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    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)

UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 144 of 144 Journals sorted alphabetically
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AJP Renal Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aktuelle Urologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
American Journal of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Andrologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Andrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Andrology & Gynecology : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Andrology and Genital Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arab Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivio Italiano di Urologia e Andrologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Españoles de Urología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Pediatric Nephrology Association     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bangladesh Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Basic and Clinical Andrology     Open Access  
BJU International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
BJUI Compass     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Urological Association Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical and Experimental Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Clinical Kidney Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cuadernos de Cirugía     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Nephrology & Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Opinion in Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Current Urology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Der Nephrologe     Hybrid Journal  
Der Urologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Diabetic Nephropathy     Open Access  
EMC - Urología     Full-text available via subscription  
Enfermería Nefrológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
European Urology Focus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Urology Oncology     Hybrid Journal  
European Urology Open Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Forum Nefrologiczne     Full-text available via subscription  
Geriatric Nephrology and Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale di Clinica Nefrologica e Dialisi     Open Access  
Hellenic Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
IJU Case Reports     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Brazilian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Urology and Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal für Urologie und Urogynäkologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Clinical Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Endoluminal Endourology     Open Access  
Journal of Endourology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Endourology Case Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Genital System & Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Integrative Nephrology and Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Kidney Cancer and VHL     Open Access  
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nephrology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Pediatric Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Renal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Journal of The Egyptian Society of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access  
Journal of Urology & Nephrology     Open Access  
Kidney Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Kidney International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Kidney International Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidney Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kidney Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidneys (Počki)     Open Access  
Nature Reviews Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Nature Reviews Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Nefrología     Open Access  
Nefrología (English Edition)     Open Access  
Nephro-Urology Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Nephron     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nephron Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nephron Experimental Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephron Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Neurourology and Urodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
OA Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Urology & Nephrology Journal     Open Access  
Paediatric Nephrology Journal of Bangladesh     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Portuguese Journal of Nephrology & Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Progrès en Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Progrès en Urologie - FMC     Full-text available via subscription  
Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Renal Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Renal Replacement Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research and Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Nefrología, Diálisis y Trasplante     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Urología     Open Access  
Revista Urologia Colombiana     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Seminars in Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Prostate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Translational Research in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trends in Urology & Men's Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Urine     Open Access  
Uro-News     Hybrid Journal  
Urolithiasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Internationalis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Urologic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urologic Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urological Science     Open Access  
Urologicheskie Vedomosti     Open Access  
Urologie in der Praxis     Hybrid Journal  
Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Urology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urology Times     Free   (Followers: 3)
Urology Video Journal     Open Access  
World Journal of Nephrology and Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Urology and Nephrology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.653
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-2584 - ISSN (Online) 0301-1623
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Magnesium is crucial in renal-cardiovascular fibrosis but the Gitelman’s
           syndrome paradox still awaits resolution

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      PubDate: 2022-08-04
       
  • Evaluation of Apelin-13 levels in patients with diabetic nephropathy

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      Abstract: Purpose There is no clear information about the level of Apelin-13 in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN). In this study, we investigated whether there is a relationship between Apelin-13 level and the severity of the disease in patients with DN. Methods In our case–control study, we included patients who applied to the endocrinology outpatient clinic in 2019. Patients without a history of diabetes were determined as the healthy group (group 1). The patients were divided into 4 groups according to their microalbumin and creatinine levels. Venous blood samples were obtained from all patients for routine laboratory parameters and Apelin-13 levels. Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) for insulin resistance was calculated using the formula: plasma glucose X insulin level/405. Results Albumin was found to be significantly lower in group 5 (p = 0.032), hemoglobin A1c, microalbumin/creatinine and HOMA-IR values were found to be significantly lower in group 1 (p < 0.001 for each). Apelin-13 level was found to be significantly higher in group 4 and group 5 (p < 0.001). A negative correlation was found between Apelin-13 and GFR (r = − 0.286, p = 0.003). A positive correlation was found between Apelin-13 and HOMA-IR (r = 0.309, p = 0.009) and microalbumin/creatinine (r = 0.296, p < 0.001). Conclusion In patients with DN, Apelin-13 level increases with the severity of the disease and can be used as a biomarker for staging of DN.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
       
