Subjects -> MATHEMATICS (Total: 1013 journals)
    - APPLIED MATHEMATICS (92 journals)
    - GEOMETRY AND TOPOLOGY (23 journals)
    - MATHEMATICS (714 journals)
    - MATHEMATICS (GENERAL) (45 journals)
    - NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (26 journals)
    - PROBABILITIES AND MATH STATISTICS (113 journals)

MATHEMATICS (GENERAL) (45 journals)

Showing 1 - 35 of 35 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, Mathematica     Open Access  
Algebra Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Computational Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Mathematics and Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Archiv der Mathematik     Hybrid Journal  
Beiträge zur Algebra und Geometrie / Contributions to Algebra and Geometry     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Communications in Mathematics     Open Access  
Communications in Mathematics and Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Conformal Geometry and Dynamics     Full-text available via subscription  
Difficoltà in Matematica     Full-text available via subscription  
Ergodic Theory and Dynamical Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Applied Metaheuristic Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Computing Science and Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Mathematics and Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Elliptic and Parabolic Equations     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Physics A : Mathematical and Theoretical     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of the American Mathematical Society AMS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Jurnal Fourier     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mathematical Journal of Interdisciplinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mathematical Programming     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Mathematics of Computation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Mathematika     Full-text available via subscription  
Memoirs of the American Mathematical Society AMS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Optimization: A Journal of Mathematical Programming and Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Pesquimat     Open Access  
Pro Mathematica     Open Access  
Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society AMS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Representation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
St. Petersburg Mathematical Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Theoretical Mathematics & Applications     Open Access  
Transactions of the Moscow Mathematical Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Memoirs of the American Mathematical Society AMS
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.917
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0065-9266 - ISSN (Online) 1947-6221
Published by AMS  [11 journals]
  • AMS Short Course: Polynomial systems, homotopy continuation and
           applications

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Systems of multivariate polynomial equations are ubiquitous throughout mathematics and neighboring scientific fields such as kinematics, computer vision, power flow systems, and more. Numerical homotopy continuation methods are a fundamental technique for both solving these polynomial systems and determining more refined information about their structure. A research community has blossomed around the subject, with important work on both basic methods and applications that are ripe for sharing with a general mathematical audience. This two-day short course, organized by Timothy Duff, University of Washington, and Margaret H. Regan, Duke University, will offer six introductory lectures on the theory of polynomial systems, homotopy continuation, and their applications. Our six speakers represent a broad and diverse cross-section of researchers working on basic methods and applications of homotopy continuation.
      PubDate: Mon, 02 Jan 2023 00:00:00 EST
       
  • JMM 2023 to Draw 5,000 Mathematicians to Boston

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: JMM logo 2023 BostonThe world’s biggest math gathering comes to Boston January 4 to 7, 2023.The Joint Mathematics Meetings, known worldwide as the JMM, will bring together some 5,000 members of the math community for talks, panels, minicourses, poster sessions, employment centers, career fairs, and more at the John B. Hynes Veterans Memorial Convention Center, Boston Marriott Hotel, and Boston Sheraton Hotel. Many attendees will come from Boston-area universities, colleges, and schools.At JMM, scientists from all fields of math will participate in sessions on topics that range from theoretical research to recent applications of math. Many sessions concern current issues such as the COVID-19 pandemic, gerrymandering, rethinking math teaching and learning, and encouraging participation of underrepresented groups. For example, a session on the mathematical foundations of democracy will include a dozen presentations by scientists engaged in some of the most innovative research in the intersection of mathematics and politics. For local lovers of numbers and the beauty of math, the JMM’s final day, Saturday, January 7, will be free and open to the public, with workshops, lectures, exhibits, invited speakers, and a family-friendly math festival for all ages. Saturday’s activities include:
      A Mathematical Art Exhibition from 9 a.m.–noon in Exhibit Hall D in the Hynes Convention Center. This annual art exhibit will feature works in various media by artists inspired by mathematics and by mathematicians who use visual art to express their love of mathematics.
      The Julia Robinson Math Festival from 9 a.m.–noon in Exhibit Hall C in the Hynes Convention Center. Named for inspirational mathematician Julia Robinson, this festival will feature fun math activities, including puzzles, games, and arts and crafts. Activities at the Festival will be designed for students from kindergarten through high school. Students at all skill levels will find meaningful and appropriate challenges to build problem-solving skills.
      Three lectures in Ballroom A&B, third floor of the Hynes Convention Center. From 10:05–10:55 a.m., best-selling author Jordan Ellenberg will present “Outward-facing Mathematics.” Award-winning PBS co-host Talithia Williams will present “The Power of Talk: Engaging the Public in Mathematics,” from 1–1:50 p.m.. And from 3–3:50 p.m., Bernd Sturmfels, University of California, Berkeley, will deliver the annual AMS-MAA-SIAM Gerald and Judith Porter Lecture. His talk is titled, “The Quadratic Formula Revisited.”This will be the first JMM held in person since 2020 in Denver. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, JMM 2021 and JMM 2022 were held virtually.This year, 15 math organizations have partnered to present a versatile and wide-ranging JMM: the American Institute of Mathematics (AIM), American Mathematical Society (AMS), American Statistical Association (ASA), Association for Symbolic Logic (ASL), Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM), Consortium for Mathematics and its Applications (COMAP), International Linear Algebra Society (ILAS), Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival (JRMF), MSRI / Simons Laufer Mathematical Sciences Institute (SLMath), National Association of Mathematicians (NAM), Pi Mu Epsilon (PME), Pro Mathematica Arte (PMA), Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), Association for LGBT Mathematicians (Spectra), and Transforming Post-Secondary Education in Mathematics (TPSE)The JMM Grand Opening Reception on Wednesday, January 4 is a celebration for all regist...
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Dec 2022 00:00:00 EST
       
