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    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)

UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 144 of 144 Journals sorted alphabetically
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AJP Renal Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aktuelle Urologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
American Journal of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Andrologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Andrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Andrology & Gynecology : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Andrology and Genital Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arab Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivio Italiano di Urologia e Andrologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Españoles de Urología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Pediatric Nephrology Association     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bangladesh Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Basic and Clinical Andrology     Open Access  
BJU International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
BJUI Compass     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Urological Association Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical and Experimental Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Clinical Kidney Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cuadernos de Cirugía     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Nephrology & Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Opinion in Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Current Urology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Der Nephrologe     Hybrid Journal  
Der Urologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Diabetic Nephropathy     Open Access  
EMC - Urología     Full-text available via subscription  
Enfermería Nefrológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
European Urology Focus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Urology Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Urology Open Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Forum Nefrologiczne     Full-text available via subscription  
Geriatric Nephrology and Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale di Clinica Nefrologica e Dialisi     Open Access  
Hellenic Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJU Case Reports     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Brazilian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Urology and Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal für Urologie und Urogynäkologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Clinical Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Endoluminal Endourology     Open Access  
Journal of Endourology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Endourology Case Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Genital System & Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Integrative Nephrology and Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Kidney Cancer and VHL     Open Access  
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nephrology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Pediatric Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Renal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Journal of The Egyptian Society of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access  
Journal of Urology & Nephrology     Open Access  
Kidney Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Kidney International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Kidney International Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidney Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kidney Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidneys (Počki)     Open Access  
Nature Reviews Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Nature Reviews Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Nefrología     Open Access  
Nefrología (English Edition)     Open Access  
Nephro-Urology Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Nephron     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nephron Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nephron Experimental Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephron Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Neurourology and Urodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
OA Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Urology & Nephrology Journal     Open Access  
Paediatric Nephrology Journal of Bangladesh     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Portuguese Journal of Nephrology & Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Progrès en Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Progrès en Urologie - FMC     Full-text available via subscription  
Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Renal Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Renal Replacement Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research and Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Nefrología, Diálisis y Trasplante     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Urología     Open Access  
Revista Urologia Colombiana     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Seminars in Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Prostate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Translational Research in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trends in Urology & Men's Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Urine     Open Access  
Uro-News     Hybrid Journal  
Urolithiasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Internationalis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Urologic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urologic Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urological Science     Open Access  
Urologicheskie Vedomosti     Open Access  
Urologie in der Praxis     Hybrid Journal  
Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Urology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urology Times     Free   (Followers: 3)
Urology Video Journal     Open Access  
World Journal of Nephrology and Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
World Journal of Urology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.272
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1433-8726 - ISSN (Online) 0724-4983
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Value of magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound fusion prostate biopsy to
           select patients for focal therapy

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      Abstract: Purpose To investigate the role of transrectal MRI fusion biopsy to select patients for prostate cancer focal therapy. Methods Patients with suspected prostate cancer underwent transrectal MRI fusion biopsy with the Koelis trinity device. Two focal therapy eligibility criteria were subsequently defined: Group 1: PSA ≤ 15 ng/ml, unilateral csPCa, ISUP grade ≤ 2, no contralateral PIRADS 3–5 lesion; Group 2: same criteria but ISUP grade 3. These subgroups were correlated with histopathological post-prostatectomy parameters for stage pT2, unilateral csPCa, no ISUP upgrading. In addition, parameters of csPCa detection were analyzed for patients undergoing primary and re-biopsy. Results Four hundred fourteen consecutive patients were analyzed (314 for primary biopsy, 100 for re-biopsy). Post-prostatectomy whole mount section analysis was available from 155 patients. 39 and 62 of these patients met focal therapy inclusion criteria for group 1 and group 2, respectively. A correlation with final pathology parameters following radical prostatectomy (stage pT2, unilateral csPCa, no ISUP upgrading) revealed a positive predictive value of only 53.8% and 64.5% for Group 1 and 2, respectively. The overall csPCa detection rate was 73.7%. In the re-biopsy group 20% additional patients with csPCa were detected by targeted biopsy. Conclusion Despite high csPCa detection rates following MRI fusion biopsy our study demonstrated that, using final pathology to confirm locally advanced tumor stage, presence of bilateral csPCa and ISUP upgrading, between 35.5 and 46.2% of patients would have been incorrectly selected for focal therapy.
      PubDate: 2022-09-24
       
