Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8185 journals)
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ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 152 of 152 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Orthopaedica     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthopedics     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Arthroplasty Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone & Joint 360     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Bone Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Burns & Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Orthopedic Research     Open Access  
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Chinese Journal of Traumatology     Open Access  
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Concussion     Open Access  
Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Orthopaedic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Der Orthopäde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Die Wirbelsäule     Hybrid Journal  
Duke Orthopedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
East African Orthopaedic Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
EFORT Open Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Técnicas Quirúrgicas - Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
EMC - Tecniche Chirurgiche - Chirurgia Ortopedica     Full-text available via subscription  
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Podiatry / Revista Europea de Podología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Foot & Ankle International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Spine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Orthopaedics     Open Access  
International Musculoskeletal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JAAOS : Global Research & Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants     Hybrid Journal  
JBJS Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
JOR Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal de Traumatologie du Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal für Mineralstoffwechsel & Muskuloskelettale Erkrankungen     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bone and Joint Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Bone and Joint Infection     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Children's Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Musculoskeletal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 72)
Journal of Orthopaedic Association of South Indian States     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Diseases and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedic Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Orthopaedic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Orthopaedic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Orthopaedic Translation     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Orthopaedics, Trauma and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Orthopedics & Rheumatology     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Musculoskeletal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Musculoskeletal Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma     Open Access  
North American Spine Society Journal (NASSJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Obere Extremität     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Orthopedics and Rheumatology     Open Access  
Open Journal of Trauma     Open Access  
Open Orthopaedics Journal     Open Access  
Operative Orthopädie und Traumatologie     Hybrid Journal  
Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopädie & Rheuma     Full-text available via subscription  
Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Orthopaedic Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Orthopaedic Proceedings     Partially Free  
Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopaedics and Trauma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Orthopedic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Orthopedic Research and Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Orthopedic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthoplastic Surgery     Open Access  
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Open     Open Access  
Osteologie     Hybrid Journal  
Osteoporosis and Sarcopenia     Open Access  
OTA International     Open Access  
Paediatric Orthopaedics and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Prosthetics and Orthotics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Chilena de Ortopedia y Traumatología / Chilean Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Cubana de Ortopedia y Traumatologí­a     Open Access  
Revista de la Asociación Argentina de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Open Access  
Revista Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Portuguesa de Ortopedia e Traumatologia     Open Access  
Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Romanian Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology     Open Access  
SA Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SICOT-J     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Sport-Orthopädie - Sport-Traumatologie - Sports Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Strategies in Trauma and Limb Reconstruction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Techniques in Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma (Travma)     Open Access  
Trauma und Berufskrankheit     Hybrid Journal  
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology and Orthopedics of Russia     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ортопедия, травматология и протезирование     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2397-1983 - ISSN (Online) 2397-1991
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Percutaneous revascularization for the treatment of refractory digital
           ischemia in systemic sclerosis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lily A Romero-Karam, Kevin A Honan, Salman A Arain, Maureen D. Mayes
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The objective of this study is to explore the role of adjunctive percutaneous revascularization of the hand in the management of patients with systemic sclerosis–associated refractory digital ischemia.Methods:We present our initial experience of using percutaneous upper extremity interventions to treat patients with systemic sclerosis and symptomatic Raynaud’s phenomenon who presented with either refractory digital ischemia or non-healing ulcers. We discuss patient characteristics, procedural findings, and short-term clinical outcomes of these interventions.Results:We performed 14 interventions in 6 patients with non-healing digital ulcers or refractory ischemia secondary to systemic sclerosis. Angioplasty was performed at or below the wrist in conjunction with intravenous prostaglandin therapy, started prior to or immediately after the revascularization procedure. All patients experienced symptomatic relief and demonstrated accelerated wound healing. Two patients required an additional procedure to treat recurrent ischemia (without new ulceration) in the treated digit. Three of the patients underwent multiple procedures during the study period to treat new ischemic lesions or Raynaud’s phenomenon symptoms, highlighting the progressive nature of the vascular occlusions in systemic sclerosis. There were no adverse events related to the interventions.Conclusions:Our retrospective analysis suggests that percutaneous revascularization in combination with vasodilator therapy in systemic sclerosis–associated digital ischemia is safe and can facilitate the healing of long-standing ulcers. Its role in the management of refractory digital ischemia in patients with systemic sclerosis should be explored further.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T06:15:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221116669
       
  • Evaluation of hypertension in systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus
           erythematosus overlap

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      Authors: Erin Chew, April Barnado, Talat Alp Ikizler, Roy Zent, Tracy Frech
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Patients with systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus serologies present a unique challenge to the clinician when hypertension is detected in the outpatient setting. Treatment choices for non-renal crisis hypertension are different for systemic sclerosis versus systemic lupus erythematosus. Urgent laboratory studies and, in the presence of certain symptoms, imaging assessment are indicated in systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus overlap patients with systemic hypertension. Long-term assessment of systemic hypertension may be enhanced by advances in non-contrast imaging that serve as valuable biomarkers for progressive vasculopathy. In this review, the diagnostic approach to systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus overlap patients presenting with hypertension is discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-09-14T07:44:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221122673
       
