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  • Examining the relationship between system noise and organisational
           performance in local government in Australia

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e130158
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e130158
      Authors : Barry Hemmings : For local governments in Australia, organisational development represents a significant investment in the improvement of performance. However, organisational development and change practice still experience significant gaps between theory and practice (Luthans 2011), as well as gaps between knowledge of a phenomenon and taking action to change or improve that phenomenon (Ahmadi and Vogel 2019, Luthans 2011, Pfeffer and Sutton 2000). The latter is described in the literature as the knowing-doing gap (Ahmadi and Vogel 2019, Greener 2018, Hulme 2014, Luthans 2011, Pfeffer and Sutton 2000). While the relationship between the knowing-doing gap and organisational performance is (to an extent) implied, less well-defined are the reasons for the presence of the knowing-doing gap. In that, organisational factors surrounding change and development are complex and diverse and require further investigation to better understand how performance improvement activities are affected (Ahmadi and Vogel 2019, Greener 2018, Luthans 2011) (See Fig. 1). Of particular interest is the possibility that more recently developed constructs such as system noise (Kahneman et al. 2021) and choice architecture (Thaler et al. 2014 may explain the presence of the gap and that forecasting skill (Schoemaker and Tetlock 2016, Tetlock and Gardner 2015) may mitigate the effects of noise on performance in local and state governments. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • A study on the Malaysian Education system’s Employability skills

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e130049
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e130049
      Authors : Gandhimathi Krishnappan : IntroductionMalaysia has always struggled with graduate unemployment. Department of Statistics (2023) reports that 71.9% of graduate students are awaiting employment opportunities six months after graduation as of Dec 2022. Basir et al. (2022) says, that employability remains a major concern for all stakeholders, including graduates, higher education providers, industry representatives, and policymakers. He also, says that according to Economic Outlook 2021 of Malaysia, the unemployment rate among graduates has remained stable from 2001 to 2019, with fluctuations ranging from 3.1% to 4.0%. In February 2020, Malaysia had a 3.3% unemployment rate, slightly higher than the previous month's 3.2% Department of Statistics Malaysia (2020, cited in Basir et al. (2022)) Significance / Rational of the StudyThe acquisition of non-technical skills holds immense significance in augmenting the employability prowess of post-millennial graduate students. The current cohort of students demonstrates high levels of engagement and attachment to various social media and online platforms. Consequently, this phenomenon bears consequences for the development of their non-technical skills in a dynamic work setting. The present research seeks to address the existing gaps in previous studies while simultaneously bolstering the current body of knowledge by assimilating the alterations observed in the contemporary educational landscape and the advancements in information and communication technology. The findings of this study will serve as valuable input for policymakers, students, and educators alike, as they work towards enhancing the incorporation of non-technical skills into the existing curriculum.Study ObjectiveDo cognitive skills, and Socio communication skills increase the employability of graduate students'Are graduates aware of the soft skills required for employability'Do the graduate students fulfil employability skills as perceived by employers and Human capital consultants'Research QuestionAre students ready to embark on their journey in the Human Capital market with the required Skills and Competency'HypothesisH1 A relationship exists between Social Communication skills and Graduate Employability.H0 There is no relationship between Social Communication skills and Graduate Employability.Research MethodologyA mixed-method approach with a Convergent Parallel design as depicted below shall be used. The research process can be symbolized as qualitative and quantitative QUAL+QUAN Morse (1991, as cited in Demir and Pismek (2018)).A convergent parallel design involves the simultaneous execution of quantitative and qualitative aspects during a specific stage of the research procedure. The researcher assigns equal importance to both methods, analyzes each component separately, and subsequently integrates the results (Creswell and Plano Clark 2011) (as cited in Demir and Pismek (2018)).Sample / ParticipantsQuantitative: Criterion sampling is used to select an equal number of students (male and female) equal in numbers and simple random sampling will be used to select universities with studies from Arts, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) and Law.Qualitative: Simple random sampling is used to recruit respondents like Employers, Recruitment companies and Human Capital Consultants. Respondents would be from various departments (HR, Hiring Manager, Department Heads and at the Manager level) from each organisation. Interviews and focus groups shall be considered for data collection.Data Collection For the Quantitative study, an Online survey questionnaire with close-ended questions would be administered electronically using tools like SurveyMonkeyTM, or Google Forms. A pilot study would be conducted at my place of work to test the validity of the questionnaire and tool. For the qualitative study, a questionnaire with open-ended questions would be used and data would be collected by interviewing Hiring managers, Human Capital Consultants & HR Managers. AnalysisAll data would be analysed using SPSS. Quantitative study would be analysed using Inferential statistics, Qualitative study would be analysed on Descriptive statistics. Cronbach’s alpha test will be done to test the reliability of the questionnaire. Score between 0.6 to 0.7 which is considered to be an acceptable level of reliability.ConclusionsThe challenges faced by young individuals in securing employment opportunities and the difficulties businesses encounter in finding individuals with the appropriate skills can be attributed to a deficient connection between the realms of education and business operations. Recent research conducted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has outlined the primary forms of collaborations that can be established between educational institutions and industries.First, social partners can assume a formal role in the governance of educational institutions.Second, employers, in conjunction with academic faculty, can actively engage in developing and evaluating educational curricula to ensure alignment with the demands of the labour market.Third, work-based learning, typically formulated in collaboration with social partners, can be integrated into the curricula.This research would help graduates and educators to lay more emphasis on skills that are needed by the business houses and also, change the perspective of business house's expectations from fresh graduates seeking employment in the post covid scenario. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • Exploring Identity and Possible Selves Across Ensemble Musicians

