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UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 144 of 144 Journals sorted alphabetically
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AJP Renal Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aktuelle Urologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
American Journal of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Andrologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Andrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Andrology & Gynecology : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Andrology and Genital Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arab Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivio Italiano di Urologia e Andrologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Españoles de Urología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Pediatric Nephrology Association     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bangladesh Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Basic and Clinical Andrology     Open Access  
BJU International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
BJUI Compass     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Urological Association Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical and Experimental Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Clinical Kidney Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cuadernos de Cirugía     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Nephrology & Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Opinion in Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Current Urology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Der Nephrologe     Hybrid Journal  
Der Urologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Diabetic Nephropathy     Open Access  
EMC - Urología     Full-text available via subscription  
Enfermería Nefrológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
European Urology Focus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Urology Oncology     Hybrid Journal  
European Urology Open Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Forum Nefrologiczne     Full-text available via subscription  
Geriatric Nephrology and Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale di Clinica Nefrologica e Dialisi     Open Access  
Hellenic Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJU Case Reports     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Brazilian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Urology and Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal für Urologie und Urogynäkologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Clinical Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Endoluminal Endourology     Open Access  
Journal of Endourology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Endourology Case Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Genital System & Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Integrative Nephrology and Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Kidney Cancer and VHL     Open Access  
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nephrology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Pediatric Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Renal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Journal of The Egyptian Society of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access  
Journal of Urology & Nephrology     Open Access  
Kidney Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Kidney International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Kidney International Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidney Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kidney Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidneys (Počki)     Open Access  
Nature Reviews Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Nature Reviews Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Nefrología     Open Access  
Nefrología (English Edition)     Open Access  
Nephro-Urology Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Nephron     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nephron Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nephron Experimental Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephron Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Neurourology and Urodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
OA Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Urology & Nephrology Journal     Open Access  
Paediatric Nephrology Journal of Bangladesh     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Portuguese Journal of Nephrology & Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Progrès en Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Progrès en Urologie - FMC     Full-text available via subscription  
Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Renal Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Renal Replacement Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research and Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Nefrología, Diálisis y Trasplante     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Urología     Open Access  
Revista Urologia Colombiana     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Seminars in Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Prostate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Translational Research in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trends in Urology & Men's Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Urine     Open Access  
Uro-News     Hybrid Journal  
Urolithiasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Internationalis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Urologic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urologic Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urological Science     Open Access  
Urologicheskie Vedomosti     Open Access  
Urologie in der Praxis     Hybrid Journal  
Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Urology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urology Times     Free   (Followers: 3)
Urology Video Journal     Open Access  
World Journal of Nephrology and Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Clinical and Experimental Nephrology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.711
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1437-7799 - ISSN (Online) 1342-1751
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Delayed kinetics of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody production in kidney
           transplant recipients following the third dose of COVID-19 vaccination

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      PubDate: 2022-08-05
       
  • Serum alkaline phosphatase and infection-related mortality in hemodialysis
           patients: ten-year outcomes of the Q-cohort study

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      Abstract: Background High serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels are associated with excess all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). However, the long-term relationship between serum ALP levels and infection-related mortality remains unclear. Methods A total of 3502 maintenance HD patients were registered in the Q-Cohort Study, an observational cohort study in Japan. The primary outcome was infection-related mortality during a 10-year follow-up period. The covariate of interest was serum ALP levels at baseline. The association between serum ALP levels and infection-related mortality was calculated using a Cox proportional hazards model and a Fine–Gray subdistribution hazards model with non-infection-related death as a competing risk. Results During the follow-up period, 446 patients died of infection. According to their baseline serum ALP levels, the patients were categorized into sex-specific quartiles (Q1–Q4). Compared with patients in the lowest serum ALP quartile (Q1), those in the highest quartile (Q4) had a significantly higher multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.70 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.24–2.32] for infection-related mortality. Furthermore, the HR for every 50 U/L increase in serum ALP levels was 1.24 (95% CI 1.12–1.36) for infection-related mortality. These associations remained consistent in the competing risk model: subdistribution HR, 1.47; 95% CI 1.07–2.03 for Q4 compared with Q1. Conclusion Higher serum ALP levels were significantly associated with a higher risk of infection-related mortality in patients undergoing HD.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
       
