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SPORTS MEDICINE (77 journals)

Showing 1 - 79 of 79 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Journal of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162)
American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Archives of Sports Medicine and Physiotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arthroscopy, Sports Medicine, and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asian Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
B&G Bewegungstherapie und Gesundheitssport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Baltic Journal of Sport and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Biomedical Human Kinetics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
British Journal of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Case Studies in Sport Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Clinics in Sports Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Current Sports Medicine Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
European Journal of Sport Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research : Sportwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Athletic Therapy & Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Kinesiology and Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
International Journal of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Athletic Enhancement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Education, Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Exercise & Organ Cross Talk     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology     Open Access  
Journal of Human Kinetics     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of ISAKOS     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Physical Education Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery Open     Open Access  
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Journal of Sport & Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Sports Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Knie Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Motor Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Movement & Sport Sciences : Science & Motricité     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
OA Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Physical Therapy in Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Physician and Sportsmedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Saudi Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Science & Sports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Science and Medicine in Football     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Hacettepe Journal of Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Spor ve Performans Araştırmaları Dergisi / Ondokuz Mayıs University Journal of Sports and Performance Researches     Open Access  
Sport Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sport Sciences for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sport, Education and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sport, Ethics and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sportphysio     Hybrid Journal  
Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sports Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Sports Medicine - Open     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Sports Medicine and Health Science     Open Access  
Sports Medicine International Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Sportverletzung · Sportschaden     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sri Lankan Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine     Open Access  
Translational Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Video Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Sportpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.073
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 59  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0195-9131 - ISSN (Online) 1530-0315
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • Long-Term Exercise Intervention in Patients with McArdle Disease: Clinical
           and Aerobic Fitness Benefits

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      Authors: SANTALLA; ALFREDO; VALENZUELA, PEDRO L.; RODRIGUEZ-LOPEZ, CARLOS; RODRÍGUEZ-GÓMEZ, IRENE; NOGALES-GADEA, GISELA; PINÓS, TOMÀS; ARENAS, JOAQUÍN; MARTÍN, MIGUEL A.; SANTOS-LOZANO, ALEJANDRO; MORÁN, MARÍA; FIUZA-LUCES, CARMEN; ARA, IGNACIO; LUCIA, ALEJANDRO
      Abstract: imageIntroduction The long-term effects of exercise in patients with McArdle disease—the paradigm of “exercise intolerance”—are unknown. This is an important question because the severity of the disease frequently increases with time.Purpose This study aimed to study the effects of a long-term exercise intervention on clinical and fitness-related outcomes in McArdle patients.Methods Seventeen patients (exercise group: n = 10, 6 male, 38 ± 18 yr; control: n = 7, 4 male, 38 ± 18 yr) participated in a 2-yr unsupervised intervention including moderate-intensity aerobic (cycle-ergometer exercise for 1 h) and resistance (high load–low repetition circuit) training on 5 and 2–3 d·wk−1, respectively. Patients were assessed at baseline and postintervention. Besides safety, outcomes included clinical severity (e.g., exercise intolerance features) on a 0–3 scale (primary outcome), and aerobic fitness, gross muscle efficiency, and body composition (total/regional fat, muscle, and bone mass; secondary outcomes).Results The exercise program was safe and resulted in a reduction of 1 point (−1.0; 95% confidence interval, −1.6 to −0.5; P = 0.025) in clinical severity versus the control group, with 60% of participants in the exercise group becoming virtually asymptomatic and with no functional limitation in daily life activities. Compared with controls, the intervention induced significant and large benefits (all P < 0.05) in the workload eliciting the ventilatory threshold (both in absolute (watts, +37%) and relative units (watts per kilogram of total body mass or of lower-limb muscle mass, +44%)), peak oxygen uptake (in milliliters per kilogram per minute, +28%), and peak workload (in absolute (+27%) and relative units (+33%)). However, no significant changes were found for muscle efficiency or for any measure of body composition.Conclusions A 2-yr unsupervised intervention including aerobic and resistance exercise is safe and induces major benefits in the clinical course and aerobic fitness of patients with McArdle disease.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Strength and Biomechanical Risk Factors for Noncontact ACL Injury in Elite
           Female Footballers: A Prospective Study