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e129737
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e129737
      Authors : Rebecca Adams, Philip A. Cartwright, Maria Barbolla Zapater : This research reports initial results from a study focused on better understanding the formation of self-identity and possible selves amongst a sample of professional musicians, dancers, and actors of various ages. The study dives deeper into applying the he original concept of possible selves to ensemble musicians.Much literature concerns the development of self-identity and possible selves in adolescents, which is an important foundation for understanding the formation of identity. To dive deeper, this study also includes respondents of middle aged and elder respondents within performing arts. The goal brings insight to how identity evolves throughout the entire lifespan of a performing artist with respect to their own attachment and conviction to the self. A secondary objective is to understand the extent to which perceptions of possible selves changes (typical of adolescents) amongst older respondents. A survey consistent with meeting ethical standards is distributed electronically to a not-publicly available list of professional ensemble musicians, ballet dancers and actors. Twenty-five survey statements are presented in six categories: Association, Emotional Attachment, Conviction, External Factors, Goals and The Ensemble & Me. Five-point Likert scale responses are analyzed using conventional methods (i.e., correlation, cluster and factor analysis). Further, a Musical Identity Measure (MIM) consistent with other researchers is applied to investigate an individual's self-identities and possible selves and consistency relative to the six categories of questions.The authors expect the results will provide insights into respondent self-identity based motivations to engage with performing arts activities and to the extent these activities and associations regulate behavior. Furthermore, identifying areas that require additional support or guidance, and supporting future oriented decision making. The measure may also support educators and researchers to better understand and support processes of development and skill acquisition, while upholding modifications and new investigation into self-identity for performing artists.To access the references mentioned in the full length text please see the document attached titled "Selected References". HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • Neuropedagogy in Higher Education

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e129736
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e129736
      Authors : Anthony Moss-Zobel : The convergence of neuroscience and pedagogy, known as neuroeducation, has sparked significant interest in the field of education since US President George Bush declared the 1990s to be ’The Decade of the Brain'. The purpose of this study is to look into worldwide higher education educators' and administrators' opinions, needs, and potential performance consequences for neuroeducation. The study goes into the complex link between neuroscience research and educational practices.The education community is keen to acquire the neuroscience findings transfer into neuro-methodologies and neuro-didactics that promises to improve learning outcomes. There are several challenges that the education community must be mindful of in pursuing effective evidence-based practices. One is neuromyths, which are misrepresentations or misunderstandings about scientific findings. Second, having a common language that educators, parents, administrators, and policymakers can use to discuss neuroeducation in a meaningful way is necessary. Several keywords are used interchangably such as; neuroeducation, neuropedagogy, educational neuroscience among others which can be confusing. Third, policy decisions must be made based on clear goals and grounded in evidence. Lots of resources are wasted on prescriptive methods that have no connection to any sound research. Fourth, There is evidence of strong interest in how the brain learns and processes information which means that access to evidence-based research findings must be accessible to help decrease misleading and misinformation. Fragkaki et al. 2022 However, the growing interest in the education–brain relationship does not match the proper use of research findings.The research questions attempt to provide answers to the perspectives on neuroeducation and understand the interest and awareness of neuro-methodologies and neuro-didactics in the higher education community. Objectives:1. Perception Analysis: The goal is to identify and analyze worldwide perceptions of neuroeducation among higher education educators, with an emphasis on understanding how these perceptions influence teaching approaches.2. Performance-Oriented Training Needs: To investigate the perceived training needs and wants of higher education instructors and administrators in terms of neuroeducation-based strategies for improving performance outcomes, such as engagement and commitment.3. Neuromyth Impact: This study will look into the knowledge and prevalence of neuromyths among educators, as well as their possible impact on performance-oriented pedagogical practices.Methodology:This study takes a mixed-methods approach, including surveys with Likert scale questions disseminated between May and December 2023. The questionnaire covers five major performance-related areas: communication and emotions, concentration and engagement, didactic methodologies, creativity and critical thinking, and neuroscience and neuropedagogy.Quantitative data will be analyzed using statistical tools, with an emphasis on potential relationships between neuroeducation perceptions and performance outcomes. The thematic investigation will be used for qualitative data, with an emphasis on aspects crucial to performance enhancement.Future Research:This finding sets the path for future research into performance-based neuroeducation. The following research may investigate the efficacy of neuroeducation-based training programs in improving particular performance markers. Longitudinal study can monitor the long-term influence of neuroeducation on instructors' performance-related practices, offering significant insights for ongoing development. Furthermore, investigating the influence of misinformation and disinformation on educators' decision-making processes, as well as the consequent impact on performance, is a viable path for future research.This study adds to the academic discourse on neuroeducation while also providing practical insights to improve instructors' performance, benefiting both higher education institutions and students. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • Post-Conflict Public Sector Projects: Measuring the Performance of
           International Interventions to Ensure Effective Peacebuilding