  • Verapamil inhibited the development of ureteral stricture by blocking CaMK
           II-mediated STAT3 and Smad3/JunD pathways

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      Abstract: Background Ureteral stricture (US) is a fibrotic process that leads to urinary tract obstruction and even kidney damage, with the characteristic of reduced extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and increased collagen synthesis. Verapamil, as a calcium channel blocker, was reported to prevent scar formation. Our work aimed to investigate the biological effects and mechanism of verapamil in US. Methods Fibroblasts were subjected to transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) to stimulate collagen synthesis, and the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein expressions in fibroblasts were assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot. The location of phosphorylation-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3) and Jund proto-oncogene subunit (JunD) in fibroblasts were determined by immunofluorescence (IF). The binding relationship between signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and collagen type I alpha1 (COL1A1)/collagen type III alpha 1 chain (COL3A1) and the binding relationship between JunD and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) were verified by dual luciferase reporter gene and chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Results Herein, we found that verapamil could inhibit TGF-β1/Ca2 + ⁄calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II)-mediated STAT3 activation in fibroblasts, and STAT3 inhibition repressed collagen production. In addition, verapamil could inhibit TGF-β1/CaMK II-mediated Mothers against DPP homolog 3 (Smad3)/JunD pathway activation in fibroblasts, and JunD silencing inhibited TIMP1 (a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor) expression. Our subsequent experiments revealed that STAT3 bound with COL1A1 promoter and COL3A1 promoter and activated their transcription, and JunD bound with TIMP1 promoter and activated its transcription. Moreover, as expected, STAT3 activation could eliminate the inhibitory effect of verapamil treatment on TGF-β1-induced collagen production in fibroblasts, and JunD overexpression reversed the inhibitory effect of verapamil treatment on TGF-β1-induced TIMP1 expression in fibroblasts. Conclusion Verapamil inhibited collagen production and TIMP-1 expression in US by blocking CaMK II-mediated STAT3 and Smad3/JunD pathways.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03
       
  • Could systemic immune inflammation index be a new parameter for diagnosis
           and disease activity assessment in systemic lupus erythematosus'

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      Abstract: Purpose Systemic immune inflammation index (SII) has been used as a marker of inflammatory status in various diseases, but its role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is unknown. We aimed to investigate the role of SII in SLE and its association with disease activity and renal involvement. Methods In this retrospective study, 76 patients with SLE were compared with 76 age- and gender-matched healthy control group in terms of SII, neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (NLR), and platelet–lymphocyte ratio (PLR). SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 system (SLEDAI-2 K) was used to divide the SLE patients into an inactive group (SLEDAI-2 K < 9) and an active group (SLEDAI-2 K ≥ 9). Correlations between the ratios and both disease activity and renal involvement were analyzed. Results SLE patients had a higher level of SII compared with controls. The ability of SII in predicting SLE (AUC = 0.626) was lower than NLR (AUC = 0.723) and PLR (AUC = 0.666). SII was positively correlated with C-reactive protein (r = 0.288. p = 0.01), but no association between SII and SLEDAI-2 K scores was found. Significantly higher values of NLR, but not SII, were detected in patients with nephritis (p = 0.04). The best NLR cut-off value to predict SLE patients with nephritis was 2.32, with 78.5% sensitivity and 56.2% specificity. Conclusion For the first, we demonstrated that SII level was elevated in patients with SLE. However, NLR is a better marker than SII in predicting SLE and could serve as an indicator of nephritis. Larger-scale studies should be carried out to confirm our results.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
       
  • Etiology, urine metabolic risk factors, and urine oxalate patterns in
           patients with significant hyperoxaluria and recurrent nephrolithiasis