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      Authors: COLLINGS; TYLER J.; DIAMOND, LAURA E.; BARRETT, ROD S.; TIMMINS, RYAN G.; HICKEY, JACK T.; DU MOULIN, WILLIAM S.; WILLIAMS, MORGAN D.; BEERWORTH, KATE A.; BOURNE, MATTHEW N.
      Abstract: imagePurpose This study aimed to determine if a preseason field-based test battery was prospectively associated with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in elite female footballers.Methods In total, 322 elite senior and junior female Australian Rules Football and soccer players had their isometric hip adductor and abductor strength, eccentric knee flexor strength, countermovement jump (CMJ) kinetics, and single-leg hop kinematics assessed during the 2019 preseason. Demographic and injury history details were also collected. Footballers were subsequently followed for 18 months for ACL injury.Results Fifteen noncontact ACL injuries occurred during the follow-up period. Prior ACL injury (odds ratio [OR], 9.68; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 2.67–31.46), a lower isometric hip adductor to abductor strength ratio (OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.09–3.61), greater CMJ peak take-off force (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.09–3.61), and greater single-leg triple vertical hop average dynamic knee valgus (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.06–3.63) and ipsilateral trunk flexion (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.01–2.55) were independently associated with an increased risk of subsequent ACL injury. A multivariable prediction model consisting of CMJ peak take-off force, dynamic knee valgus, and ACL injury history that was internally validated classified ACL injured from uninjured footballers with 78% total accuracy. Between-leg asymmetry in lower limb strength and CMJ kinetics were not associated with subsequent ACL injury risk.Conclusions Preseason field-based measures of lower limb muscle strength and biomechanics were associated with future noncontact ACL injury in elite female footballers. These risk factors can be used to guide ACL injury screening practices and inform the design of targeted injury prevention training in elite female footballers.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Genome-wide Association Study of Liking for Several Types of Physical
           Activity in the UK Biobank and Two Replication Cohorts

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      Authors: KLIMENTIDIS; YANN C.; NEWELL, MICHELLE; VAN DER ZEE, MATTHIJS D.; BLAND, VICTORIA L.; MAY-WILSON, SEBASTIAN; ARANI, GAYATRI; MENNI, CRISTINA; MANGINO, MASSIMO; ARORA, AMIT; RAICHLEN, DAVID A.; ALEXANDER, GENE E.; WILSON, JAMES F.; BOOMSMA, DORRET I.; HOTTENGA, JOUKE-JAN; DE GEUS, ECO J. C.; PIRASTU, NICOLA
      Abstract: imageIntroduction A lack of physical activity (PA) is one of the most pressing health issues today. Our individual propensity for PA is influenced by genetic factors. Stated liking of different PA types may help capture additional and informative dimensions of PA behavior genetics.Methods In over 157,000 individuals from the UK Biobank, we performed genome-wide association studies of five items assessing the liking of different PA types, plus an additional derived trait of overall PA-liking. We attempted to replicate significant associations in the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR) and TwinsUK. Additionally, polygenic scores (PGS) were trained in the UK Biobank for each PA-liking item and for self-reported PA behavior, and tested for association with PA in the NTR.Results We identified a total of 19 unique significant loci across all five PA-liking items and the overall PA-liking trait, and these showed strong directional consistency in the replication cohorts. Four of these loci were previously identified for PA behavior, including CADM2, which was associated with three PA-liking items. The PA-liking items were genetically correlated with self-reported (rg = 0.38–0.80) and accelerometer (rg = 0.26–0.49) PA measures, and with a wide range of health-related traits. Each PA-liking PGS significantly predicted the same PA-liking item in NTR. The PGS of liking for going to the gym predicted PA behavior in the NTR (r2 = 0.40%) nearly as well as a PGS based on self-reported PA behavior (r2 = 0.42%). Combining the two PGS into a single model increased the r2 to 0.59%, suggesting that PA-liking captures distinct and relevant dimensions of PA behavior.Conclusions We have identified the first loci associated with PA-liking and extended our understanding of the genetic basis of PA behavior.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Cross-Sectional Associations of Sedentary Behavior and Sitting with Serum
           Lipid Biomarkers in Midlife