  • Perineural invasion as predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate
           cancer following open radical prostatectomy: a single-center experience

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      Abstract: Purpose To explore the association between perineural invasion (PNI) and biochemical recurrence (BCR) in patients undergoing open radical prostatectomy (ORP). Methods A retrospective observational study was conducted, in which we analyzed patients who underwent ORP at our institution between 2003 and 2020. The biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival and overall survival (OS) rates were defined using the Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank analysis. Multivariable Cox-regression models were used to test the effect of other different factors such as preoperative PSA, Gleason score and T stage on biochemical recurrence. The Clavien–Dindo classification was used to report the complication rates. Results In total, 1040 patients were included. PNI was found in 458 (44.1%) and BCR occurred in 212 patients (20.4%) at a median follow-up of 91.2 months. After undergoing the procedure, 216 patients received adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Despite receiving adjuvant treatment, the BCR-free survival was still significantly shorter for PNI-positive patients (mean 32.2 vs. 62.3 months, p < 0.001). The 5- and 10-year BCR-free survival rates for patients without PNI were 90% and 81%, respectively. For the same period of time, BCR-free survival rates for patients with PNI were 75 and 63%, respectively. Therefore, PNI was a strong predictor of BCR (p < 0.001). These results remained even after controlling for established predictors of biochemical recurrence. Limitations include retrospective and single-center study design. Conclusion In conclusion, despite its limitations, our study emphasizes the prognostic importance of PNI in prostate cancer patients. The results demonstrate that the presence of PNI is associated with a high risk of BCR.
      PubDate: 2022-09-24
       
  • Assessing the need for systematic biopsies in addition to targeted
           biopsies according to the characteristics of the index lesion at mpMRI.
           Results from a large, multi-institutional database

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      Abstract: Purpose We hypothesized that systematic biopsies (SBx) value for clinically significant PCa (csPCa) detection, in addition to mpMRI targeted biopsies (TBx), may vary significantly according to mpMRI index lesion (IL) characteristics. Methods We identified 1350 men with an mpMRI suspicious lesion (PI-RADS ≥ 3), defined as IL, who underwent TBx and SBx at three referral centres. The outcome was SBx added value in csPCa (grade group ≥ 2 PCa detected at SBx and missed by TBx) detection. To this aim, we performed multivariable logistic regression analyses (MVA). Furthermore, we explored the interaction between IL volume and SBx csPCa added value, across different PI-RADS categories, using lowess function. Results Overall, 569 (42%) men had csPCa at TBx and 78 (6%) csPCa were identified at SBx only. At MVA PSA (OR 0.90; p < 0.05) and IL volume (OR 0.58; p < 0.05) were associated with SBx csPCa added value. At interaction analyses, a nonlinear correlation between PI-RADS and SBx csPCa added value was identified with a decrease from roughly 10 to 4% followed by a substantial plateau at 1.2 ml and 0.6 ml for PI-RADS 3 and 4, respectively. For PI-RADS 5 lesions SBx csPCa added was constantly lower than 4%. Conclusions Increasing IL volume in PI-RADS 3 and 4 lesions is associated with reduction in SBx csPCa added value. For diagnostic purposes, SBx could be omitted in men with IL larger than 1.2 ml and 0.6 ml for PI-RADS 3 and 4, respectively. Conversely, for PI-RADS 5, SBx csPCa added value was minimal regardless of IL volume.
      PubDate: 2022-09-23
       
  • Determining the threshold of acute renal parenchymal damage for intrarenal
           pressure during flexible ureteroscopy using an in vivo pig model

