Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8196 journals)
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SPORTS MEDICINE (77 journals)

Showing 1 - 79 of 79 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Journal of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 153)
American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Archives of Sports Medicine and Physiotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arthroscopy, Sports Medicine, and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asian Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
B&G Bewegungstherapie und Gesundheitssport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Baltic Journal of Sport and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Biomedical Human Kinetics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
British Journal of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Case Studies in Sport Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Clinics in Sports Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Current Sports Medicine Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
European Journal of Sport Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research : Sportwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Athletic Therapy & Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Kinesiology and Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
International Journal of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Athletic Enhancement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Education, Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Exercise & Organ Cross Talk     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology     Open Access  
Journal of Human Kinetics     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of ISAKOS     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Physical Education Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery Open     Open Access  
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Sport & Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Sports Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Knie Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Motor Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Movement & Sport Sciences : Science & Motricité     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
OA Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Physical Therapy in Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Physician and Sportsmedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Saudi Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Science & Sports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Science and Medicine in Football     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Hacettepe Journal of Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Spor ve Performans Araştırmaları Dergisi / Ondokuz Mayıs University Journal of Sports and Performance Researches     Open Access  
Sport Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sport Sciences for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sport, Education and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sport, Ethics and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sportphysio     Hybrid Journal  
Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sports Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Sports Medicine - Open     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Sports Medicine and Health Science     Open Access  
Sports Medicine International Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Sportverletzung · Sportschaden     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sri Lankan Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine     Open Access  
Translational Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Video Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Sportpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
British Journal of Sports Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.232
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 78  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0306-3674 - ISSN (Online) 1473-0480
Published by BMJ Publishing Group Homepage  [62 journals]
  • Progress over 30 years should not mean principles have to change: a
           Society of Sports Therapists perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Smith; G. N.
      Pages: 775 - 775
      Abstract: The development of Sports Therapy principles When The Society of Sports Therapists was formed in 1990, the Sport and Exercise Medicine (SEM) landscape, especially in the UK, was significantly different to how it is today, even though the overriding principles of care and protection remain the same. Many of the practitioners working with teams and/or governing bodies at that time, did so primarily on a voluntary basis, that often required them to use either annual or unpaid leave to accompany teams or attend tournaments, including Olympic and Commonwealth Games. It was also a time when the need to have formal qualifications in SEM in order to work with teams was being introduced. Until this point, appointments were frequently made on a ’who knows who’ basis. Minimum qualifications to work as a therapist in professional football, predominantly in England, were also being introduced. Before this, anyone could be the...
      Keywords: BJSM
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T01:03:20-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2022-105912
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 14 (2022)
       
  • Tackling an unmet need in sports cardiology: understanding
           exercise-induced cardiac remodelling and its clinical consequences

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: De Bosscher, R; Heidbuchel, H, Claessen, G, La Gerche, A, Pro@Heart Consortium, Dausin, Janssens, Bogaert, Elliott, Ghekiere, M. Van De Heyning, Sanders, Kalman, Fatkin, Herbots, Willems, Soest, Hespel, Claus, Claeys, Goetschalckx, Dymarkowski, Dresselaers, Miljoen, Favere, Paelinck, Vermeulen, Witvrouwen, Hansen, Thijs, Vanvoorden, Lefebvre, Flannery, Mitchell, Brosnan, Prior
      Pages: 776 - 777
      Abstract: The field of sports cardiology has surpassed many hurdles over the past decades. From initial findings of cardiac enlargement by clinical examinations and chest radiographs, through the better phenotyping of exercise-induced cardiac remodelling (EICR) on electrocardiography, echocardiography and cardiac MRI, our understanding of the spectrum of the athlete’s heart has greatly advanced. The limits of research on EICR Prior scientific endeavours have largely focused on describing EICR in healthy athletes and contrasting this with pathological mimics. For example, early studies contrasted the ‘physiological’ left ventricular wall thickening associated with athlete’s heart to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.1 These studies provided some invaluable clinical tools enabling better discrimination of physiology from pathology, although recent observations have questioned the dichotomous separation between healthy ‘physiological’ myocardial hypertrophy and disease. Several questions exemplify current knowledge gaps and the limits of our understanding of EICR. Why does EICR incompletely resolve on detraining' Why does...
      Keywords: BJSM
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T01:03:20-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2022-105440
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 14 (2022)
       
  • Profiling the tackle and its injury characteristics in premier New Zealand
           club rugby union players over a complete season