  • Current antihypertensive treatment and treatment-resistant hypertension in
           Japanese patients with chronic kidney disease

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      Abstract: Background Hypertension is an important prognostic predictor in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the recommended target blood pressure has been continuously revised. This study aimed to reveal the current antihypertensive practices in Japanese patients with CKD. Methods In the Fukuoka Kidney disease Registry, we extracted 3664 non-dialysis-dependent patients with CKD. Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) was defined as a failure of blood-pressure control treated with three antihypertensive medication classes or a treatment with ≥ 4 classes regardless of blood pressure. The blood-pressure control complied with the target blood pressure recommended by the KDIGO 2012 guideline. Results The median age of the patients was 67 years, body mass index (BMI) was 23 kg/m2, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 40 mL/min/1.73 m2. The number of patients with unachieved blood-pressure control was 1933, of whom 26% received ≥ 3 classes of antihypertensive medications. The first choice of medication was renin–angiotensin system inhibitors, followed by calcium-channel blockers. The rate of thiazide use was low in all CKD stages (3–11%). The prevalence of aTRH was 16%, which was significantly associated with BMI (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] per 1-standard deviation change, 1.38 [1.25–1.53]), decreased eGFR (1.87 [1.57–2.23]), as well as age, diabetes mellitus, and chronic heart disease. Conclusions Renal dysfunction and obesity are important risk factors of aTRH. Even under nephrologist care, most patients were treated with insufficient antihypertensive medications. It is important to prescribe sufficient classes of antihypertensive medications, including diuretics, and to improve patients’ lifestyle habits.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
       
  • Activation of necroptosis pathway in podocyte contributes to the
           pathogenesis of focal segmental glomerular sclerosis

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      Abstract: Background Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is characterized by podocyte damage and severe proteinuria. The exact mechanism of podocyte damage and loss remains unclear. Necroptosis, a lytic form of programmed cell death mediated by RIP3 and MLKL, has emerged as an important cell death pattern in multiple tissues and cell types. Necroptosis in FSGS has not been investigated. Methods Public GEO data regarding podocyte treated with vehicle or adriamycin (ADR) was identified and analyzed. Cultured human podocytes were used to explore the activation of necroptosis upon ADR stimulation. The expression of necroptosis pathway molecules, p-RIP3 and p-MLKL, was examined in the glomeruli and defoliated urinary podocytes of patients with FSGS. The effect of necroptosis inhibition was assessed in ADR-induced glomerulopathy mice using GSK872. Results Publicly available RNA-sequencing data analysis showed that both necroptosis and NLRP3 inflammasome pathway were up-regulated in ADR-injured podocyte. Immunofluorescent staining showed increased expression of p-RIP3 and p-MLKL, the active forms of RIP3 and MLKL, in podocytes of FSGS patients and ADR-induced glomerulopathy mice but not in the normal control. GSK872, an RIP3 kinase inhibitor, significantly inhibited the expression of p-RIP3, p-MLKL and activation of NLRP3 in cultured podocytes treated with ADR. GSK872 treatment of mice with ADR-induced nephropathy resulted in the reduced expression of p-RIP3, p-MLKL, NLRP3 and caspase-1 p20. GSK872 also significantly inhibited the expression of p-MLKL in the podocytes of ADR-induced nephropathy, resulting in the attenuation of proteinuria and renal histological lesions. Conclusion Necroptosis pathway might be a valuable target for the treatment of FSGS.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
       
  • Dapagliflozin and the initial glomerular filtration rate decline in
           advanced-stage non-diabetic chronic kidney disease

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      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • The association of 5-year therapeutic responsiveness with long-term renal
           outcome in IgA nephropathy

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      Abstract: Background Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common type of primary glomerulonephritis. Since most patients have a relatively benign renal prognosis, long-term follow-up is required. During such a long course of disease, relapse of IgAN is occasionally observed after upper respiratory tract infection or without any trigger. However, little is known about the impact of relapse on long-term renal outcomes. Methods In this retrospective cohort study of biopsy-proven primary IgAN, we analyzed the association of 5-year therapeutic responsiveness (relapse) with the subsequent development of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) using a 5-year landmark analysis (Cox model) and explored predictors of relapse from histological and clinical data at baseline. Results Among 563 patients from the exploratory cohort, most relapses (13.7%) occurred within 5 years after treatment. Using 5-year landmark analysis, among 470 patients, 79 developed ESKD during a median follow-up period of 155 months. Even after adjustment for clinicopathological relevant confounders, hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) in the relapse and non-responder groups compared with the remission group were 2.86 (1.41–5.79) and 2.74 (1.48–5.11), respectively. Among 250 patients who achieved remission within 5 years, proteinuria, eGFR, mesangial hypercellularity, endocapillary hypercellularity, segmental sclerosis, and crescent, but not interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy, were independent predictors of 5-year relapse in multivariable logistic regression analysis, Conclusions Both relapsers and non-responders had similarly strong association with ESKD in patients with IgAN. We also confirmed the predictors of relapse 5 years after renal biopsy, which may guide the treatment strategies for patients with IgAN who occasionally relapse after remission.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Impact of preoperative factors on catheter position in peritoneal
           dialysis: a prospective cohort study

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      Abstract: Background Peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter malposition is one of the complications of renal replacement therapy. This study aimed to determine the preoperative factors that cause PD catheter malposition. Methods The prospective cohort study included patients who underwent PD catheter insertion surgery and had preoperative and postoperative computed tomography scans. We compared preoperative and intraoperative factors between the lower depth catheter group (group L) and upper depth catheter group (group U), and preoperative and intraoperative factors between the posterior catheter group (group P) and anterior catheter group (group A). In addition, PD catheter obstruction requiring surgical intervention in each group was followed up for 1 year. Results A total of 150 patients were categorized into groups L (n = 77) and U (n = 73), or groups P (n = 107) and A (n = 43). Body mass index (BMI; P = 0.02), subcutaneous fat area (P = 0.02), and rate of previous abdominal surgery (P = 0.01) were significantly lower in group L than in group U. In terms of anterior catheter position, females had more-anterior catheter positions. The time to PD catheter obstruction requiring surgical intervention (P = 0.03) was significantly lower in group U than in group L. Conclusions High BMI, high subcutaneous fat area, high subcutaneous fat thickness, and previous abdominal surgery were identified as preoperative factors that cause the PD catheter to have an upper depth. Female sex was a preoperative influencing factor for the anterior PD catheter position.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Ultrasonographic reference values and a simple yet practical formula for
           estimating average kidney length in Japanese children

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      Abstract: Background The assessment of kidney size is essential for treating kidney disease. However, there are no reliable and sufficiently robust ultrasonographic reference values or prediction formulas for kidney length in Japanese children, based on a sufficient number of participants. Methods We retrospectively analyzed kidney measurements by ultrasonography in children aged 18 years or younger from eight facilities throughout Japan between January 1991 and September 2018. Detailed reference values were developed by aggregating the left and right kidneys of boys and girls separately. Simple and practical reference values were developed by combining all the data from left and right kidneys and boys and girls. The estimation formulas for the average value and lower limit of the normal range for kidney length were developed based on regression analysis. Results Based on the aggregated kidney length data of 1984 participants (3968 kidneys), detailed reference values and simple reference values for kidney length were determined. From the regression analysis, the formula for calculating the average kidney length was generated as “kidney length (cm) = body height (m) × 5 + 2”, and that for predicting the lower limit of normal kidney length in children under 130 cm was calculated as “lower limit (cm) = 0.85 × [body height (m) × 5 + 2]”. Conclusion Detailed ultrasonographic reference values of kidney length for Japanese children and simple reference values and estimation formulas for daily practice have been established.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Development and validation of a predictive model for acute kidney injury
           in patients with moderately severe and severe acute pancreatitis