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      Abstract: Purpose To identify a threshold for intrarenal pressure (IRP), that if exceeded, will result in renal parenchymal damage. Herein, we attempt to identify an IRP threshold by subjecting in vivo porcine kidneys to various levels of extreme pressurized irrigation. Our objective was not to simulate ureteroscopy treatment, but to attempt identify a threshold of IRP injury. Methods Ten female pigs were intubated and sedated. The abdomen was opened; the ureters were isolated and incised. A LithoVue™ (Boston Scientific) ureteroscope was inserted. A 0-silk tie was then used to tie the ureter around the scope to create a closed system (to achieve a constant level of pressure). Real-time IRPs were measured using the Comet™ Pressure guidewire (Boston Scientific). Kidneys were exposed to pressurized, saline for 36 min (at control, 50, 100, 150 mmHg and higher pressures). Kidneys were then immediately harvested. Two expert histologists independently analyzed kidney slides to identify areas of renal damage. Results The two kidneys exposed to IRPs > 185 mmHg resulted in forniceal rupture and large areas of hematoma. The other IRP groups (control, 50, 100, and 150 mmHg) had no identifiable gross or histologic renal parenchymal damage. Conclusions No differences in renal parenchymal morphology were identified between pressure groups of control, 50, 100, or 150 mmHg. However, IRPs > 185 mmHg did result in forniceal rupture in this closed-system in vivo porcine model. Further study is required to elucidate the damage threshold.
      PubDate: 2022-09-22
       
  • Radical nephroureterectomy for UTUC conferred survival benefits
           irrespective of age and comorbidities

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      Abstract: Purpose We investigated the effects of age, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification (ASA) grading and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) on the survival outcomes of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Methods The CROES-UTUC registry was an international, multicenter study on patients with UTUC. Primary outcomes were overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Kaplan–Meier and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed by stratifying patients according to their age (≤ 70 and > 70 years old) and ASA grade (I–II and III–V)/CCI (0–1 and ≥ 2). Results A total of 2352 patients were included in this study. Patients aged ≤ 70 years with ASA grading of I–II (p = 0.002), and patients aged ≤ 70 years with a CCI of 0–1 (p = 0.002) had the best OS. Upon multivariate analysis, both in patients aged ≤ 70 and > 70 years, ASA grading and CCI were not significantly associated with OS. Patients aged ≤ 70 years with ASA grading of III–IV (p = 0.024) had the best DFS. When stratified according to age and CCI, no significant difference in DFS was noted. Upon multivariate analysis, radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) was significantly associated with better DFS in patients aged ≤ 70 and > 70 years; CCI of ≥ 3 was significantly associated with worse DFS in patients ≤ 70 years; ASA grading was not associated with DFS in patients aged ≤ 70 and > 70 years. Conclusions A high ASA grading and CCI should not be considered contraindications for RNU. RNU should be considered even in elderly patients when it is deemed feasible and achievable after a geriatric assessment.
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
       
  • Does the 5-item Frailty Index predict surgical complications of endoscopic
           surgical management for benign prostatic obstruction' An analysis of
           the ACS-NSQIP

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      Abstract: Purpose To assess whether the 5-item Frailty Index (5i-FI) predicts surgical complications of endoscopic surgery for benign prostatic obstruction (BPO) and examine the rates of these complications across BPO surgical modalities adjusting for patient frailty. Methods The ACS-NSQIP registry was queried for patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP), and laser enucleation of the prostate (LEP) between 2009 and 2019. Patients’ frailties were estimated using the 5i-FI. We assessed the association between 5i-FI and the following endpoints: all complications, major complications (Clavien–Dindo \(\ge\) 3), length of stay (LOS) ≥ 2 days, and 30-day postoperative readmission. Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) was used to account for selection bias in treatment allocation. IPTW-adjusted rates for 30-day complications were compared between surgical modalities. Results The cohort included 38,399 (62.6%) TURP, 19,121 (31.2%) PVP, and 3797 (6.2%) LEP. Men with 5i-FI score ≥ 2 were more likely to receive TURP (22.7%) and PVP (22.5%) than LEP (18.8%). 5i-FI ≥ 2 was associated with higher odds of all complications (OR 1.50), major complications (OR 1.63), LOS ≥ 2 (OR 1.31), and readmission (OR 1.65). After IPTW, LEP had the lowest rates for all complications (6.29%; 95%CI 5.48–7.20), major complications (2.30%; 95%CI 1.83–2.89), and readmission (3.80%; 95%CI 3.18–4.53). Conclusion The 5i-FI score is an independent predictor of 30-day postoperative surgical complications after endoscopic BPO surgery. After IPTW, LEP and PVP were associated with lower rates of complications than TURP. However, frail patients were less likely to undergo PVP and LEP. Preoperative frailty assessment could improve risk stratification before BPO surgery.
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
       
