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    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)

UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 144 of 144 Journals sorted alphabetically
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AJP Renal Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aktuelle Urologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
American Journal of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Andrologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Andrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Andrology & Gynecology : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Andrology and Genital Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arab Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivio Italiano di Urologia e Andrologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Españoles de Urología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Pediatric Nephrology Association     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bangladesh Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Basic and Clinical Andrology     Open Access  
BJU International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
BJUI Compass     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Urological Association Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical and Experimental Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Clinical Kidney Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cuadernos de Cirugía     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Nephrology & Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Opinion in Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Current Urology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Der Nephrologe     Hybrid Journal  
Der Urologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Diabetic Nephropathy     Open Access  
EMC - Urología     Full-text available via subscription  
Enfermería Nefrológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
European Urology Focus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Urology Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Urology Open Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Forum Nefrologiczne     Full-text available via subscription  
Geriatric Nephrology and Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale di Clinica Nefrologica e Dialisi     Open Access  
Hellenic Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJU Case Reports     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Brazilian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Urology and Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal für Urologie und Urogynäkologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Clinical Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Endoluminal Endourology     Open Access  
Journal of Endourology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Endourology Case Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Genital System & Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Integrative Nephrology and Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Kidney Cancer and VHL     Open Access  
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nephrology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Pediatric Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Renal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Journal of The Egyptian Society of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access  
Journal of Urology & Nephrology     Open Access  
Kidney Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Kidney International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Kidney International Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidney Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kidney Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidneys (Počki)     Open Access  
Nature Reviews Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Nature Reviews Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Nefrología     Open Access  
Nefrología (English Edition)     Open Access  
Nephro-Urology Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Nephron     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nephron Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nephron Experimental Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephron Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Neurourology and Urodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
OA Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Urology & Nephrology Journal     Open Access  
Paediatric Nephrology Journal of Bangladesh     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Portuguese Journal of Nephrology & Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Progrès en Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Progrès en Urologie - FMC     Full-text available via subscription  
Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Renal Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Renal Replacement Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research and Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Nefrología, Diálisis y Trasplante     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Urología     Open Access  
Revista Urologia Colombiana     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Seminars in Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Prostate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Translational Research in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trends in Urology & Men's Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Urine     Open Access  
Uro-News     Hybrid Journal  
Urolithiasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Internationalis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Urologia Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Urologic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urologic Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urological Science     Open Access  
Urologicheskie Vedomosti     Open Access  
Urologie in der Praxis     Hybrid Journal  
Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Urology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urology Times     Free   (Followers: 3)
Urology Video Journal     Open Access  
World Journal of Nephrology and Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.142
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 27  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0931-0509 - ISSN (Online) 1460-2385
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Defining intradialytic hypertension: the importance of measuring blood
           pressure accurately

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      Pages: 1783 - 1785
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac142
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • TESTING the effects of corticosteroids in patients with IgA nephropathy

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      Pages: 1786 - 1788
      Abstract: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft10.13039/501100001659START10.13039/10000552419/21RWTH Aachen University10.13039/501100007210German Society of Neurology10.13039/501100007735
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac221
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • What the seminal experience of the Seattle Northwest Kidney Centers
           teaches to today's young nephrologists

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      Pages: 1789 - 1791
      Abstract: artificial kidneybioethicshaemodialysishome dialysisvascular access
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac042
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • Acid–base homeostasis: a historical inquiry of its origins and
           conceptual evolution

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      Pages: 1816 - 1823
      Abstract: ABSTRACTTo a great extent, the conceptual evolution of acid–base homeostasis has been shaped by progress in chemistry. It began with the theoretical consideration of matter by the natural philosophers of antiquity, progressed into an observational craft as chymistry during the Scientific Revolution, evolved into analytical chemistry in the Enlightenment when acid–alkali interactions began to be deciphered, then was clearly exposed in the organic chemistry of the 19th century and ultimately formulated in mathematical precision as the chemical equations of physical chemistry in the 20th century. Two principal transformational changes shaped their clinical application. The first, launched by the Chemical Revolution of Antoine Lavoisier, introduced quantitation, clarified the language and added experimental rigor to chemical studies, which Claude Bernard then introduced into physiology, formulated the concept of regulatory homeostasis, refined experimental medicine and explored the role of the kidney in acid–base balance. The second transformational change in their gradual clinical applicability began in electrochemical studies that revived the atomic composition of matter and introduced the notion of ions and electrolytes that were fundamental in formulating the concept of acid–base ionization by Svante Arrhenius in 1884 and their measurement from hydrogen ion concentration as pH by Søren Sørensen in 1909. Subsequent studies of Lawrence J. Henderson and Donald D. van Slyke introduced these laboratory-based conceptual advances to the bedside in the 20th century. Clinical studies of acidosis and alkalosis that followed over the past few decades have facilitated and refined the clinical recognition, interpretation and treatment of acid–base disorders.
      PubDate: Sat, 29 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac014
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • Issues regarding COVID-19 in kidney transplantation in the ERA of the
           Omicron variant: a commentary by the ERA Descartes Working Group

