Subjects -> MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (Total: 362 journals)
    - CERAMICS, GLASS AND POTTERY (31 journals)
    - MACHINERY (34 journals)
    - MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (223 journals)
    - METROLOGY AND STANDARDIZATION (5 journals)
    - PACKAGING (19 journals)
    - PAINTS AND PROTECTIVE COATINGS (4 journals)
    - PLASTICS (42 journals)
    - RUBBER (4 journals)

MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (223 journals)            First | 1 2     

Showing 201 - 73 of 73 Journals sorted alphabetically
Tire Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Traitements et Materiaux     Free   (Followers: 18)
Tsinghua Science & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Underwater Technology: The International Journal of the Society for Underwater     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Review of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Вісник Приазовського Державного Технічного Університету. Серія: Технічні науки     Open Access  

  First | 1 2     

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Technology and Culture
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.284
Number of Followers: 28  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0040-165X - ISSN (Online) 1097-3729
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Atomic Shocks of the Old: Putting Water at the Center of Nuclear Energy
           History

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      Abstract: Nuclear energy has long fascinated historians of technology. Over the past fifty years, Technology and Culture has published dozens of articles on the subject, and interest has grown markedly in recent years.1 The literature is intriguing in many ways, but it also features some peculiar paradoxes. One concerns the common argument that the invention of nuclear fission constitutes a radical rupture in world history.2 Nuclear energy and nuclear weapons are portrayed as revolutionary technologies that offered radically new methods to produce electricity, gave rise to previously unimaginable environmental hazards, and forever changed the art of war.3 They are framed as exceptional phenomena with no counterpart in world ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Capitalism Matters: How Financial and Technological Innovations Shaped
           U.S. Telegraphs, 1845–60

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      Abstract: Why do people innovate' What shapes the material traits of technologies' These are two of the bigger questions in the history of technology, and scholars have offered many answers.1 One answer that has received surprisingly little attention is finance, and especially finance capitalism. This article shows that finance capitalism has been integral to technology because it spurred innovation and shaped design. Conversely, technology played a key role in the development and spread of finance capitalism. The article illustrates these arguments using the history of telegraphs in the United States, where telegraphs and finance capitalism were parts of the same sociotechnical systems.These arguments provide the foundation ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Tampon Technology in Britain: Unilever's Project Hyacinth and the "7-Day
           War" Campaign," 1968–1980

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      Abstract: In 1975, a woman in an English suburb answered the door and was invited to take part in a Unilever market survey regarding her menstrual product habits. The woman, alongside a dozen others, agreed. She provided crucial evidence about product technologies, her material preferences, marketing concepts, and the culture of menstruation. It is unclear whether she was paid or informed of the subsequent commercial endeavor to develop a new type of tampon, but her knowledge formed the expertise that Unilever applied in their attempt to conquer the British and international menstrual market.The resulting project, named "Hyacinth" and organized by Unilever's Project Hyacinth Special Committee (PHSC), reveals how these ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Craft of Color and the Chemistry of Dyes: Textile Technology in the
           Ryukyu Kingdom, 1700–1900

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      Abstract: When Kamakura Yoshitarō (1898–1983), a founding scholar of Ryukyu art and culture, traveled to Okinawa in the 1920s to research bingata production, he was surprised to discover that only people born before the annexation of the islands by Meiji Japan (1868–1912) were skilled in the dyeing practices of their family lines.1 Kamakura was further disappointed to learn from Takushi Jino, the last craftsman of his lineage, that his family had kept two volumes on dyeing techniques but "not thinking themFig 1Bingata robe (dusudii) made from cotton, with Prussian-blue-dyed ground; Shuri (Okinawa), nineteenth century. (Courtesy of Okinawa Prefectural Museum and Art Museum.)valuable, unbound the pages, and used them for ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Red Brick Imperialism: How Vernacular Knowledge Shaped Japanese Colonial
           Expertise in Northeast China, 1905–45

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      Abstract: On his first trip to Manchuria in 1939, Japanese poet and editor Yukio Haruyama was impressed by the widespread red brick architecture. At every station along the South Manchuria Railway (Mantetsu) and everywhere he stopped, in rural areas or cities, Haruyama was amazed by the picturesque scenery centered around red brick: bricks carried in horse wagons traversing the land, bricks heaped up in piles like hills throughout the suburbs, and houses built by laying brick into solid walls. To Haruyama, red brick embodied the culture of Manchukuo, a client state of Japan in Manchuria, and showed that the state was becoming civilized, for in his eyes, "civilization starts with roads and red bricks."1The coproduction of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Aviation for the People: Class and State Aviation in Perón's "New
           Argentina," 1946–55

