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    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)

UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 144 of 144 Journals sorted alphabetically
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AJP Renal Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aktuelle Urologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
American Journal of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Andrologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Andrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Andrology & Gynecology : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Andrology and Genital Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arab Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivio Italiano di Urologia e Andrologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Españoles de Urología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Pediatric Nephrology Association     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bangladesh Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Basic and Clinical Andrology     Open Access  
BJU International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
BJUI Compass     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Urological Association Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical and Experimental Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Clinical Kidney Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cuadernos de Cirugía     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Nephrology & Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Opinion in Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Current Urology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Der Nephrologe     Hybrid Journal  
Der Urologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Diabetic Nephropathy     Open Access  
EMC - Urología     Full-text available via subscription  
Enfermería Nefrológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
European Urology Focus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Urology Oncology     Hybrid Journal  
European Urology Open Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Forum Nefrologiczne     Full-text available via subscription  
Geriatric Nephrology and Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale di Clinica Nefrologica e Dialisi     Open Access  
Hellenic Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
IJU Case Reports     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Brazilian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Urology and Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal für Urologie und Urogynäkologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Clinical Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Endoluminal Endourology     Open Access  
Journal of Endourology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Endourology Case Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Genital System & Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Integrative Nephrology and Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Kidney Cancer and VHL     Open Access  
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nephrology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Pediatric Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Renal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Journal of The Egyptian Society of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access  
Journal of Urology & Nephrology     Open Access  
Kidney Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Kidney International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Kidney International Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidney Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kidney Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidneys (Počki)     Open Access  
Nature Reviews Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Nature Reviews Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Nefrología     Open Access  
Nefrología (English Edition)     Open Access  
Nephro-Urology Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Nephron     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nephron Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nephron Experimental Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephron Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Neurourology and Urodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
OA Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Urology & Nephrology Journal     Open Access  
Paediatric Nephrology Journal of Bangladesh     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Portuguese Journal of Nephrology & Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Progrès en Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Progrès en Urologie - FMC     Full-text available via subscription  
Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Renal Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Renal Replacement Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research and Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Nefrología, Diálisis y Trasplante     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Urología     Open Access  
Revista Urologia Colombiana     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Seminars in Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Prostate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Translational Research in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trends in Urology & Men's Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Urine     Open Access  
Uro-News     Hybrid Journal  
Urolithiasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Internationalis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Urologic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urologic Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urological Science     Open Access  
Urologicheskie Vedomosti     Open Access  
Urologie in der Praxis     Hybrid Journal  
Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Urology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urology Times     Free   (Followers: 3)
Urology Video Journal     Open Access  
World Journal of Nephrology and Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.099
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 24  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1555-9041 - ISSN (Online) 1555-905X
Published by American Society of Nephrology Homepage  [2 journals]
  • Pathophysiological Implications of Variability in Blood Tacrolimus Levels
           in Pediatric and Adolescent Kidney Transplant Recipients

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Becker-Cohen; R.
      Pages: 1105 - 1106
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.06640622
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Physiology of the Aging Kidney: We Know Where We Are Going, but We Dont
           Know How...

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Delanaye, P; Pottel, H, Melsom, T.
      Pages: 1107 - 1109
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.06880622
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Health Care for Older Adults with Kidney Failure

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      Authors: Fonseca-Correa, J. I; Jassal, S. V.
      Pages: 1110 - 1112
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.07110622
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Novel Approaches for the Removal of Uremic Solutes

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      Authors: Tang, M; Kalim, S.
      Pages: 1113 - 1115
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.06860622
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Calamari, Hyperkalemia, and Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade

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      Authors: Janak, E; Kramer, H.
      Pages: 1116 - 1118
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.07280622
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Age and the Course of GFR in Persons Aged 70 and Above

