Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)

Showing 1 - 59 of 59 Journals sorted alphabetically
AAS Open Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AbeÁfrica : Revista da Associação Brasileira de Estudos Africanos     Open Access  
África     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Africa Renewal     Free   (Followers: 13)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
African Anthropologist     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
African Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
African Journal of History and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Social Science Review     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Afrika Focus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afrique : Archéologie & Arts     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Afrique contemporaine : La revue de l'Afrique et du développement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Afriques     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afro Eurasian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annales islamologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annali Sezione Orientale     Hybrid Journal  
Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Estudos Africanos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of African Studies / La Revue canadienne des études africaines     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Journal of African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
CONTRA : RELATOS desde el Sur     Open Access  
Critical African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Critical Interventions : Journal of African Art History and Visual Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dotawo : A Journal of Nubian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Eastern African Literary and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Inkanyiso : Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Islamic Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of African American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of African Cinemas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Conflicts and Peace Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Africana Religions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Egyptian History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of History and Diplomatic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Namibian Studies : History Politics Culture     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Natal and Zulu History     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Retracing Africa     Open Access  
Journal of the Indian Ocean Region     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Musical Arts in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Kronos : Southern African Histories     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Lagos Historical Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Les Cahiers d’Afrique de l’Est     Open Access  
Libyan Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nordic Journal of African Studies     Open Access  
Philosophia Africana     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research in Sierra Leone Studies : Weave     Open Access  
Revista Eletrônica Discente História.com     Open Access  
Settler Colonial Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Studi Magrebini : North African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Studia Orientalia Electronica     Open Access  
Thought and Practice : A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya     Open Access  
University of Mauritius Research Journal     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
African Archaeological Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.862
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1572-9842 - ISSN (Online) 0263-0338
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Aspects of Zulu Ceramic Traditions in the Upper and Lower uThukela Basin,
           KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract In southern Africa and elsewhere, the archaeological study of ceramics largely relies on two approaches that tend to be treated separately: technology and style. While the emphasis of Iron Age archaeology has been on the range of shapes and decorative characteristics of pots and how these are determined or illustrative of cultural identities, little is known about the technological processes of ceramic production. This article uses ethnoarchaeological methods to examine the chaine operatories of ceramic production in specific sociocultural contexts among the Nguni-speaking (Zulu) peoples in the Upper and Lower uThukela Basins in KwaZulu-Natal. The study focuses on social and technical decisions for ceramic production and documents production stages and attributes, design, style, and functional components. Moreover, the social characteristics of production stages are used to understand various techniques, processes, tools, and materials involved in ceramic production, including distribution and apprenticeship. The social and operational attributes of ceramic production discussed in this article are potential sources for developing models that would bridge the gaps between the technology and style approaches in the archaeological study of Iron Age ceramics in southern Africa.
      PubDate: 2023-01-27
       
  • Barbara Frank: Griot Potters of the Folona: The History of an African
           Ceramic Tradition

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      PubDate: 2023-01-17
       
  • Lotfi Belhouchet: Du Capsien Chasseur au Capsien Pasteur. Pour un Modèle
           Régional de Néolithisation

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      PubDate: 2023-01-14
       
  • Networked Farmers, Ancestral Rituals, Regional Marketplaces, and Salt: New
           Insights into the Complexity of First Millennium BC/AD Farming Societies
           in West Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract In West Africa, there is a disjuncture between historical processes in the second millennium BC and late first millennium AD due to a comparative lack of archaeological data. In the Mouhoun Bend of western Burkina Faso, recent research has found that beginning in the second quarter of the first millennium BC, a landscape emerged of dispersed agricultural homesteads spaced 1–3 km apart. This paper synthesizes published data from the basal levels (Yellow I subphase) of the site of Kirikongo, adds new survey and excavation data from three sites identified by the Kirikongo Regional Project, and integrates data from previous archaeological research in the region. During Yellow I, Mouhoun Bend residents lived in economically generalized multi-family houses that produced their own material culture (ceramics, iron), farmed, kept domestic animals, fished, hunted, and managed wild plants. Funerary rituals involved the creation of earthen structures and the ritualized deposition of material culture and food remains in pits or concavities. Comparing these sites with contemporary and earlier communities in the region including Kintampo, Rim, and Jenne-jeno, we argue that West Africa from the second millennium BC through the early first millennium AD was home to a complex and culturally diverse interconnected network of dispersed farming societies. The capillary network they created facilitated broader trade and exchange including transfers of technologies and new economic resources throughout the region. The emergence of early marketplace centers was supported by and served these networks and may have been linked to mineral salt production and/or exchange.
      PubDate: 2023-01-05
       
  • The Urban Biography of a Mauritanian City: Microstratigraphic Analysis of
           the Eastern Quarter of Tamuda (Morocco)