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      Authors: TJURIN; PETRA; NIEMELÄ, MAISA; KANGAS, MAARIT; NAUHA, LAURA; VÄHÄ-YPYÄ, HENRI; SIEVÄNEN, HARRI; KORPELAINEN, RAIJA; FARRAHI, VAHID; JÄMSÄ, TIMO
      Abstract: imageIntroduction Physical inactivity, excessive total time spent in sedentary behavior (SB) and prolonged sedentary bouts have been proposed to be risk factors for chronic disease morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, which patterns and postures of SB have the most negative impacts on health outcomes is still unclear. This population-based study aimed to investigate the independent associations of the patterns of accelerometer-based overall SB and sitting with serum lipid biomarkers at different moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) levels.Methods Physical activity and SB were measured in a birth cohort sample (N = 3272) at 46 yr using a triaxial hip-worn accelerometer in free-living conditions for 14 d. Raw acceleration data were classified into SB and PA using a machine learning–based model, and the bouts of overall SB and sitting were identified from the classified data. The participants also answered health-related questionnaires and participated in clinical examinations. Associations of overall SB (lying and sitting) and sitting patterns with serum lipid biomarkers were investigated using linear regression.Results The overall SB patterns were more consistently associated with serum lipid biomarkers than the sitting patterns after adjustments. Among the participants with the least and the most MVPA, high total time spent in SB and SB bouts of 15–29.99 and ≥30 min were associated with impaired lipid metabolism. Among those with moderate amount of MVPA, higher time spent in SB and SB bouts of 15–29.99 min was unfavorably associated with serum lipid biomarkers.Conclusions The associations between SB patterns and serum lipid biomarkers were dependent on MVPA level, which should be considered when planning evidence-based interventions to decrease SB in midlife.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Preseason Eccentric Strength Is Not Associated with Hamstring Strain
           Injury: A Prospective Study in Collegiate Athletes

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      Authors: WILLE; CHRISTA M.; STIFFLER-JOACHIM, MIKEL R.; KLIETHERMES, STEPHANIE A.; SANFILIPPO, JENNIFER L.; TANAKA, CLAIRE S.; HEIDERSCHEIT, BRYAN C.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction Established risk factors for hamstring strain injuries (HSI) include older age and prior HSI. However, these are nonmodifiable and have a limited role in injury prevention. Eccentric hamstring strength is a common component of HSI prevention programs, but its association with injury is less clear.Purpose This study aimed to determine if eccentric hamstring strength was prospectively associated with HSI among collegiate athletes, while controlling for sex, age, and prior HSI. We hypothesized that athletes with lower eccentric hamstring strength or greater between-limb strength asymmetry at preseason would have an increased risk of HSI.Methods Hamstring eccentric strength measures, maximum total force (FTotal) and between-limb asymmetry in maximum force (FAsym), were measured at preseason on male and female athletes. HSIs were tracked over the subsequent 12 months. Generalized estimating equations were used to identify univariable and multivariable associations between athlete demographics, eccentric hamstring strength, and HSI risk.Results Data for 326 athletes (85 female; 30 track, 43 basketball, 160 American football, 93 soccer) were included, and 64 HSIs were observed. Univariable associations between eccentric hamstring strength and subsequent HSI were nonsignificant (FTotal: odds ratio [OR], 0.99 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.93–1.05); P = 0.74; FAsym: OR, 1.35 (95% CI, 0.87–2.09); P = 0.23). No relationship between eccentric hamstring strength and HSI (FAsym: OR, 1.32 (95% CI, 0.84–2.08); P = 0.23) was identified after adjusting for confounders including sex, age, and prior HSI.Conclusions No association between preseason eccentric hamstring strength and risk of subsequent HSI was identified after controlling for known risk factors and sex among collegiate athletes. Eccentric hamstring strengthening may continue to serve as a preventative approach to HSI, but it does not provide additional insight into HSI risk beyond factors such as age and prior HSI.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Leg Dominance Does Not Influence Maximal Force, Force Steadiness, or Motor
           Unit Discharge Characteristics

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      Authors: PETROVIC; IVANA; AMIRIDIS, IOANNIS G.; HOLOBAR, ALES; TRYPIDAKIS, GEORGIOS; KELLIS, ELEFTHERIOS; ENOKA, ROGER M.
      Abstract: imagePurpose The aim of our study was to compare maximal force, force steadiness, and discharge characteristics of motor units in tibialis anterior during contractions with the dorsiflexors of the dominant and nondominant legs at low-to-moderate target forces and three ankle angles.Methods Twenty young adults performed maximal and submaximal isometric contractions (5%, 10%, 20%, 40%, and 60% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)) with the dorsiflexors of the dominant and nondominant legs at three ankle angles (75°, short length; 90°, intermediate length; 105°, long length). High-density EMG signals from the tibialis anterior muscle of each leg were recorded.Results Maximal force (average dominant, 182.9 ± 64.5 N; nondominant, 179.0 ± 58.8 N) and the fluctuations in force, quantified as absolute (SD) and normalized amplitudes (coefficient of variation (CoV)), were similar between the two legs across the three ankle angles (average CoV for dominant, 1.5% ± 1.0%; nondominant, 1.7% ± 1.3%). The CoV for force for both legs decreased from 5% to 20% MVC force, and then it plateaued at 40% and 60% MVC force. EMG amplitude, mean discharge rate of motor units, discharge variability (interspike interval), and the variability in neural drive (filtered cumulative spike train) were similar between the two legs across the submaximal contractions.Conclusions MVC force and force steadiness were similar across ankle angles and target forces between the dominant and nondominant legs. The attributes that underlie the self-reported identification of a dominant leg were not associated with the force capacity or the control of force for the dorsiflexor muscles, at least during isometric contractions.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Mitochondrial Mass of Naïve T Cells Is Associated with Aerobic Fitness
           and Energy Expenditure of Active and Inactive Adults

