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UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 146 of 146 Journals sorted alphabetically
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
African Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
AJP Renal Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aktuelle Urologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
American Journal of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Andrologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Andrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Andrology & Gynecology : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Andrology and Genital Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arab Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivio Italiano di Urologia e Andrologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Españoles de Urología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Pediatric Nephrology Association     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Basic and Clinical Andrology     Open Access  
BJU International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
BJUI Compass     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BMC Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Canadian Urological Association Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical and Experimental Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Clinical Kidney Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Cuadernos de Cirugía     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Nephrology & Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Opinion in Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Current Urology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Der Nephrologe     Hybrid Journal  
Der Urologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Diabetic Nephropathy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Urología     Full-text available via subscription  
Enfermería Nefrológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
European Urology Focus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Urology Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Urology Open Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Forum Nefrologiczne     Full-text available via subscription  
Geriatric Nephrology and Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale di Clinica Nefrologica e Dialisi     Open Access  
Hellenic Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Human Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJU Case Reports     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Brazilian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Urology and Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal Africain d'Urologie     Open Access  
Journal für Urologie und Urogynäkologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Clinical Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Endoluminal Endourology     Open Access  
Journal of Endourology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Endourology Case Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Genital System & Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Integrative Nephrology and Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Kidney Cancer and VHL     Open Access  
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Nephrology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pediatric Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Renal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Journal of The Egyptian Society of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access  
Journal of Urology & Nephrology     Open Access  
Kidney Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Kidney International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Kidney International Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidney Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kidney Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Kidneys (Počki)     Open Access  
Nature Reviews Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Nature Reviews Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Nefrología     Open Access  
Nefrología (English Edition)     Open Access  
Nephro-Urology Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Nephron     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nephron Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nephron Experimental Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephron Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Neurourology and Urodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
OA Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Urology & Nephrology Journal     Open Access  
Paediatric Nephrology Journal of Bangladesh     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Portuguese Journal of Nephrology & Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Progrès en Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Progrès en Urologie - FMC     Full-text available via subscription  
Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Renal Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Renal Replacement Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research and Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Nefrología, Diálisis y Trasplante     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Urología     Open Access  
Revista Urologia Colombiana     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Seminars in Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Prostate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Translational Research in Urology     Open Access  
Trends in Urology & Men's Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Urine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Uro-News     Hybrid Journal  
Urolithiasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Internationalis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Urologic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urologic Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Urological Science     Open Access  
Urologicheskie Vedomosti     Open Access  
Urologie in der Praxis     Hybrid Journal  
Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Urology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urology Times     Free   (Followers: 3)
Urology Video Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Nephrology and Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Urolithiasis
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.899
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2194-7228 - ISSN (Online) 2194-7236
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Deficient butyrate metabolism in the intestinal microbiome is a potential
           risk factor for recurrent kidney stone disease

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      Abstract: Abstract Intestinal microbiome dysbiosis is a known risk factor for recurrent kidney stone disease (KSD) with prior data suggesting a role for dysfunctional metabolic pathways other than those directly utilizing oxalate. To identify alternative mechanisms, the current study analyzed differences in the metabolic potential of intestinal microbiomes of patients (n = 17) and live-in controls (n = 17) and determined their relevance to increased risk for KSD using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. We found no differences in the abundance of genes associated with known oxalate degradation pathways, supporting the notion that dysfunction in other metabolic pathways plays a role in KSD. Further analysis showed decreased abundance of key enzymes involved in butyrate biosynthesis in patient intestinal microbiomes. Furthermore, de novo construction of microbial genomes showed that the majority of genes significantly enriched in non-stone formers are affiliated with Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a major butyrate producer. Specifically pertaining to butyrate metabolism, the majority of abundant genes mapped back to F. prausnitzii, Alistipes spp., and Akkermansia muciniphila. No differences were observed in ascorbate or glyoxylate metabolic pathways. Collectively, these data suggest that impaired bacterial-associated butyrate metabolism may be an oxalate-independent mechanism that contributes to an increased risk for recurrent KSD. This indicates that the role of the intestinal microbiome in recurrent KSD is multi-factorial, which is representative of the highly intertwined metabolic nature of this complex environment. Future bacteria-based treatments must not be restricted to targeting only oxalate metabolism.
      PubDate: 2024-02-28
       