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e129726
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e129726
      Authors : Mohamad Fadl Harake : With the closing of the Cold War the world faced several wars and conflicts that devasted countries and regions alike. Extioperiences and studies showed that post-conflict countries have a 25% chance of returning to either a partial or full-blown war situation (UNDP 2010). This led to the initian of new approaches to rebuilding war-affected countries – that were spearheaded by either the direct as well as the indirect intervention of international organizations and donor states – whom are considered as "public entrepreneurs’’.International entities’ involvement in post-conflict countries (PCC) have shifted from simple peacekeeping activities and humanitarian aid projects (in some cases) to direct public sector interventionism (Hillman 2013). Such project were justified by a consensus that perceives the failure and weakness of public institutions as the (or at least one of the) main source(s) of conflicts (Collier 2009; The World Bank 2012). This is based on a neoliberal approach that views that if the state is rebuilt, public administration were restored, services were provided equally among citizens, and the economy is developed, then there is no reason to return to a state of war. Hence, to ensure a sustainable peace-base and prevent future conflicts, the international community must rebuild public administrations, ensure the delivery of public services, and review their managerial public model to ensure the provision of services to the deprived communities (Brinkerhoff 2007; Chandy 2011; The World Bank 2011). We can highlight a process of artificial reconstruction of PCCs that is initiated, launched, and financed by international entities, thus, justifying their long-term presence (Ankersen 2008). This is done by intrinsically creating new incentive structures, and by installing public management models capable of collecting and managing public expenditures in a way that is perceived as both efficient and fair by the concerned citizens (Boyce 2007).Thus, such programs and projects gained both legitimacy and credibility both locally internally and by the international community (UN 2012).However, in recent years, experts have considered the neoliberal post-conflict public sector state-building model as being inefficient, ineffective, insufficient, and inappropriate (given its technical limitations) as each country / region has its own environmental specificities (e.g. socio-cultural, historical, anthropological, political, etc.) which can affect the deployment of the new system as is (Blunt and Turner 2005; Narayan and Petesch 2010). Also, several reconstructed public sectors have failed and many post-conflict countries have returned to a state of war.The purpose of this paper is to review the success of the post-conflict public sector reconstruction projects that are both initiated and implemented by international entities. In other words, the aim of the study is to review the post-conflict performance indicators (PCPI) applied to public projects. The idea is to assess the quality of implemented projects to support a successful transition and recovery from conflict, as well as to foster sustainable growth, deprivation reduction and the effective use of development assistance. The PCPI is usually based on multiple technical criteria, reference systems as well as a holistic understanding of the concerned environment’s security, political economic and social spheres.A Lebanese study spanning a network of 14 International organizations is explored via semi-structured interviews. The World Bank’s PCPI framework was used to provide insight into the overall dynamics of performance management and the elaboration of indicators related to public sector projects in a post-conflict environment while considering contextual, environmental, and operational factors. The research is based on a qualitative empirical data specific to Lebanon in terms of PCPI.Key findings revolved around four clusters that are focused on the most relevant issues faced by a post-conflict country when going through a reconstruction phase. The Lebanese example highlights several shortcomings when it comes to both project implementation and outcome :Cluster 01 – Economic Management and Structural policies : Huge failures when it comes to macroeconomic management, non-functioning public administration, failed PPP initiatives, public debt problems (especially when it comes to obtaining regular access to external concessional resources), financial crisis, failed budget administration, and slow incubation of private initiatives and job creation projects, etc.Cluster 02 – Social Inclusion and Human Development : Non serious capacity building as a heavy reliance on INGOs and international interventionism (in terms of resources, capacities, skills, competences, etc.) still exists. Also, rural marginalization (lack of development projects), gender inequality, inequitable access to economic and productive resources, etc.Cluster 03 – Governance : Widespread corruption, failure to deliver public services, lack accountability, absence of transparency, class ruling, conflict of interest, etc.Cluster 04 – Post-Conflict Risk : Lack of security, terror zones, armed militias presence, microstates, de facto parallel illegal systems of ervice provision’’, skirmishes (internal and external), widespread violence and crime, etc. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • Influence of Majority Expatriate National Cultures on the Organizational
           Culture in the UAE Healthcare Sector