  • Katz to Receive 2023 Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievement

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The AMS awards the 2023 Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievement to Nicholas M. Katz of Princeton University for his landmark contributions to number theory and arithmetic geometry.Nicholas M. KatzNicholas M. KatzCredit: Charles MozzochiFrom the citation:Katz’s fundamental articles and monographs have benefited the mathematical community by opening up new directions of research and illuminating large areas of mathematics. His best-known works include his long Antwerp article on p-adic modular forms; his Astérisque volume on exponential sums; the Annals of Mathematics Studies volume on moduli of elliptic curves by Katz and Mazur; and the AMS volume “Random matrices, Frobenius eigenvalues, and monodromy” by Katz and Sarnak.A continuing theme in Katz’s work is his pathbreaking and influential study of the connection between exponential sums and lisse l-adic sheaves on open curves over finite fields. By viewing such sums as traces of Frobenius at the closed points of the curve, and applying the fundamental results of Deligne, he obtained powerful distribution results for exponential sums, through a study of the global monodromy groups of the sheaves.Throughout his career, Katz has been generous in sharing his enthusiasm and far-reaching insights with students and colleagues at all levels. His mentorship of generations of mathematicians has been of inestimable value.Response of Katz:I am delighted and honored to receive the Leroy P. Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievement. I have had astoundingly good luck in my career. When I graduated from high school in 1960, calculus was not standardly taught in high school, and the usual first semester college math course was “Analytic Geometry.” But when I arrived at Johns Hopkins, that course had just been scrapped completely, in favor of a revolutionary course designed by Mostow, Meyer, and Sampson, with the idea that genuine “abstract" mathematics could and should be taught to everyone. Mostow taught the course that year, and it was transformational for me. I also fell under the charismatic spell of Ken Ireland, then a graduate student of Dwork, and when I was taught Galois theory by Dwork there was no going back. Another transformational event was Dwork?s arranging my attending Woods Hole in 1964, where I saw giants at work and at play. I then had the good fortune to visit IHES [Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques] and learn from and be inspired by both Deligne and Grothendieck, and later by Gabber. Having Laumon, Mazur, Messing, Oda, Sarnak, and Tiep as co-authors, each with amazing breadth of knowledge and interest and enthusiasm, has been an inspiration to me.Biographical Sketch of Katz:Nicholas M. Katz attended Johns Hopkins University as an undergraduate and received his PhD from Princeton in 1966 as a student of Bernard Dwork. His work focuses on the p-adic and l-adic aspects of life over finite fields, and its relation to life in characteristic zero. He is a professor at Princeton. He visited IHES for numerous sabbaticals and for many, many summers, and twice was a visiting professor at Orsay. He has held a NATO Postdoctoral Fellowship, a Sloan Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship twice, a JSPS [Japan Society for the Promotion of Science] Fellowship, a Visiting Miller Professorship, a Simons Fellowship, and was several times an Ordway Visiting Professor at the University of Minnesota. He served as Department Chair at Princeton in 2002-2005. He and Peter Sarnak were jointly awarded the Levi L. Conant Prize in 2003. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He is an editor of Annals of Mathematics.About the prize:Presented annually, the AMS Leroy P. Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievement is awarded for the cumulative influence of the total mathematical work of the recipient, high level of research over a period of time, particular influence on the development of a field, and influence on mathematics through PhD students. The Steele Prizes were established in 1970 in honor of George David Birkhoff, William Fogg Osgood, and William Caspar Graustein, and are endowed under the terms of a bequest from Leroy P. Steele.The 2023 prize will be presented during the Joint Prize Session at the 2023 Joint Mathematics Meetings in Boston.Read more about the prize and previous winners.Contact: AMS Communications*****The American Mathematical Society is dedicated to advancing research and connecting the diverse global mathematical community through our publications, meetings and conferences, MathSciNet, professional services, advocacy, and awareness programs. 
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Dec 2022 00:00:00 EST
       