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      Authors: ALLEY; JESSICA R.; VALENTINE, RUDY J.; KOHUT, MARIAN L.
      Abstract: imagePurpose Chronic exercise training is known to induce metabolic changes, but whether these adaptations extend to lymphocytes and how this may affect immune function remains largely unknown. This study was conducted to determine the extent to which mitochondrial characteristics of naïve T cells differ according to fitness status and to further examine the energy production pathways of cells from aerobically trained and inactive participants.Methods Blood was collected from 30 aerobically active (>6 h·wk−1) or inactive (
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Eccentric Exercise Causes Specific Adjustment in Pyruvate Oxidation by
           Mitochondria

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      Authors: HODY; STÉPHANIE; WARREN, BLAIR E.; VOTION, DOMINIQUE-MARIE; ROGISTER, BERNARD; LEMIEUX, HÉLÈNE
      Abstract: imageIntroduction The impact of eccentric exercise on mitochondrial function has only been poorly investigated and remains unclear. This study aimed to identify the changes in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, specifically triggered by a single bout of eccentric treadmill exercise.Methods Male adult mice were randomly divided into eccentric (ECC; downhill running), concentric (CON; uphill running), and unexercised control groups (n = 5/group). Running groups performed 18 bouts of 5 min at 20 cm·s−1 on an inclined treadmill (±15° to 20°). Mice were sacrificed 48 h after exercise for blood and quadriceps muscles collection. Deep proximal (red) and superficial distal (white) muscle portions were used for high-resolution respirometric measurements.Results Plasma creatine kinase activity was significantly higher in the ECC compared with CON group, reflecting exercise-induced muscle damage (P < 0.01). The ECC exercise induced a significant decrease in oxidative phosphorylation capacity in both quadriceps femoris parts (P = 0.032 in proximal portion, P = 0.010 in distal portion) in comparison with the CON group. This observation was only made for the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) pathway using pyruvate + malate as substrates. When expressed as a flux control ratio, indicating a change related to mitochondrial quality rather than quantity, this change seemed more prominent in distal compared with proximal portion of quadriceps muscle. No significant difference between groups was found for the NADH pathway with glutamate or glutamate + malate as substrates, for the succinate pathway or for fatty acid oxidation.Conclusions Our data suggest that ECC exercise specifically affects pyruvate mitochondrial transport and/or oxidation 48 h after exercise, and this alteration mainly concerns the distal white muscle portion. This study provides new perspectives to improve our understanding of the mitochondrial adaptation associated with ECC exercise.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Effects of Exercise Training on PPARβ/δ Expression in Skeletal Muscle of
           Rats with Spontaneous Hypertension

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      Authors: YANG; MINGXUAN; PAN, YANXIA; LI, KUNHUI; CHEN, XIUYUN; LI, MINYAN; LIN, JIANPING; LI, MING; LIN, CHENG
      Abstract: imagePurpose This study aimed to identify the relationship and mechanism between skeletal muscle peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) and spontaneous hypertension.Methods Rats were divided into four groups (n = 10): spontaneous hypertensive rats exercise group (SHR-E), spontaneous hypertensive rats sedentary group (SHR-S), Wistar-Kyoto control rats exercise group (WKY-E), and Wistar-Kyoto control rats sedentary group (WKY-S). Although the sedentary groups were placed on the treadmill without moving during the training sessions, the exercise groups were forced to run on a treadmill for 8 wk, 1 h·d−1, 5 d·wk−1. After training, the density and area of gastrocnemius microvessels were observed. PPARβ/δ, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2), and nitric oxide synthase in gastrocnemius were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and Western blot.Results Except the sixth week of age, the systolic blood pressure of SHR-S was significantly higher than that of WKY-S at all time periods. Exercise significantly reduced systolic blood pressure in SHR rats. Compared with the SHR-S group, the WKY-S group had significantly higher PPARβ/δ protein level and density of skeletal muscle microvessels. Eight weeks of exercise increased the PPARβ/δ, SOD-2, VEGFA, and microvessel density and area in the skeletal muscle of SHR.Conclusions Exercise training promoted PPARβ/δ mRNA and protein-level expression of PPARβ/δ, SOD-2 and VEGFA in skeletal muscle, thus increasing the density and area of skeletal muscle blood vessels. These regulations contribute to the reduction of peripheral vascular resistance. This may be a potential mechanism of exercise to reduce blood pressure.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Higher 24-h Total Movement Activity Percentile Is Associated with Better
           Cognitive Performance in U.S. Older Adults