  • Prevalence of and factors independently associated with digital ischemic
           complications in patients with systemic sclerosis

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      Authors: Theerajet Guayboon, Chayawee Muangchan
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To investigate the prevalence of and independent predictors for digital ischemic complications in patients with systemic sclerosis.Method:Patients enrolled in the Siriraj Systemic Sclerosis Cohort registry during 2013–2019 were classified as having or not having digital ischemic complications at the baseline and 1-year timepoints.Results:A total of 171 patients with systemic sclerosis were included. The prevalence of digital pulp loss, digital pitting scar, digital ulcer, and digital amputation at baseline and 1 year was 41.5%, 39.8%, 3.5%, 7.6% and 37.4%, 43.9%, 14.1%, 6.4%, respectively. Over half (58.5%) of overall systemic sclerosis had developed new digital ischemic complications during the 1-year follow-up. Those with digital ischemic complications at baseline were at high risk for developing new digital ischemic complications (odds ratio: 15.9). Diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis is associated with digital ischemic complications (odds ratio: 6.0), digital pitting scar (odds ratio: 4.9), and digital pulp loss (odds ratio: 6.4). Tendon friction rub is associated with digital pitting scar (odds ratio: 5.0). Salt-and-pepper skin appearance is associated with digital pulp loss (odds ratio: 3.0) and digital ulcer (odds ratio: 6.9). Disease duration > 3 years is associated with digital ulcer (odds ratio: 4.4). Male gender is associated with digital ulcer (odds ratio: 5.4).Conclusion:Digital pulp loss, digital pitting scar, digital ulcer, and digital amputation were common manifestations of digital ischemic complications, and diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis was the strongest of the six independent predictors.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-08-26T06:43:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221118720
       
  • Prevalence and clinical associations with primary hypogonadism in male
           systemic sclerosis

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      Authors: Sapol Thepwiwatjit, Suranut Charoensri, Wichien Sirithanaphol, Ajanee Mahakkanukrauh, Siraphop Suwannaroj, Chingching Foocharoen
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Systemic sclerosis may affect male and female fertility. Premature ovarian failure has been reported in female systemic sclerosis patients, but the effects on male fertility in systemic sclerosis have not been studied.Objectives:We aimed to determine the prevalence and clinical associations with primary hypogonadism among male systemic sclerosis patients.Methods:This was a cross-sectional pilot study, including 30 adult male systemic sclerosis patients attending the Scleroderma Clinic, Khon Kaen University. Testosterone deficiency symptoms were assessed using the Aging Males’ Symptoms Rating Scale, urological examination, and blood testing (for total testosterone, free testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone). We excluded patients with congenital hypogonadism and any acquired disorders of the testes and genitalia. The definition of primary hypogonadism was based on the International Society for the Study of the Aging Male 2015 diagnostic criteria for hypogonadism.Results:Seven patients met the definition of primary hypogonadism—a prevalence of 23.3% (95% confidence interval: 9.9–42.3). The respective mean age and mean systemic sclerosis duration was 59.4 ± 11.9 and 5.5 ± 4.7 years. Older age at onset, high triglyceride level, and older age starting corticosteroid treatment were significantly associated with primary hypogonadism (p = 0.02, 0.02, and 0.03, respectively). Systemic sclerosis subset, disease severity, and immunosuppressant use were not associated with primary hypogonadism among Thai male systemic sclerosis patients.Conclusion:Around one-quarter of male systemic sclerosis patients had primary hypogonadism. Elderly onset of systemic sclerosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and late corticosteroid treatment were risk factors for developing primary hypogonadism.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T04:30:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221112021
       
  • The validity and reliability of the Swedish version of the Satisfaction
           with appearance scale for individuals with systemic sclerosis

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      Authors: Malin Mattsson, Roger Hesselstrand, Karin Gunnarsson, Elisabet Dyrsmeds, Monica Holmner, Annica Nordin, Carina Boström
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Systemic sclerosis (SSc) can lead to visible changes in appearance which could generate concerns among patients. Thus, valid questionnaires that capture these concerns are valuable to identify and communicate appearance concerns.Objective:To determine aspects of the validity and reliability of the Swedish version of the Satisfaction with Appearance scale for individuals with SSc (SWAP-Swe in SSc).Methods:Content validity was assessed by interviews. In a cross-sectional design, construct validity was evaluated by comparing the self-reported questionnaire SWAP-Swe in SSc to the Scleroderma Health Assessment Questionnaire (SSc HAQ), Patient Health Questionnaire-8 (PHQ-8), RAND-36, modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS), disease duration and age using Spearman’s rank correlations (rs). Internal consistency was evaluated by Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and corrected item-to-total correlations. Test–retest reliability was investigated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC).Results:Eleven patients and 10 health professionals participated in the assessment of content validity. For the other aspects of validity and reliability 134 patients (median age 62 years, women 81%, limited cutaneous SSc 75%) participated. Overall, the content validity was satisfactory. The SWAP-Swe in SSc correlated with SSc HAQ (HAQ-DI rs = 0.50, visual analogue scales rs = 0.24–0.41), PHQ-8 (rs = 0.46), RAND-36 (rs = −0.21 to −0.47), mRSS (rs = 0.28), disease duration (rs = −0.01) and age (rs = −0.15). The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.92, corrected item-to-total correlations ⩾ 0.45 and the ICC 0.82.Conclusion:The SWAP-Swe in SSc showed satisfactory content validity, sufficient and good internal consistency and sufficient test–retest reliability. It was more strongly associated with self-reported questionnaires than with physician-assessed skin involvement and age, indicating that appearance concerns in SSc seem to be multidimensional as earlier reported. Our study contributes with a thorough investigation of validity and reliability including aspects that have not been investigated before. However, evaluation of more validity aspects of the SWAP-Swe in SSc is suggested.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-07-18T04:17:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221107858
       