  • Comparing outcomes of single-use vs reusable ureteroscopes: a systematic
           review and meta analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Flexible ureterolithotripsy is a frequent urological procedure, usually used to remove stones from the kidney and upper ureter. Reusable uretero-scopes were the standard tool for that procedure, but recent concerns related to sterility and maintenance and repair costs created the opportunity to develop new technologies. In 2016, the first single-use digital flexible ureteroscope was introduced. Since then, other single-use ureteroscopes were developed, and studies compared them with the reusable ureteroscopes with conflicting results. The purpose of this study is to describe the literature that compares the performance of single-use and reusable flexible ureteroscopes in retrograde intrarenal surgery for urinary stones. A Systematic Review was performed in October 2022 in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and MetaAnalyses (PRISMA). A search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Google Scholar and LILACS retrieved 10,039 articles. After screening, 12 articles were selected for the Meta-Analysis. No differences were found in stone-free rate (OR 1.31, CI 95% [0.88, 1.97]), operative time (MD 0.12, CI 95% [−5.52, 5.76]), incidence of post-operative fever (OR 0.64, CI 95% [0.22, 1.89]), or incidence of post-operative urinary tract infection (OR 0.63 CI 95% [0.30, 1.32]). No differences were observed in the studied variables. Hence, the device choice should rely on the availability, cost analysis and surgeons’ preference.
      PubDate: 2024-02-28
       
  • The fate of clinically insignificant residual fragments following
           retrograde intrarenal surgery and factors affecting spontaneous passage

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      Abstract: Abstract The remaining stone fragments after retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) can lead to stone recurrence/regrowth, or stone-related events (SRE). We aimed to delineate the clinical circumstances that are decisive for spontaneous passage of clinical insignificant residual fragments (CIRF) (primary outcome) and define risk factors for stone recurrence/regrowth and their clinical manifestation (secondary outcome). A total of 115 patients who had CIRF following RIRS were included in this study. Demographic, clinical data, stone, and anatomic characteristics including infundibulopelvic angle (IPA), infundibular length (IL) and follow-up data of patients were analyzed. The mean follow-up time was 27.5 ± 6.9 months. 31 (26.9%) patients passed the CIRF spontaneously. Patients were divided into two groups as spontaneous fragment passage group and fragment remaining group and compared with respect to demographic, clinical, stone-related, and anatomic characteristics. 61.2% of patients had lower pole CIRF in fragment remaining group and 83.3% of patients in spontaneous fragment passage group (p = 0.031). In addition, IPA was wider in spontaneous fragment passage group (60.7° vs 51.4°, p = 0.001). A subanalysis was performed for fragment remaining group. In 84 patients, 44 (52.4%) patients were stable for their CIRF at their follow-up and included in stable group. 40 (47.6%) patients experienced stone re-growth (27 patients) or SRE (13 patients) at their follow up. Patients in re-growth/SRE group were older (49.1 vs 39.4 years, p = 0.047), had higher body mass index (28.2 vs 27 kg/m2, p = 0.03) and larger CIRF (2.8 vs 2.1 mm). CIRFs may be not expelled spontaneously and they may lead to additional morbidity and lithotripsy interventions.
      PubDate: 2024-02-28
       
  • Molecular mechanism of Rhizoma Polygonati in the treatment of
           nephrolithiasis: network pharmacology analysis and in vivo experimental
           verification

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      Abstract: Abstract Rhizoma Polygonati (RP) is the dried rhizome of the liliaceous plant. It has anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis effects. But its role in kidney stones has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of RP in the treatment of nephrolithiasis through network pharmacological analysis and in vivo experiments. The active compounds and protein targets of RP, as well as the potential targets of the nephrolithiasis were searched from the database. The protein–protein interaction (PPI) network diagram and the drug–compounds–targets–disease network were constructed. The enrichment analysis was performed by Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Subsequently, the effect of RP on the prevention and treatment of nephrolithiasis was experimentally validated in vivo. Animal experiments showed that RP ameliorates renal function and reduced crystal deposition in a mouse model. It may act through anti-inflammation and anti-apoptosis. Our study showed that RP could prevent and treat nephrolithiasis by inhibiting apoptosis and inflammation, which provided a new efficacy and clinical application for RP.
      PubDate: 2024-02-20
       
  • Acoustic emission of kidney stones: a medical adaptation of statistical
           breakdown mechanisms