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      Authors: DOOLEY; ERIN E.; PALTA, PRIYA; WOLFF-HUGHES, DANA L.; MARTINEZ-AMEZCUA, PABLO; STAUDENMAYER, JOHN; TROIANO, RICHARD P.; PETTEE GABRIEL, KELLEY
      Abstract: imagePurpose This study aimed to assess the association of a wrist-worn, device-based metric of 24-h movement with cognitive function and subjective cognitive complaints among older adults, 60 yr and older.Methods This is a cross-sectional analysis of the 2011–2012 and 2013–2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles. A wrist-worn ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer captured total 24-h movement activity, analyzed as Monitor-Independent Movement Summary units (MIMS-units), and quantified into placement based on an age- and sex-standardized percentile. Cognitive tests in the domains of memory, language/verbal fluency, and executive performance were administered. Test-specific cognitive z-scores were generated. Subjective cognitive complaints included perceived difficulty remembering and confusion/memory loss.Results The analytical sample included 2708 U.S. older adults (69.5 ± 0.2 yr, 55% female, 20.9% non-White). Multivariable linear regressions revealed those in quartiles 3 (50th–74th percentile) and 4 (≥75th percentile) for their age and sex had higher cognitive function z-scores across all domains compared with those in quartile 1. Logistic regressions demonstrated those in quartiles 3 and 4 also had lower odds of reporting difficulty remembering (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.31–0.89; AOR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.37–0.88) and confusion/memory loss (AOR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.27–0.91; AOR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.27–0.98), respectively, compared with those in quartile 1.Conclusions In a representative sample of U.S. older adults, higher cognitive functioning occurs among those that perform total 24-h movement activity at or above the 50th percentile for their age and sex. Future studies should consider movement behaviors across a 24-h period on cognitive health outcomes in older adults. More research exploring prospective associations of MIMS-units and time-use behaviors across midlife and older adulthood that may affect cognitive functioning across diverse populations is needed.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Relative Skeletal Maturity and Performance Test Outcomes in Elite Youth
           Middle Eastern Soccer Players

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      Authors: LOLLI; LORENZO; JOHNSON, AMANDA; MONACO, MAURICIO; DI SALVO, VALTER; GREGSON, WARREN
      Abstract: imagePurpose This study aimed to explore the influence of differences in relative skeletal maturity on performance test outcomes in elite youth soccer players from the Middle East.Methods We integrated skeletal age and performance assessments using mixed-longitudinal data available for 199 outfield players (chronological age range, 11.7 to 17.8 yr) enrolled as academy student-athletes (annual screening range, 1 to 5 visits). Skeletal age was determined as per the Tanner–Whitehouse II protocol. Relative maturity was calculated as the difference (∆) between Tanner–Whitehouse II skeletal age minus chronological age. Performance test outcomes of interest were 10-m sprinting, 40-m sprinting, countermovement jump height, and maximal aerobic speed. Separate random-effects generalized additive models quantified differences in performance test outcomes by relative skeletal maturity. Estimated differences were deemed practically relevant based on the location of the confidence interval (95% CI) against minimal detectable change values for each performance test outcome.Results For 40-m sprinting, differences of +0.51 s (95% CI, +0.35 to +0.67 s) and +0.62 s (95% CI, +0.45 to +0.78 s) were practically relevant for relative maturity status of ∆ = −1.5 yr versus ∆ = +0.5 and ∆ = +1 yr, respectively. For countermovement jump height, a difference of −8 cm (95% CI, −10 to −5 cm) was practically relevant for ∆ = −1.5 yr versus ∆ = +1 yr relative maturity status comparison. Effects for 10-m sprinting and maximal aerobic speed were unclear.Conclusions Integration of skeletal age and performance assessments indicated that conventional maturity status classification criteria were inconsistent to inform player development processes in our sample. Between-player differences in test performance may depend on a substantial delay in skeletal maturation (∆ ≤ −1.5 yr) and the performance outcome measure.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • New Predictive Resting Metabolic Rate Equations for High-Level Athletes: A
           Cross-Validation Study