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      Authors: Schaeffner, E. S; Ebert, N, Kuhlmann, M. K, Martus, P, Mielke, N, Schneider, A, van der Giet, M, Huscher, D.
      Pages: 1119 - 1128
      Abstract: Background and objectivesIn older adults, data on the age-related course of GFR are scarce, which might lead to misjudgment of the clinical relevance of reduced GFR in old age.Design, setting, participants, & measurementsTo describe the course of eGFR in older adults and derive reference values in population-based individuals, we used the longitudinal design of the Berlin Initiative Study (BIS) with a repeated estimation of GFR over a median of 6.1 years of follow-up. In 2069 community-dwelling older individuals (mean inclusion age 80 years, range 70–99), GFR was estimated biennially with the BIS-2 equation, including standardized creatinine and cystatin C levels, sex, and age. We described the crude and adjusted course using a mixed-effects model and analyzed the influence of death on the GFR course applying joint models. GFR slopes were compared using GFR equations on the basis of creatinine and/or cystatin C.ResultsWe observed a decreasing, thus nonlinear, eGFR decline with increasing age in a population of old adults. The estimated 1-year slope for ages 75 and 90 diminished for men from –1.67 to –0.99 and for women from –1.52 to –0.97. The modeled mean eGFR for men aged ≥79 and women ≥78 was below 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Multivariable adjustment attenuated slopes only minimally. Taking death into account by applying joint models did not alter the nonlinear eGFR decline. Using eGFR equations on the basis of creatinine only showed linear slope patterns in contrast to nonlinear patterns for equations including cystatin C.ConclusionsThe eGFR decline depended on sex and age and changed only marginally after multivariable adjustment but decelerated with increasing age. Equations including cystatin C demonstrated a nonlinear slope challenging the previously assumed linearity of the decline of eGFR in old age.
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.16631221
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Prevalence and Risk Factors for Kidney Disease and Elevated BP in
           2-Year-Old Children Born Extremely Premature

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      Authors: Hingorani; S., Schmicker, R., Ahmad, K. A., Frantz, I. D., Mayock, D. E., La Gamma, E. F., Baserga, M., Khan, J. Y., Gilmore, M. M., Robinson, T., Brophy, P., Heagerty, P. J., Juul, S. E., Goldstein, S., Askenazi, D., for the PENUT Trial Consortium, PENUT Primary Investigators coauthors, Wadhawan, Courtney, Robinson, Ahmad, Bendel-Stenzel, Baserga, LaGamma, Downey, Rao, Fahim, Lampland, Frantz, Khan, Weiss, Gilmore, Ohls, Lowe, Srinivasan, Perez, Thomas, Elhassan, Mulkey, Vijayamadhavan, Mulrooney, Yoder, Kase, Check, Osterholm, George, Georgieff, Martin, OReilly, deRegnier, Porta, Bazacliu, Northington, Valdez, Saurabhkumar, Diaz-Barbosa, Richards, Feltner, Esposito, Hauge, Nikirk, Silvia, Clopp, Ott, Mora, Hedrick, Flynn, Wyatt, Loy, Sikes, Mason, McConnell, Brown, Harrison, Pearson, Drake, Wright, Walden, Guy, Nason, Talbot, Lee, Penny, Boles, Drummond, Kohlleppel, Kathen, Kaletka, Gonzales, Worwa, Fisher, Richter, Ginder, Reich, Rau, Loertscher, Cole, McGrath, Lewis, Burnett, Schaefer, Bird, Giblin, Daly, Lanier, Warden, Wassenaar, Ericksen, Davern, Osborne, Talele, Obregon, Ziyeh, Clarke, Wegner, Patel, Schau, Russow, Curry, Barnhart, Parkinson, Beauman, Hanson, Kuan, Lacy, Galvis, Bombino, Martinez, Bell, Long, Nefcy, Konodi, Hartman, OShea, Ballard, OShea, Kuban, Lowe, Widness
      Pages: 1129 - 1138
      Abstract: Background and objectivesExtremely low gestational age neonates born
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.15011121
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Short-Term Changes in Serum Potassium and the Risk of Subsequent Vascular
           Events and Mortality: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial of ACE
           Inhibitors