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      Abstract: Abstract Kidney stones have a prevalence rate of > 10% in some countries. There has been a significant increase in surgery to treat kidney stones over the last 10 years, and it is crucial that such techniques are as effective as possible, while limiting complications. A selection of kidney stones with different chemical and structural properties were subjected to compression. Under compression, they emit acoustic signals called crackling noise. The variability of the crackling noise was surprisingly great comparing weddellite, cystine and uric acid stones. Two types of signals were found in all stones. At high energies of the emitted sound waves, we found avalanche behaviour, while all stones also showed signals of local, uncorrelated collapse. These two types of events are called ‘wild’ for avalanches and ‘mild’ for uncorrelated events. The key observation is that the crossover from mild to wild collapse events differs greatly between different stones. Weddellite showed brittle collapse, extremely low crossover energies (< 5 aJ) and wild avalanches over 6 orders of magnitude. In cystine and uric acid stones, the collapse was more complicated with a dominance of local “mild” breakings, although they all contained some stress-induced collective avalanches. Cystine stones had high crossover energies, typically \(\sim\) 750 aJ, and a narrow window over which they showed wild avalanches. Uric acid stones gave moderate values of crossover energies, \(\sim\) 200 aJ, and wild avalanche behaviour for \(\sim\) 3 orders of magnitude. Further research extended to all stone types, and measurement of stone responses to different lithotripsy strategies, will assist in optimisation of settings of the laser and other lithotripsy devices to insight fragmentation by targeting the ‘wild’ avalanche regime.
      PubDate: 2024-02-20
       
  • Ureteral stricture formation after endoscopic removal of obstructing
           

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      Abstract: Abstract The possible role of well-assessed radiological parameters in the prediction of ureteral stricture formation in cases with impacted obstructive ureteral calculi has been evaluated. 46 adult patients with or without ureteral stricture formation after ureteroscopic stone management were included. In addition to stone size and some certain radiological parameters including ureteral wall thickness (UWT) of the involved ureter at the impacted stone site was also measured and noted on computed tomography (CT) images. Parameters were evaluated in two subgroups of cases, namely: Group 1: patients in whom a ureteral stricture formed after endoscopic stone removal and Group 2: patients normal ureteral anatomy without any stricture formation. The possible relationship between the UWT values and degree of hydronephrosis (HN) with subsequent stricture formation was comparatively evaluated. All of the stones were proximal ureteral calculi in both groups. Both the degree of HN and proximal ureteral diameter (PUD) parenchymal was higher in cases with stricture formation. In addition, mean parenchymal thickness was lower and mean values of UWT measurements at the stone site were 3.70 ± 0.97 mm and 2.17 ± 0.26 mm in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. A cutoff value 2.49 mm for UWT was found to be highly predictive for stricture formation. UWT value calculated at the obstructing stone site was found to be predictive enough for the likelihood of ureteral stricture formation with high sensitivity and specificity . This evaluation along with some other radiological parameters may enable the urologists to follow such cases on this aspect with necessary measures taken.
      PubDate: 2024-02-19
       
  • RIRS with FV-UAS vs. MPCNL for 2–3-cm upper urinary tract stones: a
           prospective study

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      Abstract: Abstract To observe the efficacy and safety of retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) combined with flexible vacuum-assisted ureteral access sheath (FV-UAS) and minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (MPCNL) in patients with 2–3 cm upper urinary tract stones. A total of 160 patients with 2–3 cm upper urinary tract stones were prospectively randomized into 2 groups—80 in the FV-UAS group and 80 cases as control in the MPCNL group. The stone-free rates (SFRs) at different times (postoperative 1st day and 4th week) were considered as the primary outcome of the study. The secondary end points were operative time, hemoglobin decrease, postoperative hospital stay, and operation-related complications. There was no obvious difference between the two groups in patient’s demographics and preoperative clinical characteristics (all P > 0.05). Postoperative data showed that mean decrease in hemoglobin level was less in FV-UAS group than that in MPCNL group (5.3 vs. 10.8 g/L, P < 0.001). Postoperative hospital stay in FV-UAS group was more shorten than that in MPCNL group (2.7 vs. 4.9 days, P < 0.001). There was no statistical significance between the two groups in SFRs during postoperative 1st day and 4th week (both P > 0.05). However, in terms of the rates of bleeding and pain, MPCNL group were both significantly higher than FV-UAS group (6.2 vs. 0.0%, P = 0.023; 16.2 vs. 2.5%, P = 0.003; respectively). Our study showed that RIRS with FV-UAS, a new partnership to treat 2–3 cm upper urinary tract stones, was satisfying as it achieved a high SFR rate and a low rate of complications. This method was safe and reproducible in clinical practice.
      PubDate: 2024-02-10
       