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e129721
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e129721
      Authors : JOPHY DEVASIA : Organizational culture is understood to emanate from the management philosophy & leadership vision, along with workforce national culture, individual member’s background, beliefs, aspirations, perceptions & external interactions (Žarkić-Joksimović and Marinković 2018). The workforce composition seen across the Middle East presents a unique scenario deviating from the assumption of a singular core national culture in organizations. Figures available on the public domain indicate 99% expatriate employment in UAE private sector (Kapiszewski 2004) bringing about an amalgamation of cultural traits. The researcher, an HR practitioner, has made observations that expat national groups tend to respond differently on organizational stimuli, leading to investigation of nationality-based affiliation among workforce as well as existence of parallel cultural groups within the organization, focusing on healthcare sector.The research objectives are to review if majority expat national groups deviate from established country specific identifiers, the assessment of majority group behaviour on organizational cultural markers, review of the moderating effect of expat tenure & professional identity on the national cultural values, and to review whether large organizations in the UAE succeed in maintaining a unique organizational cultural identity across facilities, irrespective of employing varied expatriate majorities. Hofstede's Culture Onion Model (Hofstede and Hofstede 2005) is assumed as the base for investigating the research problem. This model ties together the concepts of National & Organizational Culture by linking the Cultural Dimensions Theory (Hofstede 1980) & the Multi-Focus Model on Organizational Culture (Hofstede 1997). Following a quantitative research design undertaken as a cross-sectional study, data collected is analysed for causal relationships. An adapted questionnaire is used, merging the elements of Hofstede's Values Survey Module (Hofstede and Minkov 2013) & the organizational cultural values questionnaire (Hofstede et al. 1990). A pilot study testing internal validity & reliability of the survey tool returned a score of 0.736 establishing acceptable range of internal consistency. The target population of around 2400 employees are considered from two tertiary care hospitals in Abu Dhabi, with different majority expat nationality mix. Sample size of 331 at 95% confidence is assumed using the Krejcie & Morgan table (Krejcie and Morgan 1970). Probability sampling is used to select the sample, with stratified random sampling method to ensure nationality representation proportional to the percentage strength in target population. Survey data generated an aggregate reliability score of 0.836. Hypotheses testing is performed & results further substantiated using Hofstede’s formulae for national cultural dimensions (Hofstede and Minkov 2013). A follow-up study on an independent sample from an acquired business of the entity, is conducted to exalt credibility to the outcomes and establish universality across a wider population. Significant differences among the majority nationalities were observed on multiple national and organizational cultural variables as well as behaviour of varying tenure groups. Majority groups seem to stay true to their nationality behavior irrespective of professional association. The cultural identity at different business units of the organization is observed to align to the majority expatriate nationality mix. Due to low to moderate correlation in hypothesis test results, the researcher has furthered the review of the data by quantifying the national & organizational cultural dimension scores to arrive at inferences. The follow-up study generated results closely aligning with the main study giving a peek into the multinational workforce behavior in a small-scale business. Hofstede’s culture onion model places organizational culture as a set of cultural dimensions which are evolved from the national cultural values, influenced by other factors unique to the organization. Prior studies have reviewed the organizational behavioural identity assuming a uniform core of same nationality workforce. This study was undertaken as a deviation analysis, reviewing how the organizational cultural dimensions would behave on Hofstede’s model, when the original construct is altered with multiple nationality groups at the core. The findings substantiate the criticality of acknowledging nationality based cultural variations present within a majority expat workforce. It reiterates the importance of a concerted management effort to define & develop a unique cultural identity for the organization, as well as the significance of cultural assimilation of expatriates. The results highlight how the organizational culture can be fragmented with the presence of multiple majority nationalities. The study generated valuable insights on the current organizational cultural identity. Increased talent mobility is resulting in workforces around the world soaring in mixed nationality staffing. While existing literature seem to lack in depth review of the cultural imbalances brought about by such workforce changes, the current study offers a unique perspective of how the nationality specific cultural traits are influencing the workforce group behaviour in organizational setting. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • Investigating the Impact of Green R&D, Transformational Leadership, and
           Cross-Cultural Approaches on Performance Management in the Manufacturing
           Sector

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e129588
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e129588
      Authors : Abdullah Hemmet : In the present era, environmental sustainability is a transformative concept that is rapidly penetrating all facets of our lives and professional environments. Belgium focuses on environmental sustainability offers a wide range of green initiatives to sustain its environmental performance. However, the previous research has failed to determine the extent to which Green R & D Investment, Green Transformational Leadership, Green Cross Culture perspective impact the Belgium manufacturing organizations. The main rationale for performing this research was to determine the above green initiative's impact on the Belgium manufacturing organization. For this, a mixed-method approach has been utilized. Data from 254 respondents have been collected. This data was further analyzed through the analyzed the SPSS to perform the quantitative analysis. The results of the quantitative analysis show the Green R & D Investment. Green Transformational Leadership significantly influence green performance management (GPM) since its significance value is less than 0.5. At the same time, the Green Cross Culture Perspective does not pose any impact on GPM since it has a p-value of 0.48. On the other hand, qualitative data was gathered through the focus group interviews. Nine managers have been included in to focus group interview. In the focus group interview, managers depict the all the considered initiatives are vital for their green sustainability. However, green cross-cultural perceptive strategies should be enhanced more and consider both collectivism, and individualism elements for green sustainability. In spite of positive research results, this research also implies that the manufacturing organization in Belgium need to continuously change R&D investment strategies, focus on leader tanning, and increase employee engagement to ensure the successful implementation of green performance management. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • Leveraging Technology and data Analytics in Performance Management- An
           Exploratory Study on its Evolution: the when, now, and hereafter

