Subjects -> RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (Total: 749 journals)
    - BUDDHIST (14 journals)
    - EASTERN ORTHODOX (1 journals)
    - HINDU (6 journals)
    - ISLAMIC (148 journals)
    - JUDAIC (22 journals)
    - OTHER DENOMINATIONS AND SECTS (4 journals)
    - PROTESTANT (22 journals)
    - RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (500 journals)
    - ROMAN CATHOLIC (32 journals)

HINDU (6 journals)

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 Journals sorted alphabetically
Electronic Journal of Vedic Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Dharma Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Religions of South Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Religions of South Asia
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.1
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1751-2689 - ISSN (Online) 1751-2697
Published by Equinox Publishing Homepage  [44 journals]
  • Editorial

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      Authors: Dermot Killingley, Anna King, Karen O’Brien-Kop
      Pages: 115– - 115–
      PubDate: 2023-09-03
      DOI: 10.1558/rosa.26587
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Gayatri in the Modern Era

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      Authors: Neil Dalal
      Pages: 118– - 118–
      Abstract: The Gayatri is a ubiquitous Vedic verbal ritual formula (mantra) in Brahmanical traditions and the modern period of Hinduism. This essay traces the Gayatri’s changing theological backgrounds, ritual contexts and political uses in the modern period. It seeks to understand the history of the Gayatri’s transformations in modern India, and questions how the Gayatri transitioned from a private initiation ritual in Vedic Brahmanical culture to a popular public mantra. Hindu reform movements at the turn of the twentieth century provide important clues for how the mantra may have become more public, particularly through reconversion rituals (suddhis) to Hinduism regardless of gender, religion, or caste. Reconversion rituals contributed to removing the Gayatri from the jurisdiction of orthodox Brahmanical authorities, and transformed it from a central symbol of twice-born Vedic identity into a broader symbol of Hindu identity. In some cases, the Gayatri is now universalized as a secular mantra in India, though one that maintains tacit Hindu or Indian nationalist identities.
      PubDate: 2023-09-03
      DOI: 10.1558/rosa.23214
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Freedom from the world and freedom in the worlds

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      Authors: Dermot Killingley
      Pages: 138– - 138–
      Abstract: Interpretation of the UpaniSads has occupied scholars from ancient times to the present, and ancient interpretations have influenced modern scholars even if they are not committed to any Vedantic school. This article looks at the history of interpretation of Katha Upanisad 6.4, which speaks of embodiment in worlds after death. Because such embodiment seems contrary to received ideas, this verse has been subject to conjectural emendations, or to interpretations which are difficult to reconcile with the text. The article looks at earlier Vedic ideas about existence after death, and some later ideas, and attempts to show that the apparent meaning of the verse is consistent with such ideas.
      PubDate: 2023-09-03
      DOI: 10.1558/rosa.24256
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Visnu’s Cakra as Narrative Weapon in the Skandapurana

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      Authors: Sanne Dokter-Mersch
      Pages: 164– - 164–
      Abstract: The Skandapurana is one of the earliest Puranas, with a strong Saiva message throughout the entire text. It promotes devotion to Siva and narrates stories about Siva, his relatives and followers. It does not, however, deny other gods. At least six narratives concern Visnu and his deeds. Three of these are manifestation myths, narrating Visnu’s conquest of the Asuras. For its retellings, such as Visnu’s manifestation myths, the Skandapurana combines known narrative elements with new characterizations, features and scenes. This is not only observable in the stories as a whole, but also on the level of narrative details. In this article, I will show this by studying one of Visnu’s primary weapons, the cakra, ‘discus’. The description of the cakra sometimes agrees with those in other texts, such as its fiery appearance and its quality of returning to its owner. At the same time, there are various new characterizations, for example the fact that it originally belongs to or comes from Siva. With the help of a theory referred to as narrative consistency, I will explore the reasons behind the inclusion of known elements and the introduction of new elements, as well as the reasons behind a combination of the two.
      PubDate: 2023-09-03
      DOI: 10.1558/rosa.22984
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Vernacularizing Jainism