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      Abstract: Background Acute kidney injury is a serious complication of moderately severe and severe acute pancreatitis, which significantly increases mortality. There are currently no reliable tools for early identification of AKI especially severe AKI in these patients. We aim to develop a predictive model so that physicians can assess the risk of AKI and severe AKI, thus take further preventive measures. Methods Patients with a diagnosis of MSAP and SAP admitted to our hospital from January 2018 to December 2021 were retrospectively included in the study. The participants were divided into the training and validation cohorts randomly, in a 2:1 ratio. A clinical signature was built based on reproducible features, using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator method and machine learning. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to develop the prediction model. Nomogram performance was determined by its discrimination, calibration, and clinical usefulness. Results A total of 996 eligible patients were enrolled. 698 patients were allocated in the training cohort and 298 in the validation cohort. AKI occurred in 148 patients (21%) in the training cohort and 54 (18%) in the validation cohort, respectively. The clinical features, including C-reactive protein, intra-abdominal pressure and serum cysC, were significantly associated with AKI as well as severe AKI. The nomogram showed favorable discrimination, calibration and clinical usefulness. Conclusions The novel risk score model has good performance for predicting AKI and severe AKI in MSAP and SAP patients. Application of this model can help clinicians stratify patients for primary prevention, surveillance and early therapeutic intervention to improve care and prognosis.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Evaluation of a newly proposed renal risk score for Japanese patients with
           ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis

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      Abstract: Background We determined the usefulness and prognostic ability of the renal risk score (RRS), proposed in Europe, for Japanese patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated glomerulonephritis (AAGN) and high myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA positivity; these aspects remain to be verified. Methods This retrospective study was conducted on 86 Japanese patients with new, biopsy-confirmed AAGN. We calculated the RRS and analyzed the relationship between this classification, and clinicopathological features and prognosis. We also compared the predictive values between RRS for endpoints including renal death and conventional prognostic tools for patients with AAGN. Results There were 33, 37, and 16 patients in the low-, medium-, and high-risk groups, respectively. All patients were MPO-ANCA positive. The median follow-up period was 33 months; 16 (18.6%) patients progressed to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In the high-risk group, 9/16 (56.3%) patients progressed to ESRD, and renal prognosis was significantly poorer than that in other groups (low-risk group, P < 0.001; medium-risk group, P = 0.004). In Cox multivariate regression analysis, RRS was an independent, poor renal prognostic factor (hazard ratio 5.22; 95% confidence interval 2.20–12.40; P < 0.001). The receiver-operating characteristic curves of the RRS for each endpoint were comparable with those of the 2010 histological classification and those of the severity classification of Japanese rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Conclusions This is the first study to report the usefulness of the RRS for predicting renal outcomes among Japanese patients with AAGN. Our predictive value of the RRS was comparable with that of conventional prognostic tools.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Relationship between compliance with management target values and renal
           prognosis in multidisciplinary care for outpatients with chronic kidney
           disease

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      Abstract: Background Although multidisciplinary care (MDC) is necessary for controlling chronic kidney disease (CKD), its impact on compliance with management target values in the CKD guidelines remains unclear. This study was designed to clarify the relationship between compliance with management target values and renal prognosis in CKD outpatients who received MDC. Methods There were 255 outpatients with pre-dialysis CKD who received MDC. Achievement rates of systolic, and diastolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, uric acid, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and hemoglobin A1c values determined according to CKD guidelines were compared before and 12 months after MDC. In addition, after dividing achievement rates of the target values at 12 months after MDC into four groups (A < 30% ≤ B < 60% ≤ C < 80% ≤ D), dialysis initiation and renal survival rates were compared. Results There was a significant increase in the overall achievement rate from 62.8 to 69.1% (p < 0.001). The higher the achievement rate after MDC, the lower the dialysis initiation rate (A 72.7%, B 35.3%, C 20.5%, D 8.2%, p < 0.001). There was also a significantly higher renal survival rate (p < 0.001). These findings suggest that MDC for CKD raised awareness of health literacy, and improved the achievement rate of target values. Furthermore, the higher the achievement rate, the later the initiation of dialysis, which led to improvement of renal survival. Conclusions MDC can improve compliance with management target values for CKD, suggesting that it may improve renal prognosis.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Pull technique versus open surgical removal of the catheter for peritoneal
           dialysis: a retrospective cohort study

