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ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 152 of 152 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Orthopaedica     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthopedics     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Arthroplasty Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone & Joint 360     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Bone Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Burns & Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Orthopedic Research     Open Access  
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Chinese Journal of Traumatology     Open Access  
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Concussion     Open Access  
Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Orthopaedic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Der Orthopäde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Die Wirbelsäule     Hybrid Journal  
Duke Orthopedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
East African Orthopaedic Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
EFORT Open Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Técnicas Quirúrgicas - Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
EMC - Tecniche Chirurgiche - Chirurgia Ortopedica     Full-text available via subscription  
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Podiatry / Revista Europea de Podología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Foot & Ankle International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Spine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Orthopaedics     Open Access  
International Musculoskeletal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JAAOS : Global Research & Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants     Hybrid Journal  
JBJS Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
JOR Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal de Traumatologie du Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal für Mineralstoffwechsel & Muskuloskelettale Erkrankungen     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bone and Joint Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bone and Joint Infection     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Children's Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Musculoskeletal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Journal of Orthopaedic Association of South Indian States     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Diseases and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Orthopaedic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Orthopaedic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Orthopaedic Translation     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Orthopaedics, Trauma and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Orthopedics & Rheumatology     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Musculoskeletal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Musculoskeletal Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma     Open Access  
North American Spine Society Journal (NASSJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Obere Extremität     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Orthopedics and Rheumatology     Open Access  
Open Journal of Trauma     Open Access  
Open Orthopaedics Journal     Open Access  
Operative Orthopädie und Traumatologie     Hybrid Journal  
Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopädie & Rheuma     Full-text available via subscription  
Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Orthopaedic Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Orthopaedic Proceedings     Partially Free  
Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopaedics and Trauma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Orthopedic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Orthopedic Research and Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Orthopedic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthoplastic Surgery     Open Access  
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Open     Open Access  
Osteologie     Hybrid Journal  
Osteoporosis and Sarcopenia     Open Access  
OTA International     Open Access  
Paediatric Orthopaedics and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Prosthetics and Orthotics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Chilena de Ortopedia y Traumatología / Chilean Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Cubana de Ortopedia y Traumatologí­a     Open Access  
Revista de la Asociación Argentina de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Open Access  
Revista Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Portuguesa de Ortopedia e Traumatologia     Open Access  
Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Romanian Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology     Open Access  
SA Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SICOT-J     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Sport-Orthopädie - Sport-Traumatologie - Sports Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Strategies in Trauma and Limb Reconstruction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Techniques in Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma (Travma)     Open Access  
Trauma und Berufskrankheit     Hybrid Journal  
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology and Orthopedics of Russia     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ортопедия, травматология и протезирование     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Foot & Ankle International
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.626
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1071-1007 - ISSN (Online) 1944-7876
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Education Calendar

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1127 - 1127
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Volume 43, Issue 8, Page 1127-1127, August 2022.

      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T09:13:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221117622
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Takedown of Ankle Fusions and Conversion to Total Ankle Replacements

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      Authors: Anna L. Lundeen, Fernando C. Raduan, Rebecca Stone McGaver, Kayla J. Seiffert, Jacquelyn E. Fritz, M. Russell Giveans, J. Chris Coetzee
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:With ankle replacements gaining credibility, there is a small subset of patients who might benefit from a conversion of an ankle fusion to a replacement. The objective of this study is to present clinical and radiographic results of patients who had their ankle fusion converted to total ankle arthroplasty (TAA).Methods:Patients presented to the senior author with ongoing ankle pain following fusion or increasing pain after a period of relative comfort after an ankle fusion. Outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with the Veterans Rand Health Survey (VR-12), Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale (AOS), and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scale. A patient satisfaction survey was also distributed.Results:All ankle fusion conversions between April 2010 and December 2019 were included. Fifty-one patients (30 females) with the mean age of 62.6 (range, 37-83) years were followed. Mean follow-up was 4.2±2.3 (range, 2-11.5) years. Two patients were lost to follow-up (1 is deceased). Pre- and postoperative mean patient-reported outcome scores were all significantly different between groups except VR-12 mental subscale scores. VR-12 physical scores improved from 28.7±8.9 preoperatively to 38.9±9.9 (P < .001) postoperatively; VR-12 mental score was stable. AOS pain and disability subscales similarly improved: 55.9±24.4 to 27.9±25.4 (P < .001) and 61.7±21.1 to 31.1±25.7 (P < .001), respectively. VAS pain improved from a mean of 64.5±27.3 to 29.4±27.7 (P < .001). There was no tibiotalar dorsiflexion or plantarflexion with the ankle fusion. Initial postoperative visit revealed that average dorsiflexion was 10.9±5.93 degrees and average plantarflexion was 14.1±5.22 degrees. At the latest follow-up, dorsiflexion improved significantly to 15.5±6.33 degrees (P < .001), with no significant improvement in plantarflexion (P = .980).Conclusion:In this single-surgeon longitudinal study of 51 patients with a painful, malaligned, or nonhealed ankle fusion treated with an ankle replacement, we found highly satisfactory functional outcomes at an average of 4.2 years. Continued long-term follow-up will reveal whether the longevity of these replacements is comparable to primary replacements.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T09:24:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221115170
       
  • Compensation of Dynamic Fixation Systems in the Quality of Reduction of
           Distal Tibiofibular Joint in Acute Syndesmotic Complex Injuries: A
           CT-Based Analysis

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      Authors: Fabian T. Spindler, Federico P. Gaube, Wolfgang Böcker, Hans Polzer, Sebastian F. Baumbach
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:There is an ongoing discussion on how to best stabilize syndesmotic injuries. Previous studies have indicated a better quality of reduction of the distal tibiofibular joint (DTFJ) for the suture button systems compared to syndesmotic screw fixation. Still, the reason for this superiority remains unclear. The aims of this retrospective study were to (1) analyze the deviation of the tibial and fibular drilling tunnels of the suture button system and (2) to compare these to the quality of reduction of the DTFJ assessed on bilateral postoperative CT images.Methods:Included were all adult patients who underwent syndesmotic stabilization for an acute injury using a suture button system, with postoperative, bilateral CT imaging over a 10-year period. A total of 147 patients were eligible. Based on individually reconstructed axial CT slices, the postoperative quality of reduction of the DTFJs was rated on bilateral CT images. Furthermore, the rotation and translation of the suture button drilling tunnels were analyzed. Based on these measurements, the intraoperative reduction of the DTFJ was recalculated and again rated. Using these values, the correction potential of suture button systems on the reduction of the DTFJ was analyzed.Results:(1) The drilling tunnel deviated considerably for both rotation 2.3±2.1 degrees (range: 0.0-13.1 degrees ) and translation 0.9±0.8 mm (range: 0-4.3 mm ). Based on the deviation of the drilling tunnels in fibula and tibia, the calculated intraoperative reduction of the DTFJ was classified as malreduced in 35.4%. (2) The DTFJ was postoperatively identified as malreduced in 17% of patients. Overall, the suture button system tended to compensate toward a more anatomical reduction both in the axial and sagittal plane.Conclusion:A suture button system postoperatively deviates and apparently has the capacity to compensate for intraoperative malreduction. Analysis of the drilling tunnels revealed that the use of a rigid fixation system would have doubled the postoperative malreduction rate.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T09:23:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221115193
       
  • Reconstruction With a 3D-Printed Megaprosthesis With Ankle Arthrodesis
           After Distal Tibial Tumor Resection

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      Authors: Haijie Liang, Jichuan Wang, Yi Yang, Tianli Niu, Zhiye Du, Jie Zang, Ran Wei, Taiqiang Yan, Xiaodong Tang, Wei Guo
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Reconstruction after en bloc resection of the distal tibia has remained an unsettled issue despite many attempts with bone grafts or prostheses in the past. Failures of the previous methods have been attributed to inadequate mechanical strength, poor articular stability, failed osseointegration, and poor soft tissue coverage. To overcome these shortcomings, we designed and applied a 3D-printed megaprosthesis with ankle arthrodesis.Patients and Methods:A total of 13 patients underwent resection of a distal tibial tumor and reconstruction with a 3D-printed distal tibial megaprosthesis between January 2017 and November 2020. Mean age was 14.9±6.5 years. Diagnoses included 11 cases of osteosarcoma and 1 case each of low-grade phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma. Baseline characteristics, operative data, complication profiles, and oncologic, and functional outcomes were reviewed and analyzed.Results:All 13 cases attained a wide or marginal resection. During a mean follow-up of 26.8±10.6 months, 1 patient experienced local recurrence and distant metastasis, whereas 3 other patients only developed distant metastasis. Periprosthetic infection subsequent to paronychia occurred in 1 patient 24 months after the operation. No other complications were observed. By the last follow-up, the mean MSTS-93 score was 28.0±1.5.Conclusion:In this relatively small cohort with short-term follow-up, reconstruction with the 3D-printed megaprosthesis with ankle arthrodesis was found to be a safe and efficacious method after resection of a distal tibial malignancy.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-08-06T04:48:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221115188
       
  • Early Radiographic and Clinical Outcomes of a Novel, Fixed-Bearing
           Fourth-Generation Total Ankle Replacement System

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      Authors: Jaeyoung Kim, Lavan Rajan, Rogerio Bitar, Kristin Caolo, Robert Fuller, Jensen Henry, Jonathan Deland, Scott Ellis, Constantine Demetracopoulos
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The Cadence Total Ankle System is a 2-component, fixed-bearing fourth-generation total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) system that was introduced for clinical use in 2016. The purpose of this study was to report non–inventor, non–industry funded survivorship, radiographic and clinical outcomes, and early complications following use of this implant at a minimum of 2 years.Methods:This single-center retrospective study included patients who underwent TAA by 2 surgeons with this novel fixed-bearing system between January 2017 and September 2018. Forty-eight patients were evaluated at an average of 33.6 months. Radiographic outcomes included preoperative and postoperative tibiotalar angle on anteroposterior radiographs of the ankle, sagittal tibial angle (STA) on lateral radiographs of the ankle, and periprosthetic lucency formation and location. Revision and reoperation data were collected, and patient-reported outcomes were assessed using Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). Subgroup analysis assessed associations between preoperative deformity, postoperative implant alignment, PROMIS scores, and periprosthetic lucency formation.Results:Survivorship of implant was 93.7%, with 3 revisions, 1 due to infection and 2 due to loosening of the implant (1 tibial and 1 talar component). Three patients had reoperations (6.3%): 2 for superficial infection and 1 for gutter debridement due to medial gutter impingement. Fifteen patients (35.8%) developed periprosthetic lucencies, all on the tibial side. PROMIS scores improved after surgery in all domains except Depression. Patients with significant postoperative periprosthetic lucency had worse postoperative PROMIS Physical function scores than patients without lucency (P < .05).Conclusion:This study demonstrated excellent minimum 2-year clinical and radiographic outcomes and low revision and reoperation rates of this new fourth-generation TAA system. Future studies with longer follow-up, especially on patients with periprosthetic lucency, are necessary to investigate the long-term complications and understand the long-term functional and radiographic outcomes of this implant.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T06:44:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221115185
       
