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ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 152 of 152 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Orthopaedica     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthopedics     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Arthroplasty Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone & Joint 360     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Bone Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Burns & Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Orthopedic Research     Open Access  
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Chinese Journal of Traumatology     Open Access  
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Concussion     Open Access  
Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Orthopaedic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Der Orthopäde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Die Wirbelsäule     Hybrid Journal  
Duke Orthopedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
East African Orthopaedic Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
EFORT Open Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Técnicas Quirúrgicas - Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
EMC - Tecniche Chirurgiche - Chirurgia Ortopedica     Full-text available via subscription  
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Podiatry / Revista Europea de Podología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Foot & Ankle International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Spine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Orthopaedics     Open Access  
International Musculoskeletal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JAAOS : Global Research & Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants     Hybrid Journal  
JBJS Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
JOR Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal de Traumatologie du Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal für Mineralstoffwechsel & Muskuloskelettale Erkrankungen     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bone and Joint Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Bone and Joint Infection     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Children's Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Musculoskeletal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 72)
Journal of Orthopaedic Association of South Indian States     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Diseases and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedic Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Orthopaedic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Orthopaedic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Orthopaedic Translation     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Orthopaedics, Trauma and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Orthopedics & Rheumatology     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Musculoskeletal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Musculoskeletal Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma     Open Access  
North American Spine Society Journal (NASSJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Obere Extremität     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Orthopedics and Rheumatology     Open Access  
Open Journal of Trauma     Open Access  
Open Orthopaedics Journal     Open Access  
Operative Orthopädie und Traumatologie     Hybrid Journal  
Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopädie & Rheuma     Full-text available via subscription  
Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Orthopaedic Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Orthopaedic Proceedings     Partially Free  
Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopaedics and Trauma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Orthopedic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Orthopedic Research and Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Orthopedic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthoplastic Surgery     Open Access  
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Open     Open Access  
Osteologie     Hybrid Journal  
Osteoporosis and Sarcopenia     Open Access  
OTA International     Open Access  
Paediatric Orthopaedics and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Prosthetics and Orthotics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Chilena de Ortopedia y Traumatología / Chilean Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Cubana de Ortopedia y Traumatologí­a     Open Access  
Revista de la Asociación Argentina de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Open Access  
Revista Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Portuguesa de Ortopedia e Traumatologia     Open Access  
Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Romanian Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology     Open Access  
SA Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SICOT-J     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Sport-Orthopädie - Sport-Traumatologie - Sports Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Strategies in Trauma and Limb Reconstruction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Techniques in Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma (Travma)     Open Access  
Trauma und Berufskrankheit     Hybrid Journal  
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology and Orthopedics of Russia     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ортопедия, травматология и протезирование     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.545
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0885-9701 - ISSN (Online) 1550-509X
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • Carotid Arterial Compliance and Aerobic Exercise Training in Chronic
           Traumatic Brain Injury: A Pilot Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tomoto; Tsubasa; Le, Tran; Tarumi, Takashi; Dieppa, Marisara; Bell, Kathleen; Madden, Christopher; Zhang, Rong; Ding, Kan
      Abstract: imageObjective: Decreased carotid arterial compliance (CAC) is associated with cerebral microvascular damage, cerebral blood flow (CBF) dysregulation, and increased risk for stroke and dementia, which are reported to be prevalent after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the effect of TBI on CAC has not been reported. The purposes of this pilot study were to (1) compare CAC between participants with chronic traumatic brain injury (cTBI) and age-matched healthy control (HC) subjects and (2) to examine whether CAC changed after 3 months of exercise training in those with cTBI.Setting: Community based.Participants: Nineteen participants with cTBI (6-72 months postinjury) and 19 HC matched for age and sex were tested at baseline. The same cTBI cohort was enrolled in a proof-of-concept randomized controlled exercise training program to investigate the effects of 3 months of aerobic exercise training (AET) or nonaerobic stretching and toning (SAT) on cerebrovascular parameters.Design: Cross-sectional study and randomized controlled trial.Main Measures: CAC was measured by tonometry and ultrasonography at the common carotid artery; CBF was measured by ultrasonography at the bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arteries, and pulsatile CBF was measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography at the middle cerebral arteries. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) was calculated as mean arterial pressure divided by total CBF.Results: Relative to HC, the participants with cTBI had lower CAC (0.10 ± 0.03 vs 0.12 ± 0.03 mm2/mm Hg, P = .046) and higher CVR (0.17 ± 0.03 vs 0.15 ± 0.03 mm Hg/mL/min, P = .028). CAC tended to increase after AET compared with SAT (P = .080). Increases in CAC were associated with decreased pulsatile CBF (r = −0.689, P = .003).Conclusion: These findings suggest that the individuals with cTBI have decreased CAC, which may potentially be improved by AET.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Research Letter: Concussion Knowledge Is Difficult to Predict From