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      Authors: Heleen De Jonckheere
      Pages: 183– - 183–
      Abstract: This article argues that the religious and social developments of seventeenth-century Jain communities in northern India can be characterized as vernacularization. This is a process in which religious expression turns towards the quotidian, the local and the practical, and is strongly intertwined with vernacular literature and art. The article makes its argument by discussing the Dharmapariksa-bhasa by the Digambara author Manohardas (seventeenth century). This so-far unstudied text is an Old Hindi version of Amitagati’s Sanskrit Dharmapariksa (eleventh century) which criticizes by means of comical narration Brahmanical myths and beliefs. Presenting selections from this text, the article will highlight the intricate ways by which Manohardas’s bhasa reframes the Dharmapariksa to express the complexity that is vernacular Jainism. This involves emphasizing the spiritual-mystical interpretation of Jainism that was in vogue, but also drawing attention to the religious praxis of Jains and their others. The transposition into the northern Indian vernacular idiom suggests the role literary language played in vernacularizing Jainism. The discussions in the article present a Jainism that, while reflecting on its own tradition, defines itself in terms of the everyday regional religious environment of northern India.
      PubDate: 2023-09-03
      DOI: 10.1558/rosa.23301
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Alchemical Metaphors and their Yogic Interpretations in Selected Passages
           of the Tamil Siddha Literature

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      Authors: Ilona Kędzia-Warych
      Pages: 205– - 205–
      Abstract: In the Tamil siddha texts, the passages on yoga frequently interlace with teachings on alchemy. The texts on these domains of the traditional siddha knowledge are often composed in a deliberately ambiguous and obscure manner, which results from the use of various strategies, such as wordplay riddles, metaphors, ellipses and vague technical vocabulary. In this article, I examine ambiguous passages in the alchemical literature of the Siddhars which, apart from their literal, alchemical meaning, can be also interpreted as metaphorical allusions to yogic practices and concepts. I concentrate mostly on the literature ascribed to Siddhar Yakopu, tentatively dated to the seventeenth century. I analyse several instances of equivocal verses and consider the possible role of the obscure passages. I study the intertwined alchemical and yogic discourse and I reflect on the siddha understanding of matter.
      PubDate: 2023-09-03
      DOI: 10.1558/rosa.25165
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Bhakti and Power: Debating India’s Religion of the Heart, edited by John
           Stratton Hawley, Christian Lee Novetzke and Swapna Sharma

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      Authors: Dermot Killingley
      Pages: 226– - 226–
      Abstract: Bhakti and Power: Debating India’s Religion of the Heart, edited by John Stratton Hawley, Christian Lee Novetzke and Swapna Sharma. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press, 2019. xii + 255 pp. ISBN 9780295745503 (pb).
      PubDate: 2023-09-03
      DOI: 10.1558/rosa.26588
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Many Buddhas, One Buddha: A Study and Translation of Avadanasataka
           1–40, by Naomi Appleton

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      Authors: Nathan McGovern
      Pages: 230– - 230–
      Abstract: Many Buddhas, One Buddha: A Study and Translation of Avadanasataka 1–40, by Naomi Appleton. Sheffield: Equinox, 2020. x + 245 pp., £75 (hb), £26.95 (pb or ebook). ISBN 9781781798966 (hb), 9781781798973 (pb), 9781781798980 (ePDF).
      PubDate: 2023-09-03
      DOI: 10.1558/rosa.26589
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • The Hagiographer and the Avatar: The Life and Works of Narayan Kasturi, by
           Antonio Rigopoulos

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      Authors: Robin Rinehart
      Pages: 232– - 232–
      Abstract: The Hagiographer and the Avatar: The Life and Works of Narayan Kasturi, by Antonio Rigopoulos. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2021. xxv + 499 pp., £75 (hb), £25 (pb). ISBN 978-1-4384-8229-3 (hb), 978-1-4384-8228-6 (pb).
      PubDate: 2023-09-03
      DOI: 10.1558/rosa.26590
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Creating the Universe: Depictions of the Cosmos in Himalayan Buddhism, by
           Eric Huntington

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      Authors: Geoffrey Samuel
      Pages: 234– - 234–
      Abstract: Creating the Universe: Depictions of the Cosmos in Himalayan Buddhism, by Eric Huntington. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2019. xx + 283 pp., $65 (hb). ISBN: 9780295744063.
      PubDate: 2023-09-03
      DOI: 10.1558/rosa.26591
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Guest Editorial

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      Authors: Elisa Freschi
      Pages: 1 - 5
      Keywords: Guest Editorial ; How to Change Law in Classical India