  • Evaluating the association between food insecurity and risk of
           nephrolithiasis: an analysis of the National Health and Nutrition
           Examination Survey

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      Abstract: Purpose This study aimed to investigate the relationship between self-reported food security and kidney stone formation. Methods Data were collected from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a database representative of the United States population. Food security status was assessed using the US Household Food Security Survey Module: Six-Item Short Form. Characteristics of patients were compared using the Chi-square test and the student t-test. Multivariate logistic regression was performed using a multi-model approach. Results We analyzed 6,800 NHANES survey respondents. 37.2% of respondents were categorized as having “low food security” (scores 2–4) and 24.0% having “very low food security” (scores 5–6). 8.4% of respondents had a history of kidney stones. We found that people with very low food security had a 42% increased likelihood of developing kidney stones compared to those with high or marginal food security, after controlling for race, age, and comorbidities (OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.01–1.99). Between the different food security groups, no significant differences were observed in age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, gout history, osteoporosis history, or coronary artery disease history. Lower food security was associated with slightly younger age (< 1 year difference, p = 0.001), higher poverty-income ratio (p = 0.001), and many comorbidities, including kidney stones (p = 0.007). Conclusion Our study provides evidence for an association between food access and the risk of kidney stone disease. Given these findings, food insecurity should be investigated as a modifiable risk factor for the development of kidney stone disease.
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
       
  • How to optimize the use of adjuvant pembrolizumab in renal cell carcinoma:
           which patients benefit the most'

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      Abstract: Purpose The KEYNOTE-564 trial showed improved disease-free survival (DFS) for patients with high-risk renal cell carcinoma (RCC) receiving adjuvant pembrolizumab as compared to placebo. However, if systematically administered to all high-risk patients, it might lead to the overtreatment in a non-negligible proportion of patient. Therefore, we aimed to determine the optimal candidate for adjuvant pembrolizumab. Methods Within a prospectively maintained database we selected patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the KEYNOTE-564. We compared baseline characteristics and oncologic outcomes in this cohort with those of the placebo arm of the KEYNOTE-564. Regression tree analyses was used to generate a risk stratification tool to predict 1-year DFS after surgery. Results In the off-trial setting, patients had worse tumor characteristics then in the KEYNOTE-564 placebo arm, i.e. there were more pT4 (5.4 vs. 2.7%, p = 0.046) and pN1 (15 vs. 6.3%, p < 0.001) cases. Median DFS was 29 (95% CI 21–35) months as compared to value not reached in KEYNOTE-564 and 1-year DFS was 64.2% (95% CI 59.6–69.2) as compared to 76.2% (95% CI 72.2–79.7), respectively. Patients with pN1 were at the highest risk of 1-year recurrence (1-year DFS 28.6% [95% CI 20.2–40.3]); patients without LNI, but necrosis were at intermediate risk (1-year DFS 62.5% [95% CI 56.9–68.8]); those without LNI and necrosis were at the lowest risk (1-year DFS 83.8% [95% CI 79.1–88.9]). LVI substratification furtherly improved the accuracy in the prediction of early recurrence. Conclusions Patients potentially eligible for adjuvant pembrolizumab have worse characteristics and DFS in the off-trial setting as compared to the placebo arm of the KEYNOTE-564. Patients with either LNI or necrosis were at the highest risk of early-recurrence, which make them the ideal candidate to adjuvant pembrolizumab.
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
       