  • Scleromyxedema in an adult following Sinopharm BBIBP-CorV vaccination: An
           extremely rare phenomenon

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      Authors: Amirhossein Parsaei, Somayeh Sadat Rezaei, Alireza Rahmani, Maryam Masoumi, Hojat Dehghanbanadaki, Somayyeh Norouzi, Mohammad Mehdi Riyahi, Reihane Tabaraii, Seyed Mohammad Hashem Montazeri
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:The Sinopharm BBIBP-CorV vaccine produces a variety of cutaneous adverse effects. Scleromyxedema is a mucinous connective tissue disorder that causes skin thickness and sclerodermoid changes. According to our findings, this is the first case of scleromyxedema induced by the Sinopharm immunization.Case description:We discuss the case of a 75-year-old woman who acquired progressive thickening of the skin in her limbs and trunk after getting the Sinopharm vaccination. Examination, laboratory testing, and a biopsy were used to verify scleromyxedema diagnosis. Intravenous immunoglobulins, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisolone were used in the treatment of the patient. The outcomes from the 4-month follow-up were reassuring.Conclusion:This study emphasizes the need of considering scleromyxedema as a connective tissue pathology in patients who have recently received Sinopharm vaccine and have similar cutaneous signs.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T03:07:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221107321
       
  • Relationship between ectopic calcifications and bone fragility depicted on
           computed tomography scan in 70 patients with systemic sclerosis

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      Authors: Marine Fauny, Elodie Bauer, Edem Allado, Eliane Albuisson, Joëlle Deibener, François Chabot, Damien Mandry, Olivier Huttin, Isabelle Chary-Valckenaere, Damien Loeuille
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Background:A higher risk of osteoporotic fracture was described in systemic sclerosis patients than in healthy patients.Objective:To evaluate the relation between osteoporotic fracture risk measured by the scanographic bone attenuation coefficient of the first lumbar vertebra (SBAC-L1) on computed tomography (CT) scan and the presence of ectopic calcifications: vascular, valvular and spinal.Methods:This monocentric retrospective study was performed on patients followed between 2000 and 2014 at Nancy University Hospital. Systemic sclerosis patients, according to ACR/EULAR 2013 criteria, followed from 2000 to 2014 and who underwent, during their follow-up, a CT including the first lumbar vertebra were included. The SBAC-L1 was measured with a threshold set at 145 Hounsfield units (HU). Vascular and spinal calcifications were studied on CT. For vascular calcifications, the Agatston score was used. Valvular calcifications were studied on echocardiography.Results:A total of 70 patients were included (mean age: 62.3 (±15.6) years, women 88.5%). The mean SBAC-L1 was 157.26 (±52.1) HU, and 35 patients (50%) presented an SBAC-L1 ⩽ 145 HU. The reproducibility of the calcification evaluation was good, with kappa coefficients varying between 0.63 and 1. In univariate analysis, spinal and vascular calcifications were associated with an SBAC-L1 ⩽ 145 HU, with ORs of 13.6 (1.6–113.3) and 8 (95%CI: 2.5–25.5), respectively. In multivariate analysis, the SBAC-L1 was not associated with the presence of any ectopic calcifications. The SBAC-L1 decreased with age (p = 0.0001).Conclusion:Patients with systemic sclerosis with an SBAC-L1 ⩽ 145 HU were older, but they did not have more ectopic calcification.Trial registration:The ethics committee of Nancy Hospital agreed with this study (referral file number 166). This study was designed in accordance with the general ethical principles outlined in the Declaration of Helsinki.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T04:40:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221104415
       
