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ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 152 of 152 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Orthopaedica     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthopedics     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Arthroplasty Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone & Joint 360     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Bone Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Burns & Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Orthopedic Research     Open Access  
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Chinese Journal of Traumatology     Open Access  
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Concussion     Open Access  
Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Orthopaedic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Der Orthopäde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Die Wirbelsäule     Hybrid Journal  
Duke Orthopedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
East African Orthopaedic Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
EFORT Open Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Técnicas Quirúrgicas - Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
EMC - Tecniche Chirurgiche - Chirurgia Ortopedica     Full-text available via subscription  
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Podiatry / Revista Europea de Podología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Foot & Ankle International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Spine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Orthopaedics     Open Access  
International Musculoskeletal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JAAOS : Global Research & Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants     Hybrid Journal  
JBJS Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
JOR Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal de Traumatologie du Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal für Mineralstoffwechsel & Muskuloskelettale Erkrankungen     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bone and Joint Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bone and Joint Infection     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Children's Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Musculoskeletal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Journal of Orthopaedic Association of South Indian States     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Diseases and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Orthopaedic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Orthopaedic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Orthopaedic Translation     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Orthopaedics, Trauma and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Orthopedics & Rheumatology     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Musculoskeletal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Musculoskeletal Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma     Open Access  
North American Spine Society Journal (NASSJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Obere Extremität     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Orthopedics and Rheumatology     Open Access  
Open Journal of Trauma     Open Access  
Open Orthopaedics Journal     Open Access  
Operative Orthopädie und Traumatologie     Hybrid Journal  
Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopädie & Rheuma     Full-text available via subscription  
Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Orthopaedic Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Orthopaedic Proceedings     Partially Free  
Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopaedics and Trauma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Orthopedic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Orthopedic Research and Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Orthopedic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthoplastic Surgery     Open Access  
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Open     Open Access  
Osteologie     Hybrid Journal  
Osteoporosis and Sarcopenia     Open Access  
OTA International     Open Access  
Paediatric Orthopaedics and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Prosthetics and Orthotics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Chilena de Ortopedia y Traumatología / Chilean Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Cubana de Ortopedia y Traumatologí­a     Open Access  
Revista de la Asociación Argentina de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Open Access  
Revista Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Portuguesa de Ortopedia e Traumatologia     Open Access  
Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Romanian Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology     Open Access  
SA Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SICOT-J     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Sport-Orthopädie - Sport-Traumatologie - Sports Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Strategies in Trauma and Limb Reconstruction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Techniques in Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma (Travma)     Open Access  
Trauma und Berufskrankheit     Hybrid Journal  
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology and Orthopedics of Russia     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ортопедия, травматология и протезирование     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.913
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0271-6798 - ISSN (Online) 1539-2570
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • Epidemiologic Changes in Pediatric Fractures Presenting to Emergency
           Departments During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Markiewitz; Nathan D.; Garcia-Munoz, John; Lilley, Brendan M.; Oduwole, Samuel; Shah, Apurva S.; Williams, Brendan A.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Fractures are a common pediatric injury. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic resulted in significant changes in daily life that could impact the incidence of pediatric fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of pediatric fractures in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic to previous seasonally adjusted fracture incidence rates using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) database and the American Community Survey (ACS).Methods: The NEISS database was queried from 2016 to 2020 for fractures occurring in pediatric (0 to 17 y) patients. ACS population data allowed for the estimation of fracture incidence per 1000 person-years. Using a quasiexperimental interrupted time series design, Poisson regression models were constructed to test the overall and differential impact of COVID-19 on monthly fracture rate by age, sex, fracture site, injury location, and disposition.Results: Our sample consisted of 121,803 cases (mean age 9.6±4.6 y, 36.1% female) representing 2,959,421±372,337 fractures nationally. We identified a stable 27% decrease in fractures per month after February 2020 [risk difference (RD) per 1000 youth years=−2.3; 95% confidence interval: −2.98, −1.57]). We found significant effect modification by age, fracture site and injury location (P
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Pediatric Elbow Fractures: Marked
           Change in Management and Resource Utilization, Without a Change in
           Incidence

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      Authors: Schultz; Jacob D.; Windmueller, Rachel; Rees, Andrew B.; Wollenman, Lucas C.; Lempert, Nathaniel L.; Schoenecker, Jonathan G.; Moore-Lotridge, Stephanie N.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Elbow fractures are the most common pediatric fractures requiring operative treatment. Although recent reports have suggested that the COVID-19 pandemic has markedly reduced the incidence of pediatric fractures, no study has specifically evaluated the impact on pediatric elbow fractures. This study aimed to evaluate changes in the incidence, severity, and resource utilization for managing pediatric elbow fractures during the COVID-19 pandemic, compared with prepandemic years.Methods: A prepandemic (2007 to 2017) cohort and a COVID-19 pandemic period (March 2020 to March 2021) cohort of pediatric elbow injuries from a single tertiary hospital were retrospectively examined and compared. Exclusion criteria included outside treatment or lack of diagnosis by an orthopedist. Presentation information, injury patterns, transport, and treatment requirements were collected.Results: Although the incidence of pediatric elbow fractures and rate of neurovascular injury were comparable, seasonal patterns were not sustained and the rate of fracture displacement was found to be significantly elevated in the COVID-19 period compared with nonpandemic years. Likewise, marked changes to where patients first presented (emergency department vs. Clinic), how the patients were transported, and the distance traveled for care were observed. Specifically, patients were more likely to present to the clinic, were more likely to self-transport instead of using emergency medical service transportation, and traveled a greater distance for care, on average. Aligning with these changes, the resources utilized for the treatment of pediatric elbow fracture markedly changed during the COVID-19 period. This study found that there was an increase in the overall number of surgeries performed, the total operative time required to treat elbow fractures, and the number of patients requiring admission during the COVID-19 period.Conclusions: These data provide a contrasting viewpoint to prior reports, illustrating that the incidence of elbow fractures remained consistent during the COVID-19 period, whereas the operative volume and need for hospital admission increased compared with years prior. Furthermore, this study demonstrated how the COVID-19 pandemic altered the interface between pediatric patients with elbow fractures and our institution regarding the location of presentation and transportation.Level of Evidence: Level III—retrospective cohort study.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Is There a Chance to Treat Modified Gartland Type IIB Pediatric
           Supracondylar Humerus Fractures With Closed Reduction and Casting'