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e129581
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e129581
      Authors : Rosemary Obi : In the words of Douglas Conant of the Campbell Soup Company, "To win in the marketplace, you must first win the workplace." Embedding performance management as a cultural cornerstone is imperative for any organization aspiring to succeed in the marketplace. Campbell's theory of performance (Campbell 1990) defines performance as behaviors or actions relevant to the organization's goals and measurable in terms of contribution to those goals. These behaviors are distinguished from effectiveness, which is the impact of behaviors on outcomes. Performance management ensures efficiency, effectiveness, and productivity by facilitating planning, monitoring, and evaluating individual and organizational performance to achieve strategic goals. Performance management involves goal setting, feedback, coaching, and evaluation to align employee efforts with strategic goals and foster accountability and continuous improvement. Historically criticized for its rigidity and lack of timeliness, performance management has evolved, propelled by technological advancements and data analytics (Swan 2015). This abstract summarizes the critical role of technology and data analytics in transforming performance management systems. It highlights the shift from traditional methods to modern, agile, and data-driven practices, emphasizing the potential of emerging technologies to revolutionize the field further. The study spotlights the importance of adopting these innovations to enhance managerial effectiveness, employee satisfaction, and organizational competitiveness in the digital age. Despite their limitations, the traditional performance management methods laid the foundation for modern performance management systems.The evolution of performance management from criticized models lacking flexibility to agile, data-driven systems has been facilitated by technology, enabling organizations to access real-time performance data and sophisticated analytics tools for proactive decision-making and personalized feedback (Pulakos et al. 2015). This shift marks a departure from static evaluations to adaptive practices empowered by technological advancements (Buckingham and Goodall 2015). Integrating technology and data analytics has revolutionized performance management, leveraging AI and machine learning to analyze vast datasets and uncover patterns in employee performance (Buckingham and Goodall 2015). These advancements have led to the emergence of performance management software, data analytics tools, real-time feedback platforms, and mobile applications, streamlining processes and fostering continuous improvement (Mone et al. 1998; Stone et al. 2009; Pulakos et al. 2015; Davenport and Harris 2007; Garris et al. 2002). These innovations enable organizations to adopt agile, data-driven, and employee-centric approaches to drive better performance outcomes and gain a competitive advantage in the digital age.Organizations worldwide increasingly turn to digital solutions to streamline processes, improve transparency, and enhance effectiveness in the current performance management landscape. For instance, IBM offers an employee feedback and review application that facilitates 360-degree feedback, allowing employees to provide input to their peers, managers, and subordinates. Airbnb utilizes employee performance management software to facilitate feedback and reviews, fostering a culture of open communication and collaboration. Amazon's performance management philosophy, "radical candor," emphasizes the importance of open, honest, and transparent communication between managers and employees, promoting a workplace performance management culture.The future of performance management holds exciting possibilities with the advent of innovative technologies such as neurotechnology and brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for real-time feedback on cognitive performance, predictive analytics, and machine learning algorithms for forecasting performance trends, genetic testing, and personalized medicine for tailored wellness programs, virtual reality (VR) training simulations for immersive learning experiences, blockchain technology for transparent record-keeping, and quantum computing for complex data analysis. This exploratory study would employ a mixed-methods approach to investigate the impact of technology and data analytics on performance management. Recommendations include adopting performance management as a culture, investing in performance management software, data analytics tools, and real-time feedback platforms, prioritizing data-driven decision-making, and fostering a culture of innovation and agility."By integrating performance management as a cultural cornerstone, organizations can leverage digital innovations to refine and amplify their practices, thus fostering organizational success in an ever-evolving digital landscape." HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • Reimagining Academic Performance Management in the Age of AI

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e129562
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e129562
      Authors : Richard Dare : The university’s initial response to the spectre of artificial intelligence nullifying the efficacy of traditional academic performance assessments may present us with, if the reader will indulge an old chestnut, a case of ‘c’est vouloir prendre des li`evres au son du tambour’. That is to say, the unexpected 2022 arrival of ChatGPT (to say nothing of the progeny rapidly evolving AI systems will likely spawn next) is at this very moment spreading like an intellectual pandemic – whether professors wish to acknowledge its presence or not. As a community dedicated to thoughtful education, this new technology compels us to choose between three entirely distinct strategies: Ignore the impact of large language models on learning and assessment altogether and watch our students’ skills erode – the default non-response if we fail to act; or Fight against the inevitable incursion of cut-and-paste technologies such as ChatGPT by categorising them as forms of plagiarism, banning their use in academia, and trying to identify their offspring so we can apply largely feckless punishments as imagined remedies; or Embrace the new technologies and harness them in ways that radically recast core international educational and assessment practises, making them more suitable for the world in which we actually live. This paper imagines just such a third way. By contextualising technological advances as useful tools that can decolonise ailing education systems, the author imagines new evidence-based teaching and assessment strategies that can challenge students to achieve higher academic standards, making higher education increasingly impactful on the real world. The opportunity, this paper argues, is for international educational systems to ‘go beyond the unknown to meet the known’. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • Is Management by Objectives (MBO) still relevant'

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e129557
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e129557
      Authors : George Kassar : Performance management is “a continuous process of identifying, measuring and developing performance in organizations by linking each individual’s performance and objectives to the organization’s overall mission and goals” (Aguinis 2023). One of the most known strategic approaches within HR and PM practices, is the Management by Objectives (MBO), which can lead to better alignment with organizational goals and improved performance metrics (Schmidt et al. 2017, Farndale and Kelliher 2013).This communication, a hybrid of a literature overview and position paper, will examine the potential relevance of the MBO model - which was popularized by Peter Drucker back in 1954 - today in 2024; after 70 years after its introduction.The MBO model is in fact a strategic management approach mostly based on the collaboration between supervisors and employees in defining clear, measurable, and achievable organizational goals (Drucker 1954) .We will synthesizes various scholarly works to explore how MBO’s fundamental components – goal setting, participatory decision-making, action planning, periodic review, and performance appraisal – continue to positively impact employee behaviour and output in modern performance management practices (George et al. 2021, Starbuck 2017) .This would includes overviewing studies that examines other approaches designed to enhance organizational effectiveness and employee performance, including the Balanced Scorecard introduced by Kaplan and Norton (1998), the concept of 360-degree feedback widely used for their ability to provide comprehensive evaluations (Garavan et al. 1997, Gruman and Saks 2011), as well as Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) introduced at Intel and popularized by Google (Schleicher et al. 2018), along with and Agile Performance Management which combines principles of agility, flexibility, with frequent feedback, and goal-setting (Poister 2010).The aim is to provide a comprehensive understanding of MBO’s legacy and its potential adaptability to modern business challenges and technological advancements so as it aligns with contemporary organizational performance management practices. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • The Implementation of SEO for Local Businesses – an Analyses of
           Event Locations in Berlin