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        Authors: Patrick Olivelle
        Pages: 6 - 22
        Abstract: In his celebrated book The Concept of Law, H. L. A. Hart posits three secondary rules in a legal system: recognition, change, and adjudication. In this paper, I look at the second category: the means provided within the Indian legal system by which laws, in this case dharma, can be changed. The category of recognition provides us with means of knowing what the laws are. In modern systems, this is done through the passage of laws in a duly constituted legislature. The ancient Indian system did not have a provision for a legislative body. Instead, law as dharma was to be discovered rather than enacted: it was thought to be found in the Veda (vedamulatva concept) and, secondarily, in the texts known as smrtis. Law is thus eternal and, in theory, immutable; it cannot be changed. But, in spite of the theory, society and culture do change and demand laws that reflect those changes. The hermeneutical tradition of India provided means by which such change, foreclosed de jure, could be enacted de facto. This paper will analyse several of these techniques, including the yuga theory, the dharma of smaller social and geographical units, and, quite interestingly, the opprobrium of the people
        (lokavidvista).
        Keywords: Articles ; Sex with Purpose

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          Authors: Donald R Davis; Jr
          Pages: 23 - 43
          Abstract: In this essay, the relationship between Mimamsa hermeneutics and Dharmasastra rules is explored through the topic of marital intercourse. The physical act of sex between married partners at prescribed times is viewed as an essential step in a ritualized understanding of the higher religious purposes or goals of intercourse. The transformation of ordinary actions into religiously purposeful actions though rules and restrictions is characteristic not only of Hindu legal thought, but also of legal rules everywhere. This small example, therefore, contains a wider lesson about the aspirations of law beyond mere social order.
          Keywords: Articles ; The Brahmin Felon and the Wise Thief

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            Authors: Timothy Lubin
            Pages: 44 - 63
            Abstract: I begin by analysing Mimamsa hermeneutics as employed in Visvarupa’s and Vijñanesvara’s commentaries on Yajñavalkya Dharmasastra 2.21, which proclaims principles for dealing with conflicts of smrti-rules, taking as an illustration the problem of self-defence against a Brahmin attacker (quoting Manava Dharmasastra 8.348–51). I then examine Bharuci’s and Medhatithi’s arguments on Manava Dharmasastra 8.314–18 (the example of the ‘wise thief’ who seeks the king’s punishment as a penance). The commentators situate the legality of the king’s interests and judicial authority in relation to Veda-based, otherworldly considerations such as sin and expiation. Punishments and penances serve different purposes, are prescribed by different authorities, and occupy distinct sections in textual sources. The case of the Brahmin felon strains the distinction: it asserts that even a Brahmin (otherwise exempt from capital punishment) may be killed if engaged in the worst crimes, but this conflicts with the rules requiring expiation for killing a Brahmin. The ‘wise thief’ is the contrived exception that proves the rule that punishment and penance are distinct; the efficacy of the act hinges on the wrong-doer’s initiative, so that the king-executioner is more instrument than agent of purification, and at his own spiritual peril. The commentators discuss these cases in terms of the relation between Dharmasastra and Arthasastra, subordinating the latter to the former.
            Keywords: Articles ; Getting into the mind of Medhatithi

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              Authors: Elisa Freschi
              Pages: 64 - 76
              Abstract: This paper analyses Medhatithi’s discussion of corporal punishment, with special reference to the debate staged in his commentary on MDh 8.318. His arguments are extremely sophisticated, especially because of the application of Mimamsa-influenced reasoning rules. The paper makes implicit steps and unspoken hypotheses explicit and highlights the selection process through which Medhatithi finally selects one solution to the controversy he examines over the others. For some instances of possible candidates: Is analogical reasoning able to provide stronger support than, for example, authoritative statements' What role does inner consistency play' Which criterion wins in case of conflicts among different textual passages' To test the inner-consistency criterion, the paper tackles the issue of corporal punishment as discussed in different contexts and tries to solve the seeming clashes that arise when different texts by Medhatithi are juxtaposed. It concludes by seeing Medhatithi’s commentary on MDh 8.318 as the culmination of a systematisation attempt regarding all cases of corporal punishment as distinctly ordained based on the purpose to be achieved.
              Keywords: Articles ; Asvatantra

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                Authors: Madhulika Chebrol
                Pages: 77 - 102
                Abstract: Traditionally considered timeless and static, dharma is necessarily rooted in the customs of people and, therefore, a function of changing times and beliefs. The purpose of this paper is to analyse how medieval Brahmanical scholars understood, justified, and interpreted dharma within the scholastic tradition and whether it was possible to reinterpret various prescriptive rules to suit the social milieu of their times. These reinterpretations, if they can be sufficiently attested through scholarship, must have their roots in historical realities. Whether the tradition wishes to accommodate change or resist it, scholarly readings and commentaries provide a valuable insight into how law was read and interpreted by the Brahmanical scholastic tradition. This paper studies the dharmic norms relating to the dependence (asvatantrya) of women as interpreted by the tenth-century commentator Medhatithi, writing on the Manavadharmasastra. Medhatithi’s lengthy commentary on controversial points suggests a vibrant scholastic debate in which interpretations varied and certain historical realities had been taken into account.
                Keywords: Articles ; Editorial