  • Multicentric evaluation of high and low power lasers on RIRS success using
           propensity score analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of HPL on different parameters by different centers and urologists. While doing this, we evaluated different parameters by comparing HPL(High Power laser) and LPL(Low-power laser). This is an observational, retrospective, comparative, multicentric study of prospectively organised database. A total of 217 patients who underwent RIRS for kidney stones smaller than 2 cm in three different centers were included in the study. The patients were divided into two groups; LPL used (Group1, n:121 patients) and HPL used (Group2, n:96). Propensity score matching was done in the data analysis part. After matching, a total of 192 patients, 96 patients in both groups, were evaluated. There was no difference between the groups regarding age, gender, stone side, and stone location. The stone-free rate on the first day was 80.3% in Group 1, it was 78.1% in Group 2 (p = 0.9). In the third month, it was 90.7% in Group 1 and 87.5% in Group 2 (p:0.7).Hospitalization duration was significantly higher in Group 1. (2.35 ± 2.27 days vs. 1.42 ± 1.10 days; p < 0.001).The operation duration was 88.70 ± 29.72 min in Group1 and 66.17 ± 41.02 min in Group2 (p < 0.001). The fluoroscopy time (FT) was 90.73 ± 4.79 s in Group 1 and 50.78 ± 5.64 s in Group 2 (p < 0.001). Complications according to Clavien Classification, were similar between the groups(p > 0.05). According to our study similar SFR and complication rates were found with HPL and LPL. In addition, patients who used HPL had lower operation time, hospital stay, and fluoroscopy time than the LPL group. Although high-power lasers are expensive in terms of cost, they affect many parameters and strengthen the hand of urologists thanks to the wide energy and frequency range they offer.
      PubDate: 2024-02-10
       
  • Antegrade flexible ureteroscopy-assisted percutaneous nephrolithotomy for
           staghorn calculi: a prospective randomized controlled study

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      Abstract: Abstract The aim is to compare the efficacy and safety between single percutaneous nephrolithotomy (sPNL) and antegrade flexible ureteroscopy-assisted percutaneous nephrolithotomy (aPNL) for the treatment of staghorn calculi. A prospective randomized controlled study was conducted at the Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University. A total of 160 eligible patients were included, with 81 in the sPNL group and 79 in the aPNL group. The study first compared the overall differences between sPNL and aPNL. Then, the patients were divided into two subgroups: Group 1 (with less than 5 stone branches) and Group 2 (with 5 or more stone branches), and the differences between the two subgroups were further analyzed. The results showed that aPNL had a higher stone-free rate (SFR) and required fewer percutaneous tracts, with a shorter operation time compared to sPNL (P < 0.05). Moreover, aPNL significantly reduced the need for staged surgery, particularly in patients with 5 or more stone branches. Moreover, there were no significant differences in the changes of hemoglobin levels and the need for blood transfusions between the sPNL and aPNL groups, and the incidence of multiple tracts was lower in the aPNL group. The two groups showed comparable rates of perioperative complications. We concluded that aPNL resulted in a higher SFR for staghorn calculi, and required fewer multiple percutaneous tracts, reduced the need for staged surgery, and had a shorter operative time than PNL alone, especially for patients with 5 or more stone branches. Furthermore, aPNL did not increase the incidence of surgical complications.
      PubDate: 2024-02-10
       
  • Confirmation of negative urine culture status after appropriate antibiotic
           treatment prior to endourological stone procedures: Is it really
           necessary'

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      Abstract: Abstract To evaluate the necessity of confirmation for a negative urine culture test outcome after an appropriate antibiotic regimen for urinary tract infection (UTI) prior to endoscopic stone removal procedures. 170 cases receiving an appropriate antibiotic treatment for culture proven UTI based on test outcomes before endoscopic stone removal were evaluated in two groups: Group 1 (n = 85) Patients in whom a second urine culture test was performed to ensure “negative urine culture” status prior to the procedures after receiving antibiotic therapy and Group 2 (n = 85). Patients receiving the same antibiotic therapy without any additional urine culture test before the procedures. Cases were comparatively evaluated with respect to the statistical significance of post-operative infective complications (fever, sepsis), duration of hospital stay and readmission rates during early post-operative period. Our findings demonstrated no significant difference regarding the rate of infective complications (presence of fever, incidence of septic findings), hospitalization period and readmission rates between the two groups. Although the presence of a negative urine status has been confirmed by urine culture test in group 1 cases, no additional urine culture test was performed with this aim in group 2 cases (negative urine culture was confirmed only with urinalysis) and the outcomes regarding the infective problems were found to be similiar. Our current findings indicate that a second urine culture test may not be a “must” if the patients receive an appropriate antibiotic regimen based on the sensitivity test outcomes for a reasonable time period.
      PubDate: 2024-02-08
       
  • Is traditional stone clinic the optimal use of NHS resources'

