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ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 152 of 152 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Orthopaedica     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthopedics     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Arthroplasty Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone & Joint 360     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Bone Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Burns & Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Orthopedic Research     Open Access  
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Chinese Journal of Traumatology     Open Access  
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Concussion     Open Access  
Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Orthopaedic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Der Orthopäde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Die Wirbelsäule     Hybrid Journal  
Duke Orthopedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
East African Orthopaedic Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
EFORT Open Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Técnicas Quirúrgicas - Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
EMC - Tecniche Chirurgiche - Chirurgia Ortopedica     Full-text available via subscription  
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Podiatry / Revista Europea de Podología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Foot & Ankle International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Spine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Orthopaedics     Open Access  
International Musculoskeletal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JAAOS : Global Research & Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants     Hybrid Journal  
JBJS Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
JOR Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal de Traumatologie du Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal für Mineralstoffwechsel & Muskuloskelettale Erkrankungen     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bone and Joint Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bone and Joint Infection     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Children's Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Musculoskeletal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 70)
Journal of Orthopaedic Association of South Indian States     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Diseases and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Orthopaedic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Orthopaedic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Orthopaedic Translation     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Orthopaedics, Trauma and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Orthopedics & Rheumatology     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Musculoskeletal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Musculoskeletal Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma     Open Access  
North American Spine Society Journal (NASSJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Obere Extremität     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Orthopedics and Rheumatology     Open Access  
Open Journal of Trauma     Open Access  
Open Orthopaedics Journal     Open Access  
Operative Orthopädie und Traumatologie     Hybrid Journal  
Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopädie & Rheuma     Full-text available via subscription  
Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Orthopaedic Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Orthopaedic Proceedings     Partially Free  
Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopaedics and Trauma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Orthopedic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Orthopedic Research and Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Orthopedic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthoplastic Surgery     Open Access  
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Open     Open Access  
Osteologie     Hybrid Journal  
Osteoporosis and Sarcopenia     Open Access  
OTA International     Open Access  
Paediatric Orthopaedics and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Prosthetics and Orthotics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Chilena de Ortopedia y Traumatología / Chilean Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Cubana de Ortopedia y Traumatologí­a     Open Access  
Revista de la Asociación Argentina de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Open Access  
Revista Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Portuguesa de Ortopedia e Traumatologia     Open Access  
Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Romanian Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology     Open Access  
SA Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SICOT-J     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Sport-Orthopädie - Sport-Traumatologie - Sports Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Strategies in Trauma and Limb Reconstruction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Techniques in Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma (Travma)     Open Access  
Trauma und Berufskrankheit     Hybrid Journal  
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology and Orthopedics of Russia     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ортопедия, травматология и протезирование     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1943-3875 - ISSN (Online) 1943-3883
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Implications of War and Healthcare

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      Authors: Rui Fernandes, Seenu Susarla, Sat Parmar
      Pages: 97 - 97
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Volume 15, Issue 2, Page 97-97, June 2022.

      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T09:27:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221096728
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • E-Scooters and Craniofacial Trauma: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Elizabeth Z. Goh, Nicholas Beech, Nigel R. Johnson
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study DesignSystematic review.ObjectiveStanding electric scooters (e-scooters) provide a cheap and environmentally friendly transport alternative, but also elicit substantial concern regarding their volume of associated injuries especially in the craniofacial region. This review aims to explore the demographics, risk factors, types of injury and surgical management of craniofacial trauma associated with e-scooters.MethodsPubMed and Scopus databases were systematically searched. Inclusion criteria were clinical studies investigating craniofacial trauma associated with e-scooters. Exclusion criteria were duplicates; non-English publications; non-full-text publications; studies with insufficient data.ResultsOf the 73 articles identified, 10 eligible articles representing 539 patients were included. The mean age was 31.5 years. Most cases were male (63.7%). Common risk factors were alcohol/drug intoxication, absence of distal extremity injuries and lack of helmet use. The most common mechanism of injury was mechanical falls (72.4%). The most common facial fracture pattern was middle third fractures (58.3%). Surgical management was required for 43.3% of fractures. Other types of injuries reported were traumatic brain injuries (17.6%), soft tissue injuries (58.3%), dental injuries (32.9%) and ophthalmological injuries (20.6%).ConclusionsThe findings of this review suggest common presentations for craniofacial trauma associated with e-scooters. Robust longitudinal evaluations with standardised descriptions of types of injuries are required. Gaps in knowledge relate to surgical management, post-operative complications and associated risk factors.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T11:42:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221118790
       