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      Abstract: Abstract The lack of vertical stratigraphic sondages and open area excavations constitutes a challenge to understanding Mauritanian urbanism. This makes the characterization of the spatio-temporal evolution of Mauritanian towns a difficult task. Systematic excavations carried out in Tamuda by several research teams in the twentieth century provided vertical and horizontal views of Mauritanian urbanism. Our study offers, for the first time, a high-resolution geoarchaeological analysis of Tamuda’s urban sequence (third through first century BC). The microfacies analysis, by means of micromorphology and µ-XRF of Spaces E18 and E20 of the Eastern Quarter revealed a complex interaction of deposits and site formation processes that resulted from changes in everyday urban life. In this respect, the overlap of different construction phases and the alternation of episodes of active use and abandonment is highly significant. This study examines the functional characterization of urban spaces, including the identification of midden activities, a roasting pit, and a milling site (possibly) linked to fish flour production. These activities leave traces on beaten floors and occupation surfaces, and several features indicate abandonment periods between short-term occupations. The result is a complex urban biography of this Mauritanian town, in which human occupation was not constant over time.
      PubDate: 2022-12-30
       
  • Kom W and Z Basin: Surface Artifact Collection, Culture History, and the
           Argument Over Village Occupation

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      Abstract: Abstract Kom W, a Neolithic site on the north shore of Lake Qarun in the Fayum in the Western Desert of northern Egypt, is well known for the excavation by the British archaeologist Gertrude Caton-Thompson in the early twentieth century. Since then, scholars have repeatedly investigated Kom W, and new information and interpretations about the site have been published. This article aims to throw light on the neglected aspects of Kom W. It will first provide an overview of the research history of Kom W and its surrounding area and the culture history of the prehistoric Fayum. This broad context is necessary for the interpretation of how Kom W and its surrounding area were inhabited in the past. It will then reconsider Kom W and its surrounding area on the basis of research on Caton-Thompson’s lithic finds, which were only partially published by her and are presently housed in museums in the UK. Finally, the article will address some of the arguments and misrepresentations in a recent publication by J. Emmitt and colleagues (Emmitt et al., 2021).
      PubDate: 2022-12-22
       
  • John W. Arthur: Beer: A Global Journey Through the Past and Present

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      PubDate: 2022-12-21
       
  • African Farmers, Not Stone Age Foragers: Reassessment of Human Remains
           from the Mumbwa Caves, Zambia

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      Abstract: Abstract In this article, we reassess the human remains from the Mumbwa Caves housed in the Raymond A. Dart Archaeological Human Remains Collection at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. Based on new radiocarbon dates from human bone collagen and stable isotope analysis, our results revealed that the poorly preserved remains, comprising mostly crania and teeth, represent at least 16 individuals. Some of them have culturally modified anterior teeth. Enamel hypoplastic lesions were seen in a few individuals, which indicates disease and malnutrition during childhood. Radiocarbon dating revealed that all the individuals were buried at Mumbwa sometime between the late tenth and early twentieth century CE, with most dates clustering between the early sixteenth and the late nineteenth century. With the exception of a single individual who seems to have had a hunter-gatherer/forager diet, the carbon and nitrogen isotope values of others are consistent with what would be expected from a low-trophic farmer diet based on foodplants with C4 photosynthetic pathways. It is, therefore, our contention that, rather than being associated with the Stone Age as previously suggested, these individuals lived in more recent agricultural communities around the Mumbwa Caves.
      PubDate: 2022-12-14
       
  • The Ash Heaps of Kweneng, South Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract Unusually large ash heaps are a remarkable Late Iron Age feature of Kweneng, near Johannesburg. They are not randomly distributed across the site. What can a spatial analysis of their distribution tell us about their significance' Our results show that the prominent ash heaps of Kweneng are principally associated with only one of the three styles of stone-walled architecture found at this site. They also show that the ash heaps were associated with wealth in cattle. Furthermore, there is a clear spatial association with stone-lined avenues or roads, possibly cattle drives. The spatial analysis indicates that the prominent ash heaps of Kweneng were not ordinary household rubbish dumps. We propose that, by the terminal phase of occupation at Kweneng, they had become a significant part of a vast stage where the extraordinary wealth of this Sotho-Tswana city was displayed. Built of a supernaturally potent substance, the prominent ash heaps elevated and displayed the elite of Kweneng along the route of the cattle processions, which daily celebrated the wealth of the polity.
      PubDate: 2022-12-02
       
  • A Contextual Reintegration of Shaw’s 1959–1964 Igbo-Ukwu Excavation
           Sites and Their Material Culture

