Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)

Showing 1 - 59 of 59 Journals sorted alphabetically
AAS Open Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AbeÁfrica : Revista da Associação Brasileira de Estudos Africanos     Open Access  
África     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Africa Renewal     Free   (Followers: 13)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
African Anthropologist     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
African Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
African Journal of History and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Social Science Review     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Afrika Focus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afrique : Archéologie & Arts     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Afrique contemporaine : La revue de l'Afrique et du développement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Afriques     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afro Eurasian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annales islamologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annali Sezione Orientale     Hybrid Journal  
Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Estudos Africanos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of African Studies / La Revue canadienne des études africaines     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Journal of African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
CONTRA : RELATOS desde el Sur     Open Access  
Critical African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Critical Interventions : Journal of African Art History and Visual Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dotawo : A Journal of Nubian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Eastern African Literary and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Inkanyiso : Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Islamic Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of African American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of African Cinemas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Conflicts and Peace Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Africana Religions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Egyptian History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of History and Diplomatic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Namibian Studies : History Politics Culture     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Natal and Zulu History     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Retracing Africa     Open Access  
Journal of the Indian Ocean Region     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Musical Arts in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Kronos : Southern African Histories     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Lagos Historical Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Les Cahiers d’Afrique de l’Est     Open Access  
Libyan Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nordic Journal of African Studies     Open Access  
Philosophia Africana     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research in Sierra Leone Studies : Weave     Open Access  
Revista Eletrônica Discente História.com     Open Access  
Settler Colonial Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Studi Magrebini : North African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Studia Orientalia Electronica     Open Access  
Thought and Practice : A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya     Open Access  
University of Mauritius Research Journal     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Lagos Historical Review
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1596-5031
Published by African Journals Online Homepage  [261 journals]
  • Editorial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David Aworawo
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • The ‘Nigerianisation’ of the officer class of Nigeria Police Force: A
           study of the role of Sir C.S.K. Bovell, 1956-1962

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Saheed Balogun Amusa
      Pages: 1 - 20
      Abstract: One of the major events that dominated the history of the Nigeria Police Force (NPF) in the last decade of British rule was the Nigerianisation of its officer ranks. This was necessitated by the fact that the officer ranks of the Force were dominated by expatriate police officers while a majority of Nigerians in the Force belonged to the Non-Commissioned Offices. The imperatives of independence necessitated the Nigerianisation of the officer ranks of the Force in the last years of colonial rule and early postindependence period. During these critical years of decolonisation and the Nigerianisation process, Sir C.S. Kerr Bovell (KCMG) was at the helm of affairs as the Inspector-General of Police (IGP) from 1956 to 1960 when independence was granted and till 1962 when he retired from the Force. His position as the IGP placed him in a crucial position as the originator, implementer and defender of some of the Nigerianisation programmes and schemes which facilitated the rapid promotion of Nigerians into the officer ranks of the NPF between 1956 and 1962, which ultimately led to the emergence of the first indigenous Inspector-General of Police in 1964. This paper examines the major issues and programmes in the Nigerianisation of the officer ranks of the NPF and the roles played by Sir Bovell in the formulation and implementation of these Nigerianisation schemes which led to the rapid promotion of Nigerians into the officer ranks of the NPF. Relying on the analysis of primary documents spiced with relevant information from secondary materials, the paper shows that Sir Bovell, more than any other British IGP of the NPF, contributed immensely to the Nigerianisation of the officer class of the NPF during the decolonisation period. 
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Historicizing a moving target: Lawal’s peregrination on Lagos