  • Motorcycle Accidents are the Strongest Risk Factor for Panfacial Fractures
           Among Pediatric Patients

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      Authors: Dani Stanbouly, Dylan Koh, Jordan Halsey, Firat Selvi, Fereshteh Goudarzi, Kevin Arce, Sung-Kiang Chuang
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study DesignA retrospective cohort study was conducted using the Kids’ Inpatient Database from 2000 to 2014. Subjects were included if they were 18 years and younger and suffered any type of facial fracture.ObjectiveThe purpose this study was to determine the risk factors for incurring panfacial fractures among the pediatric population.MethodsThe primary predictor variables were a set of heterogenous variables that included patient characteristics, injury characteristics, hospitalization outcomes. The primary outcome variable was panfacial fracture. Logistic regression was used to determine the independent risk factors for panfacial fractures.ResultsRelative to infants and toddlers, teenagers were nearly three times more likely to sustain panfacial fractures (P < .01). Relative to no chronic conditions, patients with one or more chronic conditions were more likely to incur panfacial fractures. Motorcycle accidents were over three times more likely (P < .01) to result in panfacial fractures while car accidents were over two times more likely (P < .01) to result in panfacial fractures. Falls were less likely (OR, .39; P < .01) to result in panfacial fractures.ConclusionsMotor vehicle accidents was a major risk factor for panfacial fractures. Teenagers are also found to have an increased risk for panfacial fractures relative to infants and toddlers. Each additional chronic condition was a significant risk factor for suffering panfacial fractures relative to not having any chronic condition at all. In contrast, falls independently decreased the risk of incurring a panfacial fractures. Special attention should be given to safety precautions when occupying a motor vehicle.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T06:05:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221116961
       
  • Implant Survival in Tissue-Engineered Mandibular
           Reconstruction—Early Experiences

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      Authors: Victoria A. Mañón, Nicholas Oda, Emeric Boudreaux, Huy Tran, Simon Young, James C. Melville
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe purpose of this article is to evaluate the early outcomes of dental implants placed in bone generated with tissue engineering techniques, specifically recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), allogeneic bone particulate, and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) in patients with resection of benign pathology.MethodsWe retrospectively evaluated 12 patient records, all of whom underwent segmental mandibular resection of benign pathology and reconstruction with a combination of BMAC, rhBMP-2, and allogeneic bone. Collected data points included the patient’s age, gender, medical and social histories, implant site and placement date, resection/reconstruction date, final prosthesis, pathology resected, and follow-up dates (average 25 months of follow-up). Implant success was defined as clinical osseointegration (immobility), absence of peri-implant radiolucency, and absence of infection.ResultsTwelve patients met inclusion criteria with a total 46 implants. The overall implant survival rate was 91.3%. There were 4 implant failures occurring in two patients: 1 failure in Patient 3 and 3 failures in Patient 8. Neither patient had any existing medical comorbidities or social history known to increase the risk for implant failure. The average implant placement occurred 11.6 months after mandibular reconstruction.ConclusionPreliminary findings of implant placement in bone generated with tissue engineering techniques have shown to be another predictable alternative for orofacial rehabilitation.Practical ImplicationsDental rehabilitation using dental implants is a predictable treatment option for patients that have required reconstruction of large bony defects status post resection of benign pathology using novel tissue engineering techniques.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T10:31:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221116962
       
  • Iain Hamilton McVicar (12/08/1958–11/06/2022)

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      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T09:20:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221110417
       