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      Authors: Takamori, S; Hamlin, M. J, King, D, Hume, P. A, Tachikawa, K, Koyanagi, R, Yoshida, T.
      Pages: 778 - 784
      Abstract: ObjectivesRugbySmart is a safe tackle technique education programme. Our objective was to identify whether the RugbySmart-recommended safe tackle technique was exhibited by club rugby players and whether tackle-related injuries showed poor tackle technique characteristics.MethodsThe prospective cohort design enabled 28 senior club based amateur male rugby union players from New Zealand to be followed over 18 matches in the 2017 rugby season. Game video analysis by three analysts provided categorisation of tackle technique into type, approach, foot contact, leading foot and rear foot position, face and head position. Injuries were diagnosed by the same sports medicine physician.ResultsIn the 18 matches, 28 players completed a combined total of 3006 tackles, with only six tackle-related injuries sustained. Notable findings included: (1) forwards complete more tackles than backs; (2) shoulder tackles were the most prevalent tackle; (3) good tackle technique as promoted by RugbySmart was demonstrated in 57.9% of all tackles and (4) of the six tackle-related injuries, two occurred despite RugbySmart desired tackle techniques.ConclusionThis is the first study to investigate whether players were performing the recommended ‘safe tackle technique’ proposed by New Zealand Rugby’s RugbySmart programme. As two of six tackle-related injuries occurred despite the RugbySmart preferred technique being performed, further technique analysis and a larger sample are needed to determine what techniques reduce risk of injury during tackles. As only 57.9% of tackles were performed with RugbySmart head and foot positions, further research and education regarding tackle technique recommendations are needed.
      Keywords: BJSM
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T01:03:20-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2021-104868
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 14 (2022)
       
  • Paediatric post-concussive symptoms: symptom clusters and clinical
           phenotypes

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      Authors: Lyons, T. W; Mannix, R, Tang, K, Yeates, K. O, Sangha, G, Burns, E. C, Beer, D, Dubrovsky, A. S, Gagnon, I, Gravel, J, Freedman, S. B, Craig, W, Boutis, K, Osmond, M. H, Gioia, G, Zemek, R, The Pediatric Emergency Research Canada (PERC) 5P Concussion Team
      Pages: 785 - 791
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo assess the co-occurrence and clustering of post-concussive symptoms in children, and to identify distinct patient phenotypes based on symptom type and severity.MethodsWe performed a secondary analysis of the prospective, multicentre Predicting and Preventing Post-concussive Problems in Pediatrics (5P) cohort study, evaluating children 5–17 years of age presenting within 48 hours of an acute concussion. Our primary outcome was the simultaneous occurrence of two or more persistent post-concussive symptoms on the Post-Concussion Symptom Inventory at 28 days post-injury. Analyses of symptom and patient clusters were performed using hierarchical cluster analyses of symptom severity ratings.Results3063 patients from the parent 5P study were included. Median age was 12.1 years (IQR: 9.2–14.6 years), and 1857 (60.6%) were male. Fatigue was the most common persistent symptom (21.7%), with headache the most commonly reported co-occurring symptom among patients with fatigue (55%; 363/662). Headache was common in children reporting any of the 12 other symptoms (range: 54%–72%). Physical symptoms occurred in two distinct clusters: vestibular-ocular and headache. Emotional and cognitive symptoms occurred together more frequently and with higher severity than physical symptoms. Fatigue was more strongly associated with cognitive and emotional symptoms than physical symptoms. We identified five patient groups (resolved/minimal, mild, moderate, severe and profound) based on symptom type and severity.ConclusionPost-concussive symptoms in children occur in distinct clusters, facilitating the identification of distinct patient phenotypes based on symptom type and severity. Care of children post-concussion must be comprehensive, with systems designed to identify and treat distinct post-concussion phenotypes.
      Keywords: Editor's choice, BJSM
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T01:03:20-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2021-105193
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 14 (2022)
       
  • Early versus delayed lengthening exercises for acute hamstring injury in
           male athletes: a randomised controlled clinical trial