  • Effect of pregnancy on scleroderma progression

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      Authors: Siobhan Deshauer, Mats Junek, Murray Baron, Karen A Beattie, Margaret J Larché
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To explore the trajectory of scleroderma disease activity in women who experienced a pregnancy after systemic sclerosis diagnosis compared to nulliparous women.Methods:We analyzed data from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group registry by identifying nulliparous women and women with ⩾1 pregnancy after systemic sclerosis diagnosis. Patient characteristics were compared between groups at registry entry. Controlling for age, smoking, and time since systemic sclerosis diagnosis, generalized estimating equations tested the effect of pregnancy on force vital capacity, diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide, right ventricular systolic pressure, glomerular filtration rate, antibody status, active digital ulcers, physician global assessment of activity, and severity over 9 years.Results:At registry entry, numbers of women in the nulliparous and pregnancy after systemic sclerosis diagnosis groups were 153 and 45, respectively. Corresponding numbers at 6 and 9 years were 48 and 21, and 18 and 9, respectively. The prevalence of anti-topoisomerase positivity was 18.3% in nulliparous and 12.5% in pregnancy after systemic sclerosis diagnosis. Baseline differences included mean (Standard deviation) age of diagnosis (nulliparous: 38.8 (14.0), pregnancy after systemic sclerosis diagnosis: 22.6 (6.8) years, p 
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T04:32:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221101311
       
  • Challenging diagnosis of renal failure associated with severe neurological
           symptoms in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease

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      Authors: Clothilde Gros, Olivier Fogel, Idris Boudhabhay, Charlotte Debiais, Jean-Paul Duong Van Huyen, Aurélie Hummel, Yannick Allanore, Jérôme Avouac
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      We report the case of a patient followed for a mixed connective tissue disease with signs of systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus, who presented an acute renal failure with severe neurological symptoms (confusion, obnubilation) and hypertension. The distinction between scleroderma renal crisis and lupus nephritis was challenging and hence, the decision to use or not high dose of corticosteroids. Kidney biopsy was of major importance for the diagnosis and therapeutic strategy. The diagnosis of neurological symptoms was also made difficult given the clinical presentation and the results of imaging. Neurolupus, malignant hypertension, or posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome were the evoked diagnosis.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T09:10:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221099847
       
  • Normotensive scleroderma renal crisis as the presenting symptom of
           systemic sclerosis sine scleroderma: A case report

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      Authors: Fadi Hassan, Firas Sabbah, Mohammad E Naffaa
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Scleroderma renal crisis is a rare but serious complication of systemic sclerosis. It is usually associated with marked hypertension and carries significant risk for morbidity and mortality. Its occurrence prior to the development of skin sclerosis is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a patient who presented with recurrent pericardial effusion and later tested positive for anti-nuclear and anti-topoisomerase antibodies. He later developed normotensive renal crisis as confirmed by kidney biopsy despite complete absence of skin involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first published case of a patient presenting with normotensive renal crisis without any skin involvement.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T04:03:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221101296
       
  • Effect of skin phototype on quantitative nailfold capillaroscopy

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      Authors: Devender Bairwa, Chengappa G Kavadichanda, Saikumar Dunga, Anoop Mathew, Aishwarya G, Gayathri M S, Gorijavolu Mamatha, Molly Mary Thabah, Vir Singh Negi
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:To determine the impact of Fitzpatrick scale-based skin phototype on visualization of capillary density using nailfold capillaroscopy in healthy Indian adults.Methods:In this cross-sectional study, healthy adults were examined for nailfold capillaroscopy findings utilizing a portable capillary microscope at 800× magnification. Photographs of two contiguous areas measuring 1 mm2 each of the distal row of capillaries were captured. Images were captured from the central area of all fingers except thumb in both hands. Capillary density and morphology of nailfold capillaroscopies were assessed by two blinded assessors. The nailfold capillaroscopy parameters were compared between the Standard Fitzpatrick scale-based skin phototypes.Results:A total of 118 healthy adults were enrolled in the study. Type III, IV, V, and VI skin phototypes were seen in 27 (22.90%), 32 (27.19%), 29 (24.58%), and 30 (25.42%) participants, respectively. All participants (100%) had normal nailfold capillaroscopy morphology and architecture. Zero capillaries were visible in 11 fingers among 5 patients (4.24%) and all of them had Type VI phototype. The median capillary density per mm was 5.19 (interquartile range = 4.37–6.75) with 90 (76.27%) participants having less than seven capillaries. The median average capillary density was significantly different (p-value 
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T05:04:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221102688
       
  • The need to accurately measure energy intake and expenditure in patients
           with systemic sclerosis

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      Authors: Michael Hughes, Elizabeth Harrison, Ariane L Herrick, John T McLaughlin, Simon Lal
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Malnutrition is common in systemic sclerosis and patients are frequently underweight. However, the balance between assessed dietary energy intake versus expenditure has been neglected to date. This study aimed to assess energy (dietary) intakes and expenditures and to compare discrepancies in systemic sclerosis.Methods:Thirty-six outpatients with systemic sclerosis completed the study. Demographics and clinical data were recorded. Functional questionnaires were completed. Predicted energy requirements were calculated. Over a consecutive 3-day period, patients completed an estimated food diary and wore a specialist energy expenditure monitor (SenseWear® Armband). Assessments of intake and expenditure were compared for individual patients, and the impact according to patient demographics, clinical manifestations and disease severity evaluated.Results:Energy intake did not correlate with predicted (s = 0.117; p = 0.511) or measured (s = −0.039; p = 0.825) expenditures. Predicted and measured energy expenditures correlated, but actual values differed for individuals (intraclass correlation = 0.62; 95% limits of agreement = −459 to 751 kcal). Respiratory involvement was negatively correlated with number of steps (s = −0.350; p = 0.04) and time spent lying (s = 0.333; p = 0.05). There was a significant correlation between body mass index and predicted versus measured energy discrepancy (s = 0.41; p = 0.02), and this discrepancy was greater with higher body mass indices.Conclusion:There was no correlation between intake and either predicted or measured energy expenditure. Predicted and measured energy expenditures were strongly correlated yet differed for the individual patient. In patients with systemic sclerosis, where energy expenditure must be accurately assessed, it should be directly measured.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T08:18:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221095763
       
  • Reasons for hospitalization and in-hospital mortality in adults with
           systemic sclerosis: Analysis of the National Inpatient Sample

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      Authors: Joanna Potera, Augustine M Manadan
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune condition with significant morbidity and mortality despite modern medical therapies. The goal of this investigation was to comprehensively analyze all reasons for hospitalization and in-hospital death of systemic sclerosis patients.Methods:We conducted a retrospective analysis of the adult systemic sclerosis hospitalizations from the 2016–2018 National Inpatient Sample. We included patients with a primary or secondary diagnosis of systemic sclerosis and compared them to the group without the disease. The incidence of inpatient death and total hospitalization charges were recorded along with the most frequent principal diagnoses for systemic sclerosis hospitalizations and mortality categorized into subgroups.Results:There were 94,515 adult systemic sclerosis hospitalizations recorded in the 2016–2018 National Inpatient Sample database. Systemic sclerosis patients had higher inpatient mortality compared to the non-systemic sclerosis group (4.5% vs 2.2%, respectively, p 
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T07:00:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221083225
       
  • Severe digital ischemia as an unrecognized manifestation in patients with
           antisynthetase autoantibodies: Case series and systematic literature
           review

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      Authors: Akira Yoshida, Takahisa Gono, Yuka Okazaki, Yuichiro Shirai, Mitsuhiro Takeno, Masataka Kuwana
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Severe digital ischemia, including digital ulcers and gangrene, is considered rare in patients with antisynthetase antibodies. This study aimed to elucidate the clinical features of antisynthetase-positive patients complicated with digital ulcers and/or gangrene using a systematic literature review and case series in a single-center cohort.Methods:A systematic literature review was conducted to identify reports describing antisynthetase-positive cases with digital ulcers and/or gangrene. Our cohort of consecutive patients with antisynthetase antibodies was stratified by the history of severe digital ischemia. Demographic and clinical features and outcomes in patients with severe digital ischemia identified in the systematic literature review and our cohort were compared with those in patients without severe digital ischemia in our cohort.Results:The systematic literature review revealed 12 antisynthetase-positive patients with severe digital ischemia from one case series and eight case reports. Seven (7%) of 100 patients with antisynthetase antibodies in our cohort had a record of severe digital ischemia. Severe digital ischemia was often found at presentation and was associated with the classification of systemic sclerosis with or without myositis overlap. Clinical features associated with severe digital ischemia in antisynthetase-positive patients included Raynaud’s phenomenon (p 
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T05:32:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221090857
       
  • Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis–related pulmonary restriction: An
           under-appreciated manifestation potentially reversible with imatinib
           therapy

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      Authors: Jennifer Mansour, Cheralyn Coleman, Fabian Mendoza, Matthew Lammi, Lesley Ann Saketkoo
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis typically occurs in patients with renal failure and is strongly associated with gadolinium exposure through stimulation of macrophage-activated fibrosis. Patients present with prominent fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Quality of life is significantly diminished due to impairment from restrictive mobility of large and small joint contractures, pain, and ensuing psychological stress. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis can be severe and life-threatening. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis patients reliant on hemodialysis with cutaneous symptoms, defined as hyperpigmentation, hardening, and tethering of skin on the extremities, experience rates of mortality as high as 48%. Physician awareness and preventive strategies coincided with a reduction in the incidence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Several treatments, of which physical therapy may be a key adjuvant, have been used to treat nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, with variable and inconsistent results, lacking wide consensus. Improvement of renal function may improve nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, with some patients demonstrating stabilization or improvement after renal transplantation or resolution of acute renal failure. Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, demonstrates antifibrotic effects in the skin and recently was used to successfully treat nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. We report a case of severe nephrogenic systemic fibrosis with extensive skin fibrosis causing extrapulmonary restriction who demonstrated improved lung function following treatment with imatinib.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-04-16T03:52:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221088213
       
  • Extranodal localization of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in systemic sclerosis:
           A diagnostic challenge and review of the literature

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      Authors: Giorgio Galoppini, Beatrice Maranini, Giovanni Ciancio, Melissa Padovan, Gian Luca Casoni, Francesco Cavazzini, Roberta Gafà, Giovanni Lanza, Marcello Govoni
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Systemic sclerosis is associated with an increased incidence of malignancies, in particular solid neoplasms. Hematological cancers have been also observed in autoimmune diseases, though rarely present with lung involvement. The latter may be misdiagnosed in systemic sclerosis patients, due to the frequent concomitant interstitial lung disease.Case description:Here, we present the case of a 63-year-old man affected by systemic sclerosis presenting with an atypical lung imaging and splenomegaly, who was diagnosed with splenic marginal zone lymphoma, thus raising the suspicion of lung secondarism. We discuss the diagnostic challenge of differential diagnosis in interstitial lung presentation and briefly review the available literature on this topic.Conclusion:Several reports have demonstrated an increased risk of malignancy in patients with systemic sclerosis. Still, the lack of concretely defined guidelines for systemic sclerosis, along with systemic sclerosis multifaceted organ involvement at presentation, may challenge diagnosis and management. Here, we remark the importance of clinical work-up and a multidisciplinary approach in systemic sclerosis, to early detect and treat concomitant hematological malignancies, especially during the first years of the disease.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T05:05:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221088459
       
  • Primary heart involvement in systemic sclerosis, from conventional to
           innovative targeted therapeutic strategies

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      Authors: Arianna Ferlito, Corrado Campochiaro, Alessandro Tomelleri, Lorenzo Dagna, Giacomo De Luca
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Primary heart involvement is frequent in systemic sclerosis, even though often sub-clinical, and includes cardiac abnormalities that are predominantly attributable to systemic sclerosis rather than other causes and/or complications. A timely diagnosis is crucial to promptly start the appropriate therapy and to prevent the potential life-threatening early and late complications. There is little evidence on how to best manage systemic sclerosis-primary heart involvement as no specific treatment recommendations for heart disease are available, and a shared treatment approach is still lacking. The objective of this review is to summarize the state of the art of current literature and the overall management strategies and therapeutic approaches for systemic sclerosis-primary heart involvement. Novel insights into pathogenic mechanisms of systemic sclerosis-primary heart involvement are presented to facilitate the comprehension of therapeutic targets and novel treatment strategies.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T05:31:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221083772
       
  • A patient with scleroderma associated with severe acro-osteolysis: A case
           report

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      Authors: Mahsa Zargaran, Atiyeh Rostamian, Mahrooz Malek, Abdolrahman Rostamian
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune chronic sclerotic disease that can damage organs and cause serious complications for the patient such as musculoskeletal manifestations, Gastrointestinal involvement, pulmonary involvement, and renal disease. Acro-osteolysis is one of the musculoskeletal manifestations that causes corrosion of the bones in the fingertips of the hand and feet. In this paper, we have reported the rarely current evidence of severe Acro-osteolysis of the distal phalanges of the hands by radiological x-ray.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T06:01:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983211070117
       
  • Diagnosis and monitoring of systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial
           lung disease using high-resolution computed tomography

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      Authors: Dinesh Khanna, Oliver Distler, Vincent Cottin, Kevin K Brown, Lorinda Chung, Jonathan G Goldin, Eric L Matteson, Ella A Kazerooni, Simon LF Walsh, Michael McNitt-Gray, Toby M Maher
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Patients with systemic sclerosis are at high risk of developing systemic sclerosis–associated interstitial lung disease. Symptoms and outcomes of systemic sclerosis–associated interstitial lung disease range from subclinical lung involvement to respiratory failure and death. Early and accurate diagnosis of systemic sclerosis–associated interstitial lung disease is therefore important to enable appropriate intervention. The most sensitive and specific way to diagnose systemic sclerosis–associated interstitial lung disease is by high-resolution computed tomography, and experts recommend that high-resolution computed tomography should be performed in all patients with systemic sclerosis at the time of initial diagnosis. In addition to being an important screening and diagnostic tool, high-resolution computed tomography can be used to evaluate disease extent in systemic sclerosis–associated interstitial lung disease and may be helpful in assessing prognosis in some patients. Currently, there is no consensus with regards to frequency and scanning intervals in patients at risk of interstitial lung disease development and/or progression. However, expert guidance does suggest that frequency of screening using high-resolution computed tomography should be guided by risk of developing interstitial lung disease. Most experienced clinicians would not repeat high-resolution computed tomography more than once a year or every other year for the first few years unless symptoms arose. Several computed tomography techniques have been developed in recent years that are suitable for regular monitoring, including low-radiation protocols, which, together with other technologies, such as lung ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, may further assist in the evaluation and monitoring of patients with systemic sclerosis–associated interstitial lung disease. A video abstract to accompany this article is available at: https://www.globalmedcomms.com/respiratory/Khanna/HRCTinSScILD
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T05:27:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983211064463
       
  • Management of scleroderma gastrointestinal disease: Lights and shadows

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      Authors: Jenice X Cheah, Dinesh Khanna, Zsuzsanna H McMahan
      First page: 85
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Gastrointestinal symptoms affect the great majority of patients with systemic sclerosis. Management of these complications is often challenging as any region of the gastrointestinal tract may be involved, and significant heterogeneity exists in clinical presentation, kinetics, and outcomes. Here, we highlight new findings relevant to the management of systemic sclerosis-related gastrointestinal disease (lights) and consider areas that we have yet to elucidate (shadows).
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T03:24:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221086343
       
