Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)

Showing 1 - 59 of 59 Journals sorted alphabetically
AAS Open Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AbeÁfrica : Revista da Associação Brasileira de Estudos Africanos     Open Access  
África     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Africa Renewal     Free   (Followers: 13)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
African Anthropologist     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
African Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
African Journal of History and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Social Science Review     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Afrika Focus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afrique : Archéologie & Arts     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Afrique contemporaine : La revue de l'Afrique et du développement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Afriques     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afro Eurasian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annales islamologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annali Sezione Orientale     Hybrid Journal  
Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Estudos Africanos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of African Studies / La Revue canadienne des études africaines     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Journal of African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
CONTRA : RELATOS desde el Sur     Open Access  
Critical African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Critical Interventions : Journal of African Art History and Visual Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dotawo : A Journal of Nubian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Eastern African Literary and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Inkanyiso : Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Islamic Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of African American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of African Cinemas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Conflicts and Peace Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Africana Religions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Egyptian History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of History and Diplomatic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Namibian Studies : History Politics Culture     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Natal and Zulu History     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Retracing Africa     Open Access  
Journal of the Indian Ocean Region     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Musical Arts in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Kronos : Southern African Histories     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Lagos Historical Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Les Cahiers d’Afrique de l’Est     Open Access  
Libyan Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nordic Journal of African Studies     Open Access  
Philosophia Africana     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research in Sierra Leone Studies : Weave     Open Access  
Revista Eletrônica Discente História.com     Open Access  
Settler Colonial Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Studi Magrebini : North African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Studia Orientalia Electronica     Open Access  
Thought and Practice : A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya     Open Access  
University of Mauritius Research Journal     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Kronos : Southern African Histories
Number of Followers: 4  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0259-0190
Published by SciELO Homepage  [688 journals]
  • Contributors

    •  
  • iMpuma-Koloni / Eastern Cape, Part 2

    •  
  • Eroding the Past: A Study of the Approaches of Courts towards Oral and
           Expert Testimony in the Salem Commonage Land Claim

    • Abstract: Since the Restitution of Land Rights Act 22 of 1994 came into operation, courts have come to attach considerable significance to historian expert testimony when ruling on land claims that made it to court. Therefore, a universal approach had to be adopted. Over the years the Supreme Court of Appeal and Constitutional Court have developed tried and tested methodologies to aid the courts in determining the weight and admissibility of a witness' testimony. In the Salem Commonage case, both the Land Claims Court and the majority of the Supreme Court of Appeal deviated from these precedents by adopting arguably a broader interpretation of the Act than intended. The case is unique in the sense that the dispute involves a commonage that was subdivided via a court order in 1940, resulting in the removal of the remaining black African population from that land. The question therefore was whether or not this group of people fulfilled the requirements for a valid claim as set out in the Act. The Land Claims Court and Supreme Court of Appeal felt that it had. The landowners applied for leave to appeal to the Constitutional Court. The application was granted, but in his judgment, Edwin Cameron agreed with the rationale of both courts, and held that there was a valid claim. This was despite the fact that the testimony of the claimants' 'star witness', Msile Nondzube, was heavily criticised by the landowners as well as a Supreme Court of Appeal judge. The Constitutional Court emphasised that the Act was an extraordinary piece of legislation and had to be interpreted in such a way so as to address the injustices of the past. This included provisions of the Act which dealt with how oral and expert evidence would be dealt with.
       
  • Fighting in the Shadow of an Apartheid State: Boxing and Colonialism in
           Zimbabwe

    • Abstract: Boxing was arguably the most popular and controversial sport in colonial Zimbabwe. To tame the sport's violence, which was considered too extreme, colonial officials in Zimbabwe sought guidance and advice from South Africa from the mid-1930s on how best to regulate the sport. South Africa occupied a unique position in this regard, not only because of the relationship it had with colonial Zimbabwe as a neighbouring white settler colony, but also because of how sections of its white settler community responded to the triumphs of Black boxers over white opponents around the world. The colony of South Africa played a significant role in shaping the control of boxing in colonial Zimbabwe. The relationship between the two colonies culminated in the passage of the Boxing and Wrestling Control Act of 1956 in colonial Zimbabwe, an identical version to a similarly named law that South Africa had passed just two years prior.
       
  • Ukusebenza/Ukuphangela: Raiding the Work of the Future

    • Abstract: This paper is not about work or labour itself, and how it changes historically in South Africa (from pastoral, to agricultural and industrial; native labour, wage labour, migrant labour etc.), but about how the meaning of 'work' and 'labour' itself changes. What we want to suggest, is that an 'original' meaning of the tasks/duties associated with 'work' was 'woman': ukusebenza. What men did, does not constitute 'work' but something else entirely: raiding, moving, occasional, going etc.: ukuphangela. It is in the latter term, ukuphangela, that the term 'raid' emerges, and the argument draws on this notion and meaning of raid to underscore the re-thinking of gender, the subject and her relation to work, and history. The paper operates in two registers, focusing on the historic meanings of work and labour in the Eastern Cape and tracing lateral translations of these meanings into East London in the 1950s. It argues that in re-thinking meanings of labour and work through multiple temporalities, and through the contested meanings of the isiXhosa terms ukusebenza and ukuphangela, these word fragments are read as 'entryways to a wordliness' that puts lateral universals and temporalities of work back into circulation. As such, we pose the question rather, following Anne Kelk Mager and Helen Bradford, of whether it is gender (and what it means to be a man or a woman) that is at the forefront not only of class and race struggles, but of what comes to constitute the meaning of 'work', a concept whose provenance and meaning changes, as we have noted, with the making of modernity, industrialisation/capitalism, and the 'Europeanisation' of the world.
       
  • Between Problem and Critique: Whither the Postcolonial'

    • Abstract: This essay seeks to set to work on the question of race and the futures of the postcolonial in post-apartheid South Africa through abiding by the site of the indeterminacy between problem and critique. Arguing that reading, in the robust sense offered by Gayatri Spivak and Stuart Hall, is a necessary and urgent response to the question, the paper examines the interventions of three key figures for thinking radical black thought in our time, namely Achille Mbembe's Critique of Black Reason, Nahum Chandler's X: The Problem of the negro as a Problem for Thought, and Qadri Ismail's Culture and Eurocentrism. Through abiding by the stakes of the work of reading in this conjuncture, I argue that it is through resisting the easy route of cultural and relativized difference that the pedagogical work of reading, and teaching reading, for the future, becomes possible.
       
  • No title

    • Abstract: This essay seeks to set to work on the question of race and the futures of the postcolonial in post-apartheid South Africa through abiding by the site of the indeterminacy between problem and critique. Arguing that reading, in the robust sense offered by Gayatri Spivak and Stuart Hall, is a necessary and urgent response to the question, the paper examines the interventions of three key figures for thinking radical black thought in our time, namely Achille Mbembe's Critique of Black Reason, Nahum Chandler's X: The Problem of the negro as a Problem for Thought, and Qadri Ismail's Culture and Eurocentrism. Through abiding by the stakes of the work of reading in this conjuncture, I argue that it is through resisting the easy route of cultural and relativized difference that the pedagogical work of reading, and teaching reading, for the future, becomes possible.
       
 
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