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      Authors: Sisman; Ali; Avci, Ozgür; Cepni, Serdar Kamil; Cullu, Emre
      Abstract: imageBackground: Wilkins modification of the Gartland classification (WMGC) type IIB supracondylar humeral fractures (SCHFs) are unstable, and their primary treatment is surgery. This study sought to evaluate the chance of closed reduction and long arm cast (CR&LAC) treatment of type IIB fractures.Methods: In this retrospective case-control study, pediatric patients with WMGC type II fractures whose initial treatment was CR&LAC were examined. Cases were subdivided according to WMGC. Type IIA and IIB cases were compared in terms of the reduction loss rate and clinical and radiologic results. Then, patients with type IIB fractures who were treated conservatively or surgically were compared in terms of clinical and radiologic results.Results: A total of 817 pediatric SCHFs were examined, of which 233 had type II fractures. This study finally enrolled 87 cases who met the inclusion criteria, including 52 with type IIA fractures and 35 with type IIB fractures. Among those with type IIB fractures, the first-time reduction success rate was 44.3%. Although the probability of a loss of reduction among type IIB fractures in conservative follow-up was ~5 times higher than that among type IIA fractures, all the cases with reduction loss were detected among the first-week controls, and 9 of them were type IIB and 3 were type IIA (P=0.011). The treatment of 26 (32.9%) cases with type IIB fractures was completed conservatively. There was no difference in the clinical or radiologic comparison results of type IIA and type IIB fractures whose treatment was completed conservatively. There was no clinical or radiologic difference in the comparison of type IIB fractures whose treatment began with CR&LAC but was completed conservatively or surgically.Conclusions: Although the initial reduction success is not high among WMGC type IIB fractures, the results are like those of conservatively managed type IIA fractures if successful reduction is achieved. This study showed that the treatment results of all type II SCHFs with no loss of reduction in the first week after CR&LAC are satisfactory. No reduction loss was observed in any of the cases after the first week.Level of Evidence: Level III, case-control study.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Frequency and Outcomes of Nerve Palsies in Operatively Treated
           Supracondylar Humerus Fractures

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      Authors: Norrell; Kirsten N.; Muolo, Connor E.; Sherman, Ashley K.; Sinclair, Micah K.
      Abstract: imageBackground: A high index of suspicion for nerve palsy is essential in the setting of a displaced supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF) with careful attention to the examination. We hypothesize that nerve injuries are more prevalent in higher energy type III and flexion SCHFs compared with type II fractures.Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 1085 operatively treated SCHFs in pediatric patients, aged 0 to 14 years, between January 1, 2015 and December 31, 2018. There were 979 patients eligible for analysis. Exclusion criteria included follow-up
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Risk Factors for Upper Extremity Refractures in Children

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      Authors: Gottschalk; Hilton P.; Hughes Garza, Holly; Barczyk, Amanda N.; Duzinski, Sarah V.; Lawson, Karla A.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Multiple descriptive studies have been published on refracture patterns, particularly for forearm fractures. However, few large cohorts have been analyzed quantitatively including the odds of refracture, and with a comprehensive assessment of the possible predictive factors associated with refracture. This study aimed to assess the frequency and timing of upper extremity refracture in a large pediatric orthopaedics practice, and to evaluate the strength of association of various patient-level and fracture-related factors with refracture.Methods: Medical records were reviewed retrospectively for patients 1 to 18 years of age with at least 1 upper extremity fracture (ICD-9 codes 810 to 819) between June 1, 2010 and May 31, 2011. Characteristics of patients and fractures were assessed for the association with refracture using bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression.Results: Among 2793 patients with a total of 2902 upper extremity fractures, 2% were treated for refracture within 2 years, at a median of 6 months (188 d) after the initial injury. Midshaft location, and characterization of the fracture as angulated or buckle, were associated with being more likely to refracture. Eighty percent of refractures were the result of a fall, with almost 25% involving a high-energy mechanism and about 15% from monkey bars or other playground equipment. The adjusted odds of refracture were 4 times higher if noncompliance with treatment recommendations was documented, when controlling for insurance type and number of days before orthopaedic evaluation. Forearm fractures were almost 4 times more likely to refracture compared with other bones, controlling for midshaft location, days immobilized, and buckle or torus characterization of the fracture.Conclusions: Our practice saw a refracture occurrence in 2% of patients, with median time to refracture of ~6 months. The factors most strongly associated with refracture were midshaft fracture location, forearm fracture as opposed to clavicle or humerus, and noncompliance as defined in the study. Falls and high energy activities, such as use of wheeled devices, skis, or trampolines, were important mechanisms of refracture.Level of Evidence: This study is a Level II prognostic study. It is a retrospective study that evaluates the effect of patient and fracture characteristics on the outcome of upper extremity refracture.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • An Alternative Fixation Option for Subtrochanteric Femur Fractures in
           Children: Adult Proximal Humerus Plate