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      Pages: 1824 - 1829
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe Omicron variant, which has become the dominant strain of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) worldwide, brings new challenges to preventing and controlling the infection. Moreover, the widespread implementation of vaccination policies before and after transplantation, and the development of new prophylactic and treatment strategies for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) over the past 12–18 months, has raised several new issues concerning kidney transplant recipients. In this special report, the ERA DESCARTES (Developing Education Science and Care for Renal Transplantation in European States) Working Group addresses several questions related to everyday clinical practice concerning kidney transplant recipients and to the assessment of deceased and live kidney donors: what is the current risk of severe disease and of breakthrough infection, the optimal management of immunosuppression in kidney transplant recipients with COVID-19, the role of passive immunization and the efficacy of antiviral drugs in ambulatory patients, the management of drug-to-drug interactions, safety criteria for the use of SARS-CoV-2-positive donors, issues related to the use of T cell depleting agents as induction treatment, and current recommendations for shielding practices.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac203
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • Microvascular remodeling and altered angiogenic signaling in human kidneys
           distal to occlusive atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis

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      Pages: 1844 - 1856
      Abstract: ABSTRACTBackgroundRenal artery stenosis (RAS) is an important cause of chronic kidney disease and secondary hypertension. In animal models, renal ischemia leads to downregulation of growth factor expression and loss of intrarenal microcirculation. However, little is known about the sequelae of large-vessel occlusive disease on the microcirculation within human kidneys.MethodThis study included five patients who underwent nephrectomy due to renovascular occlusion and seven nonstenotic discarded donor kidneys (four deceased donors). Micro-computed tomography was performed to assess microvascular spatial densities and tortuosity, an index of microvascular immaturity. Renal protein expression, gene expression and histology were studied in vitro using immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction and staining.ResultsRAS demonstrated a loss of medium-sized vessels (0.2–0.3 mm) compared with donor kidneys (P = 0.037) and increased microvascular tortuosity. RAS kidneys had greater protein expression of angiopoietin-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and thrombospondin-1 but lower protein expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than donor kidneys. Renal fibrosis, loss of peritubular capillaries (PTCs) and pericyte detachment were greater in RAS, yet they had more newly formed PTCs than donor kidneys. Therefore, our study quantified significant microvascular remodeling in the poststenotic human kidney. RAS induced renal microvascular loss, vascular remodeling and fibrosis. Despite downregulated VEGF, stenotic kidneys upregulated compensatory angiogenic pathways related to angiopoietin-1.ConclusionsThese observations underscore the nature of human RAS as a microvascular disease distal to main vessel stenosis and support therapeutic strategies directly targeting the poststenotic kidney microcirculation in patients with RAS.
      PubDate: Fri, 22 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac156
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • Effects of ferric citrate and intravenous iron sucrose on markers of
           mineral, bone, and iron homeostasis in a rat model of CKD-MBD

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      Pages: 1857 - 1867
      Abstract: ABSTRACTBackgroundAnemia and chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) are common and begin early in CKD. Limited studies have concurrently compared the effects of ferric citrate (FC) versus intravenous (IV) iron on CKD-MBD and iron homeostasis in moderate CKD.MethodsWe tested the effects of 10 weeks of 2% FC versus IV iron sucrose in rats with moderate CKD (Cy/+ male rat) and untreated normal (NL) littermates. Outcomes included a comprehensive assessment of CKD-MBD, iron homeostasis and oxidative stress.ResultsCKD rats had azotemia, elevated phosphorus, parathyroid hormone and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23). Compared with untreated CKD rats, treatment with FC led to lower plasma phosphorus, intact FGF23 and a trend (P = 0.07) toward lower C-terminal FGF23. FC and IV iron equally reduced aorta and heart calcifications to levels similar to NL animals. Compared with NL animals, CKD animals had higher bone turnover, lower trabecular volume and no difference in mineralization; these were unaffected by either iron treatment. Rats treated with IV iron had cortical and bone mechanical properties similar to NL animals. FC increased the transferrin saturation rate compared with untreated CKD and NL rats. Neither iron treatment increased oxidative stress above that of untreated CKD.ConclusionsOral FC improved phosphorus homeostasis, some iron-related parameters and the production and cleavage of FGF23. The intermittent effect of low-dose IV iron sucrose on cardiovascular calcification and bone should be further explored in moderate–advanced CKD.
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac162
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • Alport syndrome and autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease
           frequently underlie end-stage renal disease of unknown origin—a
           single-center analysis