           Self-Reported Exposure, Sports Participation, and Education

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      Authors: Kinmond; Sally; Sullivan, Karen A.; Jaganathan, Kannan Singaravelu
      Abstract: imageObjectives: Increasing concussion knowledge could contribute to improving injury outcomes. Understanding the predictors of concussion knowledge could determine the areas of educational need. This study examined whether individual factors, prior brain injury, prior concussion education, and contact-sports participation predicted concussion knowledge.Design and Setting: Cross-sectional study with recruitment of community volunteers.Participants: An online survey was completed by 525 adults, 443 of whom provided useable responses.Main Measures: The respondents provided background information and completed the Concussion Knowledge Index from the Rosenbaum Concussion Knowledge and Attitudes Survey (RoCKAS).Results: On average, the participants answered 19.8 out of 25 items correctly. A multiple regression model with demographic, injury, and sport-related variables did not significantly predict concussion knowledge.Conclusion: This community sample had higher than expected concussion knowledge (restricted range), but some important misconceptions were still present. The model reflecting a combination of self-reported factors did not predict concussion knowledge. The implications for concussion education are discussed, including the need for targeted education to address specific misconceptions.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Postconcussion Symptoms After an Uncomplicated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
           in Older Adults: Frequency, Risk Factors, and Impact on Quality of Life

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      Authors: Chung; Jia-Wei; Liu, Doresses; Wei, Li; Wen, Ya-Ting; Lin, Hsin-Ying; Chen, Huan-Chieh; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean
      Abstract: imageBackground: Postconcussion symptoms (PCSs) are common complaints reported by patients after a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), and these symptoms may lower quality of life. Previous investigations have primarily focused on PCSs in children, adults, and athletes. The frequency, and risk factors, and effects of PCSs for older adults with mild TBIs are unclear.Purpose: To investigate the frequency and risk factors of PCSs, and investigate their effects on quality of life over time after mild TBI in older adults.Methods: A prospective longitudinal study was performed. All participants were enrolled from the emergency department or neurosurgical outpatient clinics of a medical center. The measurement tools were the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire and the Quality of Life after Traumatic Brain Injury. Measurements were performed on the seventh day, at the first month, and at the sixth month after the head injury. A generalized estimating equation model was used for data analyses.Results: One hundred and one older adults (mean age of 76.0 years) with mild TBIs with negative neuroimaging findings were included. Overall, 32.7%, 4%, and 15.8% of the sample reported PCS after 7 days, 1 month, and 6 months of head injury, respectively, revealing a U-shaped trend. We observed that comorbidity measured using the modified Charlson Comorbidity Index was associated with differences in PCSs (P < .05). PCSs were an independent predictor of changes in postinjury quality of life (P < .001).Conclusions: The results indicate that PCS after a mild TBI in older adults is prevalent, even in the chronic phase after a TBI, and PCSs significantly affected the quality of life of our cohort. Therefore, to improve patient quality of life, healthcare providers should employ effective interventions to manage PCSs at different phases after a TBI.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Adult Cognitive Outcomes Following Childhood Mild Traumatic Brain Injury:
           A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Chadwick; Leah; Peckham, S. Benjamin; Yeates, Keith Owen
      Abstract: imageObjective: This review aimed to (1) summarize the existing literature regarding cognitive outcomes in adults with a history of pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and (2) identify gaps in the literature to provide directions for future research.Participants: Participants sustained mTBI in childhood (0-17 years of age) and underwent cognitive assessment in adulthood (older than 18 years) at least 1 year postinjury.Design: MEDLINE Ovid and PsycINFO Ovid databases were searched to identify original research studies that examined adult cognitive outcomes after childhood mTBI.Main Measures: Cognitive outcome measures assessed memory, attention, visuospatial abilities, processing speed, comprehension, reasoning, intellectual functioning, and executive functioning. Outcome measures ranged from self-reported cognitive symptoms to objective testing.Results: A total of 4216 articles were screened, leading to the inclusion of 6 published studies for review (3 prospective cohort and 3 retrospective cohort), with 131 537 participants (mTBI = 6724; controls = 123 823). Review of the included articles suggests that adults with a history of childhood mTBI perform within the average range expected for adult cognitive functioning, although they may perform more poorly than non–head-injured comparison groups on a variety of cognitive measures. Injury-related factors, such as requiring electroencephalography within 24 hours of injury and posttraumatic amnesia lasting longer than 30 minutes, may be associated with variability in adult cognitive outcomes.Conclusion: The weight of the available evidence suggests that childhood mTBI does not have a significant impact on adult cognitive functioning. However, further research is needed to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the long-term cognitive outcomes of childhood mTBI and to identify predictors of those outcomes in adulthood.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Parent Interventions Improve Behavior After Pediatric Traumatic Brain
           Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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      Authors: Cermak; Carly A.; McCabe, Sarah A.; Kuchurean, Brianna; Schaefer, Julia; Tendera, Anna; Beal, Deryk S.