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      Authors: Danişman; Murat; Özdemir, Erdi; Dursun, Gökay; Ayvaz, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Güney
      Abstract: imageBackground: Subtrochanteric femur fractures are unstable injuries due to strong muscle forces on the proximal femur. The ideal fixation device is controversial in the treatment of subtrochanteric femur fractures in children. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of subtrochanteric femur fractures in children treated with an adult proximal humerus plate.Methods: A total of 9 patients [mean age at surgery, 8.3 years (range: 7 to 12); mean follow-up period, 28.1 months (range: 12 to 56)] who underwent surgery due to a subtrochanteric femur fracture and treated with an adult proximal humerus between January 2017 and December 2021 were retrospectively evaluated. Four of the patients had a pathological fracture associated with a benign bone tumor while 5 patients had a nonpathological fracture. The clinical and radiological outcomes were assessed using the Flynn scoring system at the latest follow-up. Time to union and complications were recorded.Results: All patients demonstrated a solid fusion of the fracture site and were able to bear full weight at the latest follow-up. The mean time to union was 8.2 weeks (range: 6 to 10). Based on the Flynn scoring system at the latest follow-up, seven patients had excellent clinical outcomes and two patients had satisfactory outcomes. Two patients had limb length discrepancy, and one patient had coxa valga and a limb length discrepancy of 16 mm. There were no patients with nonunion, infection, implant failure, osteonecrosis of the femoral head, and heterotopic bone formation.Conclusion: This study suggests that the adult proximal humerus plate may be an effective alternative fixation option in the treatment of subtrochanteric femur fractures in children, including pathological fractures.Level of Evidence: Level IV, Case series
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Nonoperative Management of Closed Displaced Tibia Shaft Fractures in
           Patients Under 18 Years of Age: Low Failure Rate

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      Authors: Cummings; Jason L.; Rivera, Asdrubal E.; Pereira, Daniel E.; Oladeji, Afolayan K.; Landau, Andrew J.; Hosseinzadeh, Pooya
      Abstract: imageBackground: Tibial shaft fractures are the third most common pediatric long bone fracture pattern. Historically, these fractures have been initially treated with closed reduction and casting (CRC). Recently, there has been an increasing trend toward surgical intervention as an initial treatment for these injuries. In an effort to better understand whether this trend is warranted, this study seeks to characterize the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a large number of children who underwent nonoperative treatment with CRC as their initial treatment for pediatric tibial shaft fractures at a single tertiary care center.Methods: Outcomes measured included final alignment, other procedures performed, length of time to full radiographic healing, and length of time in each method of immobilization before progressing to full weight-bearing status. Patients were separated by ages into the following cohorts during statistical analysis: 4 to 8 years, 9 to 12 years, and 13+ years. Differences between continuous variables were analyzed with independent-samples t tests. χ2 tests were used to analyze differences in categorical variables. An α
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Orthopaedic Surgery Pediatric Sports Medicine: Characterizing Practice
           Patterns and Subspecialization

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      Authors: Block; Andrew M.; Eisenberg, Matthew T.; Ellis, Henry B.; Crepeau, Allison E.; Schmitz, Matthew R.; Carsen, Sasha; PRiSM Hip RIG; Nepple, Jeffrey J.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Pediatric sports medicine is a new and rapidly growing subspecialty within orthopaedic surgery. However, there is very limited literature on the practice of pediatric sports medicine in North America. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate and describe the current practice patterns of orthopaedic surgeons specializing in pediatric sports medicine.Methods: An online survey was distributed to orthopaedic surgeons specializing in pediatric sports medicine through the Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine Society. The purpose of the survey was to characterize (1) surgeon demographics, (2) the breakdown of different joint specialization, and (3) the specific procedures for joints that the surgeons specialize in.Results: Responses from 55 orthopaedic surgeons were collected and analyzed. Most respondents considered pediatric sports medicine as the primary focus of their practice (89.1%, n=49/55). The number of fellowships completed was almost evenly split between either a single fellowship (52.7%, n=29/55) or 2 or more (47.3%, n=26/55). The most common combination of fellowships was pediatric orthopaedics and adult sports medicine (32.7%, n=18/55). Most survey respondents had been in practice for
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Predictive Scoring for Recurrent Patellar Instability After a First-time
           Patellar Dislocation

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      Authors: Tan; Si Heng Sharon; Chua, Kasia Chen Xi; Yeo, Lincoln Kai Pheng; Liang, Shen; Lim, Andrew Kean Seng; Hui, James Hoipo
      Abstract: imagePurpose: Patellofemoral instability is a common acute knee injury seen in the pediatric population. First-time patellar dislocations usually undergo conservative management, but ~15% to 80% of patients experience recurrent instability. This study aims to develop a prediction model using radiographic parameters of the patellofemoral joint seen on computed tomography scans in different degrees of knee flexion, to determine the risk of recurrence after the first episode of patellofemoral instability.Methods: A 12-year retrospective case-control study was performed. All patients in a single institution aged 18 years or younger who had a computed tomography patellar tracking scan performed for patellar instability were included. Predictors included in the score were determined through backward logistic regression and compared using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis.Results: This study revealed that recurrent dislocation in first-time patellofemoral dislocation could be accurately predicted using the prediction score that consisted of age, tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance and congruence angle at 10- and 20-degree flexion. The sensitivity of the score was 100% and specificity was 73.3%. Three diagnostic zones were identified and used to categorize patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-probability groups.Conclusion: This study presented a scoring system that incorporated radiographic knee kinematics in the risk assessment for recurrent patellofemoral instability for patient stratification. The scoring system could guide the decision for early surgical intervention after the first-episode patellofemoral dislocation for patients at high risk of recurrent patellofemoral dislocation.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Minimizing the Risk of Vascular Injury: Anatomy of the Popliteal Artery in
           the Pediatric Knee