  • Decreased Mechanical Work Demand in the Chopart Joint After Total Ankle
           Replacement

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      Authors: Paul-André Deleu, Alexandre Naaim, Laurence Chèze, Raphaël Dumas, Bernhard Devos Bevernage, Ivan Birch, Jean-Luc Besse, Thibaut Leemrijse
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The success of total ankle replacement (TAR) must be based on restoring reasonable mechanical balance with anatomical structures that can produce mechanical joint work through elastic (eg, tendons, fascia) or viscoelastic (eg, heel pad) mechanisms, or by active muscle contractions. Yet, quantifying the work distribution across the affected joint and the neighboring foot joints after TAR is lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate if there is a change in the joint work distribution across the Ankle, Chopart, Lisfranc and Metatarsophalangeal joints during level walking before and after patients undergo TAR.Methods:Fifteen patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis scheduled for primary TAR for pain relief were recruited and peer-matched with a sample of 15 control subjects. All patients underwent a 3D gait analysis before and after surgery, during which a kinetic multisegment foot model was used to quantify intersegmental joint work.Results:The contribution of the Ankle joint (P = .007) to the total foot and ankle positive work increased significantly after TAR. In contrast, a significant decrease in the contribution to the total foot and ankle joint positive work (P < .001) were found at the Chopart joint after TAR. The foot joints combined produced a significant increase in a net mechanical work from +0.01 J/kg before surgery to +0.05 J/kg after TAR (P = .006).Conclusion:The findings of this study corroborate the theoretical rationale that TAR reduces significantly the compensatory strategy in the Chopart joint in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis after TAR. However, the findings also showed that the contribution of the ankle joint of patients after TAR to the total foot and ankle joint positive work remained impaired compared to the control group.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T11:26:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221112094
       
  • Cost-Effective Modeling of Thromboembolic Chemoprophylaxis for Total Ankle
           Arthroplasty

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      Authors: Brandon J. Martinazzi, Gregory J. Kirchner, Christopher M. Stauch, F. Jeffrey Lorenz, Kirsten M. Manto, Vincenzo Bonaddio, Zachary Koroneos, Michael C. Aynardi
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) following total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. To prevent this complication, surgeons often prescribe postoperative chemoprophylaxis. However, much controversy exists regarding the efficacy of chemoprophylaxis because of the limited studies exploring its use. Furthermore, even less is known about its cost-effectiveness. Therefore, this study sought to determine the cost-effectiveness of commonly prescribed chemoprophylactic agents using a break-even analysis economic model.Methods:The literature was searched, and an online database was used to identify patients who developed a symptomatic VTE after undergoing TAA. Our institutional records were used to estimate the cost of treating a symptomatic VTE, and an online drug database was used to obtain the cost of commonly prescribed chemoprophylactic agents. A break-even analysis was then performed to determine the final break-even rate necessary to make a drug cost-effective.Results:The low and high rates of symptomatic VTE were determined to be 0.46% and 9.8%. From 2011 to 2021, a total of 3455 patients underwent total ankle arthroplasty. Of these patients, 16 developed a postoperative symptomatic VTE (1.01%). Aspirin 81 mg was cost-effective if the initial symptomatic VTE rates decreased by an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of 0.0003% (NNT = 31 357). Aspirin 325 mg was also cost-effective if the initial rates decreased by an ARR 0.02% (NNT = 5807). Likewise, warfarin (5 mg) was cost-effective at all initial rates with an ARR of 0.02% (NNT = 4480). In contrast, enoxaparin (40 mg) and rivaroxaban (20 mg) were only cost-effective at higher initial symptomatic VTE rates with ARRs of 1.48% (NNT = 68) and 5.36% (NNT = 19). Additional analyses demonstrated that enoxaparin (40 mg) and rivaroxaban (20 mg) become cost-effective when costs of treating a symptomatic VTE are higher than our estimates.Conclusion:Chemoprophylaxis following TAA can be cost-effective. A tailored approach to VTE prophylaxis with cost-effectiveness in mind may be beneficial to the patient and health system.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-28T09:10:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221112922
       
  • The First Tarsometatarsal Joint in Lisfranc Injuries

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      Authors: Liam H. Wong, Bopha Chrea, Lara C. Atwater, James E. Meeker
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Lisfranc injuries are among the most debilitating injuries to the foot. Characterization of first tarsometatarsal (TMT) joint involvement in Lisfranc injuries is limited. Multiple studies have indicated that this joint is damaged in a variety of Lisfranc injury patterns, but there is sparse information regarding how often and in what form.Methods:A retrospective review was performed of operative Lisfranc fractures from 2010 to 2020 with patients identified by Combined Procedural Terminology codes. Hardcastle and Myerson Lisfranc injury classifications and computed tomography and radiograph characterizations of the first TMT joint were evaluated by 3 foot and ankle fellowship–trained orthopaedic surgeons. Radiographic characteristics were collected. Light’s kappa coefficient evaluated interrater reliability for injury classification. Injury mechanism and Lisfranc classification effects on the first TMT joint were further assessed using inferential statistics.Results:Of 71 patients with a Lisfranc injury of which 37 (52%) were high energy, 61 (86%) showed radiographic evidence of first TMT joint injury. A fragment was present in the TMT articular surface in 33 (47%) with median size = 8.7 mm and medial capsular avulsion in n = 25 (35%). Forty-eight patients (68%) had medial/lateral TMT joint incongruence ≥2 mm (median overhang = 4 mm), 21 (30%) had dorsal/plantar incongruence (median overhang = 6 mm). Angulation of TMT articular surfaces ≥5 degrees on the transverse/anteroposterior plane occurred in n = 32 (45%) and in n = 12 (17%) on the sagittal/lateral plane, which significantly differed between classifications (P = .020).Conclusion:The overwhelming majority of Lisfranc midfoot injuries seen at our tertiary referral center had imaging evidence of damage to the first TMT joint (86%), and the incidence may be higher. The most common patterns of first TMT joint involvement we found were joint incongruity, articular surface fractures, angulation of the articular surfaces, and medial capsular ligament avulsion fractures. A better understanding of injuries to the first TMT joint can help orthopaedic surgeons with diagnosis.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-28T09:08:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221112090
       
  • Cohort Comparison of Radiographic Correction and Complications Between
           Minimal Invasive and Open Lapidus Procedures for Hallux Valgus

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      Authors: Diogo Vieira Cardoso, Andrea Veljkovic, Kevin Wing, Murray Penner, Oliver Gagne, Alastair Younger
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The Lapidus procedure corrects hallux valgus first ray deformity. First tarsometatarsal (TMT) fusion in patients with hallux valgus deformity using minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is a new technique, but comparative outcomes between MIS and open techniques have not been reported. This study compares the early radiographic results and complications of the MIS with the open procedure in a single-surgeon practice.Methods:47 MIS patients were compared with 44 open patients. Radiographic measures compared preoperatively and postoperatively were the intermetatarsal angle (IMA), hallux valgus angle (HVA), foot width (FW), distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA), sesamoid station (SS), metatarsus adductus angle (MAA), first metatarsal to second metatarsal length, and elevation of the first metatarsal. Early complications were recorded, as well as repeat surgeries.Results:The mean follow-up was 82 (range, 31-182) months for the open group and 29 (range, 14-47) months for the MIS group. In both techniques, postoperative measures (IMA, HVA, DMAA, FW, and sesamoid station) were significantly improved from preoperative measures. When comparing postoperative measures between both groups, the IMA was significantly lower in the open group (4.8 ± 3.6 degrees vs 6.4 ± 3.2 degrees, P < .05). Differential between pre- and postoperative measures for both techniques were compared, and the open group was associated with more correction than the MIS group for IMA (12.4 ± 5.3 degrees vs 9.4 ± 4.4 degrees, P = .004) and HVA (25.5 ± 8.3 degrees vs 20 ± 9.9 degrees, P = .005). Wound complication and nonunion rates trended higher in the open group (4 vs 0) (P = .051).Conclusion:Both techniques resulted in good to excellent correction. However, the open technique was associated with lower postoperative IMA values and more correction power for IMA and HVA, than the MIS.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-26T07:02:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221112088
       
  • Significant Factors of High Performance Outcomes for Tibial Plafond
           Fractures

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      Authors: John C. Wheelwright, Garrett V. Christensen, Amy M. Cizik, Chong Zhang, Lucas S. Marchand, Justin M. Haller
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Limited research exists about high performance postsurgical tibial plafond fractures. This study aimed to identify aspects of the plafond fracture injury and care associated with “high performance” based on Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) scores.Methods:Tibial plafond fracture patients with minimum 12-month follow-up treated at a level 1 trauma center from 2006 to 2019 were categorized into high (top 25%) vs average-low (AL) (bottom 75%) performers based on PROMIS PF scores. Demographics and fracture characteristics of high and AL performers were compared. Variables with a P value less than .1 were used in stepwise logistic regressions.Results:The final cohort of 198 patients was divided into high (n=51) and AL (n=147) performers based on PF scores. The mean PF scores for the high and AL groups were 58 (SD=5.3) and 41.9 (SD=6.5), respectively. The mean PROMIS Pain Interference scores for the high performers and AL were 43.3 (SD=4.9) and 56.8 (SD=8.6) (P < .001), respectively. FAAM activities of daily living (high 95.4 [SD=5.5] vs AL 70.4 [SD=19.8], P < .001) and FAAM sports (high 76.8 [SD=21.3] vs AL 27.3 [SD=28.9], P < .001) subscale scores were significantly greater in the high-performing group. Sex, age, marital status, and diabetes were nonsignificant factors in univariate analysis. Significant demographic factors associated with high performance from univariate analysis were Caucasian race, private insurance, no tobacco use, lower body mass index (BMI), and mechanism of injury. Patients with fracture characteristics of OTA 43C (complete articular) fractures, bone loss, open fractures, or nonexcellent reduction were significantly less likely to be high performers. Additionally, less than excellent reductions were more common in more complex fracture patterns. Multivariable regression modeling showed that higher BMI, OTA/AO 43-C (complete articular) fracture classification, and open fracture were significant independent risk factors for reducing likelihood of high performance.Conclusion:Significant independent factors associated with high performance after tibial plafond fracture are lower BMI, closed fracture, and OTA/AO 43-B (partial articular) fracture.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T05:57:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221112924
       