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      Abstract: Abstract There is no clear guidance on the efficacy of stone follow-up. NICE have been unable to make recommendations with current published evidence. The aim of this study was to understand the patient journey resulting in surgical intervention, and whether traditional stone follow-up is effective. A retrospective review of patients undergoing ureteroscopy (URS) or percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) over a 3 year period identified 471 patients who underwent these procedures to treat stone disease. Records were interrogated for the following: symptoms, mechanism of booking, reason for intervention, stone size, stone location, risk factors and previous follow-up. Of 471 patients who underwent intervention, 168 were booked from stone clinic follow-up (36%). Of these, 96% were symptomatic and 4% were asymptomatic. When risk factors were removed, this figure was reduced to 1%. Sepsis rate for emergency admissions differs between those followed up (13%) versus new presentations (19)%. There was no statistically significant difference in the outpatient imaging frequency between patients booked from an emergency admission (80% having imaging every 6 months) and those from the clinic (82%). Our Hospital provides on average 650 stone clinic appointments a year with a cost of £93,000. Given the low rate of intervention in patients with asymptomatic renal stones, a symptomatic, direct-access emergency stone clinic could be a better model of care and use of NHS resources. Urgent research is required in this area to further assess if this is the case.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
       
  • Association between urinary lithiasis, other than struvite by
           crystallography and non-ureolytic bacteria

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      Abstract: Abstract The relationship between urinary tract infection caused by urease-producing bacteria and lithiasis due to struvite stones is well established in the literature. However, there is limited knowledge on whether non-urease producing bacteria can also promote crystallization. In our study, we analyzed the association between urinary lithiasis, other than struvite by crystallography and non-ureolytic bacteria, in 153 patients who underwent surgery for urinary stone. The collected samples were sent for crystallographic analysis and culture. Additionally, preoperatory urine culture was collected for combined evaluation with the previous data. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy was the most commonly performed approach (45.8%). Struvite stones were more frequently identified in women (90.3%). Among stones with positive cultures, except struvite, 45.5% were composed of calcium oxalate monohydrate. The difference between urine culture and stone culture was different in 24.8% of the cases. Among stones with positive cultures that did not contain struvite, 86.4% showed non-urease bacteria in their cultures and 47.1% of struvite stones also did not have urease-producing bacteria in their cultures (p < 0.021). Our findings suggest that there is an association between non-ureolytic bacteria and stones that are not composed of struvite.
      PubDate: 2024-01-20
       
  • Reducing hand radiation during renal access for percutaneous
           nephrolithotomy: a comparison of radiation reduction techniques

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      Abstract: Abstract Percutaneous nephrolithotomy confers the highest radiation to the urologist’s hands compared to other urologic procedures. This study compares radiation exposure to the surgeon’s hand and patient’s body when utilizing three different techniques for needle insertion during renal access. Simulated percutaneous renal access was performed using a cadaveric patient and separate cadaveric forearm representing the surgeon’s hand. Three different needle-holding techniques were compared: conventional glove (control), a radiation-attenuating glove, and a novel needle holder. Five 300-s fluoroscopy trials were performed per treatment arm. The primary outcome was radiation dose (mSv) to the surgeon’s hand. The secondary outcome was radiation dose to the patient. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s B post-hoc tests were performed with p < 0.05 considered significant. Compared to the control (3.92 mSv), both the radiation-attenuating glove (2.48 mSv) and the needle holder (1.37 mSv) reduced hand radiation exposure (p < 0.001). The needle holder reduced hand radiation compared to the radiation-attenuating glove (p < 0.001). The radiation-attenuating glove resulted in greater radiation produced by the C-arm compared to the needle holder (83.49 vs 69.22 mGy; p = 0.019). Patient radiation exposure was significantly higher with the radiation-attenuating glove compared to the needle holder (8.43 vs 7.03 mSv; p = 0.027). Though radiation-attenuating gloves decreased hand radiation dose by 37%, this came at the price of a 3% increase in patient exposure. In contrast, the needle holder reduced exposure to both the surgeon’s hand by 65% and the patient by 14%. Thus, a well-designed low-density needle holder could optimize radiation safety for both surgeon and patient.
      PubDate: 2024-01-13
       