  • Functional and surgical outcomes after phalloplasty in cis men

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      Abstract: Purpose Evaluate the surgical outcomes along with a comprehensive assessment of functional outcomes in cis men (non-trans) who underwent phalloplasty. Methods All consecutive cis men who underwent phalloplasty from 2008 to 2018 for penile insufficiency due to various causes were included. These underwent phalloplasty by either a radial forearm free flap (RFFF) or suprapubic phalloplasty (SPP). Data were collected from medical files. A questionnaire was sent a minimum of 1 year after surgery to each patient to evaluate sexual function and self-esteem, satisfaction with genitals, and urinary function. Results Among the 19 patients included, 12 underwent RFFF and 7 SPP; 25% of those who had RFF and 14.3% of those with SPP had a Clavien–Dindo ≥ 2 complication. A total of 16 patients had a urethroplasty procedure, 50.0% of whom had a Clavien–Dindo ≥ 2 complication. Penile prostheses were implanted in 14 patients; 64.3% of whom had a complication. Seven patients answered the questionnaire (36.8%); the relationship satisfaction score was 89.5/100 and the confidence score was 100/100. Among the 5 patients who had a sexual relationship, all reported having a lot of pleasure during sexual intercourse and reached orgasm at least “regularly”. At least 66.7% of the patients were “satisfied” or “very satisfied” about the size and the appearance of genitals. Among the 5 patients who answered questions regarding urinary function, 60.0% had standing micturition, and 80.0% reported being comfortable in public toilets. Conclusion Despite the high frequency of complications and the need for revision surgery, phalloplasty seems to allow a satisfying psychosexual and urinary functions for cis men suffering from penile insufficiency.
      PubDate: 2022-09-16
       
  • Nomogram based on baseline clinicopathological characteristics for
           predicting bladder cancer-specific survival to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in
           muscle-invasive bladder cancer

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      Abstract: Purpose To develop a risk score based on a prognostic model and a nomogram integrating baseline clinicopathological variables to predict bladder cancer-specific survival (BCSS) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) patients. Methods We retrospectively identified a consecutive sample of 247 MIBC patients treated with cisplatin-based NAC-plus-cystectomy in two Spanish hospitals between 2000 and 2019. Age at MIBC diagnosis, sex, histology, lymphovascular invasion, previous non-MIBC, hydronephrosis, and clinical TNM were included in the initial Cox regression model. A risk score was computed based on the final prognostic model and a nomogram was used to estimate BCSS at 2 and 5 years. Results Median age was 66 years; 89% were males; 83% had pure urothelial carcinoma; 16.2% had previous non-MIBC. Clinical stage was T2N0, T3-4aN0, and Tx-4N + in 24%, 57%, and 19% of patients, respectively. Complete pathological response was seen in 29.4% and downstaging to non-MIBC (ypT1, ypTa, ypTis) in 12.5% of patients. Overall 5-year BCSS was 59%. Four prognostic factors were identified: variant histology, previous non-MIBC, female sex and hydronephrosis. By adding the points attributed to each of these factors, we categorized patients in three groups: low-risk (0 points); intermediate-risk (1–9 points); high-risk (≥ 10 points). Five-year BCSS was 72%, 53%, and 15%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion We developed a nomogram and risk score based on four baseline clinicopathological characteristics to predict BCSS to NAC-plus-cystectomy in MIBC patients. If validated in prospective studies, this nomogram can be useful for selecting patients likely to benefit from NAC.
      PubDate: 2022-09-15
       
  • Testicular germ cell tumours’ clinical stage I: comparison of
           surveillance with adjuvant treatment strategies regarding recurrence rates
           and overall survival—a systematic review

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      Abstract: Purpose Testicular germ cell tumours (GCTs) represent the most common malignancy in young adult males with two thirds of all cases presenting with clinical stage I (CSI). Active surveillance is the management modality mostly favoured by current guidelines. This systematic review assesses the treatment results in CSI patients concerning recurrence rate and overall survival in non-seminoma (NS) and pure seminoma (SE) resulting from surveillance in comparison to adjuvant strategies. Methods/systematic review We performed a systematic literature review confining the search to most recent studies published 2010–2021 that reported direct comparisons of surveillance to adjuvant management. We searched Medline and the Cochrane Library with additional hand-searching of reference lists to identify relevant studies. Data extraction and quality assessment of included studies were performed with stratification for histology (NS vs. SE) and treatment modalities. The results were tabulated and evaluated with descriptive statistical methods. Results Thirty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. In NS patients relapse rates were 12 to 37%, 0 to 10%, and 0 to 11.8% for surveillance, chemotherapy and for retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) while overall survival rates were 90.7−100%, 91.7−100%, and 97−99.1%, respectively. In SE CSI, relapse rates were 0−22.3%, 0−5%, and 0−12.5% for surveillance, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, while overall survival rates were 84.1−98.7%, 83.5−100%, and 92.3−100%, respectively. Conclusion In both histologic subgroups, active surveillance offers almost identical overall survival as adjuvant management strategies, however, at the expense of higher relapse rates. Each of the management strategies in CSI GCT patients have specific merits and shared-decision-making is advised to tailor treatment.
      PubDate: 2022-09-15
       