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                  Authors: Karen O’Brien-Kop
                  Pages: 239 - 240
                  Keywords: Editorial ; When Your Desire Defines the Path

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                    Authors: Manasicha Akepiyapornchai
                    Pages: 241 - 257
                    Abstract: How does one attain spiritual liberation' What are the most important conditions' In this paper, I investigate a person’s mental condition in the soteriological process. Given the Srivaisnava belief that one can reach liberation only after death, the desire to continue or end the present life conditions how and when one attains liberation. To elaborate, those who desire liberation through surrendering their agency and possessions to God, i.e. Visnu, can be divided into two groups: (1) those who are so afflicted that they cannot bear to delay attaining liberation; and (2) those who are sufficiently content to wait to reach liberation later, at the end of their lives. This paper explores the difference in the medieval Srivaisnava intellectuals’ discussions of this dichotomy in the Sanskrit and Manipravalam (hybrid Tamil-Sanskrit) theological treatises of Vatsya Varadaguru (c.1165–1200 to 1277 ce) and Periyavaccan Pillai (c.1167 to 1262 ce). I argue that the varying ways that Srivaisnava theologians engaged with this dichotomy were modelled on their views of self-surrender. Finally, attention to this dichotomy was soon less dynamic by the time of a devoted successor of both authors and a great expounder of self-surrender, Vedantadesika or Venkatanatha (c.1268 to 1369 ce).
                    Keywords: Articles ; The Embodied One

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                      Authors: Dhruv Raj Nagar
                      Pages: 258 - 278
                      Abstract: Advaita Vedanta is often approached as a philosophy of non-dualism. However, I show that approaching the tradition as a Sariraka Mamamsa, a hermeneutics of embodiment, better captures some of its core concerns. On this account, the Upanisads are primarily invested in clarifying the complex dynamics of human embodiment and the self’s immersion in various domains of
                      materiality. To this extent, Advaita is well-placed to make unique interventions in the materialist turn in philosophy and religion, articulating a coherent discourse of embodied experience and pedagogy. Thus while the Vedantic project may be framed in terms of God or Brahman as its hermeneutic centre, it is the unfoldment of the nature of the saririn, the embodied, that drives the project at the first place. This requires discerning superimposed layers of identity (adhyasa), exfoliating each to arrive at the embodied one beneath the self’s embodying environs. This is not a negative process of withdrawing an ‘authentic’ self from its material or psychic entanglements, that is, desuperimposition (apavada). Rather, Advaitic method enjoins an embrace of the self’s immersion in its bodily environs, opening the phenomenal landscape of consciousness to hitherto unrecognized domains of phenomenal being submerged beneath conscious awareness. This is an expansive process that recalibrates one’s sense of self preparing it for more subtle forms of discernment in a graded phenomenal itinerary. I distinguish between two terms, adhyasa and adhyaropa, that, while mapping the same dynamics of embodiment, deploy it along different ends. Failure to appreciate this can obscure the precise work done by deliberate superimposition (adhyaropa) in Advaita.
                      Keywords: Articles ; Thirst, Rain, Severed Heads and Magical Fluids

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                        Authors: Brenda E F Beck
                        Pages: 279 - 300
                        Abstract: This essay studies a South Asian folk epic and searches for its basic, inner message. Suffering, penance and the power of blood are core themes. The main metaphors used refer to drought and the heat generated by personal struggle. But heat releases new life, just as a hot sun engenders rain. The story features a severed animal head that the goddess Bhudevi then transforms into a cosmic seed, birthing a fresh new yuga cycle. The same folk epic also highlights human blood, that when spilt, transfers life-power to the earth. Animal and human lives are both implicated, with fresh pregnancies after long periods of infertility being a key outcome. A second key message emerges from the actions of Lord Vishnu near the end of the story. The ocean of the sky contains amrita or soma, an elixir
                        that can extend or renew life. But earth-bound adversaries must learn to work together to release it. Cutting down trees and killing enemies to advance the wealth of ploughmen (human rulers), while indigenous craftsmen and hunters (asuras) suffer, invites drought and infertility, on both sides. Tolerance and respect are what bring down the rain, abundance and the renewal of life for all.
                        Keywords: Articles ; Restraining the Senses and Relations of Care