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      Abstract: Purpose American Urology Association guidelines recommend genetic testing for patients with recurrent stones and urine oxalate > 75 mg/day. The goal of this study was to examine the treatment of patients in this category in a large multidisciplinary adult stone clinic. Methods Patients were evaluated from a single institution between 2006 and 2019. Those with at least one level of urinary oxalate excretion (uOx) above 75 mg/day were identified. A chart review identified enteric risk factors and genetic testing results. Patients without an identifiable enteric cause were considered idiopathic. Results A total of 4229 separate 24-h urine collections in 1302 patients were reviewed. At least one measurement of uOx above 75 mg/day was found in 103 (7.9%) patients. Enteric hyperoxaluria (EH) was seen in 28 (27%) and idiopathic hyperoxaluria (IH) in 76 (74%). 20 (71%) patients in the EH group had undergone gastric bypass. The median uOx was significantly higher level in the EH group (121.0 vs. 93.0 mg/day). For the entire cohort, there was a drop in uOx (− 33.8 mg/day) with medical and dietary therapy after a follow-up of 46.6 months. The final oxalate was higher in EH (88.9 vs. 60.1 mg/day). Only one patient had referral for genetic testing and was found to have primary hyperoxaluria type 2. Conclusions The most common cause of significant hyperoxaluria in patients with recurrent nephrolithiasis remains idiopathic. Patients with IH have more significant improvement in uOx compared to EH; however, both groups had hyperoxaluria at last follow-up. Rate of genetic testing is low despite guideline recommendations.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
       
  • The role of testosterone in men’s health: is it time for a new
           approach'

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      Abstract: Purpose Because of many unanswered questions regarding men’s health, a literature review was performed to better understand the role of testosterone and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in the management of hypogonadism and aging related prostate gland diseases (ARPGD) including prostate cancer (PCa) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Methods The PubMed database was screened for pertinent peer reviewed articles published during the last four decades that culminated in the positions and recommendations in this paper. Results Hypogonadism seriously impacts men’s health, and the diagnosis remains controversial. The incidence of ARPGD is projected to increase worldwide and treatment still has significant limitations. There is compelling evidence that lower, not higher, testosterone levels trigger the development of PCa and BPH through androgen receptor over-expression. TRT was found to be safe and effective in treating hypogonadism including in PCa survivors and those harboring PCa. There is also evidence that TRT might reduce the incidence and prevalence of ARPGD. Conclusions and recommendations This review synthesizes a wide-ranging compendium of basic science and clinical research that strongly encourages altering the present approach to diagnosing and treating men with hypogonadism and ARPGD. These findings underscore the importance of avoiding significant testosterone decline and support the use of TRT. Ten recommendations are offered as a framework for the way forward. It is now time for clinicians, payers, researchers, funding agencies, professional associations, and patient advocacy groups to embrace this new paradigm to increase longevity and improve the quality of life.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Correction to: Changes before and after COVID-19 pandemic on the personal
           hygiene behaviors and incidence of peritonitis in peritoneal-dialysis
           patients: a multi-center retrospective study

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      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis: a diagnosis of exclusion for
           euvolemic hyponatremia

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      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Baggio–Yoshinari syndrome as a sexually transmitted infection: a
           possibly way of transmission'

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      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Physical activity and its trajectory over time and clinical outcomes in
           hemodialysis patients

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      Abstract: Purpose We examined whether physical activity measured at starting point and its trajectory over time were simultaneously associated with vital prognosis. Methods This retrospective cohort study included 295 ambulatory maintenance hemodialysis patients (mean age 63.9 years; 54.6% male). We measured physical activity at index date (starting point) and its change over 1 year as predictors, and all-cause death and cardiovascular events were assessed as the outcomes. Two groups each of high versus low physical activity at starting point (based on 4000 steps per day) and no decline versus decline (based on a predicted mean slope) were created. Cox proportional-hazards regression and Fine–Gray proportional sub-distribution hazards model were used to examine associations between physical activity and its trajectory and clinical outcomes. Results Decline in physical activity over 1 year was associated with a higher risk of all-cause death and cardiovascular events, irrespective of the physical activity at starting point. Furthermore, both lower physical activity at starting point and decrease in physical activity over time were independently associated with a higher risk of all-cause death and cardiovascular events in models in which each exposure was mutually adjusted. Compared to other groups that worsened in either exposure, the lowest risk for death/cardiovascular events was observed in the high at starting point/no decline over time group. Conclusions Both physical activity at starting point and its change over time were independently associated with vital prognosis. The assessment of both exposures provides additional prognostic information for the assessment of each exposure.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Combination of holographic imaging with robotic partial nephrectomy for
           renal hilar tumor treatment