  • Place of urolithiasis in the spectrum of urological pathologies, practices
           and use of endourological procedures in the management of calculi of the
           upper urinary tract: results of a survey of referral centres in Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract Our aim was to determine the current trend of endourology in the management of upper urinary tract calculi in Africa reference centres. We conducted an online multiple-choice questionnaire survey involving 46 centres from 27 countries using a structured well-designed Google Form (®) questionnaire. The questionnaires were distributed to the head of service through their emails. The questions collected demographic data about the centre, the epidemiology of urolithiasis, diagnostic means and management of upper urolithiasis, especially access to endourology procedures and their practices. Descriptive analyses were performed. The participation rate was 77.9%. Urinary lithiasis was one of the three main pathologies encountered in 42/46 centres. 33 centres had easy access to CT scanners and 34 had operating theatres equipped with endo-urological surgery equipment. Of these 34 centres, 30 perform endourology for the management of upper urinary tract stones. Rigid ureteroscopy is the main technique used by the centres. It is the only endourology technique used for stone management by 12 centres (40%). 7/30 (23.3%) have the option of performing rigid ureteroscopy, flexible ureteroscopy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy. The frequency of procedures varies widely, with 43.3% rarely performing endourological surgery. Seventeen centres have their operating theatre equipped with a fluoroscope and 6/42 centres have extracorporeal lithotripsy. Open surgery is still used in 29/42 centres (69.1%). Laparoscopy is available in 50% of centres, but none reported performing laparoscopic lithotomy. In Africa, urinary lithiasis plays an important role in the activities of referral centres. Modern management techniques are used to varying degrees (not all centres have them) and with very variable frequency. Open surgery is still widely performed as a management. Rigid ureteroscopy is the main endourological technique. It is essential to develop the practice of modern urology in Africa, mainly endourology.
      PubDate: 2024-01-12
       
  • Clinical patterns and implications of prescription opioid use in a
           pediatric population for the management of urolithiasis in the emergency
           room

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      Abstract: Abstract Extrapolations from the adult population have suggested that opioids should be avoided in the management of pediatric urolithiasis, but the literature is sparse with regards to actual practice patterns and the downstream implications. We sought to investigate the rate of oral opioid administration for children presenting to the emergency room (ER) with urolithiasis and to identify associations between opioid administration and return visits and persistent opioid use. The TriNetX Research and Diamond Networks were used for retrospective exploratory and validation analyses, respectively. Patients <18 years presenting to the emergency room with urolithiasis were stratified by the receipt of oral opioids. Propensity score matching was performed in a 1:1 fashion. Incident cases of opioid administration and risk ratios (RRs) for a return ER visit within 14 days and the presence of an opioid prescription at 6 to 12 months were calculated. Of the 4672 patients in the exploratory cohort, 11.9% were prescribed oral opioids. Matching yielded a total of 1084 patients. Opioids at the index visit were associated with an increased risk of return visits (RR 1.51, 95% CI 1.04-2.20, P = 0.03) and persistent opioid use (RR 4.00, 95% CI 2.20-7.26, P < 0.001). The validation cohort included 6524 patients, of whom 5.7% were prescribed oral opioids. Matching yielded a total of 722 patients and demonstrated that opioids were associated with an increased risk of return visits (RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.04-2.16, P = 0.03) but not persistent opioid use (RR 1.70, 95% CI 0.79-3.67, P = 0.17). We find that the opioid administration rate for pediatric urolithiasis appears reassuringly low and that opioids are associated with a greater risk of return visits and persistent use.
      PubDate: 2024-01-10
       
  • Mixed stones: urinary stone composition, frequency and distribution by
           gender and age

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      Abstract: Abstract Proper analysis of urinary stone composition is a cornerstone for diagnosis, targeted treatment and recurrence prevention of urolithiasis. The aim of this study was to determine the composition, frequency and distribution of mixed stones according to gender and age of patients. A total of 42,519 urinary stones from 30,311 men and 12,208 women submitted between January 2007 and December 2020 were studied. Most urinary calculi consisted of two components (50.9%), followed by stones of a single constituent (27.1%) and three-component stones (21.9%), while four-component stones were only rarely identified (0.1%). Among all stones, 49.8% consisted of whewellite (COM), weddellite (COD), and mixtures of COM and COD, 33.8% were pure carbonate apatite (CA) and mixtures of CA with COM and/or COD, while 7.6% were composed of uric acid anhydrous (UAA), uric acid dihydrate (UAD), and mixed UAA and UAD. The remaining 8.8% of calculi were rare single-component stones and rare mixtures of various constituents. The number of stone components was inversely associated with age (p < 0.001). The proportion of men decreased significantly with the number of stone constituents, from 3.01:1 for single-component stones to 1.0:1 for four-component urinary calculi (p < 0.001). The vast majority of urinary calculi consisted of two or more components in varying proportions. While age was inversely associated with the number of stone constituents, the proportion of women increased significantly from single-component to four-component urinary calculi. A significant proportion of mixed stones could present a challenge for diagnosis and targeted recurrence prevention.
      PubDate: 2024-01-08
       