  • Kronheimer and Mrowka to Receive 2023 Steele Prize for Seminal
           Contribution to Research

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The American Mathematical Society awards the 2023 Steele Prize for Seminal Contribution to Research to Peter B. Kronheimer of Harvard University and Tomasz S. Mrowka of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for their paper Gauge theory for embedded surfaces, I, published in 1993 in Topology 32, 773–826.Peter Kronheimer, outside, smilingPeter KronheimerCredit: Peter KronheimerTomasz S. Mrowka, outsideTomasz Stanislaw MrowkaCredit: Gigliola StaffilaniFrom the citation:This paper introduced new notions and developed sophisticated new technology that has played and continues to play a central role in gauge theory and low-dimensional topology. The first application of the new methods (given in the cited paper) was to settle a 25-year-old conjecture of Milnor, concerning the minimality of the genus of algebraic surfaces among all embedded surfaces in the four-ball spanning the same boundary curve in the three-sphere. This marks the starting point of a long development which has revolutionized our understanding of the four-ball genus (for a recent example, see Piccirillo’s proof that the Conway knot does not bound a disk). Kronheimer-Mrowka’s argument is a consequence of a general adjunction inequality obtained in the paper.Two years after the cited paper was published, Kronheimer and Mrowka used the same technology of singular instantons to describe the structure of the mysterious Donaldson invariants for closed four-manifolds, in terms of a finite number of “basic” degree two cohomology classes. This structure theorem led Edward Witten to his conjectural relationship between Seiberg-Witten invariants and Donaldson invariants.Later, Kronheimer and Mrowka defined a new version of Floer homology for knots, again based on singular instantons. Using that, they proved that the (purely algebraically defined) Khovanov homology detects whether a knot is trivial. This led to a flowering of such detection results: for instance, concerning the trefoil knot, by Baldwin and Sivek. The authors, as well as many other researchers, continue to develop the ideas in the cited paper to define new invariants in low-dimensional topology, and the subject has grown to include relations with a wide array of topics (such as sheaf theory, in Côté’s and Manolescu’s recent work).Response of Kronheimer and Mrowka:We are honored and delighted to hear that we have been awarded the Leroy P. Steele Prize for Seminal Contribution to Research.Our paper, Gauge theory for embedded surfaces, I, and its later companions had their origin in a collaboration which was forged at Oberwolfach in the summer of 1991. There we had the opportunity to work together for several weeks at the Mathematisches Forschungsinstitut, with this project in mind. By the end of that stay, the key results that we had been aiming for, concerning singular Yang-Mills instantons, were in place, and applications such as Milnor’s conjecture on the unknotting number of torus knots soon followed.Our mathematical research since then has taken several directions, but has often returned to the singular instanton story. It has been a constant source of excitement, not only to see new applications of these ideas in the work of many mathematicians, but also to see quite new tools being developed over the intervening decades, greatly increasing the state of knowledge around questions which might have seemed out of reach in 1991.We would like to thank our families for their love and support. Our sincere thanks also to the community of mathematicians whose ideas formed the background for our own work and whose contributions have led to such vigorous and unexpected growth in this field. We thank the Oberwolfach Foundation for the opportunity afforded by the Oberwolfach Prize in 1991. Finally, we thank the American Mathematical Society and the selection committee for recognizing our work in this way.Biographical sketch of Peter Kronheimer:Born in London, Peter Kronheimer was educated at the City of London School and Merton College, Oxford. He obtained his BA in 1984 and his D.Phil in 1987 under the supervision of Michael Atiyah. After a year as a Junior Research Fellow at Balliol and two years at the Institute for Advanced Study, he returned to Merton as Fellow and Tutor in Mathematics. In 1995 he moved to Harvard, where he is now William Caspar Graustein Professor of Mathematics. He is a recipient of the Förderpreis from the Mathematisches Forschungsinstitut, Oberwolfach, and the Whitehead Prize from the London Mathematical Society. He is a co-recipient of the Oswald Veblen Prize and the Joseph L. Doob Prize, both from the American Mathematical Society, and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1997. Outside of mathematics he enjoys playing the horn, often joined by his wife, Jenny, on piano.Biographical sketch of Tomasz Mrowka:Tomasz Mrowka was born in State College, PA, in 1961. He received a SB in mathematics from MIT in 1983. His 1988 PhD is from University of California, Berkeley, advised by Clifford Taubes. After postdoctoral positions at the MSRI and Stanford University, he was appointed a professor at Caltech in 1992 and moved to MIT in 1994. At MIT, Mrowka has served as chair of graduate studies, chair of the pure mathematics committee and head of the department. Mrowka was awarded the NSF Young Investigator Grant in 1993. He has been a fellow of the Sloan Foundation, Radcliffe Institute, Gug...
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Dec 2022 00:00:00 EST
       