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      Abstract: For one week of the year from 1946 to 1955, Argentines across the country craned their heads skyward. Formations of glittering aircraft swept overhead while leaflets rained down on the city streets. Outside observers might have drawn dark parallels with aviation's recent past, the contrails left by bombers on their way to distant targets in Europe and Asia. Yet in Argentina, aviation had not suffered the taint of apocalyptic war. As crowds gathered during Aviation Week to admire the new planes soaring above them, painted in brilliant blue with yellow suns, there was a sense of optimism, energy, and vitality. The newly elected president, General Juan D. Perón, promised to remake the nation, and aviation would be at ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Innovation and Maladjustment: Contraceptive Technologies in
           State-Socialist Poland, 1950s–1970s

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      Abstract: In state-socialist Poland, abortion became legal for socioeconomic reasons in 1956 and was widely available in public health care from the late 1950s to the early 1980s, with an annual average of 120,000 abortions.1 A 2013 study by the Polish Public Opinion Research Centre estimated that over one-third of Polish women born before 1978 had undergone at least one abortion.2 Polish women were therefore using abortion to control their fertility, even though the vast majority were Catholic and the Polish Catholic hierarchy fiercely opposed the liberalization of the abortion law, and abortion in general.3 The paradoxical commonality of abortion in a Catholic country with a particularly conservative ecclesiastic hierarchy ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Collison Course: Rural Track Crossing Habits and the Railroad in the
           United States, 1915–32

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      Abstract: In October 1918, Justice Alexander Simpson Jr. of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court dissented from the majority opinion in a case involving a traveler who died when a train smashed into his one-horse buggy at a crossing. Simpson's colleagues ruled that the deceased man's wife could not receive $13,500 in lost wages because he had not stopped to look out for a train before riding onto the tracks. He had stopped after crossing the first of five sets of tracks; he was hit on the fourth. All agreed that his stopping late did not cause the collision, but five of the justices held that state law was un-bending on a traveler's duty to stop, look, and listen before proceeding. Simpson disagreed, noting that the law's ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • L'analogie dans les techniques [Analogy in techniques] ed. by Sophie de
           Beaune et al. (review)

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      Abstract: Few collective books succeed in making you think differently about the history of technology using one of the most difficult and changing concepts in human culture: analogy. Behind a classic framework of collected papers lies an invitation to transform customary thoughts about technology, innovation, and their cultural context. This invitation stems from more than the act of bringing together cognitivists and historians analyzing the ontological, epistemological, and operative dimensions of analogy in technologies; the editors in fact aim to "open a space of confrontation and rapprochement between these logics [of analogy], identifying the different visions as well as overlaps and interactions" (p. 9).To ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Perspectives on Early Andean Civilization in Peru: Interaction, Authority,
           and Socioeconomic Organization during the First and Second Millennia B.C.
           ed. by Richard L. Burger et al. (review)

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      Abstract: This book, focusing on the first and second millennia BCE in the Central Andes, is the result of a session at the Fifty-Fourth International Congress of Americanists in 2012. It brings together well-illustrated papers on the Caballo Muerto Complex; the Tembladera area of the middle Jequetepeque Valley; the individual sites of Cardal, Anchucaya, Kuntur Wasi, and Pacopampa; and wider regional perspectives on exchange and interactions. Of special note is the realization that these early peoples built impressive ceremonial centers of packed earth and stone using simple tools. Bone and copper utensils and woven nets that aided hunters exemplify the technological means available.One theme that impresses is the long-term ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Lost Knowledge: The Concept of Vanished Technologies and Other Human
           Histories by Benjamin B. Olshin (review)

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      Abstract: Human history, as recorded in written accounts, covers only a small period of time compared to what is known as prehistory, human civilization before the use of writing. Prehistoric civilization is commonly understood through the interpretation of historical sites and archaeological excavations. But is there any other way to understand this period' And does other evidence shed light on questions such as whether the development of human civilization is linear, or an alternation of periodic growth and decline' How did the dissemination of human knowledge, especially in prehistoric times, proceed' These are the issues Benjamin B. Olshin explores in his book Lost Knowledge.Olshin has his own understanding of the above ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Renaissance Fun: The Machines behind the Scenes by Philip Steadman
           (review)