  • Observation and comparison of gas formation during holmium:YAG laser
           lithotripsy of cystine, uric acid, and calcium oxalate stones: a
           chromatographic and electron microscopic analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract The primary aim of the present in vitro study is to analyze the chemical content of the bubbles occurring during the fragmentation of cystine stones with both the high-power and low-power holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) lasers. The secondary aim is to discuss their clinical importance. Three types of human renal calculi calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), cystine, and uric acid were fragmented with both low-power and high-power Ho:YAG lasers in separate experimental setups at room temperature, during which time it was observed whether gas was produced. After laser lithotripsy, a cloudy white gas was obtained, after the fragmentation of cystine stones only. A qualitative gas content analysis was performed with a gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) device. The fragments in the aqueous cystine calculi setup were dried and taken to the laboratory to be examined by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM–EDX) and X-ray diffraction analysis. No gas production was observed after fragmentation in the COM and uric acid stones. Free cystine, sulfur, thiophene, and hydrogen sulfide gas were produced by both low-power and high-power Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy of the cystine stones. In the SEM–EDX mapping analysis, a free cystine molecule containing 42.8% sulfur (S), 21% oxygen (O), 14.9% carbon (C), and 21% nitrogen (N) atoms was detected in the cystine stone experimental setup. The evidence obtained, which shows that hydrogen sulfide emerges in the gaseous environment during Ho:YAG laser fragmentation of cystine stones, indicates that caution is required to prevent the risk of in vivo production and toxicity.
      PubDate: 2024-01-08
       
  • Application of novel burst wave lithotripsy and ultrasonic propulsion
           technology for the treatment of ureteral calculi in a bottlenose dolphin
           (Tursiops truncatus) and renal calculi in a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina)

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      Abstract: Abstract Marine mammals may develop kidney stones, which can be challenging to treat. We describe burst wave lithotripsy (BWL) and ultrasonic propulsion to treat ureteral calculi in a 48-year-old female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and to reduce renal stone burden in a 23-year-old male harbor seal (Phoca vitulina). BWL and ultrasonic propulsion were delivered transcutaneously in sinusoidal ultrasound bursts to fragment and reposition stones. Targeting and monitoring were performed with real-time imaging integrated within the BWL system. Four dolphin stones were obtained and fragmented ex vivo. The dolphin case received a 10-min and a 20-min BWL treatment conducted approximately 24 h apart to treat two 8–10 mm partially obstructing right mid-ureteral stones, using oral sedation alone. For the harbor seal, while under general anesthesia, retrograde ureteroscopy attempts were unsuccessful because of ureteral tortuosity, and a 30-min BWL treatment was targeted on one 10-mm right kidney stone cluster. All 4 stones fragmented completely to < 2-mm fragments in < 20 min ex vivo. In the dolphin case, the ureteral stones appeared to fragment, spread apart, and move with ultrasonic propulsion. On post-treatment day 1, the ureteral calculi fragments shifted caudally reaching the ureteral orifice on day 9. On day 10, the calculi fragments passed, and the hydroureter resolved. In the harbor seal, the stone cluster was observed to fragment and was not visible on the post-operative computed tomography scan. The seal had gross hematuria and a day of behavior indicating stone passage but overall, an uneventful recovery. BWL and ultrasonic propulsion successfully relieved ureteral stone obstruction in a geriatric dolphin and reduced renal stone burden in a geriatric harbor seal.
      PubDate: 2024-01-08
       
  • Laparoscopic pyelotomy combined with ultrasonic lithotripsy via a
           nephroscope for the treatment of complex renal stones

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of the study was to introduce a novel surgical approach of combining laparoscopic pyelotomy with ultrasonic lithotripsy via a nephroscope for the treatment of complex renal stones. Between May 2021 and April 2023, 32 patients underwent laparoscopic pyelotomy combined with ultrasonic lithotripsy via a nephroscope and their perioperative variables were retrospectively collected and outcomes were assessed. Dissection and incision of the anterior renal pelvis wall was performed via a laparoscope. A 19.5 F nephroscope was introduced into the renal pelvis through a laparoscopic trocar from the incision. Stones were fragmented and sucked out using a 3.3 mm ultrasonic probe placed through the nephroscope. All operations were completed successfully and the stone-free rate at 3 days after operation was 87.5% (28/32). Four (12.5%, 4/32) patients with staghorn stones had a small residual stone in the lower calyx after operation and did not require reintervention. No patient required perioperative transfusion and four (12.5%, 4/32) patients with struvite stones developed postoperative fever, which was successfully treated with intravenous antibiotics. The mean follow-up time was 14.0 ± 7.2 months, with no patient developing long-term complications. This approach offers a safe and effective treatment option for complex renal stones, as the method exhibits a high clearance rate with few complications.
      PubDate: 2024-01-08
       
