Subjects -> RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (Total: 749 journals)
    - BUDDHIST (14 journals)
    - EASTERN ORTHODOX (1 journals)
    - HINDU (6 journals)
    - ISLAMIC (148 journals)
    - JUDAIC (22 journals)
    - OTHER DENOMINATIONS AND SECTS (4 journals)
    - PROTESTANT (22 journals)
    - RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (500 journals)
    - ROMAN CATHOLIC (32 journals)

HINDU (6 journals)

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 Journals sorted alphabetically
Electronic Journal of Vedic Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Dharma Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Religions of South Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Similar Journals
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Journal of Dharma Studies
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2522-0926 - ISSN (Online) 2522-0934
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Necessity and Creativity: The Status of Lived Experience in Longchenpa’s
           “The Precious Treasury of the Space of Phenomena”

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper discusses the existential status of the world as a primal space of lived experience in the context of the nondual Tibetan Tradition “The Great Perfection”; is it necessary or contingent. We begin with distinguishing two senses of necessity, a primordial meaning that is grounded in the nature of nondual Awareness and a spatiotemporal meaning which signifies the predictability of specific events. Based on this distinction, it is asked if and how the world is necessary in each existential context. What we find is that the world in all its multiple experiential qualities is an inherent expression of Awareness. Simultaneously, its contents as information are woven into a continuum that unfolds according to causal patterns. Consequently, it is asserted that lived experience brings together immediate presencing and causal patterns. Finally, we turn to the relations between necessity and creativity within the nondual ground and in the space of spatiotemporal beings. This leads us to discover the integral nature of ground and beings, which is rooted in the characteristics of nondual Awareness, open essence, and lucid self-nature.
      PubDate: 2024-02-28
       
  • The Healer’s Dharma: Interfacing Dharma and Healing from
           Śākta-Tantric Perspectives

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      Abstract: Abstract It can be insisted that, since time immemorial, one of the fundamental functions of religion across the globe has been to heal people in various senses of “healing.” Across cultures, the figure of the religious healer has been prominent, and such a religious healer acts as a catalyst between the devotees and their beliefs in the therapeutic power of religion. This paper explores the dharma (one of the most polyvalent terms in Hinduism) of a religious healer from the Śākta-Tantric perspective. What are the ethical and spiritual paradigms on the basis of which a religious healer acts in the Śākta-Tantric universe' How can the epistemology of Śākta-Tantric healing be dialogized with the theoretical assumptions of health humanities' Apart from dealing with these questions, this paper also explores how the dharmic principles of a religious healer may differ from and can modify or expand the epistemic horizons of “medical ethics.” For critically reflecting on the dharma of a Śākta-Tantric healer, it specifically refers to the healing methods and principles of two Śākta-Tantric healers from the nineteenth- and twentieth-century Bengal, Sri Vishuddhananda Paramahamsa and Sri V. Raghunathan.
      PubDate: 2024-02-15
       
  • Against Pseudoyogic Cults: A Philosophical Review of Under the Yoga Mat:
           The Dark History of Yogi Bhajan’s Kundalini Yoga

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      PubDate: 2024-02-14
       
  • Review of An Indian Tantric Tradition and Its Modern Global Revival:
           Contemporary Nondual Śaivism by D.E. Osto (Routledge, 2020)

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      PubDate: 2024-02-12
       
  • Krishna Mallick. Environmental Movements of India: Chipko, Narmada Bachao
           Andolan, Navdanya

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      PubDate: 2024-01-17
       
  • Orthodoxy, Reform, and Protest: Brahmanas and Virashaivism

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper attempts to analyze the debate between the scholars concerning the nature of Virashaivism. While one category of scholars characterizes Virashaivism as anti-Brahmanical and anti-Vedic, another category of historians of religion realized the proximity of Virashaivism, at least the initial phase of its growth, with Brahmanical religion. This paper supports the contention that Virashaivism exhibited the features of a reform movement before emerging as a protest sect. In fact, the Brahmanas played an important role in the annihilation of Jainism in the earlier phase of the growth of Virashaivism even though its second phase of progress under the leaders such as Basavanna represented the anti-Brahmanical and anti-caste tendencies. The study will further substantiate this argument through the study of the Kannada text Abbaluru Charite, which narrates the achievements of Ekantada Ramayya, a Brahmana leader of Virashaivism. It is shown that the Abbaluru Charite is useful to study the role of the Brahmanas in the emergence of Virashaivism. The major concern of the Brahmanas was to compete with the Jainas to obtain royal patronage and popular support.
      PubDate: 2024-01-15
       
  • Death: Never Done Grieving

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper deals with the psychological trauma caused by death and how Hindu culture responds to that trauma. Every culture has a grieving mechanism to ease the pain and suffering brought on by death. In this paper, the author presents his personal experience with death of his parents and his best friend’s families who died of COVID-19. To cope with the loss that death involves, all cultures have some kind of death ceremonies—some are more elaborate than others. Hindu death ceremonies are rooted in texts that guide the grieving one through various steps to keep the bereaved family members preoccupied with ritualistic activities that give them no time to think about the loss. The preta karma is one of the Hindu samskāras related to death that this paper goes into detail to argue that it is designed to ease the bereavement process, a coping mechanism invented before Western psychotherapy came into practice in the nineteenth century.
      PubDate: 2023-12-11
       