  • Subtalar Arthrodesis Union Rates With and Without Adjacent Ankle
           Arthrodesis

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      Authors: Toby Jennison, James Dalgleish, Suhib Taher, Carolyn Chadwick, Chris Blundell, Mark Davies, Howard Davies
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Subtalar arthrodesis is the surgical procedure commonly performed to treat subtalar arthritis. Subtalar arthrodesis may have a higher nonunion rate if there is a preexisting adjacent joint arthrodesis. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to compare the subtalar arthrodesis union rate of patients with native tibiotalar joints to that of patients with prior tibiotalar arthrodesis. The secondary aim was to assess risk factors for nonunion.Methods:A retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients that underwent a subtalar arthrodesis in a single center between 2010 and 2020. The primary outcome of union was determined based on bridging callus on radiographs and clinical symptoms. If there was uncertainty, then a nonweightbearing CT was acquired. Chi-squared test and Mann-Whitney tests compared differences in demographics and risk factors for nonunion between groups. A logistical regression model was performed to determine risk factors for nonunion.Results:Eighteen patients had an adjacent ankle arthrodesis and 53 patients did not. The successful subtalar arthrodesis union rate in those with a preexisting ankle joint arthrodesis (44.4%) was approximately half that in those without an ankle joint arthrodesis (86.8%) (P < .001). On multivariate logistic regression, an adjacent ankle arthrodesis was the only significant risk factor for nonunion. The odds ratio of nonunion of the subtalar joint with an adjacent ankle arthrodesis present was 4.90 (95% CI 1.02-23.56) compared to a subtalar arthrodesis with a native ankle joint. In addition, 9.4% of patients without an ankle arthrodesis underwent a revision subtalar arthrodesis compared with 44.4% of those with an adjacent ankle arthrodesis (P = .001).Conclusion:In our study, we found that patients undergoing a subtalar arthrodesis with an adjacent ankle arthrodesis have a significantly increased risk of nonunion compared with those undergoing a subtalar arthrodesis with a native ankle. Patients with a previously fused ankle need counseling about the high risk of nonunion and potential additional surgery.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T05:52:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221110873
       
  • Weight-bearing Allowed Following Internal Fixation of Ankle Fractures, a
           Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Ramy Khojaly, Fiachra E. Rowan, Mekki Hassan, Sammy Hanna, Ruairí Mac Niocail
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Postoperative management regimes vary following open reduction and internal fixation of unstable ankle fractures. Traditional postoperative nonweightbearing cast immobilization may prevent loss of fixation and protect the soft tissue envelope but may also be associated with poorer functional outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare the complication rate and functional outcomes of early weightbearing (EWB) vs late weightbearing (LWB) following open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures.Methods:We performed a systematic review with a meta-analysis of controlled trials and comparative cohort studies using 3 databases. We included all studies that investigated the effect of weightbearing following internal fixation of ankle fractures in adult patients by any means. Studies that investigated mobilization but not weightbearing, non–English-language publications, and tibial Plafond fractures were excluded from this systematic review. We assessed the risk of bias using ROB 2 tools for randomized controlled trials and ROBINS-1 for cohort studies. Data extraction was performed using Covidence online software and meta-analysis by using RevMan 5.3.Results:This systematic review included 10 randomized controlled trials and 4 comparative cohort studies. Most of the included studies were rated as having some concern with regard to the risk of bias. There was no significant difference in the complication rate between the protected EWB and LWB groups (the risk ratio [RR] for infection was 1.30, 95% CI 0.74, 2.30; I² = 0%; P = .36), but better functional outcome scores were detected in the EWB group only at 6 weeks postoperatively (MD =10.08, 95% CI 5.13, 15.02; I² = 0%; P ≤ .0001), with no significant difference seen at 6 or 12 months postoperatively.Conclusion:Based on the studies reviewed, it appears that early protected weightbearing following open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures does not affect surgical incision or fracture healing and is associated with better early functional outcomes at 6 weeks, but not 6 or 12 months, postoperatively.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T10:33:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221102142
       
  • Radiographic Assessment of Ankle Fracture Displacement: A Validation Study

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      Authors: I. Leah Gitajn, Roman M. Natoli, Clay A. Spitler, Reza Firoozabadi, Lauren M. Tatman, Joshua L. Gary, Michael F. Githens, Richard E. Thompson, Andrea DeLuca, Lisa Reider, Elizabeth Wysocki, William Obremskey
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Ankle fracture displacement is an important outcome in clinical research examining the effectiveness of surgical and rehabilitation interventions. However, the assessment of displacement remains subjective without well-described or validated measurement methods. The aim of this study was to assess inter- and intrarater reliability of ankle fracture displacement radiographic measures and select measurement thresholds that differentiate displaced and acceptably reduced fractures.Methods:Eight fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeons evaluated a set of 26 postoperative ankle fracture radiographs on 2 occasions. Surgeons followed standardized instructions for making 5 measurements: coronal displacement (3) talar tilt (1), and sagittal displacement (1). Inter- and intraobserver interclass correlations were determined by random effects regression models. Logistic regression was used to determine the optimal sensitivity and specificity for the measurements with the highest correlation.Results:Three of the 5 measures had excellent interobserver reliability (correlation coefficient> 0.75): (1) coronal plane distance between the lateral border of tibia and lateral border of talus, (2) coronal plane talar tilt, and (3) sagittal plane displacement. The threshold that best discriminated displaced from well-aligned fractures was 2 mm for coronal plane distance (sensitivity 82.1%, specificity 85.4%), 3 degrees for talar tilt (sensitivity 80.4%, specificity 82.2%), and 5 mm for sagittal plane distance (sensitivity 83.9%, specificity 84.9%).Conclusion:This study identified 3 reliable measures of ankle fracture displacement and determined optimal thresholds for discriminating between displaced and acceptably reduced fractures. These measurement criteria can be used for the design and conduct of clinical research studying the impact of surgical treatment and rehabilitation interventions.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T07:09:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221106471
       
  • Pain Catastrophizing Scale Associated With Other Patient-Reported Outcome
           Measures in Plantar Fasciitis and Chronic Ankle Instability Patients

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      Authors: Nicholas A. Baxter, Caroline Hoch, Jared J. Reid, Daniel J. Scott, Christopher E. Gross
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) is a measure of how patients emotionally respond to pain. It is composed of 3 subscales—rumination, magnification, and helplessness—which address intrusive thoughts of pain, expectations of negative outcomes, and inability to cope with pain. Our purpose is to compare baseline PCS scores with other baseline patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in patients with plantar fasciitis (PF) or chronic ankle instability (CAI).Methods:We retrospectively reviewed 201 patients who reported at least 1 pretreatment PCS subscore and were diagnosed with PF or CAI between 2015 and 2020 in a single fellowship-trained foot and ankle surgeon’s clinic. Demographics, comorbidities, treatments, other baseline PROMs (i.e., visual analog scale [VAS], Pain Disability Index [PDI], 12-Item Short Form Survey [SF-12], 8-Item Somatic Symptom Scale [SSS-8]), and postoperative outcomes were recorded.Results:The PCS total score and its subscores significantly correlated with the total score and/or subscores of each PROM. Higher PCS total score significantly correlated with worse VAS (P
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T05:34:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221106472
       
  • Augmenting Osteochondral Autograft Transplantation and Bone Marrow
           Aspirate Concentrate with Particulate Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Is
           Associated With Improved Outcomes

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      Authors: Mark C. Drakos, Oliver B. Hansen, Stephanie K. Eble, Saanchi Kukadia, Taylor N. Cabe, Prashanth Kumar, Karan A. Patel, Carolyn M. Sofka, Jonathan T. Deland
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Osteochondral autograft transplant (OAT) is often used to treat large osteochondral lesions of the talus and is generally associated with good outcomes. The addition of adjuncts such as cartilage extracellular matrix with bone marrow aspirate concentrate (ECM-BMAC) may further improve the OAT procedure but have not been thoroughly studied.Hypothesis/Purpose:We hypothesized that the placement of ECM-BMAC around the OAT graft would improve radiographic and patient-reported outcomes following OAT.Methods:Patients who received OAT, with ECM-BMAC or BMAC alone, were screened and their charts were reviewed. For patients who did receive ECM-BMAC, the mixture was spread around the edges of the OAT plug and into any surrounding areas of cartilage damage. Survey and radiographic data were collected. Average follow-up in both groups was over 2 years. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were scored using the Magnetic Resonance Observation of Cartilage Tissue (MOCART) system. Outcomes were compared statistically between groups.Results:Patients treated with ECM-BMAC (n = 34) demonstrated significantly greater improvement of scores in the FAOS categories Symptoms (17 vs −3; P = .02) and Sports Activities (40 vs 7; P = .02), and the MOCART category Subchondral Lamina (P = .008) compared to those treated with BMAC alone (n = 30). They also experienced significantly lower rates of postoperative cysts (53% vs 18%, P = .04) and edema (94% vs 59%, P = .02).Conclusion:The addition of ECM-BMAC to OAT was associated with improved imaging and clinical outcomes compared to OAT with BMAC alone.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T05:33:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221104069
       
  • Supramalleolar Osteotomy for Ankle Varus Deformity Alters Subtalar Joint
           Alignment

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      Authors: Arne Burssens, Roman Susdorf, Nicola Krähenbühl, Ursina Peterhans, Roxa Ruiz, Alexej Barg, Beat Hintermann
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Although correction of ankle and hindfoot deformity after supramalleolar osteotomy has been investigated extensively, the specific effect on the subtalar joint alignment remains elusive. This can be attributed to the limitations of 2-dimensional measurements, which impede an exact quantification of the 3-dimensional subtalar joint alignment. Therefore, we determined both the ankle, hindfoot, and subtalar joint alignment before and after supramalleolar osteotomy using autogenerated 3-dimensional measurements based on weightbearing CT imaging.Methods:Twenty-nine patients with a mean age of 50.4±10.6 years were retrospectively analyzed in a pre-post study design using weightbearing CT. Inclusion criteria were correction of ankle varus deformity by an opening wedge (n = 22) or dome osteotomy (n = 7). Exclusion criteria consisted of an additional inframalleolar arthrodesis or osteotomy. Corresponding 3-dimensional bone models were reconstructed to compute following autogenerated measurements of the ankle- and hindfoot alignment: tibial anterior surface (TAS), tibiotalar surface (TTS), talar tilt (TT) angle, hindfoot angle (HA). In addition, the talocalcaneal angle (TCA) in the axial (TCAax), sagittal (TCAsag), and coronal (TCAcor) plane were measured to assess the subtalar joint alignment.Results:The preoperative radiographic parameters of the ankle joint alignment (TAS=88±4 degrees, TTS=82±7 degrees, TT=5.8±4.9 degrees) improved significantly relative to their postoperative equivalents (TAS = 93±5 degrees, TTS = 88±7 degrees, TT=4.2±4.5 degrees; P < .05). The following radiographic parameters of the hindfoot and subtalar joint alignment improved significantly from preoperatively (8.7±8.9 degrees, TCAax = 41±10 degrees, TCAsag = 48±10 degrees) to postoperatively (HA=4.5±8.6 degrees, TCAax = 38±9 degrees, TCAsag = 44±11 degrees; P < .05). No significant differences could be detected in the coronal plane alignment of the subtalar joint (TCAcor) pre- compared to postoperatively (P> .05).Conclusion:This study quantified the 3-dimensional ankle, hindfoot, and subtalar joint alignment after a solitary supramalleolar osteotomy. We found alterations in the subtalar joint alignment, which occurred by 2 to 3 degrees in each anatomic plane. However, before recommendations can be given related to inframalleolar procedures in conjunction to supramalleolar osteotomies, further studies on the variation of subtalar joint alignment change are needed.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T05:53:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221108097
       