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      Authors: Mun; Frederick; Suresh, Sukrit J.; Marrache, Majd; Suresh, Krishna V.; Ikwuezunma, Ijezie; Lee, Rushyuan Jay
      Abstract: imageBackground: Displaced pediatric tibial tubercle fractures are commonly stabilized with screws directed posteriorly toward neurovascular structures. Here, we (1) characterize the variation of the popliteal artery among pediatric patients; and (2) recommend a safe screw trajectory for fixation of tibial tubercle fractures.Methods: We retrospectively identified 42 patients (42 knees; 29 female) aged 12–17 years with lower-extremity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a tertiary academic center. The mean patient age was 14.5 (range: 12–17) years, and the mean body mass index value was 19.1 (range: 14.9–25.1). We included patients with open physes or visible physeal scars and excluded those with prior instrumentation or lower-extremity injury. Using sagittal MRI, we measured the distances from 5 levels each on the anterior and posterior tibial cortex to the popliteal artery (level 1, midpoint of proximal tibial epiphysis; level 2, the proximal extent of the tubercle; level 3, tubercle prominence; level 4, 2 cm distal to the proximal extent of the tubercle; level 5, 4 cm distal to the proximal extent of the tubercle). Using coronal MRI, we measured the width of the tibia at each level and the distance from the lateral-most and medial-most cortex to the artery.Results: The popliteal artery was laterally positioned in all knees. The mean distance between the artery and lateral-most aspect of the tibia at each level ranged from 1.9 to 2.4 cm, and from 2.3 to 3.9 cm from the medial-most aspect of the tibia. The mean distance that a screw can advance before vascular injury was 5.1 cm at level 1. The shortest mean distance to the popliteal artery was 1.7 cm, at level 5. There is minimal distance between the posterior tibial cortex and the artery at all levels.Conclusions: Understanding the position of the popliteal artery in pediatric patients can help when stabilizing tibial tubercle fractures. Because the artery is close to the posterior cortex, a drill exiting in line with the popliteal artery risks vascular injury. Therefore, we recommend that screws exit within the medial 60% of the tibia.Level of Evidence: IV
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Treatment of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus in the Skeletally Immature
           Population: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Dahmen; Jari; Steman, Jason A.H.; Buck, Tristan M.F.; Struijs, Peter A.A.; Stufkens, Sjoerd A.S.; van Bergen, Christiaan J.A.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M.M.J.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction: Skeletally immature osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) are underreported and little is known about the clinical efficacy of different treatment options. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of different conservative and surgical treatment options. The secondary aim was to assess return to sports (RTS) and radiologic outcomes for the different treatment options.Methods: An electronic literature search was carried out in the databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, CDSR, CENTRAL, and DARE from January 1996 to September 2021 to identify suitable studies for this review. The authors separately screened the articles for eligibility and conducted the quality assessment using the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS). Clinical success rates were calculated per separate study and pooled per treatment strategy. Radiologic outcomes and sports outcomes for the different treatment strategies were assessed.Results: Twenty studies with a total of 381 lesions were included. The mean MINORS score of the included study was 7.6 (range: 5 to 9). The pooled success rate was 44% [95% confidence interval (CI): 37%-51%] in the conservative group (n=192), 77% (95% CI: 68%-85%) in the bone marrow stimulation (BMS) group (n=97), 95% (95% CI: 78%-99%) in the retrograde drilling (RD) group (n=22), 79% (95% CI: 61%-91%) in the fixation group (n=33) and 67% (95% CI: 35%-88%) in the osteo(chondral) autograft group (n=9). RTS rates were reported in 2 treatment groups: BMS showed an RTS rate of 86% (95% CI: 42%-100%) without specified levels and an RTS rate to preinjury level of 43% (95% CI: 10%-82%). RD showed an RTS rate of 100% (95% CI: 63%-100%) without specified levels, an RTS rate to preinjury level was not given. RTS times were not given for any treatment option. The radiologic success according to magnetic resonance imaging were 29% (95% CI: 16%-47%) (n=31) in the conservative group, 81% (95% CI: 65%-92%) (n=37) in the BMS group, 41% (95% CI: 18%-67%) (n=19) in the RD group, 87% (95% CI: 65%-97%) (n=19) in the fixation group, and were not reported in the osteo(chondral) transplantation group. Radiologic success rates based on computed tomography scans were 62% (95% CI: 32%-86%) (n=13) in the conservative group, 30% (95% CI: 7%-65%) (n=10) in the BMS group, 57% (95% CI: 25%-84%) (n=7) in the RD group, and were not reported for the fixation and the osteo(chondral) transplantation groups.Conclusions: This study showed that for skeletally immature patients presenting with symptomatic OLTs, conservative treatment is clinically successful in 4 out of 10 children, whereas the different surgical treatment options were found to be successful in 7 to 10 out of 10 children. Specifically, fixation was clinically successful in 8 out of 10 patients and showed radiologically successful outcomes in 9 out of 10 patients, and would therefore be the primary preferred surgical treatment modality. The treatment provided should be tailor-made, considering lesion characteristics and patient and parent preferences.Level of Evidence: Level IV—systematic review and meta-analysis.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Disparities in Pediatric Scoliosis: The Impact of Race and Insurance Type
           on Access to Nonoperative Treatment for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

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      Authors: Heffernan; Michael J.; Younis, Manaf; Song, Bryant; Fontenot, Bailli; Dewitz, Ryan; Brooks, Jaysson T.; Leonardi, Claudia; Barnett, Scott A.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) has evidence-based, nonoperative treatments proven to be effective with early diagnosis and prompt treatment. The purpose of this study was to identify potential disparities in access to nonoperative treatment for AIS. Specifically, we sought to determine the interaction of socioeconomic factors on a major curve magnitude and recommend treatment at the initial presentation.Methods: A retrospective review of AIS patients who underwent surgery at a single tertiary pediatric hospital between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2018 was conducted. Patients were divided into 2 groups for comparison: patients with public insurance (PUB) and those with private insurance (PRV). Primary variables analyzed were patient race, Area Deprivation Index (ADI), major curve magnitude, and treatment recommendation at the initial presentation. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify the predictors of the major curve magnitude at presentation.Results: A total of 341 patients met the inclusion criteria; PUB and PRV groups consisted of 182 (53.4%) and 159 (46.6%) children, respectively. Overall, the major curve magnitude at presentation was significantly higher in PUB compared with PRV patients (50.0° vs. 45.1°; P=0.004) and higher in Black patients compared to White patients (51.8 vs. 47.0, P=0.042). Surgery was recommended for 49.7% of the PUB group and 43.7% of the PRV group. A lesser number of PUB patients had curve magnitudes within the range of brace indications (≤40°) compared to PRV patients (22.5% vs. 35.2%, respectively; P=0.010). The odds of having an initial major curve magnitude
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Measurable Lumbar Motion Remains 1 Year After Vertebral Body Tethering