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      Authors: Vermeulen, R; Whiteley, R, van der Made, A. D, van Dyk, N, Almusa, E, Geertsema, C, Targett, S, Farooq, A, Bahr, R, Tol, J. L, Wangensteen, A.
      Pages: 792 - 800
      Abstract: BackgroundTo evaluate the efficacy of early versus delayed introduction of lengthening (ie, eccentric strengthening) exercises in addition to an established rehabilitation programme on return to sport duration for acute hamstring injuries in a randomised controlled superiority trial.Methods90 male participants (age: 18–36 years, median 26 years) with an MRI-confirmed acute hamstring injury were randomised into an early lengthening (at day 1 of rehabilitation) group or a delayed lengthening (after being able to run at 70% of maximal speed) group. Both groups received an established rehabilitation programme. The primary outcome was time to return to sport (ie, time from injury to full unrestricted training and/or match play). The secondary outcome was reinjury rate within 12 months after return to sport. Other outcomes at return to sport included the Askling H-test, hamstring strength, clinical examination and readiness questions.ResultsThe return to sport in the early lengthening group was 23 (IQR 16–35) days and 33 (IQR 23–40) days in the delayed lengthening group. For return to sport (in days), the adjusted HR for the early lengthening group compared with the delayed lengthening group was 0.95 (95% CI 0.56 to 1.60, p=0.84). There was no significant difference between groups for reinjury rates within 2 months (OR=0.94, 95% CI 0.18 to 5.0, p=0.94), from 2 to 6 months (OR=2.00, 95% CI 0.17 to 23.3, p=0.58), and 6 to 12 months (OR=0.57, 95% CI 0.05 to 6.6, p=0.66).ConclusionAccelerating the introduction of lengthening exercises in the rehabilitation of hamstring injury in male athletes did not improve the time to return to sport nor the risk of reinjury.
      Keywords: Open access, BJSM
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T01:03:20-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2020-103405
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 14 (2022)
       
  • Progression through return-to-sport and return-to-academics guidelines for
           concussion management and recovery in collegiate student athletes:
           findings from the Ivy League-Big Ten Epidemiology of Concussion Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wiebe; D. J., Bretzin, A. C., D'Alonzo, B. A., the Ivy League-Big Ten Epidemiology of Concussion Study Investigators, Fiore, Culp, VanPatten, Levine, Desai, Wentzel, Sucheski-Drake, Karlson, Wang, Richardson, Port, Saffarian, Vesci, Gay, Day, Putukian, Steinlight, Esopenko, Wheeler, Ballard, Peterson, Klossner, Moore, Maerlender, Savage, Sennett, McQuillan, Gotlin, Arlis-Mayor
      Pages: 801 - 811
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo examine the progression of collegiate student athletes through five stages of a return-to-activity protocol following sport-related concussion (SRC).MethodsIn a multisite prospective cohort study, we identified the frequency of initial 24–48 hours physical and cognitive rest, and the sequence of (1) symptom resolution and return to (2) exertion activity, (3) limited sport, (4) full sport and (5) full academics. In resulting profiles we estimated the likelihood of return to full sport ≤14 days or prolonged>28 days and tested for variability based on timing of the stages.ResultsAmong 1715 athletes with SRC (31.6% females), 67.9% had 24–48 hours initial physical and cognitive rest. The median was 6 days to return to full academics, 8 days to symptom resolution and 9 days to exertion. Three profiles emerged; all had the same sport-specific return progression, but varied in the relative timing of full academics. In unadjusted analyses, full academics as the first stage corresponded to the longest time to return to full sport, and initiating exertion the same day as symptom resolution resulted in the shortest time. In adjusted regression analyses, athletes initiating full academics while still symptomatic were 21.5% less likely (95% CI –27.4% to –15.5%) to return to full sport ≤14 days and, analogously, 19.1% more likely (95% CI 13.4% to 24.7%) to have prolonged return>28 days. While additionally controlling for initial rest, sex, symptom count and concussion history, the likelihood of prolonged return>28 days was 37.0% (95% CI 25.2% to 48.8%) in athletes initiating exertion considerably before symptoms resolved (ie, 7+ days), but only 3.6% (95% CI –1.4% to 8.6%) in athletes initiating exertion shortly before achieving symptom resolution (ie, 3–4 days).ConclusionWe found evidence that sequential progressions were consistent with current recommendations including brief initial rest, and the initiation and relative timing of each stage impacted the final return-to-sport outcome.
      Keywords: Open access, BJSM
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T01:03:20-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2021-104451
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 14 (2022)
       
  • Effectiveness of the Activate injury prevention exercise programme to
           prevent injury in schoolboy rugby union

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      Authors: Barden, C; Hancock, M. V, Stokes, K. A, Roberts, S. P, McKay, C. D.
      Pages: 812 - 817
      Abstract: ObjectiveThe efficacious Activate injury prevention exercise programme has been shown to prevent injuries in English schoolboy rugby union. There is now a need to assess the implementation and effectiveness of Activate in the applie setting.MethodsThis quasi-experimental study used a 24-hour time-loss injury definition to calculate incidence (/1000 hours) and burden (days lost/1000 hours) for individuals whose teams adopted Activate (used Activate during season) versus non-adopters. The dose-response relationship of varying levels of Activate adherence (median Activate sessions per week) was also assessed. Player-level rugby exposure, sessional Activate adoption and injury reports were recorded by school gatekeepers. Rate ratios (RR), adjusted by cluster (team), were calculated using backwards stepwise Poisson regression to compare rates between adoption and adherence groups.ResultsIndividuals in teams adopting Activate had a 23% lower match injury incidence (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.07), 59% lower training injury incidence (RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.97) and 26% lower match injury burden (95% CI 0.46 to 1.20) than individuals on non-adopting teams. Individuals with high Activate adherence (≥3 sessions per week) had a 67% lower training injury incidence (RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.91) and a 32% lower match injury incidence (RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.92) than individuals with low adherence (
      Keywords: Editor's choice, BJSM
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T01:03:20-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2021-105170
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 14 (2022)
       