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      Authors: Ohkuma, T; Harris, K, Cooper, M, Grobbee, D. E, Hamet, P, Harrap, S, Mancia, G, Marre, M, Patel, A, Rodgers, A, Williams, B, Woodward, M, Chalmers, J, on behalf of the ADVANCE Collaborative Group
      Pages: 1139 - 1149
      Abstract: Background and objectivesHyperkalemia after starting renin-angiotensin system inhibitors has been shown to be subsequently associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular and kidney outcomes. However, whether to continue or discontinue the drug after hyperkalemia remains unclear.Design, setting, participants, & measurementsData came from the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) trial, which included a run-in period where all participants initiated angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor–based therapy (a fixed combination of perindopril and indapamide). The study population was taken as patients with type 2 diabetes with normokalemia (serum potassium of 3.5 to
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.00180122
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Short- and Long-Term Progression of Kidney Involvement in Systemic Lupus
           Erythematosus Patients with Low-Grade Proteinuria

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      Authors: Wang, S; Spielman, A, Ginsberg, M, Petri, M, Rovin, B. H, Buyon, J, Broder, A.
      Pages: 1150 - 1158
      Abstract: Background and objectivesLupus nephritis remains a common cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Current guidelines recommend performing a kidney biopsy at a urine protein-creatinine ratio of ≥0.5 g/g. However, cross-sectional studies reported a high prevalence of active histologic lupus nephritis lesions, and even chronic irreversible scarring, in patients with low-grade proteinuria. This study was initiated to assess disease progression in patients with SLE and low-grade proteinuria to identify risk factors for progression to overt proteinuria suggestive of clinical lupus nephritis.Design, setting, participants, & measurementsPatients with SLE who had an incident urinary protein-creatinine ratio of ≥0.2 and
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.01280122
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Quality of Life before and after the Start of Dialysis in Older Patients

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      Authors: de Rooij, E. N. M; Meuleman, Y, de Fijter, J. W, Le Cessie, S, Jager, K. J, Chesnaye, N. C, Evans, M, Pagels, A. A, Caskey, F. J, Torino, C, Porto, G, Szymczak, M, Drechsler, C, Wanner, C, Dekker, F. W, Hoogeveen, E. K, on behalf of the EQUAL study investigators
      Pages: 1159 - 1167
      Abstract: Background and objectivesIn older people with kidney failure, improving health-related quality of life is often more important than solely prolonging life. However, little is known about the effect of dialysis initiation on health-related quality of life in older patients. Therefore, we investigated the evolution of health-related quality of life before and after starting dialysis in older patients with kidney failure.Design, setting, participants, & measurementsThe European Quality study is an ongoing prospective, multicenter study in patients aged ≥65 years with an incident eGFR ≤20 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Between April 2012 and December 2021, health-related quality of life was assessed every 3–6 months using the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), providing a mental component summary (MCS) and a physical component summary (PCS). Scores range from zero to 100, with higher scores indicating better health-related quality of life. With linear mixed models, we explored the course of health-related quality of life during the year preceding and following dialysis initiation.ResultsIn total, 457 patients starting dialysis were included who filled out at least one SF-36 during follow-up. At dialysis initiation, mean ± SD age was 76±6 years, eGFR was 8±3 ml/min per 1.73 m2, 75% were men, 9% smoked, 45% had diabetes, and 46% had cardiovascular disease. Median (interquartile range) MCS was 53 (38–73), and median PCS was 39 (27–58). During the year preceding dialysis, estimated mean change in MCS was –13 (95% confidence interval, –17 to –9), and in PCS, it was –11 (95% confidence interval, –15 to –7). In the year following dialysis, estimated mean change in MCS was +2 (95% confidence interval, –7 to +11), and in PCS, it was –2 (95% confidence interval, –11 to +7). Health-related quality-of-life patterns were similar for most mental (mental health, role emotional, social functioning, vitality) and physical domains (physical functioning, bodily pain, role physical).ConclusionsPatients experienced a clinically relevant decline of both mental and physical health-related quality of life before dialysis initiation, which stabilized thereafter. These results may help inform older patients with kidney failure who decided to start dialysis.
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.16371221
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Removal of Uremic Solutes from Dialysate by Activated Carbon