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Edmund M. Chilaka
      Pages: 21 - 39
      Abstract: in this paper. At various periods in its history, Lagos was a British colony, a colonial and post-colonial capital of Nigeria, a commercial hub and a melting pot, all of which have excited writers of diverse genres. Currently, Lagos is the largest, fastest-developing megacity in Africa, it is generating even more literary attention because of the ‘Lagos @ 50’ anniversary celebrations. This paper surveys the idiosyncrasy or motivation of the typical writer or researcher of Lagos that is similar or dissimilar with writers of contemporaneous conurbations around the world. The review of Prof. Lawal’s writings offers a unique chance to understand the personal constitution, experience and motivation of the typical writer of Lagos history or society and their empathy with the subject. Using a combination of primary and secondary sources and exclusive interviews with the author, the paper summarizes the works chronologically and assesses the major findings on a subject which can best be described as a moving target. I found the author enraptured with the pace of social change in the city and his
      historicism flowed from cultural affinity and academic specialization in economic history, of which the city is hugely symbolic in the country’s international trade. Specifically, Lawal’s insightful work on street trading was largely prophetic because, as he concluded, the problem has defied public policy controls till the present day. In sum, the review justifies the thesis that writers focusing on cities often connect to perennial social problems as a canvas to express their disciplines.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Inter-group relations among the Esan from the pre- colonial period to 1960

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hysaint Eiguedo-Okoeguale
      Pages: 40 - 56
      Abstract: This essay interrogates inter-group relations among the Esan peoples of Edo State. It becomes necessary because adequate attention to microhistory of this nature is germane to the evolution of credible Nigerian historiography. It argues that the Esan people have close affinities to the Benin, which they see as their ancestral home. Indeed, it takes the Oba of Benin to coronate the reigning sovereigns in Esanland. It also argues that the various traditions of origin of the people demonstrate that the peoples of Esanland migrated from the great Benin Empire. It further argues that cultural festivals played an important role by providing linkages and contacts for the Esan people to be engaged in intergroup relations. The article then established the factors that promoted intergroup relations among the various Esan groups as trade, trade routes, markets, diplomacy, and intermarriages. It also argues that in the pre-colonial era, the various kings were absolute monarchs in theory because they were vested with powers over the life and death of their subjects within their various domains. The study is organized into six parts aside from the introduction and conclusion. The first part examined the traditions of origins as pointers for intergroup relations. The second and third parts focused on the weather, climate, and culture of the people respectively. The fourth part examined political organization, while the fifth part focused on the economic activities of the people. Finally, the sixth discussed the colonial administration of Esanland.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Beyond appearance: The challenges of rethinking governance in
           post-independence Africa

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Olusegun P. Adesanya, Ariyo S. Aboyade
      Pages: 57 - 74
      Abstract: Governance in post-colonial Africa has been challenging. Most of the nationalists and political elites that emerged as leaders of post-colonial African states appeared unready for governance when independence was granted, leaving most of the emergent states in the hand of unprepared leaders who grope in an unfamiliar jungle of Western-styled politics and governance. The consequences of this adventure for the development of post-independence Africa have been grave. Adopting a historical approach and using content analysis, this paper examines the source of problematic governance in post-independence Africa and the challenges to rethinking it. It interrogates measures for liberating African states from the difficulty of reengineering governance. It observes that some common factors mostly celebrated as positively impacting African states, in no small way, serve as limitations to rethinking governance in the continent and concluded that rethinking governance in Africa is not impossible. Some of the encumbrances to rethinking governance are transitory, which would change once the supporting dynamics change.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • The American-Jewish emergency efforts to the Biafran cause

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Uche U. Okonkwo, Ekeleme F. Onyinyechi
      Pages: 75 - 90
      Abstract: The outbreak of the Nigerian Civil War in 1967 challenged the conscience of the world especially the sufferings of the people of Eastern Nigeria. This was especially so with regard to the Federal Government food blockade. At the height of this development, theAmerican Jewish Emergency Efforts to Biafran Reliefwas formed as a way of combating the humanitarian problem during the civil war. This paper evaluates the rationale for the support given by the American–Jewish Association to the Biafran struggle. It relies on the archival material mainly of the Joint Church Aid Archives (JCAA) now made available online and other published secondary material in journals and books using the historical descriptive method of analysis for its interpretation of events.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Government intervention and conflict resolution in the Niger Delta