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      Authors: FREIRE; RAUL; PEREIRA, GLAUBER R.; ALCANTARA, JUAN M. A.; SANTOS, RUAN; HAUSEN, MATHEUS; ITABORAHY, ALEX
      Abstract: imagePurpose The present study aims a) to assess the agreement between the measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) using indirect calorimetry and different predictive equations (predicted RMR), and b) to propose and cross-validate two new predictive equations for estimating the RMR in high-level athletes.Methods The RMR of 102 athletes (44 women) was assessed using indirect calorimetry, whereas the body composition was assessed using skinfolds. Comparisons between measured and predicted RMR values were performed using one-way ANOVA. Mean difference, root mean square error (RMSE), simple linear regression, and Bland–Altman plots were used to evaluate the agreement between measured and predicted RMR. The accuracy of predictive equations was analyzed using narrower and wider accuracy limits (±5% and ±10%, respectively) of measured RMR. Multiple linear regression models were employed to develop the new predictive equations based on traditional predictors (equation 1) and the stepwise method (equation 2).Results The new equations 1 and 2 presented good agreement based on the mean difference (3 and −15 kcal·d−1), RMSE (200 and 192 kcal·d−1), and R2 (0.71 and 0.74), respectively, and accuracy (61% of subjects between the limit of ±10% of measured RMR). Cunningham’s equation provided the best performance for males and females among the existing equations, whereas Jagim’s equation showed the worst performance for males (mean difference = −335 kcal·d−1; RMSE = 386 kcal·d−1). Compared with measured RMR, most predictive equations showed heteroscedastic distribution (linear regression’s intercept and slope significantly different from zero; P ≤ 0.05), mainly in males.Conclusions The new proposed equations can estimate the RMR in high-level athletes accurately. Cunningham’s equation is a good option from existing equations, and Jagim’s equation should not be used in high-level male athletes.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Early Changes of Hamstrings Morphology and Contractile Properties during
           10 d of Complete Inactivity

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      Authors: FRANCHI; MARTINO V.; SARTO, FABIO; SIMUNIČ, BOŠTIAN; PIŠOT, RADO; NARICI, MARCO V.
      Abstract: imagePurpose The hamstrings (HS) muscle group plays a fundamental role in maintaining knee stability, thus contributing to the prevention and rehabilitation of lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. However, little is known about HS structural and functional adaptations after periods of prolonged inactivity. Our purpose was to investigate the HS morphological and contractile properties changes during 10 d of bed rest (BR).Methods Ten young healthy males underwent a 10-d BR. HS cross-sectional area (CSA) (at 30%, 50%, and 70% of femur length) and biceps femoris long head (BFlh) architecture were assessed by ultrasound imaging after 0 d (BR0), 2 d (BR2), 4 d (BR4), 6 d (BR6), and 10 d (BR10) of BR, whereas BFlh contractile properties (radial twitch displacement [Dm] and contraction time [Tc]) were evaluated at the same time points by tensiomyography. HS muscle volume was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging at BR0 and BR10.Results A reduction in muscle volume was observed in BFlh (P = 0.002; Δ = −3.53%), biceps femoris short head (P = 0.002; Δ = −3.54%), semitendinosus (P = 0.002; Δ = −2.63%), semimembranosus (P = 0.002; Δ = −2.01%), and HS pooled together (P < 0.001; Δ = −2.78%). Early changes in CSA were detected at 30% femur length already at BR6 for BFlh (P = 0.009; Δ = −2.66%) and biceps femoris short head (P = 0.049; Δ = −1.96%). We also found a reduction in fascicle length at BR6 (P = 0.035; Δ = −2.44%) and BR10 (P < 0.001; Δ = −2.84%). Dm and Tc increased at BR2 (P = 0.010; Δ = 30.0%) and B10 (P = 0.019; Δ = 19.7%), respectively.Conclusions Despite being a nonpostural muscle group, HS exhibited a moderate reduction in muscle dimensions in response to a short unloading period. Small changes in BFlh fascicle length were also observed, accompanied by alterations in BFLh contractile properties. These HS modifications should not be ignored from a clinical perspective.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Mechanisms of Neuromuscular Fatigability in People with Cancer-Related
           Fatigue