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      Authors: Lee, S; Sirich, T. L, Blanco, I. J, Plummer, N. S, Meyer, T. W.
      Pages: 1168 - 1175
      Abstract: Background and objectivesAdsorption of uremic solutes to activated carbon provides a potential means to limit dialysate volumes required for new dialysis systems. The ability of activated carbon to take up uremic solutes has, however, not been adequately assessed.Design, setting, participants, & measurementsGraded volumes of waste dialysate collected from clinical hemodialysis treatments were passed through activated carbon blocks. Metabolomic analysis assessed the adsorption by activated carbon of a wide range of uremic solutes. Additional experiments tested the ability of the activated carbon to increase the clearance of selected solutes at low dialysate flow rates.ResultsActivated carbon initially adsorbed the majority, but not all, of 264 uremic solutes examined. Solute adsorption fell, however, as increasing volumes of dialysate were processed. Moreover, activated carbon added some uremic solutes to the dialysate, including methylguanidine. Activated carbon was particularly effective in adsorbing uremic solutes that bind to plasma proteins. In vitro dialysis experiments showed that introduction of activated carbon into the dialysate stream increased the clearance of the protein-bound solutes indoxyl sulfate and p-cresol sulfate by 77%±12% (mean±SD) and 73%±12%, respectively, at a dialysate flow rate of 200 ml/min, but had a much lesser effect on the clearance of the unbound solute phenylacetylglutamine.ConclusionsActivated carbon adsorbs many but not all uremic solutes. Introduction of activated carbon into the dialysate stream increased the clearance of those solutes that it does adsorb.
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.01610222
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Long-Term Effect of Physical Exercise on the Risk for Hospitalization and
           Death in Dialysis Patients: A Post-Trial Long-Term Observational Study

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      Authors: Mallamaci, F; DArrigo, G, Tripepi, G, Lamberti, N, Torino, C, Manfredini, F, Zoccali, C.
      Pages: 1176 - 1182
      Abstract: Background and objectivesIn the EXerCise Introduction to Enhance Performance in Dialysis (EXCITE) trial, a simple, personalized 6-month walking exercise program at home during the day off of dialysis improved the functional status and the risk for hospitalization in patients with kidney failure. In this post-trial observational study, we tested whether the same intervention was associated with a lower long-term risk of death or hospitalization (combined end point) during a follow-up extended up to 36 months.Design, setting, participants, & measurementsIn total, 227 patients (exercise, n=104; control, n=123) completed the 6-month trial and entered the post-trial observational study. Data were analyzed by unadjusted and adjusted Cox regression analyses and Bayesian analysis.ResultsIn the long-term observation (up to 36 months), 134 events were recorded (eight deaths not preceded by hospitalization and 126 hospitalizations, which were followed by death in 38 cases). The long-term risk for hospitalization or death was 29% lower (hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 1.00), and in an analysis stratified by adherence to the walking exercise program during the 6-month trial, the subgroup with high adherence (>60% of prescribed sessions) had a 45% lower risk as compared with the control group (hazard ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.35 to 0.87). A Bayesian analysis showed that the posterior probability of a hazard ratio of 0.71 (95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 1.00) for the risk of the composite outcome observed in the post-trial observational study was 93% under the conservative prior and 97% under the optimistic prior. Sensitivity analyses restricted to the risk of hospitalization only or censoring patients at the time of transplantation fully confirmed these findings.ConclusionsA simple, personalized, home-based, low-intensity exercise program was associated with a lower risk of hospitalization.Clinical Trial registry name and registration number:EXerCise Introduction to Enhance Performance in Dialysis (EXCITE), NCT01255969
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.03160322
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Association of Genetically Predicted Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 with
           Heart Failure: A Mendelian Randomization Study