      Abstract: imageObjective: To examine child behavior change scores from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of parent interventions for pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI).Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL were searched to identify studies that examined parent interventions for pediatric TBI. Inclusion criteria included (i) a parent intervention for children with TBI; (ii) an RCT study design; (iii) statistical data for child behavior outcome(s); and (iv) studies that were published in English.Results: Seven studies met inclusion criteria. All interventions reported improved child behavior after pediatric TBI; however, child and parent factors contributed to behavior change scores in some interventions. Factors found to contribute to the level of benefit included age of child, baseline behavior levels, sociodemographics (eg, parent income, parent education), and parent mental health.Conclusion: Improved child behavior outcomes resulting from parent interventions for pediatric TBI are well supported by the evidence in the peer-reviewed literature. Clinicians are encouraged to consider child and parent factors as they relate to child behavior outcomes.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Concussion Evaluation Patterns Among US Adults

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      Authors: Womack; Lindsay S.; Breiding, Matthew J.; Daugherty, Jill
      Abstract: imageObjective: The objective of this study was to compare individuals who were not evaluated by a doctor or nurse for a self-reported concussion versus individuals who were evaluated for a concussion by demographic variables, concussion history, and concussion circumstances.Settings and Participants: Data were collected from 2018 SpringStyles, a web-based panel survey of US adults 18 years or older (n = 6427), fielded in March-April.Design: Cross-sectional.Main Measures: Respondents were asked whether they believed they had sustained a concussion in their lifetime and details about their most recent concussion, including whether they were evaluated by a doctor or nurse.Results: Twenty-seven percent of adults in the survey reported a lifetime concussion (n = 1835). Among those individuals, 50.4% were not evaluated by a healthcare provider for their most recent concussion. Not being evaluated was higher among individuals whose concussion was caused by a slip, trip, or fall (adjusted prevalence ratio [APR] = 2.22; 95% CI, 1.65-2.99), riding a bicycle (APR = 2.28; 95% CI, 1.58-3.27), being struck by or against something by accident (APR = 2.50; 95% CI, 1.88-3.34), or being struck by or against something during a fight or argument (APR = 2.89; 95% CI, 2.11-3.97), compared with individuals whose concussion was caused by a motor vehicle crash. No evaluation was also higher among individuals whose concussion occurred while engaging in a sports or recreational activity (APR = 1.39; 95% CI, 1.07-1.82) or engaging in regular activities around the house (APR = 1.65; 95% CI, 1.27-2.14), compared with individuals whose concussion occurred while working for pay.Conclusion: More than a quarter of adults reported a lifetime concussion; however, half of them were not evaluated for their last concussion by a healthcare provider. Examination by a healthcare professional for a suspected concussion may prevent or mitigate potential long-term sequelae. Furthermore, current US surveillance methods may underestimate the burden of TBI because many individuals do not seek evaluation.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Reactive Balance Responses After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Scoping
           Review

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      Authors: Morris; Amanda; Casucci, Tallie; McFarland, Mary M.; Cassidy, Benjamin; Pelo, Ryan; Kreter, Nicholas; Dibble, Leland E.; Fino, Peter C.