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      Abstract: Background The open surgical technique (OST) is the main modality for peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter removal; however, the pull technique (PT) is emerging as a minimally invasive alternative. At present, the safety and relative equivalence of PT and OST are unclear. Methods In this retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients who underwent PD catheter removal via PT or OST at the Xinyang Central Hospital from April 2015 to October 2019. Complication-free survival (CFS) and surgical outcomes 365 days after PD catheter removal were evaluated and compared between groups. Results The PD catheter was removed in 89 patients. The final sample of 80 patients was selected based on eligibility for inclusion and exclusion criteria. Ten patients experienced complications (PT group, n = 2; OST group, n = 8), including death (n = 6), dialysate leak (n = 3), and incisional dehiscence (n = 1). Epidemiological and preoperative clinical characteristics were similar in all patients. Kaplan–Meier plots for CFS revealed significant differences in prognostic outcomes between the groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that CFS was similar in both groups (with OST as a reference; hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03–1.27; P = 0.09). We observed significant differences in the operative time, blood loss, operative pain score, and anesthetic use between the groups (all P < 0.001). The length and cost of hospitalization were similar in both the groups. Conclusions PT is superior to OST in terms of blood loss, anesthetic use, operative pain score, and operating time without sacrificing safety and survival benefits.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Motion-capture technique-based interface screen displaying real-time probe
           position and angle in kidney ultrasonography

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      Abstract: Abstract Professional skill is required to reproduce ultrasound images of the kidney as an optimal cross-section is easily lost with slight deviation in scanning location or angle of the probe. We developed a motion-capture technique-based interface screen that displays the real-time probe position and angle to overlap those provided beforehand. When a professional operator captured the approximate kidney image, our system recorded the relative spatial relationship between the subject and the probe. Next, an amateur operator who had no experience of clinical practice manipulated the probe only with the aid of the interface until the probe position and angle coincided with the professional ones. Eventually, amateur operators could place the probe with a deviation of distance of (x = 2.7 ± 1.2 mm, y = 3.0 ± 1.7 mm, z = 6.6 ± 1.8 mm) and angle of (Rx = 1.5 ± 0.3 degrees, Ry = 2.6 ± 1.1 degrees, Rz = 1.1 ± 0.3 degrees) from the professional goal to produce very similar cross-sectional kidney images (N = 8). Also, motion-capture technique-based evaluation of relative locations of the probe and subject body revealed difficulty in reproducing those without the interface screen navigation. In summary, our motion-capture technique-based ultrasound guide system provides operators with the opportunity to handle the probe just as another operator would beforehand. This could help in medical procedures wherein the same cross-sectional image should be repeatedly obtained. Moreover, it requires no conventional probe training for beginners and could even shift the paradigm for ultrasound probe handling.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Altered arginine vasopressin-cyclic AMP-aquaporin 2 pathway in patients
           with chronic kidney disease

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      Abstract: Background In the collecting ducts of the kidney, arginine vasopressin (AVP), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and aquaporin 2 (AQP2) play a pivotal role in maintaining fluid volume and serum osmolality in humans. However, their association among those with chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains uncertain. Methods We prospectively included the out-patients with CKD and measured osmolality-related biomarkers including plasma AVP, urine cAMP, urine AQP2, and urine osmolality levels. Association among these parameters at each CKD stage was investigated. Results A total of 121 patients were included (median age 71 years old [61–78], 89 men, estimated glomerular filtration ratio 28.6 [16.4–45.3] mL/min/1.73 m2). Serum osmolality increased as CKD progression, accompanying incremental plasma AVP levels, whereas urine cAMP, urine AQP2, and urine osmolality decreased as CKD progression. At advanced CKD stage, urine cAMP remained low irrespective of the AVP stimulation, whereas urine cAMP levels varied according to the levels of plasma AVP at less advanced CKD stage. The associations between urine cAMP and urine AQP2 and between urine AQP2 and urine osmolality remained preserved irrespective of the CKD stages. Conclusions Vasopressin type-2 receptor seems to be particularly impaired in patients with advanced CKD, whereas the signal cascade of the downstream of vasopressin type-2 receptor is relatively preserved. Urine cAMP might be a promising marker to estimate the residual function of the collecting duct.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Fractalkine deficiency attenuates LPS-induced acute kidney injury and
           podocyte apoptosis by targeting the PI3K/Akt signal pathway