  • Non-duality in the Teaching of Vimalakīrti

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      Abstract: Abstract Even a full realization of the absence of permanent self, a core teaching of Buddhism, does not stop the process by which a subject is imputed and then moves to apprehend objects. Not only is the nature of perception dualistic, the way objects are conceptualized relies on a further round of dualistic discrimination. A key role in the setting up of mutually exclusive categories, such as inner and outer, defilement and purification, and nirvāna and saṃsāra, that underlie conventional perception is played by language. The Teaching of Vimalakīrti aspires to eliminate this illness of misperception by altering the way language is used. Rich in paradox, this early Mahāyāna text deploys the concept of non-duality to offset the mind’s dichotomizing tendencies, testing the limits of both language and perception in the process. While the importance of non-duality for Mahāyāna and its prominence in the Vimalakīrti have been duly noted by numerous scholars and dharma teachers, I have not come across a study that would scrutinize the contexts in which the term first crops up in this sūtra or that would categorize the thirty-two ways of transcending duality suggested in its culminating eighth chapter. Going quotation by quotation, I provide a close reading of relevant passages and at the end break them down into three types. In the process, I also show that Vimalakīrti’s most effective way of countering duality is based on the idea of sameness, or equality, of things which poses certain ethical questions. Finally, my textual analysis leads me to challenge the view prevalent in scholarship on non-duality which takes the term to denote—even in regard to this text—a higher metaphysical reality.
      PubDate: 2023-12-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00155-8
       
  • A Review of “The Making of Contemporary Indian Philosophy:
           Krishnachandra Bhattacharyya”

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      Abstract: Abstract The reviewed book, titled “The Making of Contemporary Indian Philosophy Krishnachandra Bhattacharyya” (Raveh, D., & Coquereau-Saouma, E. (Eds.). 2023) (the/this book hereafter), edited by Daniel Raveh and Elise Coquereau-Saouma, is part of the Routledge Hindu Studies Series in collaboration with the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies. This series aims to foster dialogue between Hindu traditions and modern research trends. The editors deserve commendation for adding value to the series and contributing significantly to debates in Indian philosophy, particularly regarding Krishnachandra Bhattacharyya’s philosophy (KCB thereafter). This book brings together scholars who have carefully looked at KCB’s big ideas, giving us clear and deep insights into his philosophy. This review carefully examines each chapter, simplifying the book’s content and ensuring that no significant details are overlooked. Our aim is to motivate readers to delve into KCB’s broader body of work and, more specifically, this book, which greatly enriches our understanding of his worldview. In harmony with the book’s flow, we delve into the current trends in Indian philosophy, giving special attention to situating KCB’s philosophy within this context, as discussed by the contributors. Additionally, we seek to clarify any misunderstandings surrounding this field, aiding aspiring researchers in tackling the intricate intellectual challenges within modern Indian philosophy—an endeavor certainly worth pursuing.
      PubDate: 2023-12-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00154-9
       
  • Non-dualism as the Foundation of Dualism: the Case of Shinran Shōnin

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      Abstract: Abstract Starting from the allegation of the Pure Land tradition “as a deviant form of Buddhism,” the paper looks at non-dualist and dualist features in the teachings of the Japanese medieval Pure Land master Shinran Shōnin (1173–1263). It is suggested that Shinran should be understood within the Mahāyāna framework of the two truths or realities (satyadvaya). Shinran retains both perspectives in a paradoxical way implicating that non-dualism needs to be realized in a spiritual practice with strong dualist aspects. Non-dual ultimate reality manifests itself within conventional reality as the all-embracing compassionate “other-power” (tariki) that evokes an existential attitude of radical entrusting (shinjin) thereby evoking a liberative transformation “naturally” (jinen).
      PubDate: 2023-11-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00153-w
       
  • Chanting Liberation: Overcoming Pain and Death Through Hindu Deathbed
           Mantra Recitation

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      Abstract: Abstract This study considers the usage of mantra for and by the dying, addressing a lacuna in Hindu death studies. This topic is approached by examining a selection of texts, including the Garuḍa Purāṇa, Upaniṣads, and Bhagavad Gītā, alongside ethnographic accounts, considering to whom these mantras are addressed. Particular focus is given to the literary and ritual usage of the Mahā Mṛtyuṃjaya Mantra as a case study. A wide-angle approach is adopted, contingent on the scope of ancient and contemporary literature that touches upon deathbed chanting, with findings supplemented by the author’s auto-ethnographic accounts as a spiritual care practitioner providing this service for cancer patients with Ganga Prem Hospice in Rishikesh, India. The power of deathbed mantra recitation is emphasized, as well as its multiplicity of expressions across a variety of communities and geographies, which is represented even within early textual materials. The recitation of mantra for and by the dying may function to relieve pain, call forth divine intimacy, and grant liberation. Through this practice, the dying subject may overcome death itself.
      PubDate: 2023-10-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00152-x
       
  • Śṛṅgāra in Stone: the Śakuntalā Reliefs at
           Paṭṭadakal

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      Abstract: Abstract Bas-reliefs of scenes from the epics Rāmāyaṇa and Mahābhārata are extremely common in temples all over India, but depictions of scenes from a Sanskrit drama (mahānāṭaka) in places of worship are virtually unheard of. A few bas-reliefs at the Lokeśvara Temple and the Trailokyeśvara Temple at Paṭṭadakal depict scenes centring around a female figure, who is arguably Śakuntalā. The story of Śakuntalā is first mentioned in the Mahābhārata and was subsequently dramatised by Kālidāsa in the fifth century in the Abhijñānaśākuntalam. From a comparison of these bas-reliefs with the aforesaid texts in the original Sanskrit, it is evident that they match the storyline in the drama better than that of the epic. Apart from corroborating the probability that these reliefs may have been inspired by a Sanskrit drama, this paper also explores how the rasas, which can normally be experienced through live performances or literature, can also be depicted and communicated through a non-dynamic medium. Additionally, this paper demonstrates that the works of Kālidāsa were known and cherished by the Cālukya royal figures, some of whom memorialised them in stone, in an unusual form of temple iconography in the two temples at Paṭṭadakal.
      PubDate: 2023-07-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00148-7
       
  • Correction to: Book Review: Beacons of Dharma: Spiritual Exemplars for the
           Modern Age—Ed. Christopher Patrick Miller, Michael Reading, and Jeffery
           D. Long Lanham, MD: Lexington Books 2020

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      PubDate: 2023-07-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00150-z
       
  • Correction to: Seeing in the Dark: of Epistemic Culture and Abhidharma in
           the Long Fifth Century C.E.

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      PubDate: 2023-06-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00147-8
       
  • A Theocentric Argument for Animal Personhood in the
           Caitanya-caritāmṛta

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      Abstract: Abstract The discourse on non-human animal personhood is at once ontological and axiological; it can involve a proposal of (what are taken to be) ontological facts about criteria for personhood and usually implies a positive axiological valuation of those who are deemed to be “persons.” The argument in favor of non-human personhood is critical for environmentalists and animal advocates alike. It is often believed that as people increasingly recognize animals as persons that the perceived human likeness to animals (the ontological component) more readily inspires empathetic pangs (an axiological component) in response to the exploitation of animals. As the public increasingly supports the idea of animal personhood, such a designation can eventually come to have legal and legislative implications as animal personhood becomes an important basis for the argument of legal protection—a legal argument that is more likely to be successful as this notion of non-human and animal personhood has increasing paradigmatic currency in the public at large. Elsewhere, I have shown how themes in the Bhāgavata Purāṇa (BhP or Śrīmad Bhāgavatam) affirm animal advocacy and animal rights in a way that is relevant to Gauḍīya (or Caitanya) Vaiṣṇava (GV) theology (Bohanec, 2018). This current work is a further movement in the construction of an animal-centered ecotheology that affirms animal personhood—where personhood is foundational to animal rights—from the perspective of the Gauḍīya tradition by investigating the implications of the 17th chapter of the Second Book (Madhya Līlā or just Madhya) of the Caitanya Caritāmṛta (CC).
      PubDate: 2023-06-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00146-9
       
  • Beacons of Dharma: Spiritual Exemplars for the Modern Age. Edited by
           Christopher Patrick Miller, Michael Reading, and Jeffery D. Long. Landham,
           MD: Lexington Books, 2020

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      PubDate: 2023-04-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00143-y
       
  • Beacons of Dharma: Spiritual Exemplars for the Modern Age. Edited by
           Christopher Patrick Miller, Michael Reading, and Jeffery D. Long. Landham,
           MD: Lexington Books, 2020

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      PubDate: 2023-04-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00144-x
       
  • Beacons of Dharma: Spiritual Exemplars for the Modern Age. Edited by
           Christopher Patrick Miller, Michael Reading, and Jeffery D. Long. Landham,
           MD: Lexington Books, 2020

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2023-04-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00145-w
       
  • Review of Digital Hinduism: Dharma and Discourse in the Age of New Media,
           Edited by Murali Balaji (Lexington Books, 2018)

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      PubDate: 2023-03-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00142-z
       
  • A Continuing Search for Light in our Shared Times of Darkness:
           Introduction and Response to a Special Review Section on Beacons of
           Dharma: Spiritual Exemplars for the Modern Age

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      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42240-023-00140-1
       
 
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  Subjects -> RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (Total: 749 journals)
    - BUDDHIST (14 journals)
    - EASTERN ORTHODOX (1 journals)
    - HINDU (6 journals)
    - ISLAMIC (148 journals)
    - JUDAIC (22 journals)
    - OTHER DENOMINATIONS AND SECTS (4 journals)
    - PROTESTANT (22 journals)
    - RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (500 journals)
    - ROMAN CATHOLIC (32 journals)

HINDU (6 journals)

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 Journals sorted alphabetically
Electronic Journal of Vedic Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Dharma Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Religions of South Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
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HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 18.207.129.175
 
Home (Search)
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JournalTOCs © 2009-