  • Association between SARS-COV-2 infection and muscle strain injury
           occurrence in elite male football players: a prospective study of 29 weeks
           including three teams from the Belgian professional football league

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wezenbeek, E; Denolf, S, Willems, T. M, Pieters, D, Bourgois, J. G, Philippaerts, R. M, De Winne, B, Wieme, M, Van Hecke, R, Markey, L, Schuermans, J, Witvrouw, E, Verstockt, S.
      Pages: 818 - 823
      Abstract: ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to investigate the association between SARS-CoV-2 infection and muscle strain injury in elite athletes.MethodsA prospective cohort study in three Belgian professional male football teams was performed during the first half of the 2020–2021 season (June 2020–January 2021). Injury data were collected using established surveillance methods. Assessment of SARS-CoV-2 infection was performed by a PCR test before each official game.ResultsOf the 84 included participants, 22 were infected with SARS-CoV-2 and 14 players developed a muscle strain during the follow-up period. Cox’s proportional hazards regression analyses demonstrated a significant association between SARS-CoV-2 infection and the development of muscle strain (HR 5.1; 95% CI 1.1 to 23.1; p=0.037), indicating an increased risk of developing muscle strains following SARS-CoV-2 infection. All athletes who sustained a muscle strain after infection were injured within the first month (15.71±11.74 days) after sports resumption and completed a longer time in quarantine (14.57±6.50 days) compared with the infected players who did not develop a muscle strain (11.18±5.25 days).ConclusionThis study reported a five times higher risk of developing a muscle strain after a SARS-CoV-2 infection in elite male football players. Although this association should be examined further, it is possible that short-term detraining effects due to quarantine, and potentially pathological effects of the SARS-CoV-2 infection are associated with a higher risk of muscle strain injury.
      Keywords: BJSM, COVID-19
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T01:03:20-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2021-104595
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 14 (2022)
       
  • Enhancing public trust in COVID-19 vaccination during the 2022 FIFA Mens
           World Cup: a call for action

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Essar, M. Y; Nawaz, F. A, Kacimi, S. E. O, Djedid, S. N. K.-, Shah, J, Ghozy, S, Laskowski, E. R.
      Pages: 824 - 825
      Abstract: The COVID-19 continues to be a global threat with many countries currently battling the third wave of this pandemic.1 This pandemic has caused long-term effects in the form of health, human and economic loss along with psychological distress, particularly in low-income countries. Although vaccination efforts are under way in many countries, vaccine hesitancy, listed as one of global health’s most challenging issues, continues to be a major limitation to curbing the pandemic.2 Moreover, vaccine distribution inequality has emerged as a matter of serious concern, leaving lower-income countries with limited vaccine doses.3 The high visibility of sport provides an opportunity, if not a responsibility, to assist multi-faceted efforts to help mitigate this distressing crisis. Global focus: on football and health One of the world’s most-watched sporting events, the FIFA Men’s World Cup, will be hosted in Qatar starting 21 November 2022. The previous...
      Keywords: BJSM, COVID-19
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T01:03:20-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2021-105249
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 14 (2022)
       
  • The Society of Sports Therapists: reciprocating kindness during the
           pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Weaver; K.
      Pages: 827 - 828
      Abstract: Graduate Sports Therapists are healthcare professionals, who have the knowledge, skills and ability to work with patients along the continuum of injury prevention, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation. They aim to return individuals to optimum levels of functional, occupational and sports-specific fitness. The five key areas of competency that underpin Sports Therapy are (1) prevention; (2) recognition and evaluation; (3) management, treatment and referral; (4) rehabilitation; and (5) education and professional practice issues. Graduate Sports Therapists are highly suited to supporting those who are physically active and suffering from a musculoskeletal illness or injury. The coronavirus pandemic presented many Graduate Sports Therapists and their wider communities with physical, psychological and social challenges. The 21 million cases reported in the UK by April 2022,1 had far-reaching effects. Providing clinical support to communities required considerable adaptation and The Society of Sports Therapists was aware of many practitioners admirably delivering high-quality services...
      Keywords: BJSM
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T01:03:20-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2022-105913
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 14 (2022)
       
 
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