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      Authors: Akwo, E; Pike, M. M, Ertuglu, L. A, Vartanian, N, Farber-Eger, E, Lipworth, L, Perwad, F, Siew, E, Hung, A, Bansal, N, de Boer, I, Kestenbaum, B, Cox, N. J, Ikizler, T. A, Wells, Q, Robinson-Cohen, C.
      Pages: 1183 - 1193
      Abstract: Background and objectivesElevated fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) has been consistently associated with heart failure, particularly heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, among patients with CKD and in the general population. FGF23 may directly induce cardiac remodeling and heart failure. However, biases affecting observational studies impede robust causal inferences. Mendelian randomization leverages genetic determinants of a risk factor to examine causality. We performed a two-sample Mendelian randomization to assess causal associations between FGF23 and heart failure.Design, setting, participants, & measurementsGenetic instruments were genome-wide significant genetic variants associated with FGF23, including variants near PIP5K1B, RGS14, LINC01229, and CYP24A1. We analyzed data from the Heart Failure Molecular Epidemiology for Therapeutic Targets and BioVU biobanks to examine associations of the four variants with overall heart failure, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and heart failure with reduced and mid-range ejection fraction. We developed an eGFR polygenic risk score using summary statistics from the Chronic Kidney Disease Genetics Consortium (CKDGen) genome-wide association study of eGFR in>1 million individuals and performed stratified analyses across eGFR polygenic risk score strata.ResultsGenetically determined FGF23 was not associated with overall heart failure in the Heart Failure Molecular Epidemiology for Therapeutic Targets consortium (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.89 to 1.42 per unit higher genetically predicted log FGF23) and the full BioVU sample (odds ratio, 1.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.95 to 1.84). In stratified analyses in BioVU, higher FGF23 was associated with overall heart failure (odds ratio, 3.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.38 to 6.91) among individuals with low eGFR-polygenic risk score (
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.00960122
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Patterns in Tacrolimus Variability and Association with De Novo
           Donor-Specific Antibody Formation in Pediatric Kidney Transplant
           Recipients

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      Authors: Piburn, K. H; Sigurjonsdottir, V. K, Indridason, O. S, Maestretti, L, Patton, M. V, McGrath, A, Palsson, R, Gallo, A, Chaudhuri, A, Grimm, P. C.
      Pages: 1194 - 1203
      Abstract: Background and objectivesHigh tacrolimus intrapatient variability has been associated with inferior graft outcomes in patients with kidney transplants. We studied baseline patterns of tacrolimus intrapatient variability in pediatric patients with kidney transplants and examined these patterns in relation to C1q-binding de novo donor-specific antibodies.Design, setting, participants, & measurementsAll tacrolimus levels in participants who underwent kidney-only transplantation at a single pediatric center from 2004 to 2018 (with at least 12-month follow-up, followed until 2019) were analyzed to determine baseline variability. Intrapatient variability was defined using the coefficient of variation (SD/mean x100%) of all samples in a 6-month moving window. Routine de novo donor-specific antibody measurements were available for a subgroup of patients transplanted in 2010–2018. Cox proportional hazards models using tacrolimus intrapatient variability as a time-varying variable were used to examine the association between intrapatient variability and graft outcomes. The primary outcome of interest was C1q-binding de novo donor-specific antibody formation.ResultsTacrolimus intrapatient variability developed a steady-state baseline of 30% at 10 months post-transplant in 426 patients with a combined 31,125 tacrolimus levels. Included in the outcomes study were 220 patients, of whom 51 developed C1q-binding de novo donor-specific antibodies. De novo donor-specific antibody formers had higher intrapatient variability, with a median of 38% (interquartile range, 28%–48%) compared with 28% (interquartile range, 20%–38%) for nondonor-specific antibody formers (P30%) had higher risk of de novo donor-specific antibody formation (hazard ratio, 5.35; 95% confidence interval, 2.45 to 11.68). Patients in the top quartile of tacrolimus intrapatient variability (coefficient of variation>41%) had the strongest association with C1q-binding de novo donor-specific antibody formation (hazard ratio, 11.81; 95% confidence interval, 4.76 to 29.27).ConclusionsHigh tacrolimus intrapatient variability was strongly associated with de novo donor-specific antibody formation.
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.16421221
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Association of HLA Mismatches and Histology Suggestive of
           Antibody-Mediated Injury in the Absence of Donor-Specific Anti-HLA
           Antibodies