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      Abstract: Objectives To evaluate the clinical value of the holographic imaging technology in combination with robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN) for renal hilar tumor treatment. Patients and methods From Dec. 2018 to Dec. 2021, patients diagnosed with renal hilar tumor were included in this retrospective study. Before the surgery, the engineers established the holographic image models based on the enhanced CT data. The models were used in patient consultation, pre-surgery planning and surgery simulation. During the RAPN, the navigation was achieved by real-time overlapping of the holographic images on the robotic surgery endoscopic views. The navigation technique helped the surgeon to identify the important anatomic structures such as tumor, renal vein, renal artery, and pelvis. Results There were total of eight patients with renal hilar tumor who underwent RAPN combined with holographic imaging technique. The mean age was 57.3 years, the median ASA score was 2. The mean tumor size was 42.4 mm and the median RENAL Nephrometry score was 9.5. The clinical stages were cT1a (37.5%) and cT1b (62.5%). All the procedures were performed uneventfully by one surgeon. The mean operative time was 144.3 min, and the mean warm ischemia time was 27.9 min. The mean estimated blood loss was 86.3 ml. There was no conversion to open surgery or radical nephrectomy. There were no Clavien–Dindo ≥ 3 perioperative complications. Conclusions Using the holographic imaging technique, the pre-surgery planning, simulation of renal arterial clamp and excision of the tumor, and intraoperative navigation were feasible and helpful in facilitating RAPN.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Prognostic value of modified National Institute of Health activity and
           chronicity scoring in determining complete renal response in newly
           diagnosed lupus nephritis: a retrospective single centre study

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      Abstract: Introduction Early response to therapy is associated with favourable long-term outcome in LN. The working group of revision of ISN/RPS classification guidelines for LN recommended modified National Institute of Health (NIH) activity and chronicity scoring system to evaluate active and chronic lesions. Data on usefulness of modified NIH scoring system to determine complete renal response (CR) in LN are sparse. Methods We retrospectively studied 80 LN patients diagnosed from June/2018 to April/2020, who has followed up for more ≥ 6 months in our hospital. CR was defined by inactive urinary sediment, urine PCR of 0.5 g/g in a 24 h urine collection and normalization/stabilization of renal function. Pathologic lesions were described as per revised 2018 ISN/RPS classification and the modified NIH scoring system. Patients were grouped by AI (low, 0–5; moderate, 6–11; high, 12–24) and CI (low, 0–2; moderate, 3–5; high, 6–12). Time to event was analysed using Kaplan–Meier curves. Prognostic variables for CR were analysed by multivariable Cox proportional hazard models. Results With a median follow-up of 8 months, 50 patients (62.5%) achieved CR. Kaplan–Meier curves showed lower CR with high AI groups (p value = 0.001) and moderate/high CI groups (p value < 0.001). Moderate and high CI with HR of 0.088 (0.034–0.229) p value < 0.001 and Glomerulosclerosis Score with HR of 0.155 (0.072–0.331) p value < 0.001 were significant determinant of CR. Conclusion Moderate and high CI scores were associated with lower chances of CR in LN. Glomerulosclerosis of CI was significant determinant of CR.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Testosterone kinetics on hypogonadal men under clomiphene