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      Abstract: Background Podocyte injury is a major biomarker of primary glomerular disease, which leads to massive proteinuria and kidney failure. The increased production of the chemokine, fractalkine (FKN, CX3CL1), is a hallmark of multiple inflammatory diseases. However, the underlying mechanism of FKN in podocyte injury remains unknown. Methods In this study, we performed an LPS infusion model in FKN knockout (FKN−/−, FKN-KO) mice. In cultured podocytes, we used plasmids to knockdown FKN and treated the podocytes with PI3K/Akt inhibitor (LY294002). Haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, Western Bolt, Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP), Immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometric analysis were employed to establish the role of FKN in podocyte injury. Results LPS stimulation resulted in kidney damage, increased the expression of the Bcl-2 family apoptosis protein, and decreased podocyte marker protein (nephrin, podocin and WT1) abundance compared with the WT mice. LPS-induced FKN-KO mice exhibited reduced lethality and inflammatory cell infiltration, podocyte apoptosis, and PI3K/Akt signal pathway inhibition compared to WT mice. In cultured podocytes, the interaction between FKN and the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway was well confirmed. FKN knockdown reduced podocyte apoptosis by regulating the Bcl-2 family; however, this protective effect was reversed by the co-administration of a PI3K/Akt inhibitor (LY294002). Conclusion Overall, these findings reveal a novel mechanistic property of FKN, PI3K/Akt signalling, and podocyte apoptosis.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Impact of inpatient educational programs on mortality after the start of
           dialysis therapy

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      Abstract: Background Although inpatient educational programs (IEPs) for non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been reported to slow disease progression, their legacy effect on prognosis after the start of dialysis therapy is unclear. Methods Consecutive patients who started dialysis therapy between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2018 were included in a single-center, retrospective, observational study. The patients were divided into two groups according to whether or not they participated in IEPs before dialysis introduction, and their background characteristics were compared. The survival rate for each group was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method and compared by the log-rank test. Furthermore, the hazard ratio (HR) of IEP participation adjusted for confounding factors associated with mortality was calculated using Cox regression analysis. Results Of the 490 subjects (median age 69 years, 71.0% male), 129 patients (26.3%) participated in the IEP. At the start of dialysis, the IEP group had higher serum albumin (3.5 vs. 3.3 g/dL, p < 0.001) and lower serum total cholesterol levels (151 vs. 166 mg/dL, p = 0.0076) and the proportion of patients with independence in their daily living activities was high (p = 0.034). The median observation period was 3.4 years, during which 153 patients (31.2%) died. The 5-year survival rates were 81.0 and 61.5% in the IEP and non-IEP groups, respectively (p = 0.0038). Cox regression analysis revealed a HR for IEP of 0.57 (95% Confidence interval 0.37–0.88, p = 0.011). Conclusion IEPs for CKD patients are associated with a more favorable prognosis after the start of dialysis.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • PET/CT imaging of renal intravascular large B-cell lymphoma

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      PubDate: 2022-07-30
       
  • The efficacy and safety of mizoribine for maintenance therapy in patients
           with myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody
           (MPO-ANCA)-associated vasculitis: the usefulness of serum mizoribine
           monitoring