  • Long-term Follow-up of 254 Ceramic Coated Implant (CCI) Evolution Total
           Ankle Replacements

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      Authors: Laurian J. M. van Es, Laurens W. van der Plaat, Inger N. Sierevelt, Daniel Hoornenborg, Daniel Haverkamp
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The ceramic coated implant (CCI) Evolution was a third-generation implant design used in approximately 2000 total ankle replacements (TARs) between 2003 and 2016. Because this implant was abandoned, long-term follow-up studies are lacking.Methods:All patients undergoing TAR using a CCI prosthesis between 2004 and 2012 were included for analysis. Preoperatively the tibiotalar alignment was measured, and postoperatively the patients were followed up clinically, with radiographs and by questionnaire. The primary outcome was implant survival at 10 years of follow-up. Implant survival was also compared for (1) inflammatory joint disease vs noninflammatory joint disease and (2) preoperative tibiotalar neutral vs varus or valgus alignment. The secondary outcomes were complications, reoperations, and function (assessed by patient-reported outcome measures).Results:Two hundred fifty-four TARs were performed in 237 patients. Two hundred twelve additional procedures were performed to achieve stable ankles. At 10-year follow-up, the survival was 67.5%, with an average time to revision of 4.5 years. The 10-year survival of the inflammatory joint disease group was 76.8% and of the noninflammatory joint group 63.1% (P = .44). In 248 TARs, the preoperative tibiotalar alignment was measured; (62% neutral, 25% varus, and 13% valgus), these showed 10-year survival rates of 74.7%, 48.2%, and 68.9% respectively (P = .07). The complication rate was 54%; 37% of patients underwent reoperation. At a mean of 8.5 years, postoperative satisfaction scored an average of 7.0 (SD 2.26) on a 0- to 10-point numeric rating scale. The mean Foot and Ankle Ability Measure sports subscore was 24.7, the mean Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) sports subscore was 42.8, and the mean 36-Item Short Form Health Survey score was 40.0. Regarding daily activities, the mean FAOS was 81.0.Conclusion:This is currently the sole study reporting the long-term results of the CCI prosthesis. The survival and functional outcomes were inferior to other third-generation mobile-bearing ankle implants.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T05:51:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221108084
       
  • Incidence of Lateral Prominence Pain Following Open Medial Displacement
           Calcaneal Osteotomy and the Efficacy of Crushplasty as a Preventive
           Technique

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      Authors: Jaeyoung Kim, Chul-Ho Kim, Jonathan Day, Jesse Seilern und Aspang, Lavan Rajan, Prashanth Kumar
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:There has been concern about lateral prominence pain at the osteotomy site following medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy (MDCO). However, no study has investigated this complication. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of lateral prominence pain following MDCO and examine the efficacy of crushplasty as a surgical technique to minimize this complication.Methods:This was a retrospective cohort study in which 137 patients (148 feet) who underwent MDCO were divided into 2 groups by whether they had concurrent crushplasty at the time of MDCO (crushplasty [n = 81] vs noncrushplasty group [n = 67]). Crushplasty was performed by flattening the bony step-off using a rongeur and bone impactor. Lateral prominence pain was defined as pain or irritating symptoms over the osteotomy site that persisted over 12 months after MDCO. The overall incidence of lateral prominence pain after MDCO and within each group was investigated. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the influence of possible risk factors on the development of postoperative lateral prominence pain.Results:The overall incidence of lateral prominence pain was 9.5% (14 of 148): 3.4% (3 of 87) in the crushplasty group, and 18% (11 of 61) in the noncrushplasty group, and χ2 analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between crushplasty and lateral prominence pain (P < .05). A relationship between the amount of medial displacement and the development of lateral prominence pain was observed in the noncrushplasty group (OR = 5.31, 95% CI 2.35-16.4, P < .05), but this was not observed in the crushplasty group (P = .641). The amount of medial displacement was an independent risk factor for the development of lateral prominence pain (OR = 2.72, 95% CI 1.54-4.79, P < .05), and concurrent crushplasty had a negative relationship with lateral prominence pain development (OR = 0.12, 95% CI 0.03-0.57, P < .05).Conclusion:This study revealed that lateral prominence pain is a significant complication of MDCO, especially in the setting of a larger displacement. The crushplasty following MDCO may minimize this complication, particularly when a greater degree of hindfoot correction is attempted.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-02T06:09:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221108098
       
  • Efficacy of Postoperative Oral Antibiotics in Foot and Ankle Surgery

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      Authors: Robert M. Frederick, Hannah Burnette, Myles Joyce, Padam Kumar, Trevor McGee, Chi-Yang Chiu, Clayton C. Bettin, Benjamin J. Grear, G. Andrew Murphy, David R. Richardson
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Preoperative oral antibiotic use in patients undergoing foot and ankle surgery is standard practice, but no consensus has been reached regarding the efficacy of postoperative oral antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to determine whether postoperative oral antibiotics reduce the rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) in patients, with and without comorbidities, undergoing foot and ankle surgery.Methods:A retrospective chart review was conducted identifying patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery by 4 fellowship-trained, foot and ankle orthopaedic surgeons between January 1, 2015, and January 1, 2019. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those who received postoperative oral antibiotics (group 1) and those who did not (group 2). Two surgeons routinely prescribed postoperative oral antibiotics, and 2 did not. Demographics, comorbidities, and procedure complexity based on surgical site and Current Procedural Terminology code were recorded from the charts. The primary outcome was postoperative infection (superficial or deep) within 6 months after surgery. Patients with antibiotic use prior to surgery, preoperative infection, or lack of follow-up>6 weeks were excluded. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was used to analyze differences in infection rate and severity.Results:Chart review identified 3631 patients, 1227 of whom did not receive postoperative oral antibiotics whereas 2394 patients did. Routine postoperative oral antibiotic use did not significantly affect postoperative infection rates or severity. However, all covariates studied (diabetes, hypertension, obesity, tobacco use, alcohol use, rheumatoid conditions, and age) influenced postoperative infection rates and severity.Conclusion:The results of this study indicate that postoperative oral antibiotics are not associated with differences in infection rates or severity. We do not recommend routine use in foot and ankle surgery.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-02T06:07:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221099929
       
  • Comparison Between Closed Suction Drainage and No Drainage Following Total
           Ankle Arthroplasty

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      Authors: Tara Gaston Moncman, Brian Fliegel, Joseph Massaglia, Steven M. Raikin, Joseph T. O’Neil, David I. Pedowitz, Joseph N. Daniel
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The purpose of this study is to determine whether the use of closed suction drains after total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is associated with lower wound complications in the first postoperative year as compared to no drain usage.Methods:A total of 324 TAA were reviewed and included for analysis. One hundred forty-four did not have a postoperative drain placed, whereas 180 did have a postoperative drain. Demographic data, including age, sex, tobacco or alcohol use, and various medical comorbidities, were obtained. Follow-up data were collected and reviewed at 2, 6, and 12 weeks; 6 months; and 1 year postoperatively for minor and major wound complications, as well as wound-related reoperations.Results:At the 2-week mark, the use of a drain demonstrated a significant increase in wound complications. No significant difference in wound complications was found at each subsequent follow-up visit. Within the first postoperative year, a total of 46 patients (31.9%) without drains and 69 patients (38.3%) with drains had a wound complication. This was not statistically significant. Most wound complications were minor, and no significant difference in reoperation rates occurred between the 2 groups.Conclusion:A postoperative closed suction drain may increase wound complications in the first 2 weeks after TAA and should therefore be used with caution.Level of Evidence:Level III, retrospective comparative study.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T11:46:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221099197
       
  • Radiographic Cutoff Values for Predicting Lateral Bony Impingement in
           Progressive Collapsing Foot Deformity

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      Authors: Jaeyoung Kim, Lavan Rajan, Robert Fuller, Carolyn Sofka, Agnes Cororaton, Constantine Demetracopoulos, Scott Ellis, Jonathan Deland
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Lateral bony impingement is a major cause of lateral foot pain in progressive collapsing foot deformity (PCFD). Weightbearing computed tomography (WBCT) provides better sensitivity than standard radiographs for detecting impingement. However, many orthopaedic centers have not yet acquired WBCT imaging. This study aimed to (1) investigate the correlation of common radiographic parameters measured on standard weightbearing radiographs with talocalcaneal and calcaneofibular distance assessed with WBCT and (2) establish radiographic cutoff values to detect bony impingement as identified on WBCT.Methods:Ninety-one patients treated for PCFD with standard preoperative radiographs and WBCT were identified. Patients with asymmetric ankle arthritis (talar tilt>2 degrees) were excluded. The talocalcaneal distance at the sinus tarsi and calcaneofibular distance were measured in multiplanar reconstructed WBCT images. Impingement was defined as direct abutment between bones. The relationships between WBCT measurements and 4 common parameters (talonavicular coverage angle [TNC], talo–first metatarsal angle, calcaneal pitch, and hindfoot moment arm [HMA]) in standard radiographs were assessed with Pearson correlations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis evaluated the ability of radiographic cutoffs to detect sinus tarsi or calcaneofibular bony impingement, and the area under curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value (PPV) were calculated.Results:Talocalcaneal distance narrowing at the sinus tarsi strongly correlated with TNC (r = 0.64, P < .001), and the calcaneofibular distance narrowing correlated with the HMA moderately yet best among the parameters (r = 0.55, P < .001). TNC (AUC = 0.837, 95% CI 0.745-0.906) and HMA (AUC=0.959, 95% CI 0.895-0.989) provided the best predictive ability for sinus tarsi and calcaneofibular bony impingement, respectively. A TNC threshold of 41.2 degrees had a 100% PPV for predicting sinus tarsi impingement, whereas an HMA threshold of 38.1 mm had a 100% PPV for calcaneofibular impingement.Conclusion:This study provides evidence that TNC and HMA measurements made on standing radiographs could be used to indicate potential lateral bony impingement in PCFD. Narrowing of talocalcaneal distance best correlated with abduction deformity of the foot, and the narrowing of calcaneofibular distance was best correlated with valgus hindfoot deformity.Level of Evidence:Level III, case control study.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T12:37:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221099010
       