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      Authors: Senev, A; Lerut, E, Coemans, M, Callemeyn, J, Copley, H. C, Claas, F, Koshy, P, Kosmoliaptsis, V, Kuypers, D, Sprangers, B, Van Craenenbroeck, A, Van Loon, E, Van Sandt, V, Emonds, M.-P, Naesens, M.
      Pages: 1204 - 1215
      Abstract: Background and objectivesThe histology of antibody-mediated rejection after kidney transplantation is observed frequently in the absence of detectable donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies. Although there is an active interest in the role of non-HLA antibodies in this phenotype, it remains unknown whether HLA mismatches play an antibody-independent role in this phenotype of microcirculation inflammation.Design, setting, participants, & measurementsTo study this, we used the tools HLAMatchmaker, three-dimensional electrostatic mismatch score, HLA solvent accessible amino acid mismatches, and mismatched donor HLA–derived T cell epitope targets to determine the degree of HLA molecular mismatches in 893 kidney transplant recipients with available biopsy follow-up. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were applied to quantify the cause-specific hazard ratios of the different types of HLA mismatch scores for developing antibody-mediated rejection or histology of antibody-mediated rejection in the absence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies. In all survival analyses, the patients were censored at the time of the last biopsy.ResultsIn total, 121 (14%) patients developed histology of antibody-mediated rejection in the absence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies, of which 44 (36%) patients had concomitant T cell–mediated rejection. In multivariable Cox analysis, all different calculations of the degree of HLA mismatch associated with developing histology of antibody-mediated rejection in the absence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies. This association was dependent neither on the presence of missing self (potentially related to natural killer cell activation) nor on the formation of de novo HLA antibodies. Also, glomerulitis and complement C4d deposition in peritubular capillaries associated with the degree of HLA mismatch in the absence of anti-HLA antibodies.ConclusionsThe histology of antibody-mediated rejection and its defining lesions are also observed in patients without circulating anti-HLA antibodies and relate to the degree of HLA mismatch.
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.00570122
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Anxiety, Comorbid Depression, and Dialysis Symptom Burden

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      Authors: Cukor, D; Donahue, S, Tummalapalli, S. L, Bohmart, A, Silberzweig, J.
      Pages: 1216 - 1217
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.01210122
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Correction: Fractional Excretion of Sodium (FENa): An Imperfect Tool for a
           Flawed Question

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      Pages: 1218 - 1218
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.06410522
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Correction: CRRT Fluid Choices: A Solution for a Common Problem'

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      Pages: 1219 - 1219
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.06480622
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Drug-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

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      Authors: Perazella, M. A; Rosner, M. H.
      Pages: 1220 - 1233
      Abstract: Medications are a common cause of AKI, especially for patients admitted to hospital wards and the intensive care unit. Although drug-related kidney injury occurs through different mechanisms, this review will focus on three specific types of tubulointerstitial injury. Direct acute tubular injury develops from several medications, which are toxic to various cellular functions. Their excretory pathways through the proximal tubules contribute further to AKI. Drug-induced AKI may also develop through induction of inflammation within the tubulointerstitium. Medications can elicit a T cell–mediated immune response that promotes the development of acute interstitial nephritis leading to AKI. Although less common, a third pathway to kidney injury results from the insolubility of drugs in the urine leading to their precipitation as crystals within distal tubular lumens, causing a crystalline-related AKI. Intratubular obstruction, direct tubular injury, and localized inflammation lead to AKI. Clinicians should be familiar with the pathogenesis and clinical-pathologic manifestations of these forms of kidney injury. Prevention and treatment of AKI relies on understanding the pathogenesis and judiciously using these agents in settings where AKI risk is high.
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.11290821
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Radiographic Contrast Media and the Kidney