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper interrogates afresh what the various Igbo-Ukwu site contexts, carefully examined and closely documented by Shaw, represent in terms of depositional history (that is, the sequence and interrelation of events and processes embodied in the archaeologically observable site features). To this end, the paper re-specifies key contextual relationships at the three excavated sites and addresses the time-depth that each series of site contexts represents. It also considers what the spatial and artifactual relationships—both within and between the sites—may reveal about the ordering of settlement locally and regionally. There has been an understandable assumption that there must be more buried bronzes and elaborate artifacts, like those discovered beneath the Anozie family compounds between 1937 and 1964, to be found in the close vicinity and in the broader Igbo-Ukwu area. Although there will undoubtedly be much to discover, including early ceramics, this article concludes that the principal items recovered 50 years ago, and to a degree also their circumstances of deposition, may represent a unique situation and a key juncture in early Igbo history.
      PubDate: 2022-11-30
       
  • Igbo-Ukwu Textiles: AMS Dating and Fiber Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Thurstan Shaw’s excavations at Igbo-Ukwu revealed many artifacts and technologies that remain astonishing, unique, and incompletely understood, both within Africa and more broadly, even after 50 years. Among these are the textiles recovered primarily from Igbo Isaiah, where fragments were preserved by contact with the bronze artifacts gathered in what has been interpreted as a shrine. In the 1960s, an analysis of 20 textile samples was unable to identify the plant fibers used to weave the fabric. In this article, we report the results of new fiber identifications based on the SEM study of two Igbo-Ukwu fabric samples curated by the British Museum. The combination of bast fibers from one or more species of the fig tree (Ficus genus) and leaf fibers from Raphia sp. provides evidence of a complex indigenous weaving technology that has largely disappeared from Africa. An AMS date on one of the samples provides an important new element to our understanding of the culture and chronology of Igbo-Ukwu. A final section positions the Igbo-Ukwu cloth within the known history of textiles in Africa, emphasizing sub-Saharan West Africa over the past two millennia.
      PubDate: 2022-11-29
       
  • A Metallographic Study of Objects and Fragments from the Site of Igbo
           Isaiah, Igbo-Ukwu, Nigeria

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      Abstract: Abstract  This work presents a new analytical and metallographic examination of fragmentary objects and components from Igbo-Ukwu, eastern Nigeria dating to approximately the ninth to twelfth centuries AD. These objects are thought to be part of the early accidental discoveries within the compound of Isaiah Anozie, collected in 1939 by the local District Officer, Frank Carpenter, in Igbo-Ukwu. As such, they pre-date the excavations undertaken by Thurstan Shaw and his team in 1959–1960 and 1964, and therefore have no primary archaeological context. The accidental and excavated finds from the site of Igbo Isaiah formed part of the contents of what is believed to be a storeroom for regalia. Previous analytical and metallographic studies on the copper alloy objects from Igbo-Ukwu have concluded that they were predominantly lost-wax (cire perdue) castings of bronze or leaded bronze. The present study establishes that while some of the fragmentary objects were cast, many of the components of composite objects, including wires, twisted handles, chain links, and bosses (spiral ornaments), had been expertly hammered into shape and annealed. Furthermore, the hammered items tended to be unalloyed copper whereas the cast objects were alloyed metal. This demonstrates that the Igbo-Ukwu smiths were fully aware of the properties of the metals they were using and made careful decisions about the selection of these metals and the choice of techniques used to produce specific objects and/or components. The trace element composition of the pieces indicates that most of the metal is likely to have come from the nearby source at Abakaliki.
      PubDate: 2022-11-29
       
  • Investigating the MIS2 Microlithic Assemblage of Umbeli Belli Rockshelter
           and Its Place Within the Chrono-cultural Sequence of the LSA Along the
           East Coast of Southern Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract South Africa is arguably one of the most studied regions in Stone Age research. There are, however, considerable differences in research intensity with respect to different regions and time periods. While KwaZulu-Natal is an epicenter for Middle Stone Age (MSA) research, the Late Pleistocene LSA record is largely understudied in this region. Here we present a lithic assemblage from the site Umbeli Belli near Scottburgh dated to 17.8 ± 1.5ka BP. The lithic analysis of the GH 3 assemblages revealed both gradual and abrupt changes within this stratigraphic horizon, indicating relatively short-term changes in material cultural traditions. A comparison with other Robberg sites in the wider surroundings highlights the regional variability of the Robberg techno-complex and indicates potential directions for future research.
      PubDate: 2022-11-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s10437-022-09497-3
       