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Moses Joseph Yakubu, Dafetta Odiri
      Pages: 92 - 107
      Abstract: Since 1960, the Nigerian state has been bedevilled by incessant security threats, which have distorted the drive for nation-building and sustainable development. The insecurity imbroglios, which have manifested in form of an uprising, social instability, election crises, armed conflict, insurgency and terrorism, have significantly defied several government engrained initiatives and/or mechanisms aimed at finding lasting peace. While some palliative measures were successful to a certain extent in some regions or states, the Niger Delta crisis has become almost intractable. The region has continued to be the hotbed of Nigerian oil politics and the cauldron of volatile activities. It is our position in this paper to critically appraise the challenges of governmental interventions in the Niger Delta crisis. While outlining some of the government intervention mechanisms for peaceful resolution of the region’s crisis, the study interrogates the challenges or factors besetting these interventions since independence. It discusses the blueprints for sustainable peace and development in the Niger Delta.In its conclusion, the study establishes that leadership problems and bad governance underpin the intractability of the Niger Delta crisis.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Food Representation in inter-group identity labelling among Nigeria’s
           ethnic nationalities: An analysis of ndi Ofemmanu and aJ’okuta ma
           m’omi labels of the Igbo and Yoruba ethnic groups in Lagos

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cecil T. Clement, Israel A. Saibu
      Pages: 108 - 123
      Abstract: In Lagos, a predominantly Yoruba but highly urbanized city, food- offered by the different cultural groups inhabiting the city-has added to its colour and charm. The Igbo and Yoruba are two of the dominant ethnic groups in Nigeria co-habiting in the city. Years of interactions have led to the use of labels, often derogatory in nature, to describe each other. The Igbo often use the term ndiofemmanu (people of the oily soup), to show the typical lavish use of palm oil in Yoruba culinary techniques. On the other hand, the Yoruba describe the Igbo as aj’okuta ma m’omi (one who eats stone without drinking water), in reference to the texture of the carbohydrate or starchy meal associated with native Igbo soups. This research takes a detailed look at the interactions between the food culture of both the Yoruba and Igbo in Lagos, with a view to understanding the rationale for and impact of the food representations in the aspects of inter-group labelling between the two ethnic groups. The research employs ethnographic methodology, which consists of participant observations, oral interviews with key informants and the use of secondary sources such as books and journal articles. The paper concludes that despite the ethnic labelling through food representation among the two groups in Lagos, integration is smoother among the youth presently in Lagos compared to the older generations in time past.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Improving local products in Tanzania for global market competition: A case
           of Iringa region

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ashura Jackson, Philpo John
      Pages: 124 - 145
      Abstract: This paper explores dominant local products produced by small-scale farmers and entrepreneurs within communities in Iringa region and how the products can be improved upon by rebranding them to meet the global market demands. The study focuses on local products such as Iringa basket, zanthoxylum-chalybeum (mkunungu), tomato, peach fruit, purple passion, pears, mushrooms, and ‘bagia.’ The aim is to unveil challenges that producers face and identify ways that can be adapted to brand the locally produced products in order to win the potential customers in the global market. The study employed qualitative research methods in which farmers, entrepreneurs and agriculture officers in Kilolo, Mufindi and Iringa Municipality were interviewed. A documentary review was also conducted to determine their earnings and their potential customers. The findings showed that the small-scale farmers and entrepreneurs engaged in producing these local products faced several challenges including education about their potential customers, especially at a global scale. Some participants revealed that most customers, who visited them, needed local products which are well packaged. The study also found that these producers had problems understanding what products were high on demand in the global market. They also mentioned that they needed education, financial support to raise their capital and improve their produce. The study, thus, recommends the government to identify these people and extend its support in order for them to increase their produce and improve quality. The improved production of these local products can also add value to the tourism sector in the region. 
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Cybercrime among Africans: A historical overview