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e129388
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e129388
      Authors : Debby Gaida, Peter Konhaeusner : The rapid evolution of the internet has made search engines an integral part of online navigation. Google, the dominant player in this arena, holds substantial influence over user preferences (Rabe 2023). Securing a high ranking on Google's search results is a coveted advantage for companies, especially regarding the high competition (Erlhofer 2023). This paper delves into the realm of Search Engine Optimization (SEO), specifically tailored to the unique needs of event locations in Berlin. Despite the critical role of SEO in online marketing, there is a noticeable gap in research focusing on its application for the business of event locations (Setiawan et al. 2022, Wiedmann 2018, Zanger and Drengner 2016). The COVID-19 pandemic has emphasized the paramount importance of a robust online presence for event locations. The shift to online and hybrid formats during the crisis underscored the significance of having a well-optimized website (Madray 2020, Zanger 2022). Even post-pandemic, the prevalence of online and hybrid events persists, necessitating effective online marketing strategies. Traditional offline advertising methods are limited in their reach, making online marketing, particularly SEO, a vital component for event locations to attract both local and international audiences (Werner et al. 2022, Zanger 2023).Understanding Google's ranking algorithm is fundamental to effective SEO. The algorithm considers over 200 components which are not specifically communicated directly by the company (Alpar et al. 2015). These can be broadly categorized into on-page and off-page factors. On-page factors involve content relevance, user-friendliness, and adherence to Google's "Core Web Vitals." Off-page factors, such as backlinks from reputable sources, contribute to a website's credibility. Personalization, incorporating user data and behavior, further refines search results (Erlhofer 2023). Basically Google uses the self-developed E-E-A-T principle (Experience, Expertise, Authoritativeness, Trustworthiness) when assessing the quality of a website (Google 2023).The study employs a three-step approach: website selection, SEO scorecard preparation, and result evaluation with SEO experts. The websites of event locations in Berlin used were filtered via the online directory “Eventinc”, whereby the selected filter criteria guarantee comparability of the websites. The self-developed SEO scorecard, incorporating key on-page and off-page factors, is used for evaluation. Experts from the field of SEO and event locations provide insights through interviews, shedding light on the causes of inadequate SEO implementation and the perceived relevance of SEO compared to other marketing elements. The analysis of 33 event location websites in Berlin reveals a suboptimal implementation of SEO practices. The majority have a very poor to mediocre result, indicating room for improvement. The Google Business Profile emerges as the best-optimized area, while the internal link structure lags. Common errors include improper keyword usage, a lack of breadcrumbs, and formatting issues in headlines. The consensus among the experts is that a lack of focus on the topic and a shortage of personnel resources contribute to poor SEO implementation (Franke 2023, Raaf 2023, Riechert 2023).Despite the acknowledged importance of SEO in digital marketing, event locations in Berlin exhibit a trend of insufficient implementation. A lot of different factors, especially the prioritization of other marketing elements, contribute to this gap. Recommendations for better implementation include a collaborative approach between developers and SEO experts during website design, prioritizing SEO as a core marketing element, and increasing knowledge of the powerful tool in the companies (Franke 2023, Raaf 2023, Riechert 2023). The findings provide valuable insights for event locations and other businesses aiming to enhance their online visibility and engagement. Further research avenues could explore a broader scope, considering national or global analyses and delving into additional SEO criteria and tools. The study serves as a call to action for event locations to embrace SEO as a key driver of online success in the evolving digital area. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • Crowdfunding Campaign Influences on Market Pricing Decisions

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e129356
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e129356
      Authors : Peter Konhaeusner, Sharon-Maria Semmerau : As an integral part of the marketing mix, pricing is related to the expected value of the products it supports (Feng et al. 2019, Zhang and Chiang 2020). The adequately set price will therefore result in a higher demand on the market and in maximizing the profit of the firm constrained by the quantity of products or services offered (Feng et al. 2019). Identifying, projecting, and influencing the price sensitivity of customers represents an important strategic marketing task (Graciola et al. 2018, Zhang and Tian 2021). Crowdfunding might be used as a preselling method as it supports the identification of target groups and future demand (Brown et al. 2017).This article explores the possibility to use crowdfunding as a method to set the price for a subsequent market entry (Popp and Woratschek 2017, Pater and Cristea 2018, Dowling et al. 2019). Recent research highlighted how the pricing mechanisms in crowdfunding campaigns work, leaving out the managerial implications for the time after the campaign (Roma et al. 2018, Peng et al. 2020, Tseng 2021, Konhäusner et al. 2021). Furthermore, the right pricing for shares in an equity-based crowdfunding campaign has been analyzed, but the view has not been expanded outside of the campaign timeline (Krämer and Kalka 2016, Feng et al. 2019).Therefore, this work discusses theoretically the use of crowdfunding campaigns as a pre-sale method to set the right price when launching the product on the market (Sayedi and Baghaie 2017). By means of case studies focusing on Kickstarter campaigns supported by data from Amazon using the online Tool Keepa, the article highlights the differences between the pricing strategy of the offered products in the crowdfunding campaigns and in the market after the successful ending of the campaign. It is discussed how crowdfunding campaigns can point customers towards new products and help marketers to set the right price based on the feedback from the crowd.With the help of the different analyzed use cases, it became evident that the feedback from the crowdfunding users can help the campaign runners to set the pricing of a product. Furthermore, most of the campaign runners used the feedback of the successful campaigns to set even a higher price on the market.Further research could evaluate unsuccessful crowdfunding campaigns which sell their products. Given more available data the analysis could be broadened to directly observe the difference in pricing between the last day of the campaign and the first day of the product on the market. Additionally, the adapted approach analyzing use cases in this study should be further applied and evaluated. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • Cybersecurity and Organisational Performance – the Interplay

