and liberation is core to his thought, a case of “reciprocal illumination” as it were. All this raises the question of whether Sharma is a Hindu apologist or a reformer.
      PubDate: 2024-02-23
       
  • William Tallotte, Music and Temple Ritual in South India: Performing for
           Śiva. SOAS Studies in Music series.

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      PubDate: 2024-02-22
       
  • Nadav Harel, director, AVATARA. Hindi and Seraji (English subtitles).

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      PubDate: 2024-02-22
       
  • The Study of Indian Philosophy in the Work of Arvind Sharma (with
           Particular Reference to Advaita Vedānta)

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      Abstract: Abstract This essay explores the role of the Advaita Vedānta philosophy of Hinduism in Arvind Sharma’s numerous works on Indian philosophy. It argues that the viewpoint from which he approaches the various traditions he studies is deeply informed by the Advaita Vedānta tradition. It argues that this is not an especially problematic stance, so long as it is clear that this represents his specific point of view as a scholar and is not being falsely represented as an “objective” perspective. It shows that Sharma is indeed open about his affinity for Advaita Vedānta. The essay then engages with various controversies associated with Advaita Vedānta in the modern period, particularly the question of “neo-Advaita” or “neo-Vedānta,” both of which are shown to be problematic terms. The essay then concludes with a broad overview and appreciation of Sharma’s work on Indian philosophy: a body of work which constitutes a major contribution to scholarship even as it advances a particular perspective on the traditions to which is applied (a fact which is true of all scholarship, even that which claims to be “objective” or “neutral” with regard to the subject matter with which it engages).
      PubDate: 2024-02-22
       
  • Reciprocal Illumination and the Discovery of Fractal Patterns in Religious
           Diversity

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      Abstract: Abstract This essay presents Arvind Sharma’s concept of “reciprocal illumination” as an innovative defense of interreligious comparison, showing that the comparative approach is still meaningful despite its currently widespread critique. In discussing Sharma’s concept, the essay focuses on the internal diversity of religious traditions, asking whether “reciprocal illumination” is possible because religious diversity is apparently not entirely at random but displays recurrent patterns and structures of a fractal nature. The existence of fractal patterns would explain very well not merely why “reciprocal illumination” is possible at all, but especially in what sense it fosters interreligious learning as part of the growing field of interreligious theology. The latter aspect is investigated by relating Sharma’s three types of “reciprocal illumination” to Catherine Cornille’s recent classification of six forms of interreligious learning. It will be argued that interreligious learning and reciprocal illumination are likely to lead to a radical change in religious self-understanding, perceiving one’s own tradition as a unique, internally diverse, and equally valid part and component of a larger diverse web of religious phenomena.
      PubDate: 2024-02-21
       
  • A Most Uncommon Task: Arvind Sharma and the Construction of Hindu
           Missiology

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      Abstract: Abstract In this essay, I offer a critical, appreciative assessment of Arvind Sharma’s vision of missionary Hinduism, as developed in his 2011 monograph Hinduism as a Missionary Religion and related works in ethics, comparative method, and philosophy of religion. As a historian, Sharma has been criticized for his selective focus and his tendency to de-emphasize the diversity and mutual rivalries of Hindu traditions, especially in the classical and medieval periods. As a self-consciously constructive, even confessional thinker, however, he also develops a coherent theology of mission, grounded in his own distinctive form of universalist Advaita Vedānta. In this sense, I argue, Sharma might be regarded as a founding figure in the emergence of missiology as a vital category of contemporary Hindu thought, as well as a rich new field for interreligious exchange.
      PubDate: 2024-02-14
       
  • Patronymic Patterns in the Mārkaṇḍeya Purāṇa: The Significance of
           Manu-Making for the Greatness of the Goddess

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      Abstract: Abstract This article maps the Manvantara section of the Mārkaṇḍeya Purāṇa to reveal a patronymic pattern at play which is key to understanding the interplay between the mythologies of Goddess and Sun found in the Mārkaṇḍeya. It explains why the Devī Māhātmya occurs, especially in the Manvantara, which has puzzled scholars since colonial times. The article argues that the compositional strategy was implemented to present the Goddess as an analog to Viṣṇu, Manu, Sun, and the Indian king, all paragons of preservation.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • The Other’s Other: Being Non-Hindu in Colonial India

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      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • Introduction

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      PubDate: 2023-10-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s11407-023-09345-2
       
  • Gandhi and the Jews, the Jews and Gandhi: An Overall Perspective

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      Abstract: Abstract Mohandas K. Gandhi (1869–1948)’s relationship with the Jews is explored in this article. The history of this relationship can be divided into two different periods. The first begins during his formative years in South Africa from 1893 to 1914, and the second, during his political activism in India thereafter. The article points out that Gandhi’s close Jewish associates in South Africa, although coming primarily from a Theosophist background, considered their support of Gandhi and his struggle to represent their core Jewish values. Still, Gandhi’s close Jewish supporters did not successfully influence Gandhi regarding Zionism. In retrospect, Gandhi’s objection to Zionism enormously impacted the Indian Congress Party’s position regarding Palestine. The article notes that although Gandhi opposed political Zionism, he supported Zionism as a spiritual movement that could be best realized “within.” Somewhat surprising and little-known fact was a desire on Gandhi’s part to mediate between the Arabs and the Jews in direct talks. Gandhi hoped the Zionist leaders would respond positively to his offer to mediate so that he could advance his teachings of nonviolence while also claiming to represent the Indian Muslims. The article discusses Gandhi’s call to German and European Jews to resist the Nazi regime by adopting Satyagraha, the consequent rift with Jewry that followed, and his silence after the Holocaust. Finally, the article also briefly explores B. R. Ambedkar (1891–1956)’s views on the Jews and the Indian pariahs.
      PubDate: 2023-10-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s11407-023-09348-z
       