  • Evans to Receive 2023 Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Lawrence Craig EvansLawrence C. EvansCredit: Lawrence C. EvansLawrence C. Evans, professor emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley, has received the Leroy P. Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition for his book Partial Differential Equations, published by the American Mathematical Society, Providence, RI, 1998 (first edition) and 2010 (second edition).“This unparalleled text has become the primary reference for every graduate student in the field and many experts,” the prize citation notes. “It achieves the near impossible task of giving coherence to the very extensive classical and modern theory of linear and nonlinear partial differential equations, through a masterful choice of material.“A pleasure to read, it combines insight and clear technical descriptions in an attractive and economical style, making a complex area accessible to numerous young and established researchers,” the citation reads.Response of Evans:My deepest thanks to the American Math Society for this honor. And, coincidentally, I also thank the AMS for publishing this book 25 years ago. I have received spectacular support from Sergei Gelfand and many others at AMS publishing, as the text has gone through many revised printings and a new edition.My thanks also to the vast numbers of readers who over the years have located typos and errors, some quite stunning. Removing all the mistakes from a really long math book turns out to be impossible, at least for me, but the current version seems pretty good.Finally, let me acknowledge also my many friends and colleagues who contributed their technical help, for various topics about which I am not so expert. Tai-Ping Liu in particular helped me immensely. It is surely true that the writing of mathematics books is deeply collaborative, even if only one name appears on the title page.Biographical Sketch of Evans:Lawrence Craig Evans received his PhD in mathematics in 1975 from UCLA, where he worked under the direction of Michael Crandall. Evans was a math faculty member at the University of Kentucky, the University of Maryland, and the University of California, Berkeley, from which he retired last year. His field of research is nonlinear partial differential equations, especially regularity theory, viscosity solutions, and weak convergence issues.Evans is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is an AMS Fellow.About the award:The AMS Leroy P. Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition is awarded annually for a book or substantial survey or expository research paper. The Steele Prizes were established in 1970 in honor of George David Birkhoff, William Fogg Osgood, and William Caspar Graustein, and are endowed under the terms of a bequest from Leroy P. Steele.The 2023 prize will be presented during the Joint Prize Session at the 2023 Joint Mathematics Meetings in Boston.Find out more about the prize and previous recipients.Contact: AMS Communications*****The American Mathematical Society is dedicated to advancing research and connecting the diverse global mathematical community through our publications, meetings and conferences, MathSciNet, professional services, advocacy, and awareness programs.  
      PubDate: Wed, 07 Dec 2022 00:00:00 EST
       