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      Pages: 1895 - 1905
      Abstract: ABSTRACTBackgroundThe prevalence of end-stage renal disease of unknown etiology in adult patients is globally high and accounts for almost 20% of all dialysis patients. Recent studies have suggested that the percentage of adult patients with a causal genetic variant has been underestimated so far. Despite severe prognostic and therapeutic implications, awareness about prevalence and manifestations of genetic kidney diseases in adult renal patients is still limited.MethodsWe recruited 58 individuals from 39 families at our transplantation center, fulfilling at least one of the following criteria: (i) unclear etiology of kidney disease, (ii) clinically suspected genetic kidney disease and (iii) positive family history for nephropathies. The cohort consisted of patients waitlisted for kidney transplantation and patients in the follow-up after transplantation. Detailed documentation of family history and phenotype was obtained before initiating gene panel sequencing of 479 nephropathy-associated genes.ResultsWith this study design, a molecular genetic diagnosis was established in one-third of all patients. Mutations in the collagen COL4A genes, and mutations in MUC1 and UMOD were the most frequent among all detected causal variants. Overall, rare genetic variants were detected in more than half of all cases.ConclusionThe combination of detailed phenotyping prior to next-generation sequencing diagnostics was highly efficient. Elucidating the underlying genetic causes in a cohort of adult renal patients has considerable clinical impact on medical management.
      PubDate: Fri, 29 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac163
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • Outcome and effect of vaccination in SARS-CoV-2 Omicron infection in
           hemodialysis patients: a cohort study

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      Pages: 1944 - 1950
      Abstract: ABSTRACTBackgroundHemodialysis patients are at high risk of Covid-19, though vaccination has significant efficacy in preventing and reducing the severity of infection. Little information is available on disease severity and vaccine efficacy since the dissemination of the Omicron variant.MethodsIn a multi-center study, during a period of the epidemic driven by the Omicron variant, all hemodialysis patients positive for SARS-CoV-2 were identified. Outcomes were analyzed according to predictor variables including vaccination status. Risk of infection was analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards model.ResultsSARS-CoV-2 infection was identified in 1126 patients including 200 (18%) unvaccinated, 56 (5%) post first dose, 433 (38%) post second dose, and 437 (39%) at least 7 days beyond their third dose. The majority of patients had a mild course but 160 (14%) were hospitalized and 28 (2%) died. In regression models adjusted for age and comorbidity, two-dose vaccination was associated with a 39% (95%CI: 2%–62%) reduction in admissions, but third doses provided additional protection, with a 51% (95%CI: 25%–69%) further reduction in admissions. Among 1265 patients at risk at the start of the observation period, SARS-CoV-2 infection was observed in 211 (17%). Two-dose vaccination was associated with a 41% (95%CI: 3%–64%) reduction in the incidence of infection, with no clear additional effect provided by third doses.ConclusionsThese data demonstrate lower incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection after vaccination in dialysis patients during an Omicron dominant period of the epidemic. Among those developing infection, severe illness was less common with prior vaccination, particularly after third vaccine doses.
      PubDate: Wed, 29 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac209
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • 3-methylhistidine and clinical outcomes in maintenance haemodialysis
           patients

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      Pages: 1951 - 1961
      Abstract: ABSTRACTBackgroundChronic kidney disease is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality. 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) is the by-product of actin and myosin degradation reflecting skeletal muscle turnover. Markedly elevated 3-MH levels have been documented in uraemic patients, but the interpretation of high 3-MH concentration in maintenance haemodialysis (MHD) patients remains unclear. Indeed, it is not known whether elevated serum 3-MH levels are a marker of excessive muscle catabolism or a better lean tissue mass. Here, we evaluated the association between serum 3-MH levels and clinical outcomes in these patients.MethodsSerum 3-MH concentration was measured by reverse-phase liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry in a cohort of MHD patients. We analysed the relationships between various clinical/laboratory indices, lean tissue mass measured by bioimpedance spectroscopy, mortality and cardiovascular (CV) events.ResultsSerum 3-MH concentration was positively correlated with serum albumin, normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), simplified creatinine index (SCI) and lean tissue mass. Of 291 MHD patients, during a mean follow-up of 847 days, 91 patients died and 101 patients experienced a CV event. Survival was significantly better in patients with high 3-MH concentrations (P = .002). A higher level of 3-MH was also associated with a lower CV mortality and lower incidence of CV events (P = .015 and P < .001, respectively). Low serum 3-MH levels remained significantly associated with CV events but not with mortality after adjustment for demographic, metabolic and CV risk factors.ConclusionElevated serum 3-MH concentration appears to be a marker of better lean tissue mass and nutritional status. Low serum 3-MH is a robust and independent predictor of CV events in the MHD population.
      PubDate: Wed, 02 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac050
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • Dialysis-network variability in home dialysis use not explained by patient
           characteristics: a national registry-based cohort study in France