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      Abstract: This book about Renaissance diversions was written primarily for the sake of entertainment, according to its author, and it is a joy to read indeed. Its ingenious composition, tailored to the book's contents and argument, significantly contributes to this. The first part deals with Renaissance stage technologies, such as ropes and drums, for presenting swiftly changing sceneries, waving waters, or angels flying through the air. The second part addresses technologies used for entertainments in Renaissance gardens, such as fountains, water jokes (hidden intermittent fountains), and artificial bird songs. The third part discusses two famous cases: the Garden of Marvels at Pratolino near Florence, created in the 1580s ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Making Disability Modern: Design Histories ed. by Bess Williamson and
           Elizabeth Guffey (review)

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      Abstract: Making Disability Modern, edited by Bess Williamson and Elizabeth Guffey, walks us through the history of how definitions of disability moved from physical and cognitive limitations of bodies—to be treated and eliminated with medical interventions or "fixed" through top-down design by the "abled"—to the broader societal concept where the effects of disability can be minimized or amplified by design. Different from Williamson's previous Accessible America (NYU Press, 2019), the edited book brings together international scholars providing a global perspective on how different bodies are perceived and treated by design. While the book mostly covers the Western history through real-world cases focused on a certain ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Untold Story of the Talking Book by Matthew Rubery (review)

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      Abstract: Having never read an audiobook, I accessed the Audible version of Matthew Rubery's The Untold Story of the Talking Book for this review. I thought this might give me a more authentic experience of reading and listening, though fully aware of the challenges my deafness would pose. I ended up reading the Introduction in a multimodal approach, playing the audiobook and following the written text, oftentimes getting frustrated because the different speeds between the two became unaligned—I tend to read faster with my eyes, and I suppose, my mind, than my ears can listen. The aurality of reading is not for me, but I can certainly understand its appeal for both blind, low-vision, and sighted people: the pace and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Know Your Remedies: Pharmacy and Culture in Early Modern China by He Bian
           (review)

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      Abstract: Know Your Remedies is a vibrant social and cultural history of the Chinese pharmacy. It challenges the tenacious view, posited by Joseph Needham some fifty years ago, that Chinese science and technology surpassed European innovations prior to 1600 but declined precipitously thereafter. Rejecting narratives of scientific stagnation in seventeenth-century China, He Bian details wide-ranging transformations in Chinese approaches to knowledge of the natural world from the late Ming (circa 1550–1644) through the early and high Qing (1644–1800)—specifically around the practice of pharmacology. She argues that this period saw the emergence of a type of early modern Chinese pharmaceutical knowledge that was distinct from ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future by Kate Brown
           (review)

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      Abstract: An eclectic combination of the history of technology, environmental history, and disaster STS, Kate Brown's Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future (also published by W. W. Norton with the subtitle An Environmental History of Chernobyl) captures the aftermath of Chernobyl (1986), focusing less on the specifics of reactor technology and far more on the issue of radiation as an unknown. Brown thus offers a careful account of the accumulation of knowledge, using human bodies, plants, and the surrounding environment collectively as a vast repository, a living archive concerning questions of radiation's absorption, as well as the environment's ability to adjust. She argues that Soviet specialists already ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • IVF and Assisted Reproduction: A Global History by Sarah Ferber et al.
           (review)

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      Abstract: Most scholars would find the prospect of writing a global history of in vitro fertilization (IVF) daunting. In IVF and Assisted Reproduction, co-authors Sarah Ferber, Nicola J. Marks, and Vera Mackie make it look easy. Commanding an enormous literature in a relatively short book, they give a sober-minded and clearly written overview of the techno-scientific, medical, political, cultural, and economic history of the past five decades of assisted reproduction.Topical chapters draw the reader through time, beginning with the development of the science and clinical technique. Rather than focusing squarely on the Western story, as histories of IVF typically do, they take a broader view, with an extended account of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Ingegnosi artificij." Serenissima Repubblica di Venezia: Trecento anni di
           storia della scienza, della tecnica e dell'innovazione (1474–1788).
           ["Ingenious artifices." The most serene Republic of Venice: Three hundred
           years of history of science, technology and innovation (1474–1788)] by
           Roberto Berveglieri (review)