  • A systematic review of treatment options for post-prostatectomy
           incontinence

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      Abstract: Purpose Urinary incontinence remains common in men after prostatectomy. Current guidance suggests early corrective surgery to those that are still incontinent after trying Pelvic Floor Muscle Therapy, however, other treatments are now available. This review aims to evaluate all currently available treatment options for men with post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI). Methods A search of MEDLINE and CENTRAL databases on 2/2/2021 produced 879 articles. Any study evaluating incontinence before and after a treatment protocol was eligible for inclusion. After screening, 17 randomized control trials were included, and pre-defined data points were collected. Due to heterogeneity, pooled analysis was not possible, and a descriptive synthesis was produced in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Cochrane Risk of Bias (RoB) tool was used to evaluate all studies. The search protocol and methods for this study was registered on the PROSPERO database before the search began, ID:(CRD42021229749). Results 3/17(18%) of studies focussed on pharmacotherapy, 2/17(12%) on vibration therapies, 8/17(47%) on pelvic floor muscle therapy (PFMT), 3/17(18%) on electrical stimulation (ES), and 1/17 (6%) on extracorporeal magnetic innervation (ExMI) as their main intervention. The use of Duloxetine, Solifenacin, PFMT, ES, and ExMI all show effective reduction in incontinence in men suffering from PPI. No study in this review evaluated surgical managements for PPI. Conclusion A large number of treatments are available for PPI using an array of different methods. For this reason, a variety of treatments could be considered before early invasive procedures, to prevent unnecessary surgery and its associated negative complications.
      PubDate: 2022-09-15
       
  • Treatment options for low-risk prostate cancer

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      PubDate: 2022-09-13
       
  • Survival with novel hormonal therapies in patients with nonmetastatic
           castration-resistant prostate cancer: indirect comparison of three
           randomized phase-III trials

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      Abstract: Introduction In recent years, new treatments have been approved for nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (M0CRPC). Because direct comparisons between these treatments are not available to guide treatment decisions, indirect comparisons can be of interest. Methods Our analysis evaluated second-generation hormone treatments proposed for M0CRPC. We searched multiple databases for articles published between 2010 and 2022. Phase-III clinical trials that studied these agents in M0CRPC patients were eligible. Among these, we included trials reporting overall survival (OS) through Kaplan–Meier curves. We performed the reconstruction of individual patient data from Kaplan–Meier graphs, according to the Shiny method, to indirectly compare the efficacy of the different agents. Indirect comparisons included testing for equivalence according to FDA criteria. Confidence intervals (CI) were 95% in all analyses except equivalence testing, where 90%CIs were used. Results Three studies met these inclusion criteria. Apalutamide (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64–0.88), darolutamide (HR 0.70, 95%CI 0.58–0.84), and enzalutamide (HR 0.77, 95%CI 0.65–0.90) were all significantly more effective than the placebo. Our results showed no difference in OS between any of these three agents, and in testing for equivalence, our estimates of HR met the 0.75–1.33 level. Conclusions While the Shiny method has confirmed its validity in reconstructing individual patient data, our indirect comparisons based on mature OS demonstrated similar efficacy and substantial equivalence among these three second-generation androgen receptor inhibitors.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
       
  • Fluoroscopy screening time and radiation dose during complete supine
           percutaneous nephrolithotomy