  • Ten Students Receive 2022 Undergraduate Opportunity Awards

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Ten students have received 2022 AMS Undergraduate Opportunity Awards, financial prizes designed to help them pursue careers in mathematics. The awards go to students at colleges and universities randomly selected each year from the AMS’s institutional members, and the number of recipients and scholarship amount vary.AMS Undergraduate Opportunity Award winners 2022(top, L-R) Michael Brito, Nevin Etter, Necef Kavrut, Aniela E. Mendez, Kayleigh Page (bottom, L-R) Mahdi Rahman, Leslye Rodriguez, Aaron Thomas, Heather Vogler, Kaia De VriesCredit: ​Photo of Kayleigh Page courtesy of Haley Dawn Photography. All other photos courtesy of the individuals pictured.Nine of this year’s awardees received Waldemar J. Trjitzinsky Memorial Awards, named in honor of the mathematician. Since 1991, more than 200 promising math students have received Trjitzinsky Awards to ensure that financial hardship does not stand in the way of completing their degree programs. In 2022, the following nine undergraduates each received $3,000:Michael Brito (Middle Tennessee State University) originally started college out of high school, working while taking classes to help pay bills. Then, after signing up for classes for the upcoming semester, Brito’s manager told him that his pay and hours would be cut if he wasn’t available every hour the store was open, so he decided to take a semester off. One thing led to another in Brito’s professional life, and that “semester” turned into 13 years. When Brito’s position was eliminated during the height of COVID, he decided to finish his degree before jumping back into the job market. This award will support him in being able to finally complete his degree program. Nevin Etter is a senior at Washington and Lee University who will graduate with a BA in mathematics and a BA in economics. He grew up in Gettysburg, PA, where he fell in love with mathematics at an early age. During the past two summers, Etter was a member of the Pomona Research in Mathematics Experience [PRiME], where he conducted research on rational elliptic curves with non-trivial isogeny and helped to update the Mathematicians of the African Diaspora database. After graduation, Etter plans to attend graduate school to further his education in mathematics.Born to doctor parents, Necef Kavrut (California Institute of Technology) spent his first few years in Iğdır, Turkey. Beyond Mount Ararat looming over him and driving around the local go-kart ring, he doesn’t remember much from this time. When he was about seven, he moved with his family to Istanbul, the other side of Turkey. High school at Robert College was where he first had the chance to explore his passions. Though math had always been his favorite subject, he’d never invested in it deeply beyond schoolwork. Mentor and friend recommendations eventually led Kavrut to apply for PROMYS [Program in Mathematics for Young Scientists] Europe.  After his first PROMYS summer, he knew he was in love with math, which was what he would pursue at college. Kavrut is a math major at Caltech.Aniela E. Mendez is a senior at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, where she majors in mathematics with a concentration in secondary mathematics education. Mendez is a first-generation college student. She started college after high school in 2018 and applied as a business major, but decided early on in her first semester that she wanted to be a mathematics teacher. The change in majors was due mainly to the huge impact of her high school teachers. These teachers made math fun to learn and made Mendez feel confident in her work. In turn, she wishes to make the same difference to her future students, as well as to change the perception that math is hard. As a teacher, Mendez hopes to focus on how fun and interesting mathematics can be.Kayleigh Page is currently a junior at the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO), majoring in Math Education and minoring in Spanish. She works at the Disability Support Services at UCO and also tutors students in Spanish and math courses. Page was inspired to continue her education in both math and Spanish from watching her AP teachers in high school. She plans on teaching algebra at an inner-city public school. Page hopes to inspire her students to enjoy and love math just as she does.Mahdi Rahman is a junior at the University of Buffalo-SUNY, majoring in mathematics. Throughout his childhood, with encouragement from his parents, he always considered a path towards becoming an engineer or a doctor. He never considered mathematics as an option, and he performed quite poorly in the subject. Things changed during his senior year of high school, when Rahman watched YouTube videos to prepare for the math section of the SAT. As more math videos were recommended to him, he realized that he actually enjoyed mathematics. So, before the start of college, he decided to choose mathematics as his major. Over the years, he was introduced to topics such as modern algebra, topology, and analysis. He became even more interested in mathematics, particularly in algebra and analysis. In the future, he aspires to dedicate himself to these fields.Leslye Rodriguez, a rising senior at DePaul University, plans to graduate with a BS in Mathematical Sciences with a concentration in Applied and Computational Mathematics. Rodriguez has loved studying math since she was in middle school, but did not decide to pursue it until her sophomore year of college after taking her first calculus course. She is currently working with other DePaul students and professors...
      PubDate: Tue, 06 Dec 2022 00:00:00 EST
       
  • Merle, Raphaël, Rodnianski, and Szeftel Awarded 2023
           Bôcher Memorial Prize