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      Abstract: The Venetian Republic's pioneering role in the establishment of patent law is now widely recognized. Although earlier monopolies had already been granted for technological inventions, the system became enshrined in law in 1474 when the Venetian Senate enacted Europe's first intellectual property legislation. The procedure remained in place for more than three centuries, lasting until the Fall of the Republic in 1797—although records for the final decade are missing. Nevertheless, the Venetian Republic was not the only European government to grant such privileges, and inventors from outside the Veneto often applied to several different states. Numerous authors have made reference to the Senate's patent ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Inventing Ideas: Patents, Prizes, and the Knowledge Economy by B. Zorina
           Khan (review)

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      Abstract: Economic historians have often delved into the causes of the Industrial Revolution in Europe with this question: "Why Britain'" In this book, B. Zorina Khan, one of the world's leading experts on the history of innovation, proposes a new direction for the debate. With the question "Why America'" she asks to clarify how the United States succeeded in overtaking Europe in the nineteenth century to become the global technology leader of the twentieth century; in the author's view, "the greatest divergence in history" (p. 398). Khan is an opinionated author with great faith in the efficiency of free-market institutions. Her clear answer to the question of American ascendance is therefore not surprising. In Europe ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Beyond Bakelite: Leo Baekeland and the Business of Science and Invention
           by Joris Mercelis (review)

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      Abstract: About forty-five years ago, when I was completing my doctoral dissertation on the history of the first plastics, the supervisor of my Smithsonian fellowship, the curator of chemistry, dropped by my desk with a small notebook in his hand and said, "You might want to take a look at this." I can still visualize the little item, and my excitement in handling it was palpable—it was the first in a series of laboratory notebooks that Leo Baekeland, Belgian-American chemist, began to keep in 1907 on new experiments with the products of reacting phenol with formaldehyde. The result of these experiments was a novel plastic, unlike anything ever made before, which Baekeland immediately called "Bakelite."Over the years, that ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Swansea Copper: A Global History by Chris Evans and Louise Miskell
           (review)

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      Abstract: In recent years, historians have devoted much attention to the global trade of consumer goods, casting light on the emergence of a new category of semi-luxury goods, of a new practice of domestic comfort, of strategies of social promotion in the context of a "culture of appearance," and of the taste for exotic objects. This approach—which has undoubtedly contributed to a better understanding of the economic, social, and cultural dynamics of early industrialization—has however neglected certain categories of goods, like "producer goods" such as metals, that are employed in the fabrication of other goods. The importance of a producer good in the history of the globalization of British industry is a central concern ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Zinc for Coin and Brass: Bureaucrats, Merchants, Artisans, and Mining
           Laborers in Qing China, ca. 1680–1830s by Hailian Chen (review)

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      Abstract: Zinc for Coin and Brass elevates an old debate on the history of zinc to a higher level. This book transforms the question "who was first" into a search for answers to "why." The book is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary history of zinc in China that takes on board the history of technology, the environment, STS, transport, monetary and social history, and the administrative history of China. Through this lens, the book produces historical insights on Chinese society that transcend the case study.Today, zinc is a metal with numerous applications. But for centuries, zinc and its ores were a mystery. When copper is combined with the ore calamine, a product (brass) is formed with a gold-like luster. This made ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Crafts and Capitalism: Handloom Weaving Industry in Colonial India by
           Tirthankar Roy (review)

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      Abstract: Global economic history has long studied and established that cotton as commodity has been one of the major engines of world capitalism at least since the sixteenth century. Along with scholars like Giorgio Riello, Prasannan Parthasarathi, and Sven Beckert, who highlighted big politics and the transmission of key-technologies, Tirthankar Roy has for the past three decades foregrounded the role of artisanal cotton handloom weavers in Colonial India. He posits a technological trajectory of craft industrialization from hand weaving to powered looms for the handmade textile industry that expanded through innovation and entrepreneurship.Roy's new book The Crafts and Capitalism is therefore of interest to scholars ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Weaving Histories: The Transformation of the Handloom Industry in South
           India, 1800–1960 by Karuna Dietrich Wielenga (review)