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      Abstract: Purpose Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is procedure of choice for treatment of large urinary tract calculi. This study aimed to investigate the affecting factors on fluoroscopy screening time (FST) and radiation dose (RD) of patients undergoing complete supine percutaneous nephrolithotomy (csPCNL). Methods Analytic cross-sectional study was performed on 355 patients who underwent csPCNL. The correlation between the FST and RD and patients’ demographics, stone characteristics, preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative parameters were assessed. Multivariate regression analysis was used to explore various parameters which affect FST and RD. Results Of all 355 patients, 191 (54.65%) were male and 161 were (45.35%) female with mean age of 48.29 ± 12.38 (16–82) years. BMI was 27.61 ± 4.53 (16.61–39.00) kg/m2. The mean operative time was 45.87 ± 18.29 min with mean FST of 101.72 ± 62.00 s. BMI, operative time, success rate, complications, stone number, and tract number had a significant relationship with FST and RD (P < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, BMI, tract number and success rate were found to be independent predictors for FST and RD. Age, gender, operation side, GFR, target calyx, lithotripsy history, stone opacity, size and site, stone configuration and distribution, and hydronephrosis did not have any correlation with FST and RD (P > 0.05). Conclusion BMI, success rate and tract number can be significant predictor for FST and RD during csPCNL. Identifying the affecting factors on FST and RD can help the surgeon to minimize the danger of radiation exposure by predicting and preoperative planning.
      PubDate: 2022-09-06
       
  • The impact of low-pressure pneumoperitoneum on robotic-assisted radical
           cystectomy and intracorporeal ileal conduit urinary diversion: a
           case–control study

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      Abstract: Purpose To evaluate the role of low intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) in improving postoperative recovery in Robotic-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) and intracorporeal ileal conduit urinary diversion (ICUD). Methods A retrospective case–control study of 49 bladder cancer patients offered RARC/ICUD with standard (12 mmHg, n = 24) or low IAP (8 mmHg, n = 25). Outcomes of interest included length of procedure (LoP), estimated blood loss (EBL), blood transfusion, margin positivity rates, time to first flatus (TtFF), time to first bowel movement (TtFBM), ileus and small bowel obstruction (SBO) rates, time to safe discharge (TtSD), postoperative hospital stay (PHS) and pain levels on a postoperative day (POD) 1 and 3. Perioperative complications were recorded using the Clavien-Dindo system. Results Demographic and baseline clinical characteristics, LoP, EBL and margin positivity rates were similar between groups. No transfusions were recorded. Median (IQR) TtFF, TtFBM and TtSD were significantly longer in Group 1 vs Group 2 (4 (1) vs 2 (1), 7 (3) vs 6 (2) and 8.5 (5.75) vs 5.0 (1), respectively). PHS and rates of postoperative ileus and SBO were lower in Group 2, however not statistically significant. Severe pain was uncommon in both groups but moderate/severe pain was significantly higher in Group 1 (95.8% vs 48% on POD1 and 62.5% vs 16% on POD3). No significant intraoperative complications were recorded and ≥ Grade 3 postoperative complications at 30 and 90 days were similar. Conclusion With limitations, Low-IAP RARC can be safely offered to RARC/ICUD patients and leads to faster bowel recovery, and shorter time to safe discharge compared to standard pneumoperitoneum.
      PubDate: 2022-09-05
       
  • Global outcomes and lessons learned in the management of Fournier’s
           gangrene from high-volume centres: findings from a literature review over
           the last two decades

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      Abstract: Introduction Fournier’s Gangrene (FG) carries a high mortality and morbidity with underreported short and long-term outcomes. Our aim was to perform a review of the recent literature to evaluate the short and long-term outcomes in patients with FG in the acute setting from large-scale studies. Methods A PubMed search was performed between January 2000 and December 2021 for studies reporting on patients with FG. Exclusion criteria included small samples (n < 100), review articles and animal studies. Primary outcomes of interest were mortality, number of operative episodes for surgical debridement and admission to intensive care unit (ICU). Other outcomes assessed included rate of faecal and urinary diversion, orchidectomy rate, penectomy rate and length of hospital stay. Results From a total of 1182 studies, 18 were eligible for inclusion and included in this review. In total, data were analysed from 13,903 FG patients. Mean inpatient mortality rate was 7.3% (range 4.7–40.4%). Mean number of surgical debridement operations performed was 1.8 (range 1.5–4.2). On average, 6.8% (range 3.6–50.5%) and 7% (range 1.2–53.2%) underwent faecal and urinary diversions, respectively. Mean rate of orchidectomy was 5.6%, with rate of penectomy being lower at 0.2%. The mean length of hospital stay was 18.5 days (range 13.0–26.6). On average, 17.5% (range 10.1%–67.5%) required ICU admission for at least a single-system support. Conclusion Our review from the past twenty years of literature suggests that the mortality for FG, whilst still high, has fallen compared to previous years. Whilst inpatient metrics are well-covered in the literature there is a lack of large-scale studies detailing long-term patient outcomes.
      PubDate: 2022-09-04
       