  • Igbo-Ukwu at 50: A Symposium on Recent Archaeological Research and
           Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract As an introduction to several papers from the “Igbo-Ukwu at 50” symposium in September 2021, this article reviews the history of the discoveries and excavations, the early debates over chronology, and more recent research contributions that refine and expand our understanding of this unique site. These include new field investigations at Igbo Ukwu, new radiocarbon dates, textile analysis, chemical analyses of glass, and carnelian beads plus lead isotope analyses of leaded bronze and copper artifacts to identify source areas, and metallographic studies.
      PubDate: 2022-11-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s10437-022-09495-5
       
  • Jean-Paul Ossah Mvondo: L’Archéologie: De la restitution de
           l’histoire à l’émergence de l’Afrique

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      PubDate: 2022-11-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s10437-022-09501-w
       
  • Expanding Space and Time at Igbo-Ukwu: Insights from Recent Fieldwork

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      Abstract: Abstract We present the results of fieldwork conducted at Igbo-Ukwu in 2019 and 2021 aimed at expanding the temporal and spatial record of the ancient settlement. Local participation and public engagement are central to the project, which has yielded a new dataset that enhances our understanding of the archaeological and landscape contexts of Thurstan Shaw’s pioneering investigations. Extending southward by 2 km from the sites of Igbo Richard, Igbo Isaiah, and Igbo Jonah, a large ceramic assemblage of Igbo-Ukwu ware was recovered in four of our five areas of investigation. For the two areas discussed in this article, substantial quantities of cultural materials came from stratified contexts. From these, three radiocarbon dates fall between the end of the ninth and the second half of the thirteenth centuries CE. This article introduces various pilot studies conducted on samples collected from recent excavations. Soil analyses (pH and particle size distribution) indicate the presence of mostly acidic soils and differential preservation potential. Multi-method analysis of pottery from excavated trenches, including multivariate analysis and elemental (pXRF) measurements, recorded similar fabrics but with varying color and chemical compositions. Archaeobotanical analysis on samples from the new excavations reveals the presence of wood charcoal and, for the first time, remains of Vitex sp. and the palm oil tree associated with Igbo-Ukwu cultural deposits. This project has garnered new data on material culture, spatial distribution, subsistence, and environment. Thus, the research has demonstrated that a multi-scaler approach that combines various recovery and analytic methods may provide valuable insights into aspects of Igbo-Ukwu’s past.
      PubDate: 2022-11-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10437-022-09499-1
       
  • Jacques Aymeric Nsangou: Les fortifications endogènes au Sénégal
           Oriental (17ème – 19ème siècle)

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      PubDate: 2022-10-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s10437-022-09498-2
       
  • Abdel Kader Bongo Doyendze: Le Paléolithique du Gabon—Étude des
           industries pré-historiques du Haut-Ogooué

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      PubDate: 2022-10-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s10437-022-09496-4
       
  • The Making of Bikini Glass in Bida, Nigeria: Ethnography, Chemical
           Composition, and Archaeology

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper discusses the process, prospects, and challenges of making bikini glass in Bida (Nupeland), central Nigeria. The Masagá glassmakers of Bida provide the ideal case study for investigating the production of bikini. Nineteenth-century Arab and European writings have described glassmaking in Nupeland; however, with the exception of the study carried out by Peter Robertshaw and his colleagues in 2009, there is no work that identifies the raw materials and formula used to produce bikini glass. Our recent ethnographic work at Bida provided the opportunities to collect raw glass, beads, and unfused raw material for bikini glass as well as vitrified furnace wall fragments for analysis. We present results of binocular observation and chemical compositional analysis conducted on the raw materials, glass products, and furnace remains to understand the mineralogical and chemical characteristics of various materials connected with the production of bikini. From the manufacture of glass to that of glass ornaments, bracelets, and beads, the documentation of the work of Masagá glassmakers provides new data for the history of glass and its techniques. This information is relevant for understanding glassworking in the past. The paper also addresses issues relating to migration, technology transfer, and culture contact between Nupeland and its neighbors in the Lower Niger region. It argues that the investigation of the production of bikini glass in Bida is essential for expanding our knowledge of the archaeology of glassmaking and glassworking in Sub-Saharan Africa and beyond.
      PubDate: 2022-10-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s10437-022-09494-6
       
  • The Politics of Knowledge Production: Training and Practice of
           Archaeological Science in Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract Numerous doctoral degree holders were trained in African archaeometallurgy in the Global North as well as on the African continent. African archaeometallurgy continues to attract a significant number of researchers from Europe and North America. This paper is based on our lived experiences as resident African archaeometallurgists. We argue that out of frustration because of unequal power relations and lack of access to archaeological science laboratories and funding, most African archaeometallurgists are now pursuing other research areas and careers altogether. We propose some solutions to ensure sustainability in the training and practice of archaeological scientists on the African continent. We conclude that African scholars need to develop home-grown and long-term research capacities and strategies.
      PubDate: 2022-09-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s10437-022-09491-9
       
 
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