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Photos of (left to right) Frank Merle, Pierre Raphael, Igor Rodnianski, and Jeremie Szeftel2023 Bôcher Prize winners (L-R): Frank Merle, Pierre Raphaël, Igor Rodnianski, Jérémie SzeftelPhoto credits L-R: Marie Liesse, Pierre Raphaël, Igor Rodnianski, Anca NiculinFrank Merle of the Université de Cergy-Pontoise, Pierre Raphaël of the University of Cambridge, Igor Rodnianski of Princeton University, and Jérémie Szeftel of Sorbonne Université will receive the 2023 Bôcher Memorial Prize from the American Mathematical Society.From the citation:The 2023 Bôcher Memorial Prize is awarded to Frank Merle, Pierre Raphaël, Igor Rodnianski, and Jérémie Szeftel for their groundbreaking work establishing the existence of blow-up solutions to the defocusing NLS equation in some supercritical regimes and to the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations.This breathtaking achievement, which greatly enhances our understanding of dispersive PDEs and of fluid dynamics, is exposed in a monumental series of three articles: "On the implosion of a compressible fluid II: singularity formation," Annals of Mathematics 196 (2022); "On the implosion of a compressible fluid I: smooth self-similar inviscid profiles," Annals of Mathematics 196 (2022); and "On blow up for the energy super critical defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equations," Inventiones Mathematicae 227 (2022).Response of Frank Merle:It is a great honor to be awarded the Bôcher Memorial Prize together with my collaborators and friends Pierre Raphaël, Igor Rodnianski, and Jérémie Szeftel. I am deeply grateful to the Prize Committee and to the American Mathematical Society for their recognition of this research. This award has special meaning for me.I would like to thank the people who influenced me early in my career, specifically Henri Berestycki, Haim Brezis, Louis Nirenberg, Hiroshi Matano, George Papanicolaou, Robert V. Kohn, Abbas Bahri, and Jean Ginibre. I am also deeply grateful to Jean Bourgain and to Carlos Kenig for their constant support and early recognition since the mid-1990s. I am also indebted to my close collaborators and friends who have helped me mature my mathematics. They are Hatem Zaag, Yvan Martel, Carlos Kenig, Thomas Duyckaerts, Luis Vega, Hiroshi Matano, Charles Collot, and of course Pierre Raphaël, Igor Rodnianski, and Jérémie Szeftel.The results mentioned in the citation stem from a long collaboration and mathematical exploration with my coauthors, Pierre, Igor, and Jérémie. Each of us brought our own expertise sharing a common enthusiasm which enabled our success. I feel very lucky to have such collaborators.These papers are the result of a seemingly chaotic process of exploration and creation related to supercritical problems with a lot of back and forth that started around ten years ago. In the process we became interested in fluid dynamics. It took a long time to realize that this could and would lead to blow-up in the defocusing situation, disproving the expected conjecture that blow up would not occur in the supercritical case stated by Jean Bourgain, a giant of mathematics. This counterintuitive result and new ideology led to the construction of blow-up solutions for the 3 Dimensional Compressible Navier-Stokes Equation.Again, I wish to thank the Prize Committee for honoring these lines of research, and I look forward to continuing to work on them.Finally, I wish to thank my family for their constant support and love: my wife, Rebecca; my children, Jascha and Maxim; my parents, Myriam and Norbert; my parents-in-law, Beverly and Hy; and my friends.Biographical sketch of Frank Merle:Frank Merle was born on November 22, 1962. He received his PhD at the Ecole Normale Supérieure in 1987 and held a position at the CNRS from 1988 to 1991. Since 1991, he has been a professor at the Université de Cergy-Pontoise. In the last twenty years, he has held a joint position between the Université de Cergy-Pontoise and l’Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques, and has been a regular visitor at the University of Chicago. He has held visiting positions at the IAS, the Courant Institute, Rutgers University, Stanford University, MSRI, and Tokyo University. Merle’s awards and honors include speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians (1998), the Bôcher Memorial Prize (2005), the Médaille d’argent du CNRS (2005), the ERC Advanced Grant (2011), speaker at the European Congress of Mathematics (2012), plenary speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians (2014), Prix Ampère de l’Académie des Sciences (2018), and member of The Academia Europaea (2020). Response of Pierre Raphaël:Receiving the Bôcher Prize is an immense honor. Many of the names of those who transformed so deeply analysis in the last century belong to the list of awardees. Receiving this prize jointly with my collaborators, Frank Merle, Igor Rodnianski, and Jérémie Szeftel, is such a pleasure! The work recognized by the committee is the accomplishment of two decades of intense collaboration. This long journey started with the breakthrough work by Miguel Herrero and Juan Velasquez (1994) on singularity formation for super critical parabolic problems, and has constantly been influenced by our interaction with Yvan Martel and Hatem Zaag, whose works on singularity formation started nothing but a revolution.Biography of Pierre Raphaël:After graduating from Ecole Polytechnique...
      PubDate: Mon, 05 Dec 2022 00:00:00 EST
       