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      Abstract: Objective To evaluate total testosterone (TT) kinetics and its predictors 6 months after the discontinuation of clomiphene citrate (CC) in patients with hypogonadism. Materials and methods Consecutive patients with normal testicles and male hypogonadism defined by TT < 300 ng/dl in the presence of signs or symptoms according to the previous consensus were prospectively evaluated in a urologic outpatient clinic by TT levels at baseline (T0), after a daily dose of 50 mg CC for 40 days (T1), and after the washout period of 6 months of CC discontinuation (T2). Results Among 75 patients, mean age 56.8 years, testosterone at T1 > 300 ng/dl was achieved by 69 (92%), 450–600 ng/dl by 32 (42.6%), and > 600 ng/dl by 27 (36.0%). 18 subjects (24%) maintained asymptomatic and TT levels over 300 ng/dl at T2. Age negatively related to testosterone response and T1 response > 810 ng/dl predicts a median gain of 166.5 ng/dl at 6 months of CC discontinuation. Conclusions CC is a compelling option to treat male hypogonadism, although a chronic treatment is needed in most patients. About one in every four patients respond to a CC short trial to "reboot" the physiology. Further understanding of TT kinetics in these patients in the long term is warranted.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Association between aortic calcification and the presence of kidney
           stones: calcium oxalate calculi in focus

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      Abstract: Purpose The current research is aimed at analyzing the relationship between kidney stone (KS) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) and the relationship between KS components and AAC. Methods This is a retrospective, case–control study. Kidney stone formers (KSFs) were treated at the Department of Urology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University for urological calculus disease from January 2014 to January 2020. Matched non-stone formers (non-SFs) were drawn from the same hospital for routine health examination from January 2018 to February 2019. Research-related information was collected and reviewed retrospectively from the hospital’s computerized records. AAC were evaluated using available results of computed tomography imaging and abdominal vascular ultrasound. The relationships of AAC between KSFs and non-SFs were compared. The composition of renal calculi was analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer. KSFs were divided into AAC groups and non-AAC based on AAC. The relationship of the composition of renal calculi between AAC and non-AAC were compared. The independent-sample t test, the chi-squared test and binary logistics regression were performed. Results Altogether, 4516 people were included, with 1027 KSFs and 3489 non-SFs. There were no significant differences in the laboratory parameters between KSFs and non-SFs. The association between the presence of AAC and KS was significant in multivariable model 2 [adjusting hypertension, diabetes mellitus, fasting blood glucose, uric acid, serum triglyceride (TG), serum calcium, and urine pH] (OR 5.756, 95% CI 4.616–7.177, p < 0.001). The result of KSFs showed that calcium oxalate calculi (CaOx) was significantly associated with AAC in multivariable model 3 (adjusting age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, drinking history, smoking history, and TG) (OR 1.351, 95% CI 1.002–1.822, p = 0.048). Conclusions The current study pioneered the revelation of the relationship between CaOx and AAC. Through an elimination of the confounding factors, the study demonstrated that KS and AAC were connected.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Intradialytic nutrition and quality of life in Chilean older patients in
           hemodialysis with protein-energy wasting

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      Abstract: Purpose The study assessed the impact of intradialytic oral nutritional supplementation on the quality of life in patients receiving hemodialysis and diagnosed with protein energy wasting. Methods A pre-test post-test quasi-experimental study was conducted before and after 3 months of intradialytic oral nutritional supplementation on 109 older hemodialysis patients. We measured before and after 3 months of intradialytic oral nutritional supplementation, the quality of life score, the burden of kidney disease, three quality of life scales and the mental and physical health status using KDQoL-SF™ 1.3, body composition and biochemical parameters of nutritional condition. Results The mean age of the patients was 69.4 ± 3.4 years, 59% were male, and the time on dialysis was 63.5 ± 52.6 months. Comparing the baseline with month 3 of intradialytic oral nutritional supplementation, we observed to better quality of life. In contrast to malnutrition, score, specifically increased significantly score of symptoms/problems list related to hemodialysis, sexual function, social and cognitive function, sleep, pain, energy/fatigue and general state of health. Significant changes were also found in nutritional status, energy intake and body composition indicators. After 3 months of intradialytic oral nutritional supplementation, we observed a nutritional status recovery in one or more indicators in 92% of the patients. Conclusion Our findings indicate that 3 months of intradialysis oral nutritional supplementation improves the components of physical and mental quality of life and nutritional status in older patients receiving hemodialysis diagnosed with loss of protein energy. These results are relevant to improve the experience of patients with protein energy loss receiving hemodialysis.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Home-based transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for overactive bladder
           syndrome: a randomized, controlled study

