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  Subjects -> SCIENCES: COMPREHENSIVE WORKS (Total: 374 journals)
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Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.165
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ISSN (Print) 1063-1801 - ISSN (Online) 1080-6520
Published by Johns Hopkins University Press Homepage  [22 journals]
  • The Hermeneutics of Computer-Generated Texts

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      Abstract: In 1989, the Los Angeles Review of Books published an article by Professor John Farrell titled "Why Literature Professors Turned Against
      Authors —Or Did They'" Farrell opens with this assertion:Since the 1940s among professors of literature, attributing significance to authors' intentions has been taboo and déclassé. The phrase literary work, which implies a worker, has been replaced in scholarly practice—and in the classroom—by the clean, crisp syllable text, referring to nothing more than simple words on a page. Since these are all we have access to, the argument goes, speculations about what the author meant can only be a distraction.1By the end of Farrell's article, though, it is clear that efforts to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fabric Bodies: The Craft of Vascular Anastomosis

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      Abstract: On June 25, 1894, crowds lined the roads of Lyon as French President Marie-François-Sadi Carnot arrived for a banquet at the Chamber of Commerce. When his open-topped landau pulled up to collect him a few hours later, the crowds were still thick with people hoping to catch a glimpse of their president as he left. As Carnot clambered into his seat, one man darted out of the crowd, dropping a rolled-up newspaper from under his arm to reveal a dagger, which he thrust into the president's back before his guards had time to react. Carnot collapsed into his seat and the carriage jerked into motion. The president and his entourage clattered towards the town hall in search of Louis Xavier Édouard Léopold Ollier, one of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Hundred Tiny Hands: Slavery, Nanotechnology, and the Anthropocene in
           Midnight Robber

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      Abstract: In response to a complaint in November 2003, the Los Angeles County Office of Affirmative Action Compliance requested that manufacturers, suppliers, and contractors refrain from using the terms "master" and "slave" to describe paired electrical components. A memo distributed to vendors by the division manager of purchasing and contract services, Joe Sandoval, stated that "based on the cultural diversity and sensitivity of Los Angeles County, this is not an acceptable identification label. We would request that each manufacturer, supplier and contractor review, identify and remove/change any identification or labeling of equipment components that could be interpreted as discriminatory or offensive in nature."1 As ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Algorithmic Empathy: Toward a Critique of Aesthetic AI

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      Abstract: Let me start with an observation. It was recorded in 1942 by German philosopher Günther Anders. Having escaped the Nazis and living in California at the time, Anders brought with him the distanced sensibility of the European exile who, not unlike his fellow emigre Theodor W. Adorno, understood America, and California in particular, as the intensified expression of life in capitalist modernity. In a journal entry, which would later become the first chapter of his book The Obsolescence of Human Beings, he described a visit to a technology exhibition in which a friend acted rather curiously: as if he were ashamed to be a human and not a machine. This, Anders noted, was a novel phenomenon, "an entirely new pudendum ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Under the Literary Microscope: Science and Society in the Contemporary
           

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      Abstract: In a 1990 essay, a leading scholar of literature and science opined:We shall not find in literature widespread reference to the ordinary doings of the sciences . . . reference to science in fiction . . . is nearly always to the scientist as a magical, isolated individual.… So when we look for the "scientist in literature" we shall not find him or her so much at the level of social description as at that of myth.1That may have been an accurate characterization of then-extant work, but it decidedly has not held up well as a prediction of things to come. A substantial body of fiction engaging directly with those missing elements began to appear at just about that time, as the editors of Under the Literary Microscope ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code by Ruha
           Benjamin (review)

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      Abstract: That digital code—the interminable combination of binary numbers underwriting our high-tech age—can be apolitical, unbiased, and colorblind is a techno-utopic fantasy undercut by decades of data-driven and encrypted inequities. In Race After Technology, Ruha Benjamin analyzes the mechanisms behind a digital caste system that she calls the "New Jim Code": the reproduction of historical forms of discrimination by modern technologies that are perceived and promoted as objective or progressive. Benjamin considers the ambitions and methods of a wide range of programmers and initiatives, including some with democratic aims. And yet, as she argues, even "technical fixes" to systemic inequalities in housing, education ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Bestiary of the Anthropocene: Hybrid Plants, Animals, Minerals, Fungi,
           and Other Specimens ed. by Nicolas Nova (review)

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      Abstract: A Bestiary of the Anthropocene is a sumptuous volume, printed with silver ink on black paper, recalling the gold leaf of medieval bestiaries. Bold metallic spot color on uncoated black stock evokes the textures of an RSVP. Enigmatic and informative, the images are seductive and rewarding: an eagle grasping a drone in midair, lost Roombas and robotic dogs, lawn rolls and astroturf, and artificial reefs and mountains. The glistening images are neither hand etchings nor photographs, neither diagrammatic nor illustrative. The volume offers images, entry stories, interviews, and essays that investigate ideas about human effects and nonhuman reactions to conditions termed "post-natural." The structure of the text ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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