  • Disability and Quality of Life After Talectomy for Arthrogryposis
           Multiplex Congenita

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      Authors: Ahmet Sevencan, Ahmet Akdogan, Hanifi Ucpunar, Osman Nuri Ozyalvac, Evren Akpinar, Avni Ilhan Bayhan
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is one of the causes of rigid and resistant clubfoot. Talectomy is considered as a primary or salvage procedure for recurrent equinovarus deformity in these patients. We conducted this study to assess patients with AMC who underwent talectomy for the correction of foot and ankle deformities in terms of health-related quality of life and disability.Methods:Patients under 10 years of age with a primary diagnosis of AMC who underwent talectomy and attended follow-up for at least 5 years were included in this study. We also formed an age- and gender-matched control group consisting of 20 individuals without any foot-ankle problem in order to compare the measurements between the AMC and healthy groups. Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire (OxAFQ) was administered as a health-related quality of life instrument to objectively measure the disability of the pediatric patients.Results:Twenty patients (10 girls, 10 boys) who underwent a total of 35 talectomy operations with an average follow-up of 7.2 years and a control group of 20 similarly aged unaffected children were included in the study. The mean OxAFQ scores were significantly lower in the AMC group than in the controls for all domains (physical, emotional, and school and play), especially for the one concerning satisfaction with footwear The presence of plantigrade foot and absence of forefoot supination were significantly associated with the physical and footwear domains of the OxAFQ scores. The presence of hindfoot varus, midfoot adductus, dorsal bunion, and having less than 10 degrees of dorsiflexion had no effect on the OxAFQ scores.Conclusion:In this study, we found that the major driving factors for satisfaction after talectomy for AMC were plantigrade foot and absence of forefoot supination. The mean OxAFQ scores were universally lower in the AMC group than controls. Finding comfortable footwear is a major concern for the AMC patients.Level of Evidence:Level III, retrospective cohort study.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T01:28:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221104076
       
  • Malignant Tumors of the Foot and Ankle

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      Authors: Mustafa Onur Karaca, Kerem Başarır, Abdullah Merter, Erdinç Acar, Emre Anıl Özbek, Mustafa Özyıldıran, Hüseyin Yusuf Yıldız
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Surgical treatment is usually required for malignant foot and ankle tumors. In this study, we sought to review factors in treatment that may be associated with morbidity and mortality.Methods:All malignant foot and ankle tumors at our institution between April 1988 and April 2018 were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical modalities used and clinical outcomes of patients according to the anatomic location (Kirby zone) and clinical stage (Enneking system) of each tumor were described. Extent of surgical resection required, recurrence, and death rates were assessed.Results:Between April 1988 and April 2018, 80 patients with malignant tumors of the foot and ankle were treated at out institution. Mean age of patients was 42.6 (range, 3-89) years. Mean follow-up was 30.2 months (range, 24-120). Tumors were primary in 75 patients (94%) and metastatic from another organ in 5 patients (6%). Tumors originated from bone in 18 patients (22%) and from soft tissue in 63 patients (78%). Synovial sarcoma was the most common soft tissue tumor, and osteosarcoma was the most common osseous tumor.All patients had surgery to resect their tumor. Twenty-one (26%) had unplanned surgical procedures without initial biopsy at an outside institution prior to referral. Those patients were more likely to be treated with amputation or wide excison and free flap surgery (P < .01). The recurrence rate was 50% for the unplanned surgery group and 22% for the planned surgery group. Mortality rate was 10% for the unplanned group and 6% for the planned group. The recurrence and mortality rate was higher in the unplanned group (P = .03).Conclusion:Our study suggests that unplanned initial surgeries are associated with higher recurrence and mortality rates and reinforces the notion that these patients should be referred for treatment at a center with specialized expertise in tumor management.Level of Evidence:Level III, IV – retrospective case series.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T11:08:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221097654
       
  • Outcomes of Percutaneous Achilles Repair Compared With Endoscopic Flexor
           Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfer to Treat Achilles Tendon Ruptures

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      Authors: Nasef Mohamed N. Abdelatif, Jorge Pablo Batista
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Both percutaneous and endoscopically assisted methods are reported to produce good results in the surgical management of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare between a percutaneous method and a recently described isolated endoscopically assisted flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfer method as surgical means of management in patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures.Methods:One hundred seventeen patients were included in the current study and divided into 2 groups: 59 patients who underwent percutaneous Achilles repair (PAR Group) and 58 patients who underwent isolated endoscopic FHL transfer (FHL Group) were compared. Patients were clinically evaluated using American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score, Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), and Achilles tendon resting angle (ATRA) measures. In addition, ankle plantarflexion power, FHL dynamometry, Tegner activity levels, and return to previous levels of activity were also documented for all patients.Results:Nine months after surgery, patients in the FHL transfer group were more likely to be able to return to normal activities (91% vs 73%, P < .01). Thirty months after surgical treatment, we found no difference in ATRS, AOFAS, ATRA, ankle plantarflexion strength, or Tegner activity scores between study groups. Overall complications were reported in 6 patients in the FHL group (10.3%) and in 8 patients in the PAR group (13.6%). No major neurovascular or skin complications were encountered.Conclusion:The current study demonstrated satisfactory and comparable results and complications when comparing isolated endoscopic FHL tendon transfer or percutaneous Achilles tendon repairs in the surgical management of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.Level of Evidence:Level III, retrospective controlled trial.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T07:23:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221096674
       
  • Supramalleolar Osteotomy vs Arthrodesis for the Treatment of Takakura 3B
           Ankle Osteoarthritis

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      Authors: Xin-Quan Yang, Yan Zhang, Qiong Wang, Jing-Qi Liang, Liang Liu, Xiao-Jun Liang, Hong-Mou Zhao
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:To compare the clinical/functional outcomes of supramalleolar osteotomy (SMOT) and ankle arthrodesis (AA) for the treatment of modified Takakura stage 3B ankle osteoarthritis.Methods:Outcomes of 28 SMOT patients and 30 AA patients were reviewed at an average of 50 and 51 months, respectively. The baseline characteristics of the 2 groups were similar. The preoperative tibial articular surface angle and talar tilt angle in the SMOT group were 82.6 and 10 degrees and in the AA group, 83.9 and 9.1 degrees, respectively. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score, visual analog scale (VAS) score, 12-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) mental component summary (MCS) and physical component summary (PCS) scores, range of motion (ROM), radiologic parameters, and complications were compared.Results:The AOFAS, VAS, and SF-12 MCS and PCS scores improved significantly postoperatively in both groups (P < .001). The VAS and SF-12 PCS scores indicate marginally better improvement in the AA group (P < .05). The patient satisfaction value (P = .028) and the possibility of repeated surgery value (P = .012) were also significantly higher in the AA group. The early (P = .905) and late (P = .181) complications did not significantly differ between the 2 groups. The reoperation rate was significantly higher in the SMOT group (P = .038).Conclusion:Both SMOT and AA showed improvements in function, pain, alignment, and quality of life after surgery. Patients in the AA group reported better pain relief, had a lower reoperation rate, and better hindfoot alignment during a short- to mid-term follow-up time.Level of Evidence:Level III, retrospective comparative study.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T05:54:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221099183
       
  • Removal of Broken Tibiotalocalcaneal Nail: Case Report and Technical Tip

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      Authors: Min Gyu Kyung, Gil Young Park, Dong Yeon Lee
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T01:48:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221093576
       
  • Radiofrequency Plantar Fascia Coblation With and Without Gastrocnemius
           Recession in the Management of Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis

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      Authors: Don Thong Siang Koh, William Yeo, Kevin Oon Thien Koo, Nicholas Eng Meng Yeo
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of plantar heel pain. Although most are self-limiting, recalcitrant conditions can be debilitating, significantly reducing patient’s quality of life. A myriad of surgical procedures are available for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis (RPF) with little consensus on best practice. This purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of radiofrequency coblation with and without gastrocnemius release on the surgical management of RPF.Methods:Between June 2013 and June 2019, a total of 128 patients with RPF and tight gastrocnemius were treated surgically. Presence of tight gastrocnemius was assessed clinically by a positive Silfverskiold test. Group A (n = 73) consisted of patients who underwent radiofrequency coblation alone; group B (n = 55) consisted of patients who underwent radiofrequency coblation and endoscopic gastrocnemius recession. The primary outcome measure was visual analog scale (VAS) score. Secondary outcome measures included (1) American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot score; (2) physical (PCS) and mental component summaries (MCS) of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey; (3) overall assessment of improvement, expectation fulfilment, and satisfaction; and (4) complication rates.Results:Both groups reported significant improvement in VAS, AOFAS, and PCS scores postoperatively at 6 and 24 months. Group B (radiofrequency coblation with gastrocnemius recession) was associated with better VAS at both 6 months (3.0 ± 2.9 vs 1.7 ± 2.6, P < .05) and 24 months postoperatively (1.9 ± 3.1 vs 0.8 ± 2.0, P < .05) compared with group A (radiofrequency coblation without gastrocnemius recession). At 24 months postoperatively, no differences were found in AOFAS, PCS, MCS scores, expectation fulfilment, or overall satisfaction. No wound complications were reported in either group. One patient (group B) has persistent symptoms consistent with tarsal tunnel syndrome.Conclusion:In this retrospective cohort comparative study, treatment of RPF with radiofrequency coblation alone was associated with slightly inferior results than radiofrequency coblation combined with endoscopic gastrocnemius recession in terms of pain relief without an increase in complication rates. However, at 2 years, we did not find a significant difference in other measures of outcome.Level of Evidence:Level III, retrospective cohort study.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T01:44:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221091807
       
  • Valgus Second Toe Deformity Treated With a Percutaneous Extracapsular
           Closing-Wedge Osteotomy of the Proximal Phalanx