  • Systemic sclerosis in Asians: Are there racial differences'

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      Authors: Sue-Ann Ng, Andrea Hsiu Ling Low
      First page: 98
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Systemic sclerosis is a multisystemic autoimmune disease characterized by vasculopathy and fibrosis. Racial factors exert a significant influence on the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, antibody profile, mortality and genetic factors in systemic sclerosis. In this review, we examined Asian systemic sclerosis cohorts reported in Asia and multi-racial cohort studies to evaluate the disease characteristics and outcomes of systemic sclerosis in Asians. Asian patients have distinct genetic susceptibility to systemic sclerosis, younger age of systemic sclerosis onset, higher frequency of diffuse skin involvement, different autoantibody profiles such as higher frequency of anti-Scl70 and anti-U1-RNP antibodies, and more severe clinical phenotype. There was a suggestion of poorer survival among Asians that may be contributed by more severe disease, socioeconomic factors and differences in healthcare systems. Recognizing the influence of racial differences in systemic sclerosis disease course is important as it has implications for appropriate treatment, monitoring and prognostication.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T05:36:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221074749
       
  • Clinical characteristics associated with small airways disease in systemic
           sclerosis

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      Authors: Sanskriti Varma, Jae Hee Yun, John S Kim, Anna J Podolanczuk, Nina M Patel, Elana J Bernstein
      First page: 128
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Pulmonary manifestations of systemic sclerosis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Small airways disease can cause dyspnea and pulmonary function test abnormalities. We aimed to determine the prevalence of small airways disease and describe the characteristics associated with small airways disease in a cohort of systemic sclerosis patients.Methods:We performed a retrospective cohort study of adults with systemic sclerosis who met American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism 2013 classification criteria and were evaluated at our institution between November 2000 and November 2015. Patients with prior lung transplantation were excluded. Small airways disease was defined as the presence of one or more of the following: airway-centered fibrosis on surgical lung biopsy, forced expiratory volume at 25–75% ⩽ 50% on pulmonary function tests, and/or high-resolution computed tomography scan of the chest with bronchiolitis, mosaic attenuation, or air trapping on expiratory views. The primary outcome was small airways disease diagnosis. We performed multivariable logistic regression to determine the association of clinical variables with small airways disease.Results:One-hundred thirty-six systemic sclerosis patients were included; 55 (40%) had small airways disease. Compared to those without small airways disease, a significantly greater proportion of those with small airways disease had interstitial lung disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary hypertension, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. On multivariable analysis, pulmonary hypertension (odds ratio = 2.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.11–7.65, p-value = 0.03), gastroesophageal reflux disease (odds ratio = 2.70, 95% confidence interval = 1.08–6.79, p-value = 0.034), and anti-topoisomerase I (anti-Scl-70) antibody positivity (odds ratio = 0.42, 95% confidence interval = 0.19–0.93, p-value = 0.033) were associated with diagnosis of small airways disease.Conclusion:Small airways disease is prevalent among systemic sclerosis patients; those with pulmonary hypertension or gastroesophageal reflux disease may have a higher risk of small airways disease.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T06:01:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221083882
       
  • Systemic sclerosis manifestations and clinical outcomes in
           Hispanics/Latinos of the American Southwest

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      Authors: Sharon E Nunez, Angie Ariza-Hutchinson, Roderick A Fields, Jaime A Vondenberg, Rosemina A Patel, N Suzanne Emil, Maheswari Muruganandam, James I Gibb, Janet L Poole, Wilmer L Sibbitt
      First page: 135
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Certain Hispanic/Latino (Hispanic) populations have been reported to have higher rates and severity of systemic sclerosis; however, little is known of systemic sclerosis in the American Southwest. This study compared manifestations of systemic sclerosis in Hispanics with non-Hispanics of New Mexico.Methods:This cross-sectional longitudinal study included 109 systemic sclerosis patients followed over a mean of 12.6 ± 8.9 years. Subjects were repetitively evaluated including physical examination, echocardiography, chest imaging, and serologic testing and observed for complications. Disease characteristics and long-term outcomes were statistically compared between self-identified Hispanic and non-Hispanic subjects.Results:A total of 73 (67%) systemic sclerosis subjects were Hispanic and 36 (33%) were non-Hispanic. The cohorts were similar in mean age, age of systemic sclerosis onset, limited versus diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis, telangiectases, gastroesophageal reflux disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon, autoantibody profile, interstitial lung disease, pulmonary hypertension, scleroderma renal crisis, mortality, and comorbid malignancy (all p > 0.05). However, the standardized mortality ratio was increased in both cohorts relative to age-adjusted mortality: Hispanic: 2.08, confidence interval (1.94–2.24); non-Hispanic: 1.56, confidence interval (1.46–1.68). Furthermore, the standardized incidence ratio for malignancy was increased in both cohorts: Hispanic: 1.45, confidence interval (1.35–1.56); non-Hispanic: 1.24, confidence interval (1.16–1.34). The mean age of cancer diagnosis occurred at a significantly younger age in Hispanics (Hispanics: 53.1 ± 9.7 years; non-Hispanics 63.7 ± 7.9 years; 95% confidence interval: −19 ⩽ 10.6 ⩽ 2.2; p = 0.016).Conclusion:Systemic sclerosis phenotype, autoantibodies, complications, outcomes, malignancy rates, and mortality are generally similar between Hispanics and non-Hispanics with systemic sclerosis in the American Southwest. However, age-adjusted comorbid malignancy and mortality rates are significantly increased in both groups.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T04:59:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221086214
       