  • LC–MS metabolomics of urine reveals distinct profiles for
           non-muscle-invasive and muscle-invasive bladder cancer

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      Abstract: Purpose Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most frequent malignancies worldwide. Novel non-invasive markers are needed to diagnose and stage BC with more accuracy than invasive procedures like cystoscopy. To date, no study has identified urine metabolites characteristic of all BC stages. To discover novel urine metabolomic profiles to diagnose and stage non-muscle-invasive (NMIBC) and muscle-invasive (MIBC) patients using mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Methods We prospectively recruited 198 BC patients and 98 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers without evidence of renal or bladder condition confirmed by ultrasound, from whom we collected a first morning urine sample (before surgery in patients). In a discovery stage, an untargeted metabolomic analysis was conducted in urine samples of a selection of 64 BC patients (19 TaG1, 11 TaG3, 20 T1G3, 12 T2G3, 1 T2G2, 1 T3G3) and 20 controls to identify dysregulated metabolites. Next, after exhaustive multivariate analysis, confirmed dysregulated metabolites were validated in an independent cohort of 134 BC patients (19 TaG1, 62 TaG2, 9 TaG3, 15 T1G2, 16 T1G3, 4 T2G2, 9 T2G3) and 78 controls. Results We validated p-cresol glucuronide as potential diagnostic biomarker for BC patients compared to controls (AUC = 0.79). For NMIBC, p-cresol glucuronide was valuable as staging biomarker (AUC = 0.803). And among NMIBCs, p-coumaric acid may be a potential specific staging biomarker for the TaG1 NMIBC; however, future validation experiments should be conducted once the precise version of the standard is commercially available. Remarkably, for MIBC we validated spermine as potential specific staging biomarker (AUC = 0.882). Conclusion Ours is the first metabolomics study conducted in urine of a thoroughly characterized cohort comprising all stages of NMIBC, MIBC and healthy controls in which we identified non-invasive diagnostic and staging biomarkers. These may improve BC management, thus reducing the use of current harmful diagnostic techniques. Graphic abstract
      PubDate: 2022-09-04
       
  • Development of castration resistance in prostate cancer patients treated
           with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogues (LHRHa): results of
           the ANARESISTANCE study

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      Abstract: Purpose Evaluate the percentage of patients with prostate cancer treated with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogues (LHRHa) that develop castration resistance after a follow-up period of 3 years. The secondary objective is to evaluate the variables potentially related to the progression to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods A post-authorization, nation-wide, multicenter, prospective, observational, and longitudinal study that included 416 patients treated with LHRHa between 2012 and 2017 is presented. Patients were followed for 3 years or until development of CRPC, thus completing a per-protocol population of 350 patients. A Cox regression analysis was carried out to evaluate factors involved in progression to CRPC. Results After 3 years of treatment with LHRHa 18.2% of patients developed CRPC. In contrast, in the subgroup analysis, 39.6% of the metastatic patients developed CRPC, compared with 8.8% of the non-metastatic patients. The patients with the highest risk of developing CRPC were those with a nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 2 ng/ml (HR 21.6; 95% CI 11.7–39.8; p < 0.001) and those receiving concomitant medication, most commonly bicalutamide (HR 1.8; 95% CI 1–3.1, p = 0.0431). Conclusions The proportion of metastatic patients developing CRPC after 3 years of treatment with LHRHa is consistent with what has been previously described in the literature. In addition, this study provides new findings on CRPC in non-metastatic patients. Concomitant medication and nadir PSA are statistically significant predictive factors for the time to diagnosis of CRPC, the nadir PSA being the strongest predictor.
      PubDate: 2022-09-04
       
  • Correction: Extract from Cucurbita pepo improves BPH symptoms without
           affecting sexual function: a 24-month noninterventional study

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      PubDate: 2022-09-03
       
 
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