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      Abstract: Purpose Transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation (TPTNS) for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome (OAB), with or without urge urinary incontinence (UUI) using electrodes imbedded in the fabric of a conventional sock and an attachable battery-operated stimulation device (ZIDA®—Exodus Innovations, Sufa, Israel), was compared for effectiveness and safety to a sham procedure in a prospective, blinded, randomized, controlled trial. Methods Forty patients with diagnosed with OAB were recruited from a single site. There were two groups: a treatment group (21 patients, mean age 64), which used an active ZIDA® activation device (ZIDA) and a sham control group (SCG, 19 patients, mean age 72) randomized in a 1:1 ratio. After individual fitting of the sock and face-to-face instruction in the use of the device, patients in both groups self-administered the treatment once weekly for 30 min at home for a duration of 12 weeks. Prior to randomization and in Week 12, patients completed two 3-day bladder diaries and a quality-of-life (QOL) survey. Treatment success was defined as at least a 50% reduction in urgency voids with or without incontinence or at least a 30% reduction in 24-h frequency from baseline to Week 12. The key secondary endpoint was change in QOL from baseline to Week 12. Results The success rate for the primary endpoint in the ZIDA group was 80% (n = 16/20) versus 39% (n = 7/18) in the SCG (p = 0.02). For QOL, the least squares mean difference in change from baseline to Week 12 between the ZIDA and sham control arms total score was − 12.7 (95% CI − 20.2 to − 5.1). No significant adverse effects were observed. Conclusion TPTNS using the ZIDA home-based stimulation device offers a safe and effective treatment for patients with OAB syndrome and improves QOL. Trial regestration TRN: NCT04470765.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Invasive coronary artery disease assessment and myocardial infarction in
           patients on renal replacement therapy

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      Abstract: Background The incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) is elevated in patients receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT). We hypothesized that an invasive strategy of assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD) will identify patients more prone to developing MI. Methods This was a single-center observational cohort study that included 1678 patients receiving RRT (hemodialysis and renal transplantation) assessed for CAD prospectively and analyzed retrospectively. Endpoints were the incidence of MI and death. Results The median follow-up was 43 months, and 180 patients experienced an MI with a mortality rate of 74%. Multivariate analysis showed that diabetes (HR 1.633; 95% CI 1.165–2.289), prior MI (HR 1.724; 95% CI 1.153–2.579), and CAD (HR 2.073; 95% CI 1.400–3.071) were predictors of MI. Altered myocardial scan did not correlate with MI. At the discretion of the attending physicians, 20/180 patients (11%) underwent coronary intervention that was associated with a higher cumulative survival (Log-rank 0.007). Conclusion Patients with CAD suffered an MI more frequently, independently of symptoms and risk factors for MI, including noninvasive testing. Because of the elevated rate of the lethality of MI, invasive coronary studies may be indicated in select patients on RRT. Once an MI occurs, our data suggest that an invasive therapeutic approach is warranted.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Gut microbiome in hemodialysis patients treated with calcium acetate or
           treated with sucroferric oxyhydroxide: a pilot study