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      Authors: BROWNSTEIN; CALLUM G.; TWOMEY, ROSEMARY; TEMESI, JOHN; MEDYSKY, MARY E.; CULOS-REED, S. NICOLE; MILLET, GUILLAUME Y.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a debilitating symptom that affects around one-third of people for months or years after cancer treatment. In a recent study, we found that people with posttreatment CRF have greater neuromuscular fatigability. The aim of this secondary analysis was to examine the etiology of neuromuscular fatigability in people with posttreatment CRF.Methods Ninety-six people who had completed cancer treatment were dichotomized into two groups (fatigued and nonfatigued) based on a clinical cut point for fatigue. Alterations in neuromuscular function (maximal voluntary contraction peak force, voluntary activation, potentiated twitch force, and EMG) in the knee extensors were assessed across three common stages of an incremental cycling test. Power outputs during the fatigability test were expressed relative to gas exchange thresholds to assess relative exercise intensity.Results The fatigued group had a more pronounced reduction in maximal voluntary contraction peak force and potentiated twitch force throughout the common stages of the incremental cycling test (main effect of group: P < 0.001, ηp2 = 0.18 and P = 0.029, ηp2 = 0.06, respectively). EMG was higher during cycling in the fatigued group (main effect of group: P = 0.022, ηp2 = 0.07). Although the relative intensity of cycling was higher in the fatigued group at the final common stage of cycling, this was not the case during the initial two stages, despite the greater impairments in neuromuscular function.Conclusions Our results suggest that the rapid impairments in neuromuscular fatigability in people with CRF were primarily due to disturbances at the level of the muscle rather than the central nervous system. This could affect the ability to tolerate daily physical activities.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Relationship between Anterior Pituitary Volume and IGF-1 Serum Levels in
           Soldiers with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury History

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      Authors: CASTELLANO; ANNA K.; POWELL, JACOB R.; COOLS, MICHAEL J.; WALTON, SAMUEL R.; BARNETT, RANDALINE R.; DELELLIS, STEPHEN M.; GOLDBERG, RICHARD L.; KANE, SHAWN F.; MEANS, GARY E.; ZAMORA, CARLOS A.; DEPENBROCK, PATRICK J.; MIHALIK, JASON P.
      Abstract: imagePurpose A high mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) incidence rate exists in military and sport. Hypopituitarism is an mTBI sequela; however, few studies have examined this phenomenon in those with an mTBI history. This cross-sectional study of Special Operations Forces combat soldiers aimed 1) to relate anterior pituitary gland volumes (actual and normalized) to insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentrations, 2) to examine the effect of mTBI history on anterior pituitary gland volumes (actual and normalized) and IGF-1 concentrations, and 3) to measure the odds of demonstrating lower anterior pituitary gland volumes (actual and normalized) or IGF-1 concentrations if self-reporting mTBI history.Methods Anterior pituitary gland volumes were manually segmented from T1-weighted 3D brain MRI sequences; IGF-1 serum concentrations were quantified using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Correlations and linear regression were used to determine the association between IGF-1 serum concentration and anterior pituitary gland volume (n = 74). Independent samples t-tests were used to compare outcomes between mTBI groups and logistic regression models were fit to test the odds of demonstrating IGF-1 concentration or anterior pituitary volume less than sample median based on mTBI group (n = 54).Results A significant linear relationship between the subjects’ anterior pituitary gland volumes and IGF-1 concentrations (r72 = 0.35, P = 0.002) was observed. Soldiers with mTBI history had lower IGF-1 concentrations (P < 0.001) and lower anterior pituitary gland volumes (P = 0.037) and were at greater odds for IGF-1 serum concentrations less than the sample median (odds ratio = 5.73; 95% confidence interval = 1.77–18.55).Conclusions Anterior pituitary gland volume was associated with IGF-1 serum concentrations. Mild TBI history may be adversely associated with anterior pituitary gland volumes and IGF-1 concentrations. Longitudinal IGF-1 and anterior pituitary gland monitoring may be indicated in those who report one or more mTBI.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Acute Floatation-REST Improves Perceived Recovery After a High-Intensity
           Resistance Exercise Stress in Trained Men