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      Authors: Robbie Ray, Thomas L. Lewis, Peter Robinson, Paul M. C. Dearden, Thomas A. J. Goff, Clare Watt, Peter Lam
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Coronal and sagittal plane deformities of the lesser toes are common yet challenging to treat. Traditional open releases and translational Weil osteotomies can be unpredictable and lead to postoperative stiffness. We present the results of a percutaneous closing wedge extracapsular osteotomy of the proximal phalanx to treat valgus deformity of the second toe.Methods:Thirty-one patients underwent 40 percutaneous osteotomies at a median age of 58.6±9.4 years. Using a small dorsomedial incision, a percutaneous proximal metaphyseal medial closing-wedge extracapsular osteotomy of the second toe is performed, leaving the dorsolateral cortex intact. An irrigated low-speed, high-torque 2- × 8-mm burr is used under image guidance. The osteotomy is then closed to correct deformity and taped for 2 weeks. Patient-reported outcomes and weightbearing radiographs were obtained.Results:Questionnaire data was available for 89.7% (n=35) of cases. Most cases (91.4%) were either satisfied or extremely satisfied with the procedure. Radiographs were available for 90.0% of osteotomies, with a median length from surgery to radiographic follow-up of 1.6 years (range 0.5-6.3; SD ±1.5). Median second-toe valgus angle (STVA) decreased from 16.2±10.7 degrees to 5.0±7.0 degrees (P < .001) at final follow-up. All osteotomies united with no delayed union. There were no wound complications or infections. We found 2 cases of radiographic recurrence.Conclusion:Percutaneous proximal phalanx base metaphyseal closing wedge extracapsular osteotomies of lesser toes to correct coronal plane deformity is useful adjunct to first-ray corrective surgery and is associated with high levels of patient satisfaction.Level of Evidence:Level IV, retrospective case series
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T01:40:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221095506
       
  • Preoperative Risk Factors for Primary Metatarsophalangeal Arthroplasty
           Revision to MTP Arthrodesis for Hallux Rigidus

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      Authors: Alyssa D. Althoff, Pradip Ramamurti, Corinne Vennitti, Pramod Kamalapathy, Joseph S. Park, Brian C. Werner, Minton T. Cooper
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Revision or conversion to arthrodesis following metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint arthroplasty are salvage procedures to manage complications of MTP joint arthroplasty. The purpose of this study is to use a national administrative database to characterize nationwide trends of patients undergoing hallux MTP arthrodesis vs arthroplasty for hallux rigidus. Additionally, the authors sought to evaluate demographic trends and evaluate influence of patient-related risk factors in those undergoing MTP arthroplasty revision to arthrodesis.Methods:Patients who underwent MTP arthroplasty for diagnosis of hallux rigidus from 2010 to 2019 were identified in the Mariner subset of the PearlDiver database. Patients were included if they had undergone MTP arthroplasty for the diagnosis of hallux rigidus. Notably, the database lacks resolution about critical features of the arthroplasty design and materials. The revision cohort encompassed patients who underwent subsequent ipsilateral MTP arthrodesis or arthroplasty within 2 years of index arthroplasty procedure. Demographic characteristics and medical comorbidities were examined as potential patient-related risk factors for arthroplasty revision or revision to fusion. Univariate analyses were performed to analyze differences in patient demographics, comorbidities, and risk factors. A multivariate regression analysis was subsequently conducted to control for confounding variables.Results:2750 patients underwent primary MTP arthroplasty for diagnosis of hallux rigidus. Of these, 44 (1.6%) underwent revision arthroplasty and 188 patients (6.8%) were revised to arthrodesis within the first 2 years after the index procedure. Multivariate regression analysis indicates that obesity (odds ratio [OR] 1.48, 95% CI 1.05-2.09), depression (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.15-2.20), and steroid use (OR 2.94, 95% CI 1.30-6.65) were associated with a statistically significant increase in revision to arthrodesis from primary arthroplasty.Conclusion:Revision arthrodesis following primary MTP arthroplasty for hallux rigidus within 2 years was found to be a relatively common occurrence in this national insurance database study. Risk factors for revision arthroplasty to arthrodesis within 2 years of primary arthroplasty include obesity, depression, and steroid use.Level of Evidence:Level III, case-control study.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T10:30:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221094837
       
  • Treatment of Infected Nonunions With Bone Defects Using Autologous Bone
           Graft and Absorbable Antibiotic-Loaded Calcium Sulfate–Hydroxyapatite
           Paste

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      Authors: Theodore Howard, Ines Reichert, Jasdeep Giddie, Raju Ahluwalia
      First page: 1007
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Revision surgery in the presence of infection carries high risks. We describe our results using a new technique to treat these challenging problems. We treated infected nonunions with cavitary voids with adjuvant antibiotic loaded calcium sulfate–hydroxyapatite paste composite and autologous bone graft (ABG) layer technique coupled with stable fixation.Methods:Thirty consecutive patients who underwent revision foot and ankle surgery for an infected nonunion were prospectively studied. Following multidisciplinary team workup, surgical debridement and biopsies were undertaken. Bone voids were measured and classified according to containment and size. ABG was mixed and layered with an adjuvant antibiotic-loaded calcium sulfate–hydroxyapatite paste followed by surgical reconstruction including arthrodesis and fixation. Empirical and pathogen-specific antibiotics were instituted until intraoperative sample-specific antibiotics were identified and used. Patients were prospectively followed up for a minimum of 1 year.Results:The male-female ratio was 16:14, mean age was 51.3 years, and 23.3% smoked at definitive surgery. Void volume was 2 cm3 (n=8). No patients either were lost to follow-up or had a further infective episode at a mean of 38.3 months; 86.7% united with fusion on imaging. Four patients had radiographic evidence of nonunion; 3 were asymptomatic and 1 required revision surgery (void>2 cm3). Independent ambulation was achieved at an average of 12 weeks, at 1 year mean American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society score was 77.7 (SD 9.59), and the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire reached an effect size>0.5 in all domains at 1 year following surgery. The union rate was independent of smoking status and vitamin D deficiency (P = .94).Conclusion:Layered autologous bone grafting with adjuvant antibiotic-loaded calcium sulfate–hydroxyapatite paste has been shown to be effective and safe in revision arthrodesis, with low comorbidities in void gaps without infection recurrence.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T09:50:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221094013
       
  • Midterm Outcomes of Sliding Distal Metatarsal Minimally Invasive Osteotomy
           to Treat Bunionette Deformity

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      Authors: Jorge Javier Del Vecchio, Mauricio Esteban Ghioldi, Eric Daniel Dealbera, Lucas Nicolás Chemes, Nasef Mohamed N. Abdelatif, Miki Dalmau-Pastor
      First page: 1022
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Bunionette deformity is described as a painful bony prominence on the lateral aspect of the fifth metatarsal head. The present study prospectively assessed the clinical, functional, and radiographic outcomes of sliding distal metatarsal minimally invasive osteotomy (S-DMMO) used in a large series of patients with a midterm follow-up period.Methods:From December 2015 to December 2018, we evaluated 74 feet (57 patients). Radiologic (4-to-5 intermetatarsal angle, fifth metatarsophalangeal angle, the fifth metatarsal head width, lateral deviation angle, fifth metatarsal length, medial displacement, and elevation), clinician-reported scores (AOFAS score, visual analog scale [VAS]) and patient-reported outcomes measure (Foot and Ankle Ability Measure [FAAM] activities of daily living [ADL], FAAM sports, Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire [MOXFQ], and patient satisfaction survey) were included in the analysis. The time to bone union was also assessed.Results:The average 4-to-5 intermetatarsal angle improved from 11.1 degrees preoperatively to 4.5 degrees postoperatively (P < .001), whereas the average fifth metatarsophalangeal angle improved from 15.7 degrees preoperatively to 4.8 degrees postoperatively (P < .001). The lateral deviation angle was found to be 2.2 degrees. The fifth metatarsal length decreased from 66.6 to 64.3 mm postoperatively. The average initial medial displacement was 4.67 mm preoperatively and 4.54 mm at final follow-up. The elevation of the fifth metatarsal head was 1.08 mm. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society score improved from 54.3 ± 20.86 points preoperatively to 93.4 ± 17.3 (P < .001). VAS score decreased from 7.9 to 0.7 (P < .001). Also, FAAM ALD, FAAM Sport, and MOXFQ showed statistically significant differences (P < .001) between preoperative and postoperative periods. Patients found the procedure excellent in 89.1% of cases, very good in 5.4%, and good in 5.4%. Bone union was obtained at 8.1 weeks.Conclusion:The most important finding of the present study is that S-DMMO showed improvement in function and pain associated with a high satisfaction rate. Also, we found substantial capacity to correct deformities and a low incidence of complications.Level of Evidence:Level IV, case series.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T10:24:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221093367
       
  • Reliability of Fifth Metatarsal Base Fracture Classifications and Current
           Management

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      Authors: Max P. Michalski, Eitan M. Ingall, John Y. Kwon, Christopher P. Chiodo
      First page: 1034
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Classification of fifth metatarsal base fractures has been a source of confusion since originally described by Jones in 1902. Zone classifications have been described but never evaluated for reliability. The most recent classification, metaphyseal vs meta-diaphyseal, may be unknown to many surgeons. The purpose of this study was to evaluate reliability of American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) members classifying fifth metatarsal base fractures and current management of these fractures.Methods:A survey was emailed to AOFAS members including radiographs of 18 fifth metatarsal base fractures. Demographic information was collected in addition to evaluation of the radiographs. Interrater reliability was assessed for each measurement: presence of Jones fracture, zone classification, and metaphyseal vs metaphyseal-diaphyseal, using Fleiss kappa. After 3 weeks, a second email was sent to the members asking to retake the survey to evaluate intrarater reliability. Respondents were asked which region is a Jones fracture, which classification is used, if symptomatic zone 2 and 3 fractures are treated similarly, and what fractures are operative in healthy symptomatic acute fractures.Results:A total of 223 AOFAS members, with a median time in practice of 12 years (range 0-50), completed the initial survey. Eighty members (36%) repeated the survey for intrarater comparison. Interrater reliability was moderate for Jones and zone classification but substantial for the 2-zone metaphyseal/meta-diaphyseal classification. The median intrarater kappa was 0.78, 0.75, and 0.78 for Jones, zone, and metaphyseal/meta-diaphyseal respectively. Seventy percent of respondents treat zones 2 and 3 similarly, and approximately 60% consider an acute symptomatic fracture identified as Jones, zone 2 or zone 3 operative.Conclusion:A 2-zone system may be the best available classification for fifth metatarsal base fractures given high interrater reliability and 70% of AOFAS members treat zones 2 and 3 in similar fashion.Level of Evidence:Level III, diagnostic study.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:08:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221092755
       
  • Coronal Plane Rotation of the Medial Column in Hallux Valgus: A
           Retrospective Case-Control Study