      Abstract: imageObjective: Balance testing after concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) can be useful in determining acute and chronic neuromuscular deficits that are unapparent from symptom scores or cognitive testing alone. Current assessments of balance do not comprehensively evaluate all 3 classes of balance: maintaining a posture; voluntary movement; and reactive postural response. Despite the utility of reactive postural responses in predicting fall risk in other balance-impaired populations, the effect of mTBI on reactive postural responses remains unclear. This review sought to (1) examine the extent and range of available research on reactive postural responses in people post-mTBI and (2) determine whether reactive postural responses (balance recovery) are affected by mTBI.Design: Scoping review.Methods: Studies were identified using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Dissertations and Theses Global, PsycINFO, SportDiscus, and Web of Science. Inclusion criteria were injury classified as mTBI with no confounding central or peripheral nervous system dysfunction beyond those stemming from the mTBI, quantitative measure of reactive postural response, and a discrete, externally driven perturbation was used to test reactive postural response.Results: A total of 4747 publications were identified, and a total of 3 studies (5 publications) were included in the review.Conclusion: The limited number of studies available on this topic highlights the lack of investigation on reactive postural responses after mTBI. This review provides a new direction for balance assessments after mTBI and recommends incorporating all 3 classes of postural control in future research.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Short-Term Neurologic Manifestations of Repetitive Head Impacts Among
           Athletes: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Stephen; Steve J.; Hasman, Linda; Goldenberg, May; Merchant-Borna, Kian; Kawata, Keisuke; Mannix, Rebekah; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.
      Abstract: imageObjective: To summarize the evidence linking contact sports–related repetitive head impacts (RHIs) and short-term declines in neurologic function.Methods: A scoping review following the guidelines in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR) and searching 3 databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science) was performed. Peer-reviewed research articles were eligible for inclusion if they were full-length English language articles published between 1999 and 2019 examining athletes between the ages of 14 and 40 years exposed to RHIs, and reporting cognitive, vestibular, and/or oculomotor outcomes within 4 weeks of last head hit exposure.Results: Fifty-two articles met criteria for review: 14 reported oculomotor outcomes, 23 reported vestibular outcomes, and 36 reported cognitive function. Short-term RHI-related declines in neurologic function were reported in 42.9% of oculomotor studies, in 20.8% of vestibular studies, and in 33.3% of cognitive studies. Most of the 52 studies involved American football, soccer, or ice hockey athletes at the collegiate (n = 23) or high school (n = 14) level. Twenty-four (46%) studies involved only male athletes. Wearable sensors were used to measure RHIs in 24 studies (46%), while RHIs were not measured in 26 studies (50%). In addition, many studies failed to control for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder/learning disability and/or concussion history.Conclusion: The results of this scoping review suggest that the evidence linking RHIs to short-term declines in neurologic function is relatively sparse and lacking in methodological rigor. Although most studies failed to find a link, those that did were more likely to use objective measures of RHIs and to control for confounders. More careful trial design may be needed to definitively establish a causal link between RHIs and short-term neurologic dysfunction.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Effect of Race and Nativity on Functional Outcomes Following Traumatic
           Brain Injury Among Asian, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White Survivors in
           the United States: A NIDILRR TBI Model Systems Study

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      Authors: Kuerban; Aliya; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen
      Abstract: imageObjective: To compare the racial/ethnic differences in traumatic brain injury (TBI) recovery among Asians, Hispanics, and Whites, and explore the effect of nativity in the recovery process.Setting: Six Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) centers.Participants: In total, 7953 patients who had at least 1 severe TBI between 2000 and 2016 were admitted to one of the TBIMS centers.Design: Secondary data analysis.Main Measures: Functional Independent Measure (FIM instrument) ratings.Results: Asians had the lowest injury severity at admission, but they failed to make the improvements made by the Hispanics and the Whites between the rehabilitation discharge and the 1-year follow-up. The magnitude of improvement made by the foreign-born Asians was less than that made by their native-born counterparts. Both Asian and the Hispanic groups had lower functional outcomes at the 1-year follow-up, and the differences in functional outcomes between the Asian and Hispanic groups were not statistically significant. The above racial/ethnic disparities in functional outcomes were not fully explained by differences in sociodemographic status, injury characteristics, and immigration-related factors. The effect of nativity was mediated by covariates.Conclusions: This study reveals racial/ethnic disparities post-TBI functional recovery. Despite lower injury severity and apparent financial resource advantages, Asians did not experience better functional outcomes. Although the effect of nativity was not established in this study, contextual factors related to ethnicity and immigration experiences should be further investigated.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Immediate Post-Concussion and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT): Effects of Data
           Integration Strategies on Classification Accuracy

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      Authors: Gaudet; Charles E.