  • The effect of the use of tranexamic acid in percutaneous nephrolithotomy
           on blood loss and surgical visual clarity: a prospective, randomized,
           controlled and double-blind study

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      Abstract: Abstract Tranexamic acid, once a randomly used antifibrinolytic agent, has been in standard protocols for many specific surgeries. Studies are still needed to standardize the dose and route of tranexamic acid administration, examine its possible contributions in urological surgery, and establish a protocol for its use. To contribute to this goal, we designed a prospective, randomized, double-blind study on 75 patients with 1 control and 2 study groups (n = 25) who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Group Tranexamic acid received 10 mg/kg intravenous tranexamic acid preoperatively. And Group Irrigation received the same amount in the initial irrigation fluid. Primarily, we observed the total amount of blood transfusion and the changes in hemoglobin and hematocrit values during 2 postoperative days. Distinctively, we intraoperatively monitored hemoglobin continuously as a saturation hemoglobin value to assess the timing of the effect of tranexamic acid. Secondarily, we questioned surgical visual clarity with a standard visual score to reveal its contribution to surgical practicality, operative time, and residual fragment quantity. Our results revealed a significant difference in the reduction of hemoglobin and hematocrit change and blood transfusion in both tranexamic acid groups concerning control, especially on the second day (p = 0.003, p = 0.002, p = 0.001). Likewise, surgical visual scores were significantly better in both tranexamic acid groups (p = 0.018). In conclusion, intravenous or local administration of tranexamic acid at a dose of 10 mg/kg will be sufficient to maintain perioperative stability in hemoglobin values, use fewer blood products and provide a better visual advantage for the surgeon intraoperatively. The trial registration number is NCT05947435, and the date of registration is 07/07/2023, retrospectively registered.
      PubDate: 2024-01-06
       
 
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UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 146 of 146 Journals sorted alphabetically
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
African Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
AJP Renal Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aktuelle Urologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
American Journal of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Andrologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Andrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Andrology & Gynecology : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Andrology and Genital Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arab Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivio Italiano di Urologia e Andrologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Españoles de Urología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Pediatric Nephrology Association     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Basic and Clinical Andrology     Open Access  
BJU International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
BJUI Compass     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BMC Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Canadian Urological Association Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical and Experimental Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Clinical Kidney Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Cuadernos de Cirugía     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Nephrology & Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Opinion in Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Current Urology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Der Nephrologe     Hybrid Journal  
Der Urologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Diabetic Nephropathy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Urología     Full-text available via subscription  
Enfermería Nefrológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
European Urology Focus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Urology Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Urology Open Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Forum Nefrologiczne     Full-text available via subscription  
Geriatric Nephrology and Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale di Clinica Nefrologica e Dialisi     Open Access  
Hellenic Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Human Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJU Case Reports     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Brazilian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Urology and Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal Africain d'Urologie     Open Access  
Journal für Urologie und Urogynäkologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Clinical Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Endoluminal Endourology     Open Access  
Journal of Endourology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Endourology Case Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Genital System & Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Integrative Nephrology and Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Kidney Cancer and VHL     Open Access  
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Nephrology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pediatric Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Renal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Journal of The Egyptian Society of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access  
Journal of Urology & Nephrology     Open Access  
Kidney Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Kidney International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Kidney International Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidney Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kidney Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Kidneys (Počki)     Open Access  
Nature Reviews Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Nature Reviews Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Nefrología     Open Access  
Nefrología (English Edition)     Open Access  
Nephro-Urology Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Nephron     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nephron Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nephron Experimental Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephron Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Neurourology and Urodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
OA Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Urology & Nephrology Journal     Open Access  
Paediatric Nephrology Journal of Bangladesh     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Portuguese Journal of Nephrology & Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Progrès en Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Progrès en Urologie - FMC     Full-text available via subscription  
Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Renal Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Renal Replacement Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research and Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Nefrología, Diálisis y Trasplante     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Urología     Open Access  
Revista Urologia Colombiana     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Seminars in Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Prostate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Translational Research in Urology     Open Access  
Trends in Urology & Men's Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Urine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Uro-News     Hybrid Journal  
Urolithiasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Internationalis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Urologic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urologic Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Urological Science     Open Access  
Urologicheskie Vedomosti     Open Access  
Urologie in der Praxis     Hybrid Journal  
Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Urology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urology Times     Free   (Followers: 3)
Urology Video Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Nephrology and Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)

           

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