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      Authors: CALDWELL; LYDIA K.; KRAEMER, WILLIAM J.; POST, EMILY M.; VOLEK, JEFF S.; FOCHT, BRIAN C.; NEWTON, ROBERT U.; HÄKKINEN, KEIJO; MARESH, CARL M.
      Abstract: imagePurpose The aim of the present investigation was to determine whether a 1-h floatation-restricted environmental stimulation therapy (floatation-REST) session could augment recovery from high-intensity resistance exercise (6 × 10 back squats, 2-min rest) known to induce significant metabolic, adrenergic, and mechanical stress.Methods Eleven healthy resistance-trained males (age, 22.5 ± 2.3 yr; height, 176.4 ± 6.0 cm; weight, 85.7 ± 6.2 kg; back squat one-repetition maximum, 153.1 ± 20.1 kg; strength-to-weight ratio, 1.8 ± 0.2) completed the within-subject, crossover controlled study design. Participants completed two exercise testing blocks separated by a 2-wk washout. In one block, the high-intensity resistance exercise protocol was followed by a 1-h floatation-REST session, whereas recovery in the alternate block consisted of a passive sensory-stimulating control. Markers of metabolic stress, neuroendocrine signaling, structural damage, inflammation, and perceptions of soreness, mood state, and fatigue were assessed over a 48-h recovery window.Results Floatation-REST significantly attenuated muscle soreness across recovery (P = 0.035) with greatest treatment difference immediately after the intervention (P = 0.002, effect size (ES) = 1.3). Significant differences in norepinephrine (P = 0.028, ES = 0.81) and testosterone (P = 0.028, ES = 0.81) immediately after treatment revealed the modification of neuroendocrine signaling pathways, which were accompanied by greater improvements in mood disturbance (P = 0.029, ES = 0.81) and fatigue (P = 0.001, ES = 1.04).Conclusions Because no adverse effects and significant and meaningful benefits were observed, floatation-REST may prove a valuable intervention for managing soreness and enhancing performance readiness after exercise.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Vertical Loading Rate Is Not Associated with Running Injury, Regardless of
           Calculation Method

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      Authors: SCHMIDA; ELIZABETH A.; WILLE, CHRISTA M.; STIFFLER-JOACHIM, MIKEL R.; KLIETHERMES, STEPHANIE A.; HEIDERSCHEIT, BRYAN C.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction Loading rate (LR), the slope of the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF), is commonly used to assess running-related injury risk. However, the relationship between LR and running-related injuries, including bone stress injuries (BSI), is unclear. Inconsistent findings may result from the numerous LR calculation methods that exist and their application across different running speeds.Purpose This study aimed to assess the influence of calculation method and running speed on LR values and to determine the association of LR during healthy running with subsequent injury.Methods Healthy preseason running data and subsequent injury records from Division I cross-country athletes (n = 79) over four seasons (2015–2019) at 2.68 m·s−1, preferred training pace, and 4.47 m·s−1 were collected. LR at each speed was calculated four ways: 1) maximum and 2) average slope from 20% to 80% of vGRF magnitude at impact peak (IP), 3) average slope from initial contact to IP, and 4) average slope from 3% to 12% of stance time. Linear mixed effects models and generalized estimation equations were used to assess LR associations.Results LR values differed depending on speed and calculation method (P value
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Effect of Exercise for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer-Related
           Lymphedema: A Systematic Review with Meta-analysis

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      Authors: HAYES; SANDRA CHRISTINE; SINGH, BEN; REUL-HIRCHE, HILDEGARD; BLOOMQUIST, KIRA; JOHANSSON, KARIN; JÖNSSON, CHARLOTTA; PLINSINGA, MELANIE LOUISE
      Abstract: imageIntroduction The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of exercise on (i) the prevention of cancer-related lymphedema (CRL) and (ii) the treatment of CRL, lymphedema-associated symptoms, and other health outcomes among individuals with CRL.Methods An electronic search was undertaken for exercise studies measuring lymphedema and involving individuals at risk of developing or with CRL. The Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality scale was used to assess study quality, and overall quality of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. Meta-analyses were performed to evaluate effects of exercise on CRL incidence, existing CRL status, lymphedema-associated symptoms, and health outcomes.Results Twelve studies (n = 1955; 75% moderate-high quality) and 36 studies (n = 1741; 58% moderate-high quality) were included in the prevention and treatment aim, respectively. Relative risk of developing CRL for those in the exercise group compared with the nonexercise group was 0.90 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72 to 1.13) overall and 0.49 (95% CI, 0.28 to 0.85) for those with five or more lymph nodes removed. For those with CRL in the exercise group, the standardized mean difference (SMD) before to after exercise of CRL was −0.11 (95% CI, −0.22 to 0.01), and compared with usual care postintervention, the SMD was −0.10 (95% CI, −0.24 to 0.04). Improvements after intervention were observed for pain, upper-body function and strength, lower-body strength, fatigue, and quality of life for those in the exercise group (SMD, 0.3–0.8; P < 0.05).Conclusions Findings support the application of exercise guidelines for the wider cancer population to those with or at risk of CRL. This includes promotion of aerobic and resistance exercise, and not just resistance exercise alone, as well as unsupervised exercise guided by symptom response.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Orthopedic Knowledge Update: Sports Medicine 6

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Critical Rehabilitation for Partial and Total Knee Arthroplasty:
           Guidelines and Objective Testing to Allow Return to Physical Function, and
           Recreational and Sports Activities

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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