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                          Authors: Caley Charles Smith
                          Pages: 301 - 322
                          Abstract: This article puts late Vedic ritual and the renouncer and householder traditions of early South Asia into dialogue in a new way, by thinking about restraining the senses through the etic lens of regimes of care. Guiding questions in this study are: (1) How do regimes of care help us understand the conceptual interface of violence, restraint, purity and community' (2) How do shifting relations of care help us understand conceptual change over time' Finally, (3) how does conceptual change help us speculate productively about changes in relations of care' The clear thematic bifurcation in the texts will recapitulate what Nathan McGovern has termed a ‘broad, trans-sectarian tension between renunciate and householder lifestyles’.
                          Keywords: Articles ; Sallekhana and the End-of-Life Option of Voluntary Stopping of Eating and
                                 Drinking

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                            Authors: Claire Maes
                            Pages: 323 - 350
                            Abstract: This article brings sallekhana, the Jain practice of fasting to death, into conversation with the practice of ‘voluntary stopping of eating and drinking’ (VSED), an end-of-life option, available in various countries for competent adults, to hasten the end of life by consciously choosing to not eat and drink. From a medical and legal point of view sallekhana can be considered a form of VSED. Although differing in terms of intent and historical context, the two practices are similar insofar that they relate to capable and sound individuals who voluntarily forego food and water until death. Showing the critical similarity between VSED and sallekhana, I argue that the grounds put forward by major medical associations and legal societies to differentiate VSED from suicide are equally applicable to the case of sallekhana. I contend that the Jain fast needs to be disentangled from the concept of suicide based on the quality of intent, but also because the process is, in theory and for some time at least, reversible, supported by loved ones and members of the larger Jain community, and dependent on the individual’s continuous and prolonged will of renouncing food and water. I also show how medical and legal authorities defend an individual’s right to VSED based on the principles of self-determination, bodily integrity, self-ownership, and respect for persons. I put forward the view to take these ethical principles into account to legally protect a Jain’s right to take the vow of sallekhana.
                            Keywords: Articles ; Buddhism in 5 Minutes, edited by Elizabeth J. Harris

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                              Authors: Paul Fuller
                              Pages: 351 - 353
                              Abstract: Buddhism in 5 Minutes, edited by Elizabeth J. Harris. Sheffield: Equinox, 2021. xiv + 390 pp., £70 (hbk), £24.95 (pbk). ISBN 9781800500891 (hbk), 9781800500907 (pbk).
                              Keywords: Book Reviews ; Mobilising Krishna’s World: The Writings of Prince Savant Singh of
                                     Kishangarh, by Heidi R. M. Pauwels

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                                Authors: Rembert Lutjeharms
                                Pages: 354 - 357
                                Abstract: Mobilising Krishna’s World: The Writings of Prince Savant Singh of Kishangarh, by Heidi R. M. Pauwels. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2017. xvi + 262 pp. $30 (pb). ISBN 9780295742236.
                                Keywords: Book Reviews ; Exploring Hindu Philosophy, by Ankur Barua

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                                  Authors: Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad
                                  Pages: 358 - 360
                                  Abstract: Exploring Hindu Philosophy, by Ankur Barua. Sheffield: Equinox, 2023. xi + 183 pp., £22.95 (pb). ISBN 9781800502697 (hb), 9781800502703 (pb).
                                  Keywords: Book Reviews ; Three Early Mahayana Treatises from Gandhara: Bajuar Kharosthi Fragments
                                         4, 6, and 11, by Andrea Schlosser

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                                    Authors: Jonathan Silk
                                    Pages: 361 - 363
                                    Abstract: Three Early Mahayana Treatises from Gandhara: Bajuar Kharosthi Fragments 4, 6, and 11, by Andrea Schlosser. Gandharan Buddhist Texts, 7. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press, 2022. xx + 317 pp., 15 colour plates, 33 figures. $85. ISBN 9780295750736.
                                    Keywords: Book Reviews ;
                                     
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  Subjects -> RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (Total: 749 journals)
    - BUDDHIST (14 journals)
    - EASTERN ORTHODOX (1 journals)
    - HINDU (6 journals)
    - ISLAMIC (148 journals)
    - JUDAIC (22 journals)
    - OTHER DENOMINATIONS AND SECTS (4 journals)
    - PROTESTANT (22 journals)
    - RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (500 journals)
    - ROMAN CATHOLIC (32 journals)

HINDU (6 journals)

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 Journals sorted alphabetically
Electronic Journal of Vedic Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Dharma Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Religions of South Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
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JournalTOCs
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Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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