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      Abstract: Background The life prognosis of elderly patients with myeloperoxidase–anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis (MPO-AAV) has been improved by reducing the corticosteroid or cyclophosphamide dose to avoid opportunistic infection. However, many elderly MPO-AAV patients experience recurrence and renal death. An effective and safer maintenance treatment method is necessary to improve the renal prognosis of MPO-AAV. Methods Patients with MPO-AAV who reached complete or incomplete remission after induction therapy were prospectively and randomly divided into mizoribine (MZR; n = 25) and control (n = 28) groups. The primary endpoint was relapse of MPO-AAV. The patients’ serum MZR concentration was measured before (C0) and 3 h after taking the MZR. The maximum drug concentration (Cmax) and the serum MZR concentration curves were determined using population pharmacokinetics parameters. We also assessed the relationship between the MZR concentrations and adverse events. The observation period was 12 months. Results Fifty-eight MPO-AAV patients from 16 hospitals in Japan were enrolled. Ten patients relapsed (MZR group, n = 6; control group, n = 4; a nonsignificant between-group difference). Changes in the serum MZR concentration could be estimated for 22 of the 25 MZR-treated patients: 2 of the 11 patients who reached a Cmax of 3 μg/mL relapsed, whereas 4 of the 11 patients who did not reach this Cmax relapsed. The treatment of one patient with C0 > 1 μg/mL was discontinued due to adverse events. No serious adverse events occurred. Conclusion There was no significant difference in the recurrence rate of MPO-AAV between treatment with versus without MZR.
      PubDate: 2022-07-30
       
  • Incidence and risk factors of overcorrection in patients presenting with
           severe hyponatremia to the emergency department

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      Abstract: Background Hyponatremia is one of the most common electrolyte abnormalities. Overcorrection of severe hyponatremia can result in serious neurological complications such as osmotic demyelination syndrome, but the incidence and risk factors of overcorrection and osmotic demyelination have not been thoroughly investigated. Methods This is a single-center retrospective cohort study of 50 patients admitted through the emergency department with initial serum sodium (serum Na) < 125 mEq/L between January 2015 and December 2017. Incidence and risk factors of overcorrection and osmotic demyelination were examined. Overcorrection was defined as an increase in serum sodium concentration > 10 mEq/L at 24 h and/or > 18 mEq/L at 48 h, respectively. Results Six patients (12%) and one patient (2%) had overcorrection at 24 h and 48 h, respectively. A total of 5 (10%) patients had a brain MRI completed after overcorrection, and no patient showed radiologic evidence of osmotic demyelination. Symptomatic hyponatremia at presentation and 3% saline use were associated with the risk of overcorrection in univariable analysis (p < 0.001; p = 0.006, respectively). Conclusions Among patients admitted with severe hyponatremia, overcorrection occurred in 14%. Symptomatic hyponatremia at presentation and 3% saline use were associated with the risk of overcorrection.
      PubDate: 2022-07-23
       
  • N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide predicts hospitalization for
           ischemic stroke in Japanese hemodialysis patients

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      Abstract: Background The association between N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and stroke in Japanese hemodialysis (HD) outpatients is unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigate whether high NT-proBNP levels are associated with future stroke events in this population. Methods This was a multicenter prospective observational study with post hoc analysis. Baseline NT-proBNP levels were measured at the first HD session of the week and classified into tertiles (first tertile: < 2255 pg/mL; second tertile: ≥ 2255 and < 5657 pg/mL; third tertile: ≥ 5657 pg/mL). Overall hospitalization-free survival rates were compared using the Kaplan–Meier method. The association between NT-proBNP level and hospitalization for stroke was assessed using the multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Results During a 5-year follow-up of 1,229 patients, 103 (8.4%) were hospitalized and 23 (1.9%) died from stroke. The hospitalization-free survival rate for ischemic stroke was lowest in the third tertile (P < 0.01). The crude hazard ratio (HR) of hospitalization was higher in the third tertile compared with the first tertile for both ischemic stroke (HR: 3.92; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.08–7.37; P < 0.01) and hemorrhagic stroke (HR: 3.75; 95% CI 1.35–10.43; P = 0.01). On multivariate Cox hazard analysis, the adjusted HRs for ischemic stroke were higher in the third tertile. The hospitalization-free survival rates for hemorrhagic stroke and the adjusted HRs did not differ significantly. Conclusions Elevated NT-proBNP level was associated with hospitalization for ischemic stroke, suggesting that NT-proBNP level is a valid biomarker for predicting hospitalization for ischemic stroke in HD outpatients.
      PubDate: 2022-07-15
       
 
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