      Abstract: imageObjective: The current study aimed to evaluate varying data integration procedures and their effects on the classification accuracy of Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT).Setting: Data were collected from an independent secondary school that included students in grades 9 to 12.Participants: The study examined 300 consecutive ImPACT score reports generated by secondary school students between 2010 and 2015.Design: To appraise ImPACT's utility as a serialized measure, standardized regression-based equations were formulated to compute reliable change index scores. Discriminant function analyses (DFAs) consisting of varying combinations of ImPACT composite scores were conducted and their accuracy was compared to that produced by the standard interpretive procedure.Main Measures: Varying combinations of scores produced on Verbal Memory, Visual Memory, Visual Motor Speed, Reaction Speed, and the Postconcussion Symptom Scale were included in analyses.Results: DFAs yielded sensitivities ranging from 31% to 49%, specificities from 88% to 95%, positive predictive values (PPVs) from 61% to 83%, and negative predictive values (NPVs) from 67% to 75%. Conversely, the standard interpretive procedure yielded a sensitivity of 73%, specificity of 43%, PPV of 45%, and NPV of 72%.Conclusion: The standard interpretive procedure produced a higher sensitivity than the DFAs; however, its PPV did not exceed chance levels. Conversely, DFA equations produced superior PPVs; however, their sensitivity hovered around 50%, leaving a substantial proportion of individuals with concussion undetected. Cognitive composite scores did not appear to offer significant incremental utility in relation to symptom self-report. Base rate conditions and psychometric factors appeared to contribute to ImPACT's limited classification accuracy.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Association Between TBI-Related Hearing Impairment and Cognition: A
           TRACK-TBI Study

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      Authors: Hwang; Phillip H.; Nelson, Lindsay D.; Sharon, Jeffrey D.; McCrea, Michael A.; Dikmen, Sureyya S.; Markowitz, Amy J.; Manley, Geoff T.; Temkin, Nancy R.
      Abstract: imageObjective: To examine the association between hearing impairment and cognitive function after traumatic brain injury (TBI).Setting: A total of 18 level I trauma centers throughout the United States in the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in TBI (TRACK-TBI) study.Participants: From February 2014 to June 2018, a total of 2697 participants with TBI were enrolled in TRACK-TBI. Key eligibility criteria included external force trauma to the head, presentation to a participating level I trauma center, and receipt of a clinically indicated head computed tomographic (CT) scan within 24 hours of injury. A total of 1267 participants were evaluated in the study, with 216 participants with hearing impairment and 1051 participants without hearing impairment. Those with missing or unknown hearing status or cognitive assessment were excluded from analysis.Design: Prospective, observational cohort study.Main Measures: Hearing impairment at 2 weeks post-TBI was based on self-report. Participants who indicated worse hearing in one or both ears were defined as having hearing impairment, whereas those who denied worse hearing in either ear were defined as not having hearing impairment and served as the reference group. Cognitive outcomes at 6 months post-TBI included executive functioning and processing speed, as measured by the Trail Making Test (TMT) B/A and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition, Processing Speed Index subscale (WAIS-IV PSI), respectively.Results: TBI-related hearing impairment had a small but significantly greater TMT B/A ratio than without TBI-related hearing impairment: mean difference (B) = 0.25; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.43; P = .005. No significant mean differences on WAIS-IV PSI scores were found between participants with and without TBI-related hearing impairment: B = 0.36; 95% CI, −2.07 to 2.60; P = .825.Conclusion: We conclude that TBI-related hearing impairment at 6 months postinjury was significantly associated with worse executive functioning but not cognitive processing speed.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Patient-Reported Problem Areas in Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury

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      Authors: Borgen; Ida M. H.; Kleffelgård, Ingerid; Hauger, Solveig L.; Forslund, Marit V.; Søberg, Helene L.; Andelic, Nada; Sveen, Unni; Winter, Laraine; Løvstad, Marianne; Røe, Cecilie
      Abstract: imageObjective: The aims of this study were to (1) assess self-reported main problem areas reported by patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their family members in the chronic phase, and (2) compare the self-prioritized problems with difficulties captured by questionnaires and neuropsychological screening through linking to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).Setting: Outpatient clinic at the Oslo University Hospital, Norway.Participants: In total, 120 patients with TBI were recruited, of whom, 78 had a participating family member. Eligibility criteria were a clinical TBI diagnosis with verified intracranial injury, living at home, aged 18 to 72 years, 2 years or more postinjury, and experiencing perceived TBI-related difficulties, reduced physical and mental health, or difficulties with participation in everyday life. Patients with severe psychiatric or neurological disorders or inability to participate in goal-setting processes were excluded.Design: Cross-sectional.Main Measures: Target Outcomes, that is, 3 main TBI-related problem areas reported by patients and family members, collected in a semistructured interview; standardized questionnaires of TBI-related symptoms, anxiety, depression, functioning, and health-related quality of life; neuropsychological screening battery.Results: Target Outcomes were related to cognitive, physical, emotional, and social difficulties. Target Outcomes were linked to 12 chapters and 112 distinct categories in the ICF, while standardized measures only covered 10 chapters and 28 categories. Some aspects of post-TBI adjustment were found to be insufficiently covered by the ICF classification, such as identity issues, lack of meaningful activities, and feeling lonely.Conclusion: The Target Outcomes approach is a useful assessment method in a population with chronic TBI. The standardized questionnaires capture the spectrum of problems, whereas the Target Outcomes approach captures the prioritized individual problems hindering everyday life after TBI. While the standardized measures are an irreplaceable part of the assessment, Target Outcomes ensures patient involvement and may help clinicians better tailor relevant rehabilitation efforts.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Exploring Vestibular Ocular Motor Screening in Adults With Persistent
           Complaints After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

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      Authors: Parrington; Lucy; King, Laurie A.; Hoppes, Carrie W.; Klaiman, Maxwell J.; Michielutti, Patrick; Fino, Peter C.; Dibble, Leland E.; Lester, Mark E.; Weightman, Margaret M.
      Abstract: imageObjective: The purpose of this study was to (1) explore differences in vestibular ocular motor screening (VOMS) symptoms between healthy adults and adults with persistent symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), and (2) explore the relationships between VOMS symptoms and other measures (self-reported vestibular symptoms, clinical measures of balance and gait, and higher-level motor ability tasks).Setting: Research laboratory setting.Participants: Fifty-three persons with persistent symptoms (>3 weeks) following mTBI and 57 healthy controls were recruited. Eligibility for participation included being 18 to 50 years of age and free of medical conditions that may affect balance, with the exception of recent mTBI for the mTBI group.Design: Cross-sectional.Main Measures: The primary outcomes were the VOMS symptom scores and near point of convergence (NPC) distance. Secondary outcomes included the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) total and subdomain scores, sway area, Functional Gait Analysis total score, gait speed, and modified Illinois Agility Task completion time, and Revised High-Level Mobility Assessment Tool total score.Results: The mTBI group reported more VOMS symptoms (z range, −7.28 to −7.89) and a further NPC (t = −4.16) than healthy controls (all Ps < .001). DHI self-reported symptoms (total and all subdomain scores) were strongly associated with the VOMS symptom scores (rho range, 0.53-0.68; all Ps < .001). No significant relationships existed between VOMS symptoms and other measures.Conclusion: Significant group differences support the relevance of the VOMS for mTBI in an age-diverse sample with persistent symptoms. Furthermore, strong association with DHI symptoms supports the ability of the VOMS to capture vestibular complaints in this population.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Community-Based Interventions After Acquired Brain Injury—A Systematic
           Review of Intervention Types and Their Effectiveness

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      Authors: Hauger; Solveig Lægreid; Borgen, Ida M. H.; Løvstad, Marianne; Lu, Juan; Forslund, Marit V.; Kleffelgård, Ingerid; Andelic, Nada; Røe, Cecilie
      Abstract: imageObjectives: Comprehensive review of existing types and effectiveness of community-based interventions delivered to adults (mean age 18-65 years) with long-lasting (≥6 months) difficulties following acquired brain injury (ABI).Design: Systematic review of controlled intervention studies published until February 2021.Main Measures: Systematic searches in databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects [Cochrane Library], and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials [Cochrane Library]) and inclusion of English peer-reviewed full-text articles; randomized or controlled community-based intervention studies; sample size of 20 or more participants; and 3 or more intervention sessions. Two reviewers independently extracted data for the synthesis and assessed the methodological quality. Data extraction included study characteristics, demographics of participants, content and dose of intervention, outcome measures, and findings.Result: The search returned 7386 publications, of which 49 eligible studies were included, revealing a diverse range of community-based interventions and a myriad of outcome measures applied for assessing functional capacities, participation, and quality of life in the chronic phase of ABI. Intervention types encompassed 14 holistic, 23 physical, and 12 specific interventions. A large heterogeneity regarding intervention frequency and intensity was found. Meta-analyses performed on the holistic, physical, and specific interventions did not indicate any significant pooled effects but showed highly variable effects between individuals, both in persons with traumatic and nontraumatic brain injuries.Conclusions: Because of lack of pooled effects within types of community-based interventions, specific evidence-based recommendations within holistic, physical, and specific interventions designed to mitigate long-lasting ABI problems cannot be made. This review highlights the need for future studies to address methodological issues concerning larger sample size, lack of clear description interventions and comparator, missing reports of effects in change scores, need for consistent use of recommended outcome measures, and investigating the wide variety in intervention responsiveness among participants with ABI. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO (CRD42019124949).