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      Authors: Mathew; Smitha E.; Milbrandt, Todd A.; Larson, A. Noelle
      Abstract: imageIntroduction: Vertebral body tethering (VBT) is growing in popularity for skeletally immature patients with scoliosis because of presumed preservation of spinal motion. Although results have shown preserved thoracic motion, there is minimal data to support motion over the lumbar instrumented segments after VBT. The purpose of this study was to analyze the range of motion of the thoracolumbar and lumbar spine after lumbar VBT.Methods: Retrospective review of patients treated with lumbar VBT underwent low-dose biplanar flexion-extension and lateral bending radiographs at 1 year after surgery to assess motion. Coronal motion at 1 year was compared with preoperative side-bending radiographs. The angle subtended by the screws at the upper instrumented vertebra and lower instrumented vertebra was measured on left-bending and right-bending radiographs to evaluate the coronal arc of motion and was compared with preoperative values over the same levels measured from the end plates. At 1 year postoperatively, the sagittal angle was measured over the instrumented levels on flexion and extension radiographs.Results: Of the 71 scoliosis patients who underwent VBT at our center eligible for 1-year follow-up, 20 had lumbar instrumentation, all of whom had lumbar bending films available at 1 year after surgery. Seven patients had both thoracic and lumbar VBT on the same day and 13 had lumbar or thoracolumbar tether only. Mean age was 13.5±1.9 years. Mean preoperative major coronal curve measured 52+8 degrees (range: 42 to 70) and mean 27 degrees (range: 13 to 40) at latest follow-up. Mean levels instrumented was 8 (range: 5 to 12), with the lowest instrumented level typically L3 (N=14). The mean preoperative coronal arc of motion over the instrumented segments was 38±13 degrees (range: 19 to 73 degrees) and decreased after surgery to a mean arc of 17±7 degrees (range: 7 to 31 degrees). However, 19 of the 20 (95%) had at least a 10-degree coronal arc of motion. Patients maintained on average 46% (range: 22% to 100%) of their preoperative coronal arc of lumbar motion over the instrumented lumbar segments. On flexion-extension lateral radiographs taken at 1 year postoperatively, there was a mean postoperative arc of motion of 30±13 degrees.Conclusions: Lumbar VBT resulted in preserved flexion and extension motion at 1 year postoperatively. We also noted some preserved coronal plane motion, but this was decreased compared with preoperative values by ~50%. These findings provide proof of concept that some spinal motion is preserved after lumbar VBT in contrast to lumbar fusion where no motion is retained over the instrumented segments.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Preoperative Patient Education and Smaller Prescription Quantity Reduce
           Opioid Use After Posterior Spinal Fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic
           Scoliosis: Results of a Prospective Study

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      Authors: Yang; Daniel; Jha, Sahil; Swallow, Jennylee; Caird, Michelle S.; Lopyan, Alexander; Stepanovich, Matthew; Whyte, Noelle; Li, Ying
      Abstract: imageBackground: Most opioids prescribed postoperatively are unused. Leftover opioids are a major source of nonmedical opioid use among adolescents. Postoperative opioid use has also been associated with prescription quantity. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of preoperative patient education and implementation of evidence-based prescribing guidelines on opioid use and pain level after posterior spinal fusion (PSF) for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS).Methods: AIS patients aged 10 to 17 years undergoing PSF were prospectively enrolled [postintervention cohort (POST-INT)]. Previous data on 77 patients showed median consumption of 29 doses of oxycodone after PSF [preintervention cohort (PRE-INT)]. All eligible patients during the study period were discharged with 30 doses of oxycodone and standard nonopioid analgesics. Only study participants received education on postoperative pain control. Demographics, radiographic/surgical data, pain level, and patient-reported outcomes were collected. Requests for opioid refills were documented.Results: Forty-nine patients were enrolled. POST-INT was divided into low (L, ≤8 doses), average (AVE, 9-25), and high (H,>25) opioid use groups. Demographics, radiographic/surgical data, pain level, and patient-reported outcomes were similar between the groups. However, there was a difference in days of oxycodone use, doses consumed in the first week, and leftover doses (P42) use groups showed that POST-INT L and AVE consumed less oxycodone (L: P=0.002; AVE: P
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Evaluation of Anterior Coverage in Children With Developmental Dysplasia
           of the Hip Using Transverse Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 2 Years Is
           Predictive of Future Radiographic Coverage

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      Authors: Tsukagoshi; Yuta; Kamada, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Ryoko; Tomaru, Yohei; Nakagawa, Shogo; Kimura, Mio; Aiba, Shutaro; Shimada, Hayato; Ikezawa, Yoshiyasu; Yamazaki, Masashi
      Abstract: imageBackground: Although normal anterior acetabular coverage provides stability to the hip, acetabular retroversion leads to femoroacetabular impingement related to hip osteoarthritis. Previous studies have focused on acetabular version and anteroposterior coverage in children with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH); however, the correlation between anteroposterior coverage and acetabular development is unclear. We measured anteroposterior acetabular coverage in DDH patients using transverse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and subsequent bony acetabular growth, and evaluated the correlation of those findings.Methods: We evaluated 37 DDH (dislocations) in 36 patients who underwent MRI at 2 years of age. The mean age was 2.2±0.3 years at the time of MRI (1.6±0.4 y after reduction) and 6.0±0.1 years at the time of plain radiography for the Severin classification. On MRI scans, we measured the cartilaginous center-edge angle (CCEA) and cartilaginous acetabular-head index (CAHI) in the coronal plane and the anterior and posterior cartilaginous center-edge angles (AC-CEA and PC-CEA, respectively) in the transverse plane. Severin I or II was defined as a good outcome and III or IV as a poor outcome.Results: In the evaluations conducted at 2 years of age, the mean CCEA, CAHI, AC-CEA, and PC-CEA were 14±9 degrees, 66%±10%, 39±8 degrees, and 77±7 degrees, respectively; the CEA at 6 years of age was 13±7 degrees. Twelve and 25 hips were classified in the good and poor outcome groups, respectively. Although CCEA, CAHI, and AC-CEA were significantly associated with the outcome in a single regression analysis (P
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Effect of Postoperative Femoral Neck Shaft Angle on Femoral Head
           Sphericity Following Proximal Femoral Osteotomy in Legg-Calve-Perthes
           Disease