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      Authors: Matthieu Lalevée, Nacime Salomao Barbachan Mansur, Kevin Dibbern, Hunter Briggs, Connor J. Maly, Kepler Alencar Mendes de Carvalho, François Lintz, Cesar de Cesar Netto
      First page: 1041
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:We previously reported an increase in pronation of the first metatarsal (M1) head relative to the ground in hallux valgus (HV) patients compared to controls. Still, the origin and location of this hyperpronation along the medial column is unknown. Recent studies showed that presence of progressive collapsing foot deformities (PCFDs), which is a condition frequently associated with HV, can strongly influence the medial column coronal plane alignment. The objective of this study was to assess the coronal rotation of the medial column bones in HV feet, HV feet with radiologic markers of PCFD, and controls. We hypothesized that hyperpronation in HV will originate from a combination of M1 intrinsic torsion and first tarsometatarsal joint malposition.Methods:The same cohort of 36 HV and 20 controls matched on age, gender, and body mass index was used. Previously, a validation of the measurements was carried out through a cadaveric study. Using these metrics, we assessed the coronal plane rotation of the navicular, medial cuneiform, and the M1 at its base and head with respect to the ground using weightbearing CT images. We measured the Meary angle and the calcaneal moment arm in our 36 HV subjects. We subdivided our cohort into an HV group and a potential PCFD HV group according to these measurements. Comparisons on medial column bones coronal rotation were performed between HV, PCFD HV, and control groups.Results:Twenty-two HV cases were included in the HV group and 14 in the PCFD HV group. Both groups presented an increase in pronation of the first metatarsal head relative to the ground when compared to the control group (P < .001). Comparing HV and controls showed an 8.3 degrees increase in pronation of M1 intrinsic torsion (P < .001) and a 4.7 degrees pronated malposition of the first tarsometatarsal joint (P = .02) in HV. A 9.7 degrees supinated malposition of the first naviculocuneiform joint (P < .001) was also observed in HV. Comparing PCFD HV and controls showed a significant increase in pronation of the navicular (respectively, 17.2 ± 5.4 and 12.3 ± 3.4 degrees, P = .007) and a 5.5 degrees increase in pronation of M1 intrinsic torsion (P = .02) in PCFD HV, without malposition of the first tarsometatarsal and naviculocuneiform joints.Conclusion:Hyperpronation of the M1 head relative to the ground originated from both increases in pronation of M1 intrinsic torsion and first tarsometatarsal joint malposition in HV, although partially counterbalanced by a supinated malposition of the first naviculocuneiform joint. On the other hand, PCFD HV patients showed a generalized pronated position throughout the medial column from the navicular to the M1 head and may be related to the midfoot and hindfoot deformities frequently present in PCFD.Level of Evidence:Level III, retrospective comparative study.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T06:56:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221091810
       
  • A Case-Control Study of 3D vs 2D Weightbearing CT Measurements of the
           M1-M2 Intermetatarsal Angle in Hallux Valgus

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      Authors: Jonathan Day, Cesar de Cesar Netto, Arne Burssens, Alessio Bernasconi, Celine Fernando, Francois Lintz
      First page: 1049
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Weightbearing computed tomography (WBCT) 3-dimensional measurements may be reliable in assessing hallux valgus (HV). The objective of this study was to compare 2D and 3D WBCT measurements of the M1-M2 intermetatarsal angle (IMA) in patients with HV and in healthy controls. We hypothesized that 2D and 3D IMA measurements would correlate and have similar reliability in both HV and controls.Methods:Retrospective multicenter comparative study included WBCT scans from 83 feet (41 HV, 42 controls). IMA was measured on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR-IMA). 3D angle (3D-IMA) and its projection on the weightbearing plane (2D-IMA) were calculated from 3D coordinates of the first and second metatarsals. Intraobserver reliability and intermethod correlations were calculated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs).Results:Intraobserver reliability was very strong for DRR-IMA (0.95) and 3D-IMA (0.99). Intermethod correlation between the 3 modalities in HV patients ranged from moderate (DRR vs 2D, 0.48; DRR vs 3D, 0.48) to very strong (2D vs 3D, 0.91). Similarly, intermethod correlation in the control group ranged from moderate (DRR vs 2D, 0.56; DRR vs 3D, 0.60) to very strong (2D vs 3D, 0.92).Conclusion:Measurements for IMA are similar using DRR, 3D and 2D projected angles, with very strong intraobserver reliability and moderate to very strong intermethod correlations. This is the first head-to-head comparison between these measurement modalities in HV. Further investigations are warranted before formulating guidelines for the clinical use of 3D angles.Level of Evidence:Level III, case-control study.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:01:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221091812
       
  • Relationship Between Preoperative PROMIS Scores and Postoperative Outcomes
           in Hallux Rigidus Patients Undergoing Cheilectomy

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      Authors: Lavan Rajan, Matthew Conti, Agnes Cororaton, Robert Fuller, Scott J. Ellis
      First page: 1053
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Previous studies have demonstrated that preoperative patient-reported outcome measures are associated with postoperative outcomes in foot and ankle surgery, and also in specific procedures such as bunionectomy, flatfoot reconstruction, and total ankle replacement. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if preoperative Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) physical function, pain interference, pain intensity, and depression scores were associated with the ability of patients undergoing cheilectomy for hallux rigidus to achieve a minimal clinically important difference (MCID) of improvement.Methods:This retrospective study included preoperative and ≥2-year postoperative PROMIS physical function, pain interference, pain intensity, and depression scores for 125 feet in 118 patients undergoing cheilectomy collected from an institutional review board (IRB)–approved foot and ankle registry database. MCIDs were established using distribution-based methods to determine clinical significance of improvements in PROMIS scores. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under the curve analyses were used to determine which preoperative PROMIS scores were associated with patients meeting the MCID.Results:ROC analysis found statistically significant areas under the curve (AUCs) for the physical function domain (AUC 0.71), pain intensity (AUC 0.70), and depression (AUC 0.79) PROMIS domains. Subsequent analyses were unable to identify clinically useful 95% sensitivity and specificity preoperative thresholds, with the exception of the 95% sensitivity PROMIS physical function threshold. A preoperative physical function score of greater than 53.2 resulted in a 63% probability of achieving the MCID. The pain interference PROMIS domain did not demonstrate a statistically significant AUC.Conclusion:Preoperative PROMIS physical function, pain interference, pain intensity, and depression scores are minimally associated with preoperative to 2-year postoperative improvement in patients undergoing cheilectomy. It may be difficult to determine which patients improve from a cheilectomy based on the severity of symptoms they exhibit preoperatively.Level of Evidence:Level IV, retrospective case series.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T09:41:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221088822
       
  • Midterm Outcomes of Talocalcaneal Coalition Arthroscopic Resection in
           Adults

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      Authors: Anhong Wang, Linxin Chen, Yanbin Pi, Feng Zhao, Xing Xie, Chen Jiao, Yuelin Hu, Dong Jiang, Qinwei Guo
      First page: 1062
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Arthroscopic resection of the talocalcaneal coalition (TCC) has been reported to be associated with good short-term outcomes. However, the midterm outcomes of this approach remain uncertain.Methods:We performed a retrospective study of patients who underwent arthroscopic resection for symptomatic TCC. The patients were divided into 2 groups (group P, patients with isolated posterior facet coalition; and group MP, patients with both middle and posterior facet coalition). The preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) scores for pain and American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale scores were calculated. The postoperative AOFAS and VAS scores between the 2 groups were analyzed. Patient satisfaction was also assessed.Results:Thirty-two patients were included in this study. The mean age at the time of surgery was 26.0±8.5 years, and the mean follow-up period was 56.9±18.0 months. Thirteen (41%) patients were in group P, whereas 19 (59%) patients were in group MP. Postoperative VAS and AOFAS scores improved more significantly than preoperative scores. At the final follow-up, excellent and good subjective outcomes were attained in 26 patients (81%), fair and poor outcomes in 6 patients (19%). There were no statistical differences in the postoperative AOFAS (91.0±7.0 vs 85.8±10.8, P = .532) and VAS score (2.1±1.7 vs 4.0±2.6, P = .537) between patients with the ratio of coalition/posterior facet more than or less than 50%. There were no statistical differences in postoperative VAS score (1.8±1.3 vs 2.6±2.2, P = .236) and AOFAS score (92.5±5.6 vs 89.2±8.7, P = .297) between group P (n=13) and group MP (n=19), either. Three patients (9.4%) had complications, including these notable findings: 1 patient complained of restricted dorsal flexion, 1 with computed tomography–proven coalition recurrence, and 1 with partial tibial nerve injury.Conclusion:We found that TCC arthroscopic resection was generally associated with reasonable outcomes at midterm follow-up.Level of Evidence:Level IV, case series.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T04:53:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221092756
       
  • Supramalleolar Lateral Opening-Wedge Osteotomy in Conjunction With
           Progressive Collapsing Foot Deformity Reconstruction for PCFD With Ankle
           Instability

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      Authors: Naoki Haraguchi, Kota Asano, Tatsuya Arimoto, Hisateru Niki, Koki Ota, Takuma Ozeki, Masaki Gibu, Yoshihiko Kanetake, Atsushi Tsutaya
      First page: 1070
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Reconstruction of progressive collapsing foot deformity (PCFD) with ankle instability (PCFD class E) remains a substantial challenge to orthopaedic surgeons. We report the outcomes of PCFD class E treated by means of a relatively standard PCFD foot reconstruction approach with the addition of a supramalleolar lateral opening-wedge osteotomy.Methods:We conducted a retrospective study of 13 patients (15 ankles) who underwent this procedure for PCFD class E between 2010 and 2021. Mean follow-up time was 3.8 (range, 2-6.3) years. Clinical assessment was based on the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot (JSSF) ankle/hindfoot scale as well as a Self-Administered Foot Evaluation Questionnaire (SAFE-Q). Radiographic assessments, including identification of the mechanical ankle joint axis point and a modified valgus Takakura-Tanaka osteoarthritis grade, were recorded.Results:The mean JSSF score improved significantly from 45.2 preoperatively to 83.9 postoperatively (P < .001). SAFE-Q scores at the final follow-up were 70.1 for the pain and pain-related subscale, 75.4 for the physical functioning and daily living subscale, 83.0 for the social functioning subscale, 74.4 for the shoe-related subscale, and 78.1 for the general health and well-being subscale. Radiographic measurements showed improvement in the tibiotalar tilt angle (average improvement: 5.4 degrees); orientation of the talus joint line relative to the ground (average improvement: 14.0 degrees); anteroposterior talus–first metatarsal angle (average improvement: 11.2 degrees), talonavicular coverage angle (average improvement: 21.6 degrees), and lateral talus–first metatarsal angle (average improvement: 17.0 degrees). Postoperatively, the mechanical ankle joint axis point moved medially for all patients and into the medial half of the ankle joint for 7 patients. The modified osteoarthritis stage improved postoperatively in most cases.Conclusion:In this select and relatively small group of patients who had a supramalleolar lateral opening-wedge osteotomy combined with PCFD reconstruction, we measured general improvement in JSSF scores and radiographic variables. Long-term durability of the procedure remains unknown. This procedure may be an option for preserving the ankle joint in treatment of PCFD class E with osteoarthritis of the ankle.Level of Evidence:Level IV, therapeutic.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T10:20:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221093344
       