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Role of Neuroinflammation in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Following
           Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Feiger; Jeremy A.; Snyder, Rachael L.; Walsh, Michael J.; Cissne, Mackenzie; Cwiek, Andrew; Al-Momani, Seima I.; Chiou, Kathy S.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common following traumatic brain injury (TBI), but their etiological onset remains unclear. Mental health research implicates neuroinflammation in the development of psychiatric disorders. The presence of neuroinflammatory responses after TBI thus prompts an investigation of their involvement in the emergence of neuropsychiatric disorders postinjury.Objective: Review the literature surrounding the role of neuroinflammation and immune response post-TBI in the development of neuropsychiatric disorders.Methods: A search of scientific databases was conducted for original, empirical studies in human subjects. Key words such as “neuroinflammation,” “TBI,” and “depression” were used to identify psychopathology as an outcome TBI and the relation to neuroinflammatory response.Results: Study results provide evidence of neuroinflammation mediated post-TBI neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety, trauma/stress, and depression. Inflammatory processes and stress response dysregulation can lead to secondary cell damage, which promote the development and maintenance of neuropsychiatric disorders postinjury.Conclusion: This review identifies both theoretical and empirical support for neuroinflammatory response as feasible mechanisms underlying neuropsychiatric disorders after TBI. Further understanding of these processes in this context has significant clinical implications for guiding the development of novel treatments to reduce psychiatric symptoms postinjury. Future directions to address current limitations in the literature are discussed.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Utility of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) Sleep Disturbance
           Item as a Screener for Insomnia in Individuals With Moderate to Severe
           Traumatic Brain Injury

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      Authors: Lequerica; Anthony H.; Watson, Eric; Dijkers, Marcel P.; Goldin, Yelena; Hoffman, Jeanne M.; Niemeier, Janet P.; Silva, Marc A.; Rabinowitz, Amanda; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D.
      Abstract: imageObjective: To examine the utility of the sleep disturbance item of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) as a screening tool for insomnia among individuals with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).Setting: Telephone interview.Participants: A sample of 248 individuals with a history of moderate to severe TBI participated in an interview within 2 years of their injury.Design: Observational, cross-sectional analysis.Main Measures: The PHQ-9 was administered along with the Insomnia Severity Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Sleep Hygiene Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the Insomnia Interview Schedule.Results: Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was conducted for the PHQ-9 sleep item rating against a set of insomnia criteria to determine an optimal cutoff score. A cutoff of 2 on the PHQ-9 sleep item maximized sensitivity (76%) and specificity (79%), with an area under the curve of 0.79 (95% CI, 0.70-0.88). The 2 groups formed using this cutoff differed significantly on all sleep measures except the Epworth Sleepiness Scale.Conclusions: The PHQ-9 sleep item may serve as a useful screener to allow for detection of potential sleep disturbance among individuals with moderate to severe TBI. Those who screen positive using this item included in a commonly used measure of depression can be prioritized for further and more comprehensive assessment of sleep disorders.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Abstracts of the 2nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Concussion
           Network/Réseau Canadien des Commotions (CCN-RCC)

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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