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      Authors: Kim; Sungmin; Oh, Ho-Seok; Lee, Minsu; Jung, Sung Taek
      Abstract: imageBackground: Herein, we aimed to examine the relationship between the postoperative neck shaft angle (NSA) and the Stulberg outcome at skeletal maturity in patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) who underwent proximal femoral varus osteotomy (PFVO) and to determine the optimal angle of varization.Methods: In this retrospective study, we analyzed the data of 90 patients aged older than 6 years at the time of diagnosis with LCPD who underwent PFVO at our institution between 1979 and 2014. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to examine the effects of variables on the sphericity of the femoral head at skeletal maturity, including the age at onset, sex, stage at operation, extent of epiphyseal involvement and epiphyseal collapse, presence of specific epiphyseal, metaphyseal, and acetabular changes, and postoperative NSA. The sphericity of the femoral head on the final plain follow-up radiographs of the hip joint at skeletal maturity was assessed using the Stulberg classification. Cases of spherical femoral head (Stulberg I or II) were rated as good, whereas those of ovoid or flat femoral head (Stulberg III, IV, or V) were rated as bad.Results: The mean age at diagnosis was 7.93 (range, 6.0-12.33) years. The average follow-up period was 10.11 (range, 5.25-22.92) years. The pre and postoperative mean NSAs were 137.31±6.86 degrees (range, 115.7-158 degrees) and 115.7±9.83 degrees (range, 88.6-137.6 degrees), respectively. The age at diagnosis, lateral pillar classification, and postoperative NSA were found to be closely related to the sphericity of the femoral head at skeletal maturity. Patients with a postoperative NSA of
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Scores in
           Pediatric Idiopathic Toe Walkers

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      Authors: Lindsay; Sarah E.; Bauer, Jeremy; Bouton, Daniel; Do, Patrick; Woodmark, Carly; Sienko, Susan; Raney, Ellen M.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Idiopathic toe walking (ITW) can result in early contact with the health care system and be distressing for patients and their families. The natural history of ITW is poorly characterized. Deciding how and when to intervene can be difficult.Patient-reported outcomes are utilized in the clinical setting to assess patient factors and indications that may better inform treatment plans. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) is an instrument designed to collect patient-reported outcomes. Minimum clinically important differences in PROMIS metrics have been established to facilitate clinical relevance and utility of these metrics. The purpose of this study was to characterize the patient perspective of ITW by utilizing the PROMIS scores.Methods: Retrospective chart review was performed to identify children aged 5 to 17 with a diagnosis of ITW treated at a single tertiary care center between 2017 and 2020. Inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of ITW and completion of a PROMIS questionnaire. Exclusion criteria were neurologic disease, autism, and previous surgical treatment. Demographic, physical exam, treatment, and available motion analysis data were collected. PROMIS scores for the following domains were available: Mobility, Peer Relationships, and Pain Interference.Results: Forty-five children were enrolled. Seventy-three percent of PROMIS scores were patient reported while the remainder were parent reported. PROMIS score means for the cohort by domain were Mobility: 45.2±8.2 (P
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Barriers to Discharge After Hip Reconstruction Surgery in Non-ambulatory
           Children With Neurological Complex Chronic Conditions

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      Authors: Flaugh; Rachel A.; Shea, Jodie; Difazio, Rachel L.; Berry, Jay G.; Miller, Patricia E.; Lawler, Kathleen; Matheney, Travis H.; Snyder, Brian D.; Shore, Benjamin J.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Hip reconstruction surgery in patients with neurological complex chronic conditions (CCC) is associated with prolonged hospitalization and extensive resource utilization. This population is vulnerable to cognitive, developmental, and medical comorbidities which can increase length of stay (LOS). The aims of this study were to characterize barriers to discharge for a cohort of children with neurological CCC undergoing hip reconstruction surgery and to identify patient risk factors for prolonged hospitalization and delayed discharge.Methods: Retrospective chart review of nonambulatory patients with neurological CCC undergoing hip reconstruction surgery between 2007-2016 was conducted. Hospitalization ≥1 day past medical clearance was characterized as delayed discharge. Barriers were defined as unresolved issues at the time of medical clearance and categorized as pertaining to the caregiver and patient education, durable medical equipment, postdischarge transportation/placement, and patient care needs.Results: The cohort of 116 patients was 53% male, 16% non–English speaking, and 49% Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) V with the mean age at surgery of 9.1±3.64 years. Median time from admission to medical clearance was 5 days with median LOS of 6 days. Approximately three-quarters of patients experienced delayed discharge (73%) with barriers identified for 74% of delays. Most prevalent barriers involved education (30%) and durable medical equipment (29%). Postdischarge transportation and placement accounted for 26% of barriers and 3.5 times longer delays (P
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Mid-term to Long-term Follow-up Results of Reconstruction for Thumb Radial
           Polydactyly