  • Nailfold capillaroscopy for the early diagnosis of the scleroderma
           spectrum of diseases in patients without Raynaud’s phenomenon

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      Authors: Cassandra Hong, Ling Xiang, Seyed Ehsan Saffari, Andrea HL Low
      First page: 144
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The utility of nailfold capillaroscopy in the evaluation of patients without Raynaud’s phenomenon is unclear.Objective:This study aims to compare the utility of nailfold capillaroscopy for the early diagnosis of the scleroderma-spectrum of diseases in patients who present with Raynaud’s phenomenon, undifferentiated non-Raynaud’s phenomenon features and positive systemic sclerosis-associated antibodies without scleroderma-spectrum of disease features.Methods:Eligible patients were divided into three referral criteria groups: (I) Raynaud’s phenomenon; (II) Undifferentiated non-Raynaud’s phenomenon features and (III) Positive systemic sclerosis-associated autoantibodies without features to suggest scleroderma-spectrum of diseases. This includes systemic sclerosis, mixed connective tissue disease and dermatomyositis. The association between baseline scleroderma pattern on nailfold capillaroscopy (systemic sclerosis–nailfold capillaroscopy) and final diagnosis at follow-up was determined using logistic regression analysis. Test characteristics of nailfold capillaroscopy were compared and stratified by referral groups.Results:Of 95 patients followed-up for a mean of 1.6 years, 28 (29.5%) patients developed scleroderma-spectrum of diseases, 36 (37.9%) patients had suspected/other connective tissue disease and 27 (28.4%) patients had no connective tissue disease. Baseline systemic sclerosis-nailfold capillaroscopy was significantly associated with the development of scleroderma-spectrum of diseases in patients from Group I (odds ratio, 7.1, p = 0.01) and Group II (odds ratio 7.3, p = 0.005). In Group II patients, nailfold capillaroscopy had a sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 71.4%, 76.5%, 55.6% and 86.7%, respectively. Specificity (81.8%) and PPV (69.2%) were the highest in Group I patients. Nailfold capillaroscopy had the highest negative predictive value in Group III (100%), followed by Group II (86.7%) and Group I (78.3%) patients.Conclusion:In addition to evaluating patients with Raynaud’s phenomenon, nailfold capillaroscopy was useful in the evaluation and exclusion of scleroderma-spectrum of diseases in patients with undifferentiated non-Raynaud phenomenon features and those with systemic sclerosis-associated antibodies without features to suggest scleroderma-spectrum of diseases.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T02:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221088460
       
  • Musculoskeletal ultrasound of the shoulder in systemic sclerosis

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      Authors: Vatakan Surat, Patpiya Sirasaporn, Chingching Foocharoen
      First page: 151
      Abstract: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:To explore shoulder findings by ultrasonography and to find factors associated with shoulder ultrasonographic abnormalities in systemic sclerosis patients.Methods:A series of systemic sclerosis patients who attended the scleroderma clinic, Srinagarind Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Thailand, were prospectively evaluated for baseline characteristics, physical examination, and ultrasonography of both shoulders.Results:Seventy-four systemic sclerosis patients were enrolled in this study. Diffuse cutaneous type of systemic sclerosis was the most common type (62.2%). The three common systemic sclerosis–associated symptoms were skin tightness (28.5%), salt–pepper appearance (20.9%), and telangiectasia (11.6%). The prevalence of shoulder pain in systemic sclerosis patients was 43.2% (32/74). Sixty-eight patients (92%) had abnormal ultrasonographic findings. The most common ultrasonographic abnormalities were unilateral calcification inside the glenohumeral joint (45.9%), bilateral calcification inside the glenohumeral joint (36.5%), and bilateral supraspinatus tendinosis (28.9%). Skin edematous was the only factor associated with abnormal shoulder ultrasonographic findings. No association between shoulder pain and abnormal shoulder ultrasonographic findings was detected.Conclusion:Ultrasonographic abnormalities in the shoulder were common in the systemic sclerosis patients. The most frequent ultrasonographic finding of shoulder joints in systemic sclerosis patients was calcification inside the glenohumeral joint. Moreover, asymptomatic shoulder ultrasonographic abnormalities were prevalent in individuals with systemic sclerosis.
      Citation: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T04:50:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23971983221086215
       
 
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