  • Miller, Sheffield to Receive 2023 Eisenbud Prize

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The American Mathematical Society awards the 2023 Leonard Eisenbud Prize in Mathematics and Physics to Jason P. Miller of the University of Cambridge and Scott Sheffield of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for works on random two-dimensional geometries, and in particular on Liouville Quantum Gravity.Jason P. MillerJason MillerCredit: Jason MillerScott SheffieldScott SheffieldCredit: Julie SheffieldFrom the citation: Jason Miller and Scott Sheffield are awarded the Leonard Eisenbud Prize of the AMS for their monumental series of papers on Liouville Quantum Gravity. This body of work provides a novel and deep understanding of ideas and concepts that first had been developed and used in the theoretical physics community (and called quantum gravity there) and opened the door to a number of new mathematical results and research directions.For mathematicians, “Quantum Gravity” in two dimensions can be viewed broadly as encapsulating ways to define and study random planar geometries. This can encompass quite different perspectives — one can define random distances in a planar domain, random area measures in a planar domain, [and] random metric spaces. The wide-ranging survey “What is a random surface?” written in colloquial style by Scott Sheffield for the proceedings of this year’s ICM, can be a good way for newcomers to learn about this area, which has become a cornerstone of contemporary mathematical physics.Response of Scott Sheffield:I am tremendously honored by this award, and especially honored to be sharing it with my longtime collaborator Jason Miller. I started working in this general area some 15 or 20 years ago, and at the time had no idea how far it would develop, or how exciting it would turn out to be. I?d like to thank my earliest close collaborators in the subject (including Bertrand Duplantier, Oded Schramm, and Wendelin Werner) as well as the many wonderful collaborators and inspirational colleagues who have helped us so much since then.Response of Jason Miller:It is a great pleasure to receive this prize together with Scott Sheffield.  I was introduced to this area by my PhD supervisor, Amir Dembo, when he gave me a copy of Greg Lawler’s book, “Conformally Invariant Processes in the Plane,” as well as an early draft of Bertrand Duplantier and Scott Sheffield’s paper “Liouville quantum gravity and KPZ,” which played a major role in kicking off this subject. I never guessed at the time that I still would be working intensively on it 15 years later. I would also like to thank Scott Sheffield, who I first met in 2008 at a conference in CRM in Montreal, where he gave a talk on his work with Duplantier. Later, Scott was my postdoctoral advisor at MIT and research mentor for many years. Finally, I would like to thank my other research collaborators. Indeed, all of them have played an incredibly important part in driving the subject forward.Both Sheffield and Miller thank the nominators, the selection committee, the Eisenbud family, and the AMS.Biographical sketch of Scott Sheffield:Scott Sheffield received his undergraduate and master’s degrees from Harvard University in 1998 and his PhD from Stanford University in 2003 under the supervision of Amir Dembo. He worked at Microsoft Research; University of California, Berkeley; and IAS Princeton (as a postdoc); and at New York University (as faculty) before joining MIT in 2008. His other honors include the Clay Research Award (also joint with Jason Miller), the Loève Prize, the Rollo Davidson Prize, the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, and a Sloan Research Fellowship. He was an invited speaker at the 2010 ICM and a plenary speaker at the 2022 ICM.Biographical sketch of Jason Miller:Jason Miller received his undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan in 2006 and his PhD from Stanford in 2011 under the supervision of Amir Dembo. He was a post-doc at Microsoft Research and then at MIT before becoming a faculty member at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of Trinity College in 2015. He previously received the Rollo Davidson Prize, the Clay Research Award (with Scott Sheffield), and the Doeblin Prize. He was an invited speaker at the 2018 ICM.About the prize:The Leonard Eisenbud Prize in Mathematics and Physics honors a work or group of works published in the preceding six years that brings mathematics and physics closer together. For example, the prize might be given for a contribution to mathematics inspired by modern developments in physics or for the development of a physical theory exploiting modern mathematics in a novel way. The prize was established in 2006 in memory of the mathematical physicist Leonard Eisenbud (1913-2004) by his son and daughter-in-law, David and Monika Eisenbud.The 2023 prize will be awarded during the Joint Prize Session at the 2023 Joint Mathematics Meetings in Boston.Learn more about the prize and previous recipients.Contact: AMS Communications* * * * *The American Mathematical Society is dedicated to advancing research and connecting the diverse global mathematical community through our publications, meetings and conferences, MathSciNet, professional services, advocacy, and awareness programs.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Dec 2022 00:00:00 EST
       
  • Ulrica Wilson to Receive 2023 Award for Impact on the Teaching and
           Learning of Mathematics