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      Authors: Lee; Hyun-Joo; Lee, Kang-San; Chung, Seung-Ho; Kim, Hee-June; Park, Kyeong-Hyeon; Kim, Poong-Taek; Park, Sook-Hyun
      Abstract: imageBackground: Preaxial or radial polydactyly is one of the most common hand congenital anomalies in newborns. Contemporary reconstruction methods include ligament reconstruction, excision of the polydactylous thumb, osteotomy, and other surgical techniques according to the type of polydactyly. The purpose of this study was to report mid-term to long-term reconstruction results for thumb (radial) polydactyly.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent reconstruction surgery for preaxial polydactyly. Clinical outcomes, including the range of motion (ROM), pain, and complications, were evaluated. We assessed the final radiographs of the reconstructed thumb to identify the potential development of arthritis or other remaining deformities. After excluding cases without a simple radiograph and cases with a short follow-up period of fewer than 5 years, 26 thumbs were included. The surgical technique followed including excision of polydactylout thumb was tailored to the type of polydactyly. If the nail size of the thumbs was similar, the Bilhaut-Cloquet method was preferred.Results: The mean age of the patients at the surgery and final follow-up was 14.9 months (range: 8 to 30 mo) and 11.9 years (range: 5.8 to 19.3 y), respectively. The mean follow-up was 128.8 months years (range: 60 to 219 mo), and the mean ROM of the thumb was 32.7 and 57.5 degrees in the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) and metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint, respectively. Ulnar or radial side instability was prominent in 7 patients in the involved joints (26.9%). One patient underwent interphalangeal (IP) fusion for extension lag with pain. The radiologic evaluation revealed that 2 patients developed radiographic evidence of IP joint arthritis (7.7%). Radial deviation of the MP or IP joint existed in 13 cases (range: 5 to 40 degrees) (50.0%), and ulnar deviation of the MP or IP joint existed in 2 cases (range: 19 to 20 degrees) (7.7%).Conclusions: In mid-term to long-term experience, sequelae such as joint instability, joint stiffness, and remaining deformity cannot be neglected. An unstable MP joint may result if the DIP joint remains stiff or has a lower ROM.Level of Evidence: Level IV—therapeutic studies.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Comparison of Shoulder Motion Measurements by Visual Estimate, Goniometer
           and Motion Capture

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      Authors: Russo; Stephanie A.; Chafetz, Ross S.; Rodriguez, Luisa M.; Roposh, Carolyn M.; Zlotolow, Dan A.; Kozin, Scott H.; Gaughan, John P.; Richards, James G.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Brachial plexus birth injuries (BPBI) can result in lasting impairments of external rotation and cross-body adduction (CBA) that disrupt functional activities such as dressing, grooming, or throwing a ball. The purpose of this study was to compare the quantification of shoulder humerothoracic (HT) external rotation (ER), and glenohumeral (GH) CBA by 3 methods – physician visual estimate, goniometer measurement by an occupational therapist, and motion capture.Methods: Twenty-six patients with BPBI (average age of 9.9±3.2 y) participated in this study. Mallet scores and visual estimates of passive HT ER and GH CBA were recorded by a physician. The passive measures were repeated by an occupational therapist using a goniometer while motion capture measures were simultaneously collected. Active HT ER was also measured by motion capture. The passive measures were compared with analyses of variance with repeated measures, intraclass correlations, and Bland-Altman plots. External rotation Mallet scores determined by motion capture and by the physician were compared.Results: The measures of GH CBA were not statistically different and demonstrated good agreement, but substantial variation. For HT ER, all measures were significantly different and demonstrated poor agreement and substantial variation. When the joint angles measured by motion capture were used to determine the Mallet score, 79% of external rotation Mallet scores assigned by the physician were incorrectly categorized, with the physician always scoring the participant higher than predicted motion capture Mallet score.Conclusions: Both GH CBA and HT ER measures demonstrated substantial variability between measurement types, but only HT ER joint angles were significantly different. In addition, more than three-quarters of external rotation Mallet scores were misclassified by the physician. Motion capture measurements offer the benefit of less susceptibility to patients’ compensatory and/or out-of-plane movements and should be considered for clinical assessment of shoulder range of motion in children with BPBI. If motion capture is unavailable, the use of a goniometer provides more accurate clinical measures of shoulder motion than visual estimates and care should be taken to minimize and account for compensatory movement strategies.Level of Evidence: Level IV Case series
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Distal Femur Growth Modification Surgery Is Associated With Higher
           Surgical Wound Complication Rate

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      Authors: Hsu; Chen-Heng; Lee, Wei-Chung; Kao, Hsuan-Kai; Yang, Wen E.; Chang, Chia-Hsieh
      Abstract: imageBackground: Orthopaedic wound complications are often associated with extensive surgeries and patient medical conditions. However, we noticed wound complications in minor growth modification surgeries in children, including guided growth and epiphysiodesis. Herein, we report the complication rate and risk factors associated with pediatric growth modification surgeries.Methods: This retrospective study reviewed surgical wound complications in 622 pediatric orthopaedic patients who underwent growth modification surgeries (418 children) or osteotomies (204 children) in the lower extremities in a single center between 2007 and 2019. The grades II and III complications assessed using the modified Clavien-Dindo-Sink complication classification system were compared between growth modification and osteotomy. Risk factors for complications, including the type of surgery, age, body mass index, neuromuscular disease, operation time, surgical sites per patient, surgical location, and implant types, were analyzed using the logistic regression.Results: The complication rate was 6.9% per patient and 3.6% per surgical site (29 sites in 29 patients comprising 21 grade II and 8 grade III) in the growth modification group, which was>1.0% per patient and 0.6% per site in the osteotomy group (2 sites in 2 patients comprising 2 grade III infections; P=0.001). Among 418 patients with 797 surgical sites in the growth modification group, wound complications were associated with surgical location (5.2% at distal femur vs. 1.0% at proximal tibia, P=0.002) and implant type (0.5% using transphyseal screw vs. 4.3–10.5% using plates or staples, P=0.011).Conclusion: Surgical wound complication was associated with growth modification surgeries using plates or staples at the distal femur. Our results alert orthopaedic surgeons to this minor but unneglectable problem. Transphyseal screws may be the implant of choice for guided growth and epiphysiodesis at the distal femur in older children, considering the lower risks of wound complication.Level of Evidence: Level III, retrospective comparative study.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Effects of Lower Extremity Rotational Malalignment on Pediatric
           Patient-reported Outcomes Measurement and Information System (PROMIS)
           Scores