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      Abstract: Karuna Dietrich Wielenga's book examines the changes brought about by the dynamic global currents from 1800 to 1960, and their impact on the handloom industry in South India. Using a variety of historical sources, Wielenga carefully demonstrates the local transformations in manufacturing techniques and production systems. The literature on textile manufacturing in India is divided into two broad positions: one holding colonialism responsible for the decline of hand spinning and weaving in the economy, and the other revisionist view that competition from northern England's goods increased efficiency in India's domestic cloth-making processes. Disagreeing with the literature's revisionist position, Wielenga expands ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hazardous Chemicals: Agents of Risk and Change, 1800–2000 ed. by Ernst
           Homburg and Elisabeth Vaupel (review)

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      Abstract: Industrial chemicals are a major driver of environmental, economic, and technological change. Their increased production in the nineteenth century contributed to the rapid growth of industrial economies and introduced novel risks and unprecedented harms. In the edited collection Hazardous Chemicals, eleven authors explore this "double-faced interaction between innovation and risk." They take a biographical approach to chemical histories that follow chemicals across a variety of intellectual domains to shed light on how humanity's relationship with hazardous substances is conditioned by a multitude of factors, from their material properties and economic demand to shifting cultural and scientific perceptions of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Angels of Efficiency: A Media History of Consulting by Florian Hoof
           (review)

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      Abstract: Angels of Efficiency deals with one of the most intriguing questions of the knowledge economy: the worldwide rise and growing influence of corporate consulting. A professor of Media Studies at the University of Lüneburg in Germany, author Florian Hoof traces the parallel development of visual media and corporate consulting between 1880 and 1930, showing how a new form of visual knowledge became integrated into management optimization practices. Visual management, exemplified by the 7-S Framework that McKinsey developed, would learn from, compete against, and complement Scientific Management, the theory pioneered by American engineer Frederick Taylor. The core of Hoof's research examines the consulting firm founded ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • From Russia with Code: Programming Migrations in Post-Soviet Times ed. by
           Mario Biagioli and Vincent Antonin Lépinay (review)

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      Abstract: While the title and back matter of this fascinating collection suggest that it covers contemporary Russian coding practices with a global impact, the volume does not address the most notorious of those practices—economic and political hacking with impacts around the world. Yet these elegant, deeply researched articles, predominantly by Russian scholars, illuminate a central quality of Russian IT culture that may explain the difficulty of addressing such illicit phenomena. That quality is a complex tension between professional and entrepreneurial identity that shapes the IT innovation emerging from this region. It originated historically in the massive Soviet state investment in computing initiated in the 1960s ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Eigensinnige Musterschüler: Ländliche Entwicklung und internationales
           Expertenwissen in der Türkei (1947–1980) [Headstrong model students:
           Rural development and international expert knowledge in Turkey
           (1947–1980)] by Heinrich Hartmann (review)

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      Abstract: In March 1924, the American philosopher John Dewey was invited to travel through Turkey in order to study its system of education and suggest pedagogical improvements. After traveling two months through Istanbul, Ankara, and Bursa with occasional visits to the Turkish countryside, Dewey presented his progressive pedagogical vision of education as the central instrument to foster a democratic civil society and integrate the rural population into a modern secular nation-state. However, Dewey's suggestions tended to address education in rural areas as a universal problem of modernizing societies, paying scant attention to the local cultural systems in which his educational ideas should take root.The tensions between ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Histories of Human Engineering: Tact and Technology by Maarten Derksen
           (review)

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      Abstract: How has the idea of human engineering, the dream of control of human behavior and society, emerged, traveled, and transformed' In Histories of Human Engineering, Maarten Derksen addresses this puzzle. His combination of histories of science with histories of concepts resonates with How Reason Almost Lost Its Mind (Erickson et al., 2013) and Objectivity (Daston & Galison, 2007).At first glance, the book resembles a lexicon of twentieth-century human engineering concepts: social technology, mind control, scientific management, the human factor, etc. It is, however, primarily an intellectual history of several key authors who all contributed to and reframed the main concept. Their ideas are recounted through a subtle ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ingénieurs et Entreprises, XIXe–XXIe siècle [Engineers and companies,
           