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      Pages: 1962 - 1973
      Abstract: ABSTRACTBackgroundAlthough associated with better quality of life and potential economic advantages, home dialysis use varies greatly internationally and appears to be underused in many countries. This study aimed to estimate the dialysis-network variability in home dialysis use and identify factors associated with (i) the uptake in home dialysis, (ii) the proportion of time spent on home dialysis and (iii) home dialysis survival (patient and technique).MethodsAll adults ≥18 years old who had dialysis treatment during 2017–2019 in mainland France were included. Mixed-effects regression models were built to explore factors including patient or residence characteristics and dialysis network associated with variation in home dialysis use.ResultsDuring 2017–2019, 7728/78 757 (9.8%) patients underwent dialysis at least once at home for a total of 120 594/1 508 000 (8%) months. The heterogeneity at the dialysis-network level and to a lesser extent the regional level regarding home dialysis uptake or total time spent was marginally explained by patient characteristics or residence and dialysis-network factors. Between-network heterogeneity was less for patient and technique survival. These results were similar when the analysis was restricted to home peritoneal dialysis or home hemodialysis.ConclusionsVariability between networks in the use of home dialysis was not fully explained by non-modifiable patient and residence characteristics. Our results suggest that to increase home dialysis use in France, one should focus on home dialysis uptake rather than survival. Financial incentives and a quality improvement programme should be implemented at the dialysis-network level to increase home dialysis use.
      PubDate: Mon, 07 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac055
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • The legacy effect of a home walking exercise programme in kidney failure
           patients on dialysis

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      Pages: 1974 - 1981
      Abstract: ABSTRACTBackgroundThe EXerCise Introduction To Enhance performance (EXCITE) trial (J Am Soc Nephrol 28: 1259–1268, 2017) in dialysis patients showed that a 6-month home walking exercise programme improves physical function and two dimensions of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form (KDQOLSF-SF™) questionnaire. Whether improvements in physical function achieved by exercise interventions are maintained in the long term has never been tested in the dialysis population.MethodsIn this post-trial study embedded in the EXCITE trial, we tested the response to the 6 min walking test (6MWT) and the 5-time Sit-To-Stand (5STS) tests and the KDQOLSF-SF™ from the 6th month (end of the trial) to the 36th month.ResultsAmong the 227 patients of the EXCITE trial cohort, 162 underwent at least three out of four testing visits (baseline, 6, 18 and/or 36 months) contemplated by the study protocol and 89 during all four testing visits. In the primary analysis by the linear mixed model, the gain in walking distance achieved in the 6th month in the exercise group [between-arms difference: +36 m, 95% confidence interval (CI): 22–51, P < .001] was maintained at the 18th month (between-arms difference: +37 m, 95% CI: 19–57, P < .001) and reduced to 23 m (95% CI: −4 to 49 meters, P = .10) at the 36th month. Overall, the post-trial difference in walking distance trajectories between the two study arms was highly significant (P = .004). Furthermore, the walking distance changes at the 6th (r = 0.34, P = .018) and 18th month (r = 0.30, P = .043) were directly related to the number of structured exercise sessions completed during the trial (i.e. the first 6 month). No such effect was registered in the response to the 5STS or in quality of life as measured by the KDQOLSF-SF™.ConclusionsIn dialysis patients, the benefits of a 6-month structured walking programme outlast the duration of the intervention and postpone the loss of walking performance which naturally occurs in this population, but does not affect the quality of life (QoL) and the response to the STS test.
      PubDate: Tue, 31 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac147
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • The blood to extracellular volume relationship is stable and in the
           physiologic range in chronic haemodialysis patients

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      Pages: 2034 - 2036
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac151
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • Correction to: MO474: expectation and acceptance of a clinical decision
           support software by nephrologist end-users: the ckdnapp survey

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      Pages: 2037 - 2037
      PubDate: Tue, 31 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac190
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
  • Correction to: Increase Echogenicity and Kidney Length are Surrogate
           Markers of Kidney Function With an Increased Echogenic Pattern Being Most
           Predictive of Kidney Dysfunction in Hiv Patients in Kwazulu-Natal, South
           Africa

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 2038 - 2038
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfac215
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 10 (2022)
       
 
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