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      Authors: Chandrananth; Janan; Hannan, Richard; Bouton, Daniel; Raney, Ellen; Sienko, Susan; Do, Patrick; Bauer, Jeremy P.
      Abstract: imageBackground: There is sparse literature demonstrating the relationship between lower limb pediatric idiopathic rotational malalignment (IRM) and patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS) scores. Our goal is to determine and quantify the amount that IRM deformities, as measured with the 3D gait analysis, affect childrens’ pain interference, mobility, and peer relationship PROMIS domains. Secondary outcomes include investigating the potential relationships between IRM and various subgroups (Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI), gender, Body Mass Index (BMI), femur Versus tibia). We also examine whether the PROMIS domains correlate with PODCI in this population.Methods: This study was a retrospective cohort, single institution, and consecutively recruited cases series. We identified 47 children over a 3-year period who were evaluated at the motion analysis center at our tertiary care hospital, with increased torsion of the femur or tibia. After exclusions, 25 children with IRM, documented PROMIS data and gait analysis were considered.Results: Femoral malrotation had a significant relationship with female gender (P=0.001) and increased BMI (P
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Art and Pediatric Orthopaedics: Ribera, an Artist for the Downtrodden

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      Authors: Youn; Sean; Esparza, Melissa; Schaub, Timothy; Belthur, Mohan V.
      Abstract: imageJusepe de Ribera’s most famous artistic works consisted of the bizarre such as mutilated bodies and social outcasts, with one being of a Neapolitan beggar boy with upper and lower limb joint contractures. Although the etiology of the boy’s contractures in The Clubfoot has been debated, we present a case for arthrogryposis with a unilateral clubfoot as the most likely diagnosis.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Noninvasive Hemoglobin Monitoring for Postoperative Pediatric Orthopaedic
           Patients: A Preliminary Study

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      Authors: Mathew; Smitha E.; Pulido, Natalie; Larson, A. Noelle; Stans, Anthony A.; Milbrandt, Todd A.; Shaughnessy, William J.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Hemoglobin (Hgb) levels are frequently checked through venipuncture [invasive hemoglobin (iHgb)] in pediatric orthopaedic patients after high blood loss procedures. This needlestick may causes further anxiety and fear in hospitalized children. Noninvasive hemoglobin (nHgb) monitoring has been effectively utilized in the adult intensive care and postoperative total joint arthroplasty setting. nHgb monitoring has not yet been validated in children for routine postoperative Hgb assessment in pediatric orthopaedics.Methods: In this prospective study, 46 pediatric orthopaedic patients were enrolled who were undergoing surgery and postoperative standard of care iHgb testing. On postoperative day 1, Hgb levels were obtained through venipuncture and nHgb monitor (Pronto-7; Masimo) within a 2-hour period. Patient preferences, iHgb and nHgb values, time to result, and provider preferences were recorded. Cost data were estimated based on the standard Medicare payment rates for lab services versus the cost of nHgb probe.Results: nHgb results were obtained after 1 attempt in 38 patients (83%), after multiple attempts in 7 patients (15%), and could not be obtained in 1 patient. The mean time to obtain nHgb value was significantly shorter than that to obtain iHgb results (1.3±1.5 vs. 40±18.1 min; P
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Prevertebral Soft Tissue Thickness of the Cervical Spine in Children: An
           Insensitive but Specific Aid in the Diagnosis of Occult Trauma

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      Authors: Karlin; Lawrence I.; Jordan, Eric M.; Miller, Patricia E.; Shore, Benjamin J.
      Abstract: imageBackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of current cervical prevertebral soft tissue swelling (PVST) values in a cohort of children with known cervical fractures or dislocations.Methods: Forty two children (average age 11.9, range 1.4 to 17.0 y) with documented cervical spine injury and 61 children (average age 11.9, range 0.5 to 17.9 y) with cervical pain but no injury were reviewed (January 2004 to December 2015). PVST was measured on lateral cervical radiographs at C2, C3, and C6. Patients were stratified by age (0 to 2 y, 3 to 6 y, 7 to 10 y, 11 to 15 y, and 16 y and above). The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare PVST measurements at each spine level across injury and noninjury cohorts. Sensitivity and specificity were estimated to assess the ability of abnormal reference values to detect when a true injury was present. In addition, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were also estimated.Results: The majority of c-spine injuries (31/42; 76%) involved bony fracture and 57% (24/42) were treated with a collar or brace. Comparison of PVST measurement found no difference at C2 (P=0.07), C3 (P=0.07), or at C6 (P=0.99) across injury and non-injury cohorts. Sensitivity was poor at single-level measures for C2 (26%), C3 (31%), and C6 (24%), while specificity was relatively high (92%, 87%, and 79%, respectively). When an increased value at either C2 or C3 indicated injury, sensitivity increased to 36%, and when an increased measurement at just one of the 3 measured levels indicated injury, the sensitivity increased to 48%, while the specificity decreased to 72%. While retropharyngeal measures were more likely to detect injury than retrotracheal, C6 alone was increased in 5 of the 20 injury patients.Conclusions: PVST measurements exhibit poor sensitivity but good specificity as indicators for the diagnosis of occult cervical trauma in children. Negative values do not exclude injury; positive values suggest further evaluation.Levels of Evidence: Level III
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Does Surgical Experience Decrease Radiation Exposure in the Operating
           Room'

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      Authors: Rehm; Andreas; Ngu, Albert W.T.; Ong, Joshua C.Y.; Ashby, Elizabeth
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Prospective Evaluation of a Treatment Protocol Based on Fracture
           Displacement for Pediatric Lateral Condyle Humerus Fractures: A
           Preliminary Study

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      Authors: Rehm; Andreas; Ngu, Albert; Thahir, Azeem
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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