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e129255
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e129255
      Authors : Veena Dorairajan : The interplay between cybersecurity and organisational performance is multifaceted in nature, as it is related to how cybersecurity impacts and is impacted by various organisational activities and performance metrics. In the age of the rapid digitalization of organisations, cybersecurity emerges as an integral part of the health and effectiveness of an organisation. It includes not only preserving the confidentiality, integrity, availability of organisational digital assets but also establishing the organisational cybersecurity culture and, consequently, human behaviour. Cybersecurity and business are interdependent influencing each other significantly. This interplay shapes modern business.The convergence of people, procedures, and technology to defend business, persons, or networks against digital attacks is known ascybersecurity. Cybersecurity is essential to protect organisational assets from risks such as but not limited to personal data breaches, unauthourised access leading to reputational and financial impact (Sandhu 2021).Organisations that decide to implement digital technologies as part of their digital transformation journey are faced with increasing cyber threats and need to implement a reliable form of defence to protect their operations. In addition to digital transformation, organisations around the world are adopting artificial intelligence in their business process to reduce operating costs, boost productivity and improve customer experience. This introduces newer threats around artificial intelligence such as adversial AI attacks which involves attack vectors such as model poisoning. Artificial intelligence enabled cyber-attacks are also increasing and are contributing to the ever evolving complex threat landscape. Digital transformation and cybersecurity are intertwined elements crucial to today’s business. The strategic management of cybersecurity involves comprehensive understanding and measures against cybercrime, attacks, and terrorism to ensure organisational and business sustainability during digital transformation (Özsungur 2021). Effective cybersecurity practices are the cornerstone of successful digital transformation, protecting enterprises from evolving cyber threats and fostering a secure digital environment.Effective cybersecurity management enhances business operations and reputation (Lopatova 2021). Businesses can turn cybersecurity into a commercial advantage by adopting proactive cybersecurity measures that not only protect assets but also assure business partners and customers of the firm's commitment to security. This can lead to smoother business transactions and partnerships, fostering trust across business networks . There is a shift in the perception about cybersecurity. It is now being viewed as a vital enabler for business growth fostering value creation and competitive advantage instead of being viewed as a cost burden. By mitigating cyber risks and fostering a secure information environment, businesses can enhance their operational efficiency, secure intellectual property, and maintain customer trust, thereby gaining a competitive edge.Digital technologies shape the organisational design and brings cultural change. Digital transformation introduces cybersecurity challenges that necessitate a culture shift towards greater security awareness within organisations (Saeed et al. 2023). Human factors plays an important role in effective cybersecurity of the organisation. End users and IT professionals and cybersecurity personnel play pivotal role. A strong organisational culture enhances cybersecurity by aligning beliefs, values, and attitudes with security goals. Organisational leaders can foster a security-aware culture that supports the organisation’s overall cybersecurity objectives. The evolving business landscape requires continuous education on cybersecurity for all stakeholders within a company. This not only involves technical training but also understanding how cybersecurity impacts business strategies and operations. Educational initiatives need to cover the spectrum of risks and prepare businesses to handle emerging cybersecurity challenges effectively.Cybersecurity must be managed strategically within an organisation to optimize performance and mitigate risks. This involves integrating cybersecurity into business strategy, recognizing it as a dynamic field that requires continuous adaptation and management. In short, cybersecurity strategy must align with business strategy and IT strategy. By integrating cybersecurity into the strategy and cultural fabric, organisations can increase their cyber resilience. The strategic approach of an organisation significantly influences its cybersecurity landscape. Firms focusing on innovation often face greater cybersecurity risks due to decentralized control systems and a variety of technologies that may introduce vulnerabilities. Conversely, efficiency-focused businesses may have more centralized and potentially more secure systems, though they also need to adapt to evolving cyber threats. Effective cybersecurity practices are crucial for maintaining organisational integrity and performance. Cybersecurity influences various performance metrics, including risk management, compliance, and even financial performance.Is there a connection between cyber security adoption and organisational performance' The organisation’s internal and external environmental elements need to be considered when studying the impact of the adoption of cybersecurity technologies. The three variables technology, organisation, and environment are used to identify the factors that affect on cybersecurity adoption. The technology-organisation-environment framework, referred to as the TOE framework, can be used for this analysis. Technological context considers the tenability, relativ...
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • "Uncertainty and fragility, I love you" artists' words