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      Abstract: French history of work is flourishing and by no means institutionally marginalized. From 2021 to at least 2023, maybe 2024, every history student candidate for the agrégation and other competitive examinations for positions in secondary education will have to study "Work in Western Europe from the 1830s to the 1930s. Craft and industrial labor, practices and social issues." History of technology and its role in social change is one of the main perspectives explored. Such conjuncture, creating a strong demand for books on the topic, can only reinforce the field: this special issue of Artefact brings its building block by focusing on engineers, more precisely their training, careers, and activities.Students—and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Unnatural Resources: Energy and Environmental Politics in Appalachia after
           the 1973 Oil Embargo by Michael Camp (review)

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      Abstract: In Unnatural Resources, Michael Camp focuses on two issues: how the United States' presidents, politicians, and public responded to the energy crises of the 1970s and 1980s and how they dealt with environmental concerns during this same period. In thoroughly documented chapters, he argues that energy is a historical concept rooted in specific times and places, and if we want to understand the history of energy during this time, we must look at its intersection with economic, political, and intellectual history. Camp examines the presidencies of Jimmy Carter (1977–81), former governor of Georgia, and Ronald Reagan (1981–89), former governor of California.Looking first at Carter's presidency, Camp says that many of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Greening the Alliance: The Diplomacy of NATO's Science and Environmental
           Initiatives by Simone Turchetti (review)

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      Abstract: Simone Turchetti has carried out a fine study of NATO's science diplomacy and, later, environmental diplomacy. It covers the period from the organization's inception in 1949 up until the present. NATO's Science Committee, funded in 1958, and the individuals that shaped and populated it, the majority of them scientists, occupy center stage in Turchetti's narrative. Another NATO organization, the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS), whose establishment in 1969 manifested NATO's environmental turn, also has a key role.At first sight, it may seem surprising that a military alliance acted as a patron of science, let alone environmental research and management. But NATO was always more than a military ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Globalizing Automobilism: Exuberance and the Emergence of Layered
           Mobility, 1900–1980 by Gijs Mom (review)

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      Abstract: The second of what will be a three-volume set, Globalizing Automobilism expands upon themes, ideas, and peeves introduced in Gijs Mom's Atlantic Automobilism (Berghahn, 2015). This previous book covered the emergence and persistence of automobility in the Western world from the late nineteenth century to the Second World War. Globalizing Automobilism extends coverage to Asia, Africa, and Latin America, recapitulating the first two phases, and adding a third—exuberance—that takes the story up to the end of the 1970s.For those few readers of this journal unfamiliar with Mom, it is worth noting that nobody has done more to develop and promote mobility studies. Founder of the International Association for the History ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Iran in Motion: Mobility, Space, and the Trans-Iranian Railway by Mikiya
           Koyagi (review)

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      Abstract: Iran in Motion is a welcome addition to our understanding of technological modernization in the Middle East. The book sits at the intersection of the modern history of Iran and mobility studies. Besides giving an account of how the trans-Iranian railway came into being, Koyagi tells us how the railway project impacted the nation's practices and imaginations of mobility. Koyagi is cautious not to frame the subject of his study solely as a state-sponsored modernization project. He thus broadens the scope of his attention from the political elites and state officials, and takes in a wide range of historical actors such as local and foreign laborers, engineers, migrants, and travelers. The book aims to unearth and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cycling and the British: A Modern History by Neil Carter (review)

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      Abstract: For about a decade, I've had a pet project jotted down in the back of my notebook that I thought of as "Britons on Bikes." Finally, I can "park" this project, as Neil Carter has ensured it is no longer needed. It is peculiar, and perhaps telling, that British historians published extensive analyses of cycling in Italy (John Foot, Pedalare! Pedalare!, 2012) and France (Hugh Dauncey, French Cycling, 2012) before a full-length academic study on the peculiarities and specificities of Britain's relationship with the bicycle. However, in Cycling and the British, Neil Carter has addressed this gap with a first-class study that will take a long time to better.As a clear and detailed guide, it is an invaluable corrective ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mountain Rivers, Mountain Roads: Transport in Southwest China,
           1700–1850 by Nanny Kim (review)