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      Authors: Cashion, W; Weisbord, S. D.
      Pages: 1234 - 1242
      Abstract: AKI is a potential complication of intravascular iodinated contrast exposure. Contrast-associated AKI, which typically manifests as small and transient decrements in kidney function that develop within several days of contrast administration, is associated with serious adverse outcomes, including progressive kidney dysfunction and death. However, a causal link between the small increases in serum creatinine that characteristically occur with contrast-associated AKI and serious adverse outcomes remains unproven. This is important given mounting evidence that clinically indicated, potentially lifesaving radiographic procedures are underutilized in patients with CKD. This has been hypothesized to be related to provider concern about precipitating contrast-associated AKI. Intravascular gadolinium-based contrast, an alternative to iodinated contrast that is administered with magnetic resonance imaging, has also been linked with potential serious adverse events, notably the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe impairment in kidney function. Patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit frequently have clinical indications for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that involve the intravascular administration of contrast media. Accordingly, critical care providers and others treating critically ill patients should possess a sound understanding of the risk factors for and incidence of such outcomes, the ability to perform evidence-based risk-benefit assessments regarding intravascular contrast administration, and knowledge of empirical data on the prevention of these iatrogenic complications.
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.16311221
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • How I Treat IgA Nephropathy

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      Authors: Reich, H. N; Floege, J.
      Pages: 1243 - 1246
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.02710322
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Prescribing Nirmatrelvir/Ritonavir for COVID-19 in Advanced CKD

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      Authors: Hiremath, S; McGuinty, M, Argyropoulos, C, Brimble, K. S, Brown, P. A, Chagla, Z, Cooper, R, Hoar, S, Juurlink, D, Treleaven, D, Walsh, M, Yeung, A, Blake, P.
      Pages: 1247 - 1250
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.05270522
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Trainee Perspectives on Race, Antiracism, and the Path toward Justice in
           Kidney Care

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      Authors: Heffron, A. S; Khazanchi, R, Nkinsi, N, Bervell, J. A, Cerdena, J. P, Diao, J. A, Eisenstein, L. G, Gillespie, N. J, Hongsermeier-Graves, N, Kane, M, Kaur, K, Seija, L. E, Tsai, J, Vyas, D. A, Zhang, A. Y.
      Pages: 1251 - 1254
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.02500222
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • HIF-PHIs for Anemia Management in CKD: Potential and Uncertainty ASCEND

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      Authors: McCallum, W; Weiner, D. E.
      Pages: 1255 - 1258
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.02440222
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Relative Contributions of Pseudohypoxia and Inflammation to Peritoneal
           Alterations with Long-Term Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

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      Authors: Krediet, R. T; Parikova, A.
      Pages: 1259 - 1266
      Abstract: Long-term peritoneal dialysis is associated with alterations in peritoneal function, like the development of high small solute transfer rates and impaired ultrafiltration. Also, morphologic changes can develop, the most prominent being loss of mesothelium, vasculopathy, and interstitial fibrosis. Current research suggests peritoneal inflammation as the driving force for these alterations. In this review, the available evidence for inflammation is examined and a new hypothesis is put forward consisting of high glucose-induced pseudohypoxia. Hypoxia of cells is characterized by a high (oxidized-reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide ratio) NADH-NAD+ ratio in their cytosol. Pseudohypoxia is similar but occurs when excessive amounts of glucose are metabolized, as is the case for peritoneal interstitial cells in peritoneal dialysis. The glucose-induced high NADH-NAD+ ratio upregulates the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 gene, which stimulates not only the glucose transporter-1 gene but also many profibrotic genes like TGFβ, vascular endothelial growth factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and connective tissue growth factor, all known to be involved in the development of peritoneal fibrosis. This review discusses the causes and consequences of pseudohypoxia in peritoneal dialysis and the available options for treatment and prevention. Reducing peritoneal exposure to the excessively high dialysate glucose load is the cornerstone to avoid the pseudohypoxia-induced alterations. This can partly be done by the use of icodextrin or by combinations of low molecular mass osmotic agents, all in a low dose. The addition of alanyl-glutamine to the dialysis solution needs further clinical investigation.
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:00:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.2215/CJN.15371121
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 8 (2022)
       
 
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