  • Gandhi the Artist

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      Abstract: Abstract Daya Krishna, one of the most original voices of contemporary Indian philosophy, writes that “Gandhi is as rare as…a Shakespeare or a Michelangelo” (1999). Mohandas K. Gandhi himself writes that “Jesus was, to my mind, a supreme artist” (1924). And Tridip Suhrud, Gandhian and Gandhi scholar, speaks of “Gandhi’s striving to lead the life of a ‘supreme artist’ ” (2018). The question raised in this article is this: If Gandhi was an artist, then what is his artwork' In reply, the author suggests that Gandhi himself is the artwork of Gandhi the artist. To substantiate this contention, Gandhi is depicted first as a “hunger artist,” in dialogue with Franz Kafka’s 1924 story of the same name, and second as a “death artist” crafting (determining, choosing) his death. Here the author draws on Ramchandra Gandhi, the Mahatma’s grandson and an intriguing philosophical voice, and examines Judah L. Magnes’s 1939 letter to Gandhi.
      PubDate: 2023-10-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s11407-023-09344-3
       
  • Rebb Binyamin’s Gandhi: India, Islam, and the Question of Palestine

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      Abstract: Abstract Rebb Binyamin (pseudonym of Yehoshua Radler-Feldman; 1880–1957) was a leading figure in movements that called for the establishment of a joint Jewish-Arab political framework in Palestine and that sharply criticized the Zionist cooperation with the British colonial authorities. In the early 1920s, he began exploring the writings of Mohandas K. Gandhi (1869–1948) as the basis for his critical approach toward the hegemonic Zionist discourse. In his writings Rebb Binyamin emphasized Gandhi’s refusal to reconcile himself to the British colonial “divide and rule” policies by creating divisions between Hindus and Muslims, the Indian anticolonial struggle that he led, and the way this struggle inspired the development of anticolonial movements in the Middle East. These aspects of Gandhi’s political repertoire were considered by Rebb Binyamin as a framework for the critical discussion of the ways in which the British colonial authorities perceived the Zionist movement as their representative and pointed to the fact that the Zionist-colonial partnership was an obstacle to the crystallization of Jewish-Arab cooperation. This article focuses on the ways in which Rebb Binyamin’s reading of Gandhi served as the basis for his critique of hegemonic Zionist discourse and practices.
      PubDate: 2023-10-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s11407-023-09347-0
       
  • Thinking about Ethical Politics: Gandhi’s Spirituality versus
           Levinas’s Philosophy

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      Abstract: Abstract In 1962, Emmanuel Levinas (1906–1995) was asked about the political implications of his ethics and the possible similarity between his philosophy and the writing of Mohandas K. Gandhi (1869–1948). They both were aware of the considerable tensions between politics and ethics. Both tried to construct ethical politics, and both thought about the ethical aspects of politics. The differences were obvious. Gandhi was an Indian thinker who embraced Hinduism, Christian ethics, Western philosophy, and Leo Tolstoy’s spiritual writings. Levinas was a Western philosopher with a traditional Jewish background, familiar with Russian literature. Gandhi was a social figure and political leader who based his attitude and activism on spirituality. Levinas was a phenomenological philosopher who based his perspective on ethics, underpinning his political philosophy. Nevertheless, this article suggests a philosophical study of Gandhi’s writings compared to Levinas’s teachings. This new perspective explains Gandhi’s philosophy by focusing on the establishment of the subject, the validity of ethics, the search for truth, and the epistemological stance. This study would structure Gandhi’s political position based on spiritual and ethical thinking. This could clarify three main principles of Gandhi’s doctrine: striving for the truth, self-control, and nonviolence.
      PubDate: 2023-10-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s11407-023-09346-1
       
  • Book Reviews

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      PubDate: 2023-08-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s11407-023-09343-4
       
  • Voices from the Margins: Early Modern Nāth Yogī Teachings for
           Muslim Publics

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      Abstract: Abstract The Avali Silūk (The Ultimate Song) and the Kāfir Bodh (The Wisdom of the Infidels) are lesser-known yogic granths, or treatises, in the early modern North Hindustani Nāth literary tradition. Erased from the modern literary canon in the mid-twentieth century, these multilingual teachings are crucial to understanding how the Nāth Yogīs conceptualized their complex relationships with Muslim communities around the time of the Nāth sampradāy’s foundation. Although the better-known Sabadī (The Sacred Utterances) attributed to Guru Gorakhnāth frequently speaks of the porous religious identity of early modern North Hindustani Nāth Yogīs, the Avali Silūk and the Kāfir Bodh are the only two known discourses that highlight Nāth Yogī engagement with Islamic publics from a Nāth point of view. This article examines these teachings, explores possible motives for their erasure in the modern printed canon, and reconsiders how the Nāth Yogīs expressed their identity and relationship with Muslim publics in early modern Hindustan.
      PubDate: 2023-08-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s11407-023-09341-6
       
 
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  Subjects -> RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (Total: 749 journals)
    - BUDDHIST (14 journals)
    - EASTERN ORTHODOX (1 journals)
    - HINDU (6 journals)
    - ISLAMIC (148 journals)
    - JUDAIC (22 journals)
    - OTHER DENOMINATIONS AND SECTS (4 journals)
    - PROTESTANT (22 journals)
    - RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (500 journals)
    - ROMAN CATHOLIC (32 journals)

HINDU (6 journals)

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 Journals sorted alphabetically
Electronic Journal of Vedic Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Dharma Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Religions of South Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 18.207.129.175
 
Home (Search)
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About JournalTOCs
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JournalTOCs © 2009-