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      Abstract: With swift rivers and rugged mountains, the Southwest borderlands were considered by Chinese to be a remote, alien, and perhaps inaccessible region. Before 1700, there was little trade with the region. The eighteenth century saw a remarkable transformation. Millions of settlers arrived from eastern China—often violently displacing indigenous communities. By the 1750s, annual exports from the Southwest borderlands to eastern China were almost 200,000 tons of Sichuan rice, 6,000 tons of Yunnan copper and Guizhou zinc, and vast quantities of medicines. Imports included large volumes of cotton and salt. Given the cost of overcoming difficult terrain, how did such robust long-distance trade emerge' In this learned ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Bildfabriken. Industrie und Fotografie im Zarenreich (1860–1917) [Image
           factories: Industry and photography in Tsarist Russia (1860–1917)] by
           Lenka Fehrenbach (review)

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      Abstract: Lenka Fehrenbach focuses her dissertation on photographs of factories in Tsarist Russia. In doing so, she follows up on Rosalinde Sartorti's study (Press Photography and Industrialization in the Soviet Union, 1981), which analyzes the interaction of photography and Soviet industrialization on the basis of the Soviet Pravda, the former official newspaper of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Fehrenbach, however, does not limit herself to newspapers, but deliberately chooses various media like albums, postcards, and single vintage prints. Her period of study begins in the 1860s and ends with the Russian Revolution, including an outlook of the continuities and ruptures within Soviet industrial photography. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • La plaque photographique – Un outil pour la fabrication et la diffusion
           des savoirs (XIXe–XXe siècle) [The photographic plate: A tool for the
           production and diffusion of knowledge (19th–20th centuries)] ed. by
           Denise Borlée and Hervé Doucet (review)

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      Abstract: This volume holds the proceedings of a colloquium held in Strasbourg (France) in 2016. Denise Borlée and Hervé Doucet have worked together on the history of art at the University of Strasbourg through its photographic collection, in particular, its projection plates. The work brings together authors from diverse backgrounds, including academics, experts, and curators of museums and collections. Comprising four parts and twenty chapters, La Plaque photographique investigates the use of photographic projection in various pedagogical contexts in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This reflection is part of more general questions about the materiality of photography, the use of projectors and magic lanterns ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Through Astronaut Eyes: Photographing Early Human Spaceflight by Jennifer
           K. Levasseur (review)

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      Abstract: The Apollo program produced some of the twentieth century's most iconic images. Photographs of Earth taken from a distant vantage point gave viewers a new emblem to contemplate the global. Jennifer Levasseur's book, Through Astronaut Eyes, contends that the resonance of these photographs was thanks largely to the human operators behind the camera. The story of the Apollo program was one narrated in first person, and the handheld camera allowed astronauts to function as our proxies in space.Levasseur lays out a two-pronged argument. First, she establishes that astronaut photography was included in NASA's lunar program because of a fortuitous confluence of technological and social forces. Pointing out that these ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Communicating Europe: Technologies, Information, Events by Andreas Fickers
           and Pascal Griset (review)

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      Abstract: It is an honor to review this magnificent contribution to the Making Europe: Technology and Transformations, 1850–2000 series previously discussed by Eda Kranakis, in the context of the seven volumes and their place in the historiography of technology, in this journal (Technology and Culture, 2021). The authors offer an expansive and detailed narrative, as well as an extensive bibliography and index, a compendium of relevant acronyms, and a huge array of maps and illustrations. A major theme of the book is "European techno-political diplomacy in information and communication technologies," from a longue duree perspective. This approach contributes to a better understanding of "European history through the lens of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sound Streams: A Cultural History of Radio-Internet Convergence by Andrew
           J. Bottomley (review)

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      Abstract: For many practitioners and scholars, the emergence of the internet had (and continues to have) a large impact on media. Supposed new forms of media have arisen, often touted as unique from what has come before. In his book, Sound Streams, Andrew J. Bottomley strongly resists this narrative in his exploration of sound-based media in recent decades. Instead of seeing things such as podcasts or other streaming formats as completely new and fundamentally changing audio, he crafts an argument around what has not changed from the origins of radio to today. To accomplish this, Bottomley takes a wide view of what radio is and includes a number of different media platforms under this umbrella term. By taking this approach ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Echo's Chambers: Architecture and the Idea of Acoustic Space by Joseph L.
           Clarke (review)

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      Abstract: Inquiries into what tethers the immaterial to the material, or vice versa, have propelled practical and theoretical engagements with the built environment throughout global histories of architecture. Sound has often critically typified these inherently complex processes while skirting an otherwise discipline-pervading ocularcentrism. The branch of architectural acoustics scientifically probes the sonic dimension of engineering structures that shelter desirable sound from unintelligible noise. Its historiography mediates the complementary influence of technological progress and cultural formation. Since historian of technology Emily Thompson shaped the field with The Soundscape of Modernity (MIT Press, 2002) two ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Modernism's Visible Hand: Architecture and Regulation in America by
           Michael Osman (review)