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Habeeb Abiodun Sanni, Faruq Idowu Boge
      Pages: 146 - 157
      Abstract: Cybercrime is a major criminal activity in contemporary Africa that has generated much concern and extensive debate. Many Africans fall victim to cybercrimes on regular basis. More so, foreigners (especially Westerners) constitute the major target of some African cybercriminals. Among the factors that promote cyber-criminal activities in Africa is the issue of underdevelopment, which has its roots in the slave trade and colonialism. Another seemingly overlooked excuse for cybercrime is the fact that some of the cybercriminals see internet fraud as vengeance on the West for the prolonged history of injustices on Africa and people of African origins.There is also the factor of greed and the desire for quick wealth. The article examines the interconnections between the rampaging rate of cybercrimes and the issue of underdevelopment. It maintains that vengeance-seeking on the West based on the history of subjugation is one of the excuses held by some African internet fraudsters, although greed is arguably the most important factor. The study adopts the historical analytical approach to data interpretations.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • ECOWAS and the promotion of democracy in Mali, Guinea and the Gambia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Joshua O. Bolarinwa, Adewole A. Adeleke
      Pages: 159 - 176
      Abstract: This paper assesses ECOWAS efforts at promoting democracy and good governance in West Africa. It argues that enforcing the ECOWAS Protocol on Democracy and Good Governance is a step in the right direction, though with some challenges of implementation and election monitoring in some places like Togo, Mali and the Gambia. With these challenges, however, the paper acknowledges the role of ECOWAS in taking the bold step to recognize and help to reclaim Barrow’s mandate as the winner in The Gambia against Yaya Jammeh’s refusal and the successful negotiation of the return to democratic rule in Mali. These are reflections of hope that the ECOWAS would no longer condone unconstitutional takeover of political power anywhere in the sub-region and would continue to ensure that democratic values are established in West Africa against the increasing wave of military interventions and insurgencies. It concludes that, in order for ECOWAS to deepen her efforts at promoting democracy and good governance and forestall recurrence of coups and temptations by politicians to temper with constitutions, a special mechanism to monitor and prevent such with strong political will should be adopted and institutionalized. This will allow member states, especially the citizens to have access to reporting and be able to challenge any anomaly in their countries through the ECOWAS platform.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Industrial and Agricultural Pollution of Waterways in Lagos State

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: George Obioha
      Pages: 178 - 191
      Abstract: There are many causes and sources of pollution of coastal waterways in Lagos State, apart from different domestic and other anthropogenic activities. The industrial and agricultural sectors account for major contamination of water sources in the state. In this paper, I examine the various ways manufacturing industries and agriculture heavily impact waterways in Lagos. The aim of the research is to show that traditional industrial and agricultural practices and activities, as aspects of economic pursuits of the people of Lagos from time immemorial, did not hugely degrade the water environment.However, modern industrial and agricultural practices have contributed immensely to water environment pollution. The paper argues that the types of industries, and the method of farming that existed in the pre-colonial era, varied from what is  in practice and contributed much to the degradation of waterbodies in the state. The work covers the pre-colonial period to the post-colonial. It is significant because it compares the three different periods and argues that colonial and post-colonial periods ushered in modern industrial and agricultural methods that exponentially worsened the degradation of coastal waters in the state. The paper shows how contamination of local waterways can be traced to industries and other polluters and how focusing on these primary causes can be instrumental in reducing the impact of degradation in the coastal environment, thereby improving the livelihood of the inhabitants living in the riparian zones, who depend on coastal resources for their survival. The paper makes recommendations on how pollution of the waterways can be reduced and concludes by highlighting how advanced countries have used modern methods in pollution control and the Polluter-Pay-Principle PPP to check pollution of local waterways.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Pivotal Issues in higher education development in Nigeria: Essays in
           honour of distinguished Professor Peter Okebukola, OFR

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Abel Idowu Olayinka
      Pages: 192 - 195
      Abstract: No abstract
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Nigeria: Culture, Economy And External Relations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Odion M. Osiki
      Pages: 196 - 197
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Singing Yoruba Christianity: Music, Media, and Morality

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Aminat Titilayo Adebayo
      Pages: 198 - 201
      Abstract: No abstract
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.195.196
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-