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e129234
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e129234
      Authors : Stephane Ginocchio : "We are leaving the risk society to enter the society of shocks, ruptures and catastrophes, systemic phenomena". As early as the 5th century BC, the recognition of Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity (a VUCA world) served as a paradigm guiding the governance of the Chinese Emperors. What has changed since then is the speed at which progress accelerates, and the ability to adapt to it. Today, the organization of work aims to reduce time to immediate results that the market or technology will disrupt. In an ever-changing world, to remain competitive and attractive, companies must constantly reinvent themselves and adapt at breakneck speed, learning to play the balancing act like real acrobats in the face of paradoxical demands (Panczuk and Point 2008). In The Innovator's Dilemma, Christensen and Raynor (2003) asks: Why do well-managed companies fail' His conclusion is that they often fail because the management practices that have enabled them to become industry leaders also make it extremely difficult to innovate and develop the disruptive behaviors that ultimately lose them their markets in a volatile and fragile world. For an organization, the question is how to reinforce its anti-fragility. The crises we have experienced have made us aware of our vulnerability, and have shown us that we need to keep readjusting in order to make anti-fragility our own. But referring back to our pre-VUCA experiences, we believe that it's simply a matter of trusting our intelligence to learn how to overcome obstacles and make these paths practicable by harnessing a capacity for individual resilience capable of building a path of collective intelligence in the face of the storms of a VUCA world. By adopting an attitude of calculated risk-taking, a culture of resilience and using disruption to innovate (Frimousse and Peretti 2021), companies believe they can become stronger and more resilient in the face of future challenges, i.e. survive shocks and quickly return to their previous state (Cyrulnik and Jorland 2012). And yet, we find that, conversely, the more mature, multifaceted and successful a company becomes, the more complicated it becomes for employees to engage collectively in innovation. So how can neuroscience enlighten managers to build the anti-fragility necessary for survival in a VUCA business world'We will demonstrate:That it is inevitable that companies will be unable to manage uncertainty if they rely solely on human rationality, It's the very workings of our brains that mislead us (Kahneman et al. 1991). Our rationality has been challenged by neuroscientists studying decision-making, who have focused on the biases affecting our choices (Sacre 2018). There is therefore a significant risk that our prediction, based on biased information or reasoning, will not come true, and that the strategy will collapse like a house of cards.That by conforming to this approach, we necessarily experience the unpredictability of the business as a source of insecurity. The fragile needs a highly detailed forecasting approach, while conversely, forecasting systems bring fragility (Taleb 2011)and the anxiety linked to the paradoxical search for solutions in a VUCA world, self-fed by the insecurity generated, mechanically limits innovation capacities (Brosschot et al. 2018), which is one of the conditions of the resilience initially sought (Fig. 1).As a result, companies have no choice but to change their mindset towards anti-fragility. We need to get away from our illusion of control over events and nature, and reinforce our appetite for risk. The challenge is to create the necessary conditions to enable employees to project themselves into discomfort without feeling in danger.Our fragilities, if not channeled, condemn us to anxiety in a BANI world, but recognized and used, they can become a strength in a VUCA world. Fragility is the path to creation and doubt (Fig. 2). It allows us to question ourselves constantly, which keeps us innovative. The issue, then, is not what to learn, but how to instill in the collective the apprenticeship of transformation, in order to face the challenges of the VUCA world. It's a question of accepting that information doesn't yet exist when the uncertain phenomenon arrives (Silberzahan 2017). The openness of possibility stems from the acceptance of the impossible. "It's not being a project of the world that makes me me; it's the way I welcome and endure the event, and the way I'm put in abyss by it, made to exist in the fragmented instant (concept of transpassibility) (Runel 2012).Companies also need to use a neuroscientific approach to integrate this new cultural paradigm. Management in a VUCA world is definitely something that relates to human beings. We may want to change, but find it hard to let go of our behaviors... what if instead of "fighting against", we learned to "deal with" with neuroscience'Opening question : what about the efficient and/or ethical use of NLP or nudges' HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • Cultural Considerations in Leadership and Performance Management

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e127008
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e127008
      Authors : Yasmina Kashouh, Patricia Nakhle : In the context of performance management, this working paper explores the relations between cultural characteristics and leadership styles. Understanding how various cultural frameworks impact the implementation and effectiveness of performance management becomes increasingly crucial as organizations operate on a global scale (Carol and Florah 2019, Agrawal 2019).“How do cultural differences influence leadership approaches, and what impact does this have on the success of performance management practices in a multicultural environment'”Addressing this inquiry, this work aims to explore the influence of cultural differences on leadership approaches and their subsequent effects on the successful implementation of performance management systems.To answer this question, we will thoroughly examine different dimensions of culture that may affect the design, implementation, and outcomes of performance management initiatives through a comprehensive review of current literature, multicultural leadership models, and case studies (Hofstede 2001).The primary objective is to illuminate the challenges arising from diverse cultural perspectives and potential obstacles in achieving optimal performance management outcomes within a heterogeneous environment. Furthermore, the paper suggests employing effective strategies and innovative leadership approaches to successfully navigate these cultural challenges in a way that positively impacts performance (Detert et al. 2000, Rhodes and Brown 2005). HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
  • A Comprehensive review of the Value Relevance of Accounting Information
           and The Role of Disclosure

    • Abstract: ARPHA Conference s 7: e126723
      DOI : 10.3897/aca.7.e126723
      Authors : Vahab Esfandani, Reza Ahmadi, Mohammad Amin Borghei, Sara Ramzani : This review which presented at The Art and Science of Managing Performance Symposium on February 29, 2024 examines the evolving significance of value relevance of accounting information as a key component for managers and investors when making market decision. The examination of the significance of value relevance of accounting information provides robust analyses concerning the market's perception of accounting information and its role in decision making. Although considerable progress has been made to date in this well established area of research, the literature does not comprehensively elucidate or reach consensus on the fluctuations in value relevance over time. Furthermore, the effect of disclosure on value relevance of accounting information remains relatively an unexplored research topic. This review focuses on value relevance research from the two past decades, also incorporating seminal studies that trace their origins back to the late 1950s. We undertake a review of four streams within the value relevance literature: the significance of earnings and book values, the significance of other accounting information, effect of IFRS and IAS on Value Relevance of accounting information and the role of disclosure on value relevance of accounting information. Moreover, we show the different explanations put forth in the existing literature in an effort to clarify the variation in value relevance over time as well as perspectives for potential future inquiries into the relevance of value. In essence, this review provides readers with a comprehensive understanding of the literature on value relevance and also an introduction to this particular area of empirical accounting and business research. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 4 Jul 2024 15:01:20 +0300
       
 
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