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      Abstract: This might not be a love story, but it is the tale of a contested relationship. At times abusive, at times symbiotic, architecture and regulation systems not only got together some time ago—here largely during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries—but also learned how to support each other. But, as in many romantic stories, the honeymoon period soon shifts as they discover how to push each other's buttons. Michael Osman stresses early on in his multifaceted book that this is not a history of technology; neither, one might add, is it the history of modern architecture told through standardization (which insists on questions of modularity, units, and the logistics to aggregate them). The history Osman ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Global Islam: A Very Short Introduction by Nile Green (review)

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      Abstract: Globalization connotes the interconnectedness and increasing interdependence of the world. This condition is experienced as transformative. This is not to assert that the world used to be entirely disconnected. There has always been travel, but with much less intensity. Technologies—paper, for example, the printing press, or the military possibilities of the horse—did travel worldwide, transforming the world, but they did not lead to the interpenetration of the world to the point of inseparability. Nile Green has elegantly argued in his article "Spacetime" that the impact of new technologies in steam and print generated not only routes between spaces, but the integration of space/time in fundamentally new ways. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • When the Medium Was the Mission: The Atlantic Telegraph and the Religious
           Origins of Network Culture by Jenna Supp-Montgomerie (review)

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      Abstract: The tale of the Atlantic telegraph (1858–66) has been told many times (Gordon, A Thread across the Ocean, 2002, Muller, Wiring the World, 2016). The reader need not worry, however, since the title of the current treatment is slightly misleading. The book only tangentially covers the history of the Atlantic telegraph and the electromagnetic telegraph. And it does not concern the missionary or religious usage of the transatlantic cable in any traditional sense.The author, a religious and communications studies scholar at the University of Iowa, uses her study on the attempt to create the world's first undersea cable connection to pose a larger and arguably more important question. How did the Atlantic telegraph ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Far Beyond the Moon: A History of Life Support Systems in the Space Age by
           David P. D. Munns and Kärin Nickelsen (review)

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      Abstract: Make no mistake, this is a book about shit in space. The sanitized title and cover design don't do justice to what's inside this important and far-ranging history of human waste's various roles in sealed artificial environments designed for space travel. The problem of what to do with astronaut poo has been there since the start of human spaceflight, and coauthors David Munns and Kärin Nickelsen note that sixty-plus years later, a long-term sustainable solution remains elusive. From stick-on poop collection bags to vacuum-assisted commodes to aquarium-like algae habitats converting solid waste into (theoretically) edible food, the array of engineering and life sciences approaches examined ranges from simple and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Shaping Science: Organizations, Decisions, and Culture on NASA's Teams by
           Janet Vertesi (review)

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      Abstract: "Spacecraft don't have social lives." This is how a principal investigator of the Saturn project code-named Helena reacts when author Janet Vertesi begins a presentation during her anthropological study of NASA scientists and engineers with this slide: "The Social Life of Spacecraft."Indeed, one may question if Vertesi's slide is just a typical anthropomorphism of a scientific tool. Yet, in Shaping Science, Vertesi masterfully, and with intricate detail, shows how spacecraft take on a life nurtured by scientists and engineers who, by their very actions and approaches, embody them with sociological characteristics.Vertesi's first book, Seeing Like a Rover (University of Chicago Press, 2014), was an examination of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Things of Life: Materiality in Late Soviet Russia by Alexey Golubev
           (review)

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      Abstract: Golubev's book stands in a rich tradition of investigating the social agency of things and the entanglements between humans and objects in Soviet Russia and other European socialist countries. Well-known studies in this field have focused on the more striking meeting places between people and things, such as kitchens (Reid, "Cold War in the Kitchen," 2002), architecture (Varga-Harris, Stories of House and Home, 2016), and food (Gronow, Caviar with Champagne, 2003). Golubev directs his attention to unexpected human-object entanglements, like youth hobby clubs for modeling miniature ships, planes, and vehicles; bodybuilding activities that many people undertook in the basements of their flats; and Karelian ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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