  • Intra-articular Calcaneal Fracture Treatment With Staged Medial External
           Fixation

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      Authors: Gi Beom Kim, Jeong Jin Park, Chul Hyun Park
      First page: 1084
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:To compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes between the conventional delayed and staged approaches for intra-articular calcaneus fractures in which early definite fixation could not be performed because of severe soft tissue injury.Methods:From January 2015 to May 2019, a total of 32 cases with acute intra-articular calcaneal fractures met criteria and were enrolled in the study. We compared the outcomes of intra-articular calcaneal fractures that underwent delayed internal fixation between groups treated with a conventional delayed approach (non-EF group) vs a temporary medial external fixation (EF group). Clinical outcome measures included a 10-point visual analog scale score, the AOFAS score, and the Foot Function Index. Radiographic outcome measures included Böhler angle, talar declination angle, and calcaneal width. Reduction of the posterior facet was assessed on CT scans.Results:The first 15 (46.9%) were treated with a conventional delayed approach, and the latter 17 (53.1%) were treated with a staged approach with temporary medial external fixation. Clinical outcomes were not different between the groups at the last follow-up. The time from injury to definite internal fixation was shorter by an average of 3.8 days in the EF group (P = .001). The Böhler angle, talar declination angle, and calcaneal width were not different between the groups before surgery and at the last follow-up. Reduction of the posterior facet on CT scans was significantly better in the EF group than in the non-EF group (good/excellent = 94% vs 60%, respectively, P = .033).Conclusion:The staged approach using medial external fixation for displaced intra-articular calcaneus fractures could be an effective method to decrease the time to definitive internal fixation and obtain optimal reduction of the posterior facet.Level of Evidence:Level III, retrospective case-control study.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T04:38:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221092761
       
  • Perioperative Impact of Early Limited Surgical Intervention to Treat Pilon
           Fractures

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      Authors: Jeremy Hreha, Michael D. Metrione, Mark C. Reilly, Michael S. Sirkin, Mark R. Adams
      First page: 1092
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The operative treatment of pilon fractures is classically treated with a staged protocol with ankle spanning external fixator, followed by definitive open reduction and internal fixation in order to decrease risk of soft tissue complications and infection. However, treatment of pilon fractures with patrial tibial fixation in addition to ankle spanning external fixation at the time of index procedure may facilitate final fixation while avoiding complications that were associated with acute definitive fixation.Methods:Retrospective cohort series of 113 patients treated for pilon fractures from September 2012 to November 2018 at a single level 1 trauma center. Charts were reviewed to compare patients who underwent traditional management with a staged protocol and those who had a limited tibial reduction and fixation (LTRF) during the index procedure. The main outcome measurement was time to definitive fixation.Results:Twenty-six percent of patients (29 of 113) had limited tibial reduction and fixation (LTRF) during index surgery. Mean time between index procedure and definitive ORIF was 4.75 days less for LTRF cohort compared to standard stage cohort (10.86 ± 7.44 vs. 15.61 ± 8.59 days, P = .009). The index procedure took on average 51 minutes longer in the LTRF cohort (P < .001), yet definitive procedure operative time was decreased by an average of 98 minutes (P < .001), and overall (index plus definitive) operative duration was shortened by an average of 50 minutes (P = .044). There was no difference in rate of infection between LTRF (3.1%) and traditional treatment (2.5%) (P = .86) or reduction quality (P = .270). There were no nonunions in either treatment group.Conclusion:Patients who had LTRF had quicker time to definitive ORIF and decreased operative time for definitive ORIF. There was no difference in infection rate, reduction quality, or nonunion rate between groups.Level of Evidence:Level IV, Retrospective Cohort Study.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T10:27:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221094024
       
  • The Effect of Progressive Lateral Column Lengthening in a Novel Stage II-B
           Flatfoot Cadaveric Model Evaluated Using Software-Guided Radiographic
           Measurements of Foot Alignment

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      Authors: John E. Femino, Andrew Kern, Ross Schumer, Christopher Anthony, Adam J. Kruse, Jessica Goetz
      First page: 1099
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:This work used software-guided radiographic measurement to assess the effects of progressive lateral column lengthening (LCL) on restoring alignment in a novel cadaveric model of stage II-B flatfoot deformity.Methods:A stage II-B flatfoot was created in 8 cadaveric specimens by transecting the spring ligament complex, anterior deltoid, and interosseous talocalcaneal and cervical ligaments. Weightbearing computed tomographic (WBCT) scans were performed with specimens under 450 N of compressive load in the intact, flat, and 6-, 8-, and 10-mm lateral column–lengthening conditions. Custom software-guided radiographic measurements of the lateral talo–first metatarsal (Meary) angle, anteroposterior talo–first metatarsal angle, naviculocuneiform overlap, and 2 new measures (plantar fascia [PF] distance and angle) were recorded on digitally reconstructed radiographs. Four anonymized analysts performed measurements twice. Intra- and interobserver agreement was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs).Results:Six-millimeter LCL restored alignment closest to the intact foot in this new cadaveric model, whereas 10-mm lengthening tended toward overcorrection. The PF line displaced laterally in the flatfoot condition, and LCL restored the PF line to a location beneath the talonavicular joint. Interobserver agreement was excellent for PF distance (ICC = 0.99) and naviculocuboid overlap (ICC = 0.91), good for Meary angle (ICC = 0.81) and PF angle (ICC = 0.69), and acceptable for the talonavicular coverage angle (ICC = 0.65).Conclusion:In this stage II-B cadaveric flatfoot model, cervical ligament transection was essential to create deformity after the medial hindfoot ligaments were transected. Software-guided radiographic measurement proved reliable; standardized implementation should improve comparability between studies of flatfoot deformity. The novel PF distance performed most consistently (ICC = 0.99) and warrants further study. With this model, we found that a 6-mm LCL restored alignment closest to the intact foot, whereas 10-mm lengthening tended toward overcorrection.Clinical Relevance:Future joint-sparing flatfoot corrections may consider using a relatively small LCL combined with other bony and/or anatomic ligament/tendon reconstructions.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T06:48:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221091817
       
  • Cadaveric Gait Simulation of the Effect of Subtalar Arthrodesis on Total
           Ankle Replacement Kinematics

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      Authors: Jensen K. Henry, Daniel Sturnick, Andrew Rosenbaum, Guilherme Honda Saito, Johnathan Deland, Brett Steineman, Constantine Demetracopoulos
      First page: 1110
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Patients undergoing total ankle replacement (TAR) often have symptomatic adjacent joint arthritis and deformity. Subtalar arthrodesis can effectively address a degenerative and/or malaligned hindfoot, but there is concern that it places abnormal stresses on the TAR and adjacent joints of the foot, potentially leading to early TAR failure. This study hypothesized that ankle and talonavicular joint kinematics would be altered after subtalar arthrodesis in the setting of TAR.Methods:Thirteen mid-tibia cadaveric specimens with neutral alignment were tested in a robotic gait simulator. To simulate gait, each specimen was secured to a static mounting fixture about a 6-degree of freedom robotic platform, and a force plate moves relative to the stationary specimen based on standardized gait parameters. Specimens were tested sequentially in TAR and TAR with subtalar arthrodesis (TAR-STfuse). Kinematics and range of motion of the ankle and talonavicular joint were compared between TAR and TAR-STfuse.Results:There were significant differences in kinematics and range of motion between TAR and TAR-STfuse groups. At the ankle joint, TAR-STfuse had less internal rotation in early-mid stance (P < .05), with decreased range of motion in the sagittal (–2.7 degrees, P = .008) and axial (–1.8 degrees, P = .002) planes in early stance, and increased range of motion in the coronal plane in middle (+1.2 degrees, P < .001) and late (+2.5 degrees, P = .012) stance. At the talonavicular joint, there were significant differences in axial and coronal kinematics in early and late stance (P < .05). Subtalar arthrodesis resulted in significantly decreased talonavicular range of motion in all planes in early and late stance (P < .003).Conclusion:In ankles implanted with the TAR design used in this study, kinematics of the ankle and talonavicular joint were found to be altered after subtalar arthrodesis. Aberrant motion may reflect altered contact mechanics at the prosthesis and increased stress at the bone-implant interface, and affect the progression of adjacent joint arthritis in the talonavicular joint.Clinical Relevance:These findings may provide a correlate to clinical studies that have cited hindfoot arthrodesis as a risk factor for TAR failure.
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T11:27:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221088821
       
  • Deep Learning Algorithms Improve the Detection of Subtle Lisfranc
           Malalignments on Weightbearing Radiographs

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      Authors: Soheil Ashkani-Esfahani, Reza Mojahed-Yazdi, Rohan Bhimani, Gino M. Kerkhoffs, Mario Maas, Christopher W. DiGiovanni, Bart Lubberts, Daniel Guss
      First page: 1118
      Abstract: Foot & Ankle International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Detection of Lisfranc malalignment leading to the instability of the joint, particularly in subtle cases, has been a concern for foot and ankle care providers. X-ray radiographs are the mainstay in the diagnosis of these injuries; thus, improving the performance of clinicians in interpreting radiographs can noticeably affect the quality of health care in these patients. Here we assessed the performance of deep learning algorithms on weightbearing radiographs for detection of Lisfranc joint malalignment in patients with Lisfranc instability.Methods:In a retrospective study, 640 patients with Lisfranc malalignment leading to instability were recruited plus 640 individuals with uninjured feet and healthy Lisfranc joint as the control group. All radiographs were screened by orthopaedic surgeons. Two deep learning models were trained, validated, and tested (in a ratio 80:10:10) using a single-view (anteroposterior) and 3-view (anteroposterior, lateral, oblique) radiographs. The performances of the models were reported as sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, accuracy, F score, and area under the curve (AUC).Results:No significant differences were observed between the patients and the controls regarding age, gender, race, and body mass index. The best deep learning algorithm outperformed our human interpreters (
      Citation: Foot & Ankle International
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T04:41:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10711007221093574
       
 
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