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The American Mathematical Society will present the 2023 Award for Impact on the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics to Ulrica Wilson of Morehouse College.Ulrica Wilson smilingUlrica Wilson
      Credit: Mikki HarrisFrom the citation:Dr. Ulrica Wilson, associate professor of mathematics at Morehouse College, has led many initiatives on the teaching and learning of mathematics for many different segments of the mathematics community. She has done so with an unwavering commitment to equity and mentorship.Dr. Wilson has been key to Morehouse Mathematics? successes and to its recognition by the AMS as the 2016 recipient of its Mathematics Programs that Make a Difference honor. She has worked with research teams of first-year students. She uses set theory to introduce early mathematics students to proof-based coursework. Through these and other efforts, she establishes relationships with her students early on, helping them grow and find opportunities. The college celebrated her impact with the 2017 Vulcan Teaching Excellence Award. Dr. Wilson improves the education of Morehouse students in her administrative and service capacities as well. She is the founding director of the James King Jr. Initiative for Student and Faculty Engagement, which initiates and supports extensive efforts that improve students? mathematical experience. One example of this is the Communicating by Thinking Effectively In and About Mathematics program, which develops abilities of older students to communicate mathematics to freshmen, in turn strengthening the success of general education mathematics.Dr. Wilson is also director of the RISE to Excellence program. Starting at the sophomore year, this program accepts math and science students and provides them scholarship support, promotes research experience, and develops them professionally through individual mentoring and program workshops. Dr. Wilson has played a long-term integral role within the Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education (EDGE) Program, a program that prepares a cohort of new PhD students, all women, to succeed in their graduate programs. Starting first as a graduate student mentor, Dr. Wilson returned to the program as an algebra instructor, then co-director, and now vice president of the Sylvia Bozeman and Rhonda Hughes EDGE Foundation, which received a 2015 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM).Dr. Wilson has served as vice president of the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM). Dr. Wilson deserves considerable credit for securing funding for the continuation of NAM?s Undergraduate MathFest, which annually attracts mathematics majors, mostly Black, at all levels to inform them about and inspire them to consider graduate study and careers in the mathematical sciences. She is a 2019 Fellow of the Association of Women in Mathematics (AWM), and serves on the AWM Scientific Advisory Committee. At the Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics (ICERM), Dr. Wilson has helped increase faculty involvement in student research broadly. She has been the PI on numerous grants for Research Experiences for Undergraduate Faculty, for workshops equipping mathematics faculty to conduct undergraduate research at their own institutions across the country. At ICERM Dr. Wilson also coordinates diversity initiatives and co-chairs the Mathematical Sciences Initiatives Diversity Committee.Response of Wilson:Thanks to AMS for recognizing efforts that impact teaching and learning as part of the overall mission to advance mathematics. I am honored to receive this prize. Inspired by many of my own mentors, including Etta Falconer, I am proud to say that throughout my career, I’ve had the support of Morehouse College, EDGE, and ICERM to create and contribute to programs that respond to specific needs that arise in the mathematics community. I have the privilege to work at an institution dedicated to educating black men—a population often overlooked and discounted. At Morehouse, I see firsthand the impact that such programs have on my current and past students.I am also thankful for the environment I entered in 2007 when I joined the Morehouse College faculty. Because of a dean that strongly supported my ideas and initiatives, a chair that was creative and unwavering in his commitment, and peers that fueled my motivation, I’ve been able to design a broad array of opportunities that expand pathways for those that are regularly underrepresented in our community. Lastly, I am immensely grateful for the community of EDGErs that have become both colleagues and friends in the past 15 years. I’ve learned so much from working with you all.Biographical sketch of Wilson:Ulrica Wilson was born in Massachusetts while her father was in graduate school and was raised in Birmingham, AL. She is an alumna of Spelman College and it was the mathematics faculty and her classmates at Spelman who informed her choice to pursue mathematics and increase opportunities for women in mathematics. Undaunted by a roadblock or two at several critical stages of her career, Dr. Wilson is committed to breaking down barriers that obstruct diverse paths to careers and opportunities in the mathematical sciences. Since the recent loss of her father, who was a geography professor, she’s had the pleasure of hearing from many of his former students and colleagues and now more than ever she recognizes the impact that teaching and learning can have long past the initial professor-student or mentor-mentee interaction.About the award:The Award for Impact on the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics was established by the AMS ...
      PubDate: Tue, 29 Nov 2022 00:00:00 EST
       
  • 2022 AMS Election Results Announced

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Results of the 2022 AMS Election have been announced.Bianca Viray, University of Washington, will be a Vice President, and Judy L. Walker, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, will serve as a Trustee.Members at Large elected to the Council include Christine Berkesch, University of Minnesota Twin Cities; William A. Massey, Princeton University; Sam Payne, University of Texas at Austin; Emily Riehl, Johns Hopkins University; and Cynthia Vinzant, University of Washington.Elected to the Nominating Committee were Jayadev Athreya, University of Washington; Kathryn Leonard, Occidental College; and Alan W. Reid, Rice University.Robert Guralnick, University of Southern California, and Kate Juschenko, University of Texas at Austin, were elected to the Editorial Boards Committee.All four bylaws amendments passed.Thank you to everyone who voted and to all those who ran. See the election results.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Nov 2022 00:00:00 EST
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.192.247.184
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-