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      Abstract: Purpose It has been proved that the gut microbiome is altered in patients with chronic kidney disease. This contributes to chronic inflammation and increases cardiovascular risk and mortality, especially in those undergoing hemodialysis. Phosphate binders may potentially induce changes in their microbiome. This trial aimed to compare the changes in the gut microbiome of hemodialysis patients treated with calcium acetate to those treated with sucroferric oxyhydroxide. Methods Twelve hemodialysis patients were distributed to receive calcium acetate or sucroferric oxyhydroxide for 5 months. Blood samples (for biochemical analysis) and stool samples (for microbiome analysis) were collected at baseline, 4, 12, and 20 weeks after treatment initiation. Fecal DNA was extracted and a 16S rRNA sequencing library was constructed targeting the V3 and V4 hypervariable regions. Results Regarding clinical variables and laboratory parameters, no statistically significant differences were observed between calcium acetate or sucroferric oxyhydroxide groups. When analyzing stool samples, we found that all patients were different (p = 0.001) among themselves and these differences were kept along the 20 weeks of treatment. The clustering analysis in microbial profiles grouped the samples of the same patient independently of the treatment followed and the stage of the treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that a 5-month treatment with either calcium acetate or sucroferric oxyhydroxide did not modify baseline diversity or baseline bacterial composition in hemodialysis patients, also about the high-variability profiles of the gut microbiome found among these patients.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Magnesium in renal fibrosis

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      Abstract: Purpose Renal fibrosis (RF) is the main pathological feature of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The main focus of research on treatment for CKD is to develop strategies that delay or prevent RF from progressing to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Inflammation and oxidative stress occur during all stages of CKD. The magnesium cation (Mg2+) can reduce inflammation and oxidative stress, regulate apoptosis, and improve RF, and magnesium-based therapies are promising new treatments that can prevent RF. We reviewed the current evidence on the effects of magnesium in RF and examined the possible mechanism of magnesium in delaying RF. Methods We searched PubMed, Web of Science, and EMBASE for articles on magnesium and fibrosis, with a focus on magnesium and RF. Results Inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis are related to the occurrence of CKD. Previous research showed that Mg2+ inhibits the differentiation of inflammatory cells, down-regulates the production of inflammatory cytokines, reduces inflammation, and reduces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. In addition, Mg2+ also regulates apoptosis and protects renal tubular function. Magnesium may also regulate TRPM6/7, promote the secretion of klotho protein and improve renal fibrosis. Therefore, Mg2+ can protect the kidney from damage and slow down the progression of RF through many molecular and cellular effects. Some of the anti-fibrotic effects of Mg2+ may be related to its antagonism of intracellular Ca2+. Conclusion Magnesium may prevent the progression of renal fibrosis and delay CKD by reducing renal inflammation and oxidative stress, and by regulating fibrosis-related signaling pathways and cytokines.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Prognostic value of metabolic syndrome in renal structural changes in type
           2 diabetes

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      Abstract: Purpose To investigate the prognostic value of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its relationship with renal structure changes in patients with type 2 diabetes and associated diabetic nephropathy (DN). Methods 411 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes and biopsy-confirmed DN were enrolled in this retrospective study. MetS was defined according to the modified criteria of the 2005 International Diabetes Federation. Baseline demographics and clinical information at the time of renal biopsy were extracted from the hospital’s electronic medical records system. Renal pathological findings were assessed according to Renal Pathology Society system. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to define the pathological covariates associated with MetS. A competing risk model, with death as the competing risk, was used to estimate the sub-distribution hazard ratio (SHR) of MetS for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Results 224 (55%) patients had MetS. Patients with MetS had poor renal function and more severe interstitial fibrosis tubular atrophy scores (IFTA) than those without MetS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that IFTA was significantly associated with MetS (odds ratio per score increase 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–2.05). Of the patients with DN at risk, 40% of patients progressed to ESKD. After adjusting for renal function and pathological parameters, the presence of MetS was an independent predictor for progression to ESKD (SHR 1.93, 95% CI 1.34–2.79). The SHRs for progression to ESKD also increased as the number of MetS components increased. Additionally, adding the IFTA scores improved the prognostic power of a model that only contained MetS and clinical covariates for predicting future ESKD. Conclusion MetS is an independent prognostic predictor of ESKD in patients with T2D and DN, while adding the IFTA scores increased the prognostic value of MetS for renal outcome.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
 
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