  • Reconstruction in Salvage Surgery for Head and Neck Cancers

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      Authors: Nageswara R. Noothanapati, Nisha R. Akali, Rahul Buggaveeti, Deepak Balasubramanian, Jimmy Mathew, Subramania Iyer, Krishnakumar Thankappan
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionSalvage surgery is the treatment option in recurrences and second primary tumors. This paper aimed to study the options and outcomes of reconstruction and the predictors of poor reconstructive outcomes in salvage surgery for head and neck cancers.Study DesignThis is a retrospective study of all patients who underwent reconstructive flap surgery as part of salvage surgery for head and neck cancers between the years 2004 and 2017.MethodsThe initial treatment may be single modality radiotherapy or surgery or multimodality with combinations of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Any pathology that required surgical salvage was included. Any procedures done purely as reconstructive surgery were excluded. Predictor variables included demographical, clinical, and treatment factors. The outcome parameter was the occurrence of any flap-related complication or not. The complications and morbidity related to the procedures are reportedResultsNinety-three patients underwent loco-regional flaps (LRF group), and 100 had free flaps (FF group). Pectoralis major flap was the commonest flap used in 68 patients (73.1%). Anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap was the commonest free flap and comprised 41% of the FF group. Any skin-related complication was seen in 35 patients (37.6%) and 41 (41%), respectively, in LRF and FF subsets. Any flap-related complication was seen in 16 patients (17.2%) and 29 patients (29%), respectively, in LRF and FF subsets. A summary measure “any one of the complications” was seen in 46 (49.5%) and 57 (57%), respectively, in LRF and FF subsets. Univariate and multivariate analysis for any flap-related complication identified no statistically significant predictor.ConclusionsSoft tissue flaps were preferred in salvage reconstruction, though the defects had a bony component. In the microvascular free flap reconstruction era, pectoralis major flap has shifted its role from a “workhorse flap” to a “salvage flap.” About half of the patients develop some complications. Flap-related complications are also common. In salvage surgery, it is important that an appropriate flap is selected, suitable for the setting, according to the indications, neck, and patient conditions.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T11:46:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221109248
       
  • Anatomical Patterns of the Nasopalatine Canal and Incisive Foramen in an
           African Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study

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      Authors: Krishan Sarna, Merna A. Estreed, Khushboo J. Sonigra, Thomas Amuti, Florence Opondo, Martin Kamau, Wei C. Ngeow
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study DesignDescriptive cross-sectional.ObjectiveTo determine the morphology and morphometry of the nasopalatine canal (NPC) and incisive foramen (IF) in an African population.Materials and MethodsMeasurements of the NPC and the IF were carried out on 150 Cone-Beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The maxillary bone thickness anterior to the NPC was measured at 3 levels. Independent t-test and Chi-square test were performed to determine the presence of sexual dimorphism.ResultsThe presence of one Stenson’s foramen was most prevalent. The mean length of NPC was 13.21 ± 3.25 mm with significantly longer canals in males. The most prevalent shape of NPC was cylindrical in sagittal view and a single canal in coronal view. The mean angulation of NPC was 118.42° to the horizontal plane. The average dimensions of the IF were 3.53 mm and 3.07 mm in the anteroposterior and mediolateral diameter, respectively, while the most common shape was round. The anterior maxillary bone was thicker in males and generally reduced in thickness from the anterior nasal spine superiorly towards the alveolar crest inferiorly.ConclusionThis study highlights the anatomical characteristics of the NPC and IF, with significant sexual dimorphism observed regarding the number of Stenson’s foramina, length of NPC, shapes of the NPC and IF, as well as alveolar bone thickness anterior to NPC.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T09:36:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221100943
       
  • Mathematical Modeling of Vessel Geometry and Circumference in
           Microvascular Surgery

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      Authors: Stacey Nedrud, Yoram Fleissig, Alba Sanjuan-Sanjuan, Anthony Bunnell, Rui Fernandes
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionMicrovascular anastomosis has traditionally been executed with a perpendicular transection through the vessel at the widest diameter to increase circumference and thus increase blood flow while decreasing resistance. In Chen’s 2015 article, it was suggested that an “open Y” would improve vessel size match, and Wei and Mardini discuss angled transections of the vessels. This project aims to explore the geometric configurations feasible at the anastomotic transection and mathematically model the resulting hypothetical increases in circumference.Materials and MethodsThe mathematical models were theoretically developed by our team. The formulas model increases in circumference of the transection at different distances in relation to the bifurcation of a blood vessel, as well as changes in circumference at different transection angulations. An in vitro exploration as to the anastomotic feasibility of each geometric cut was completed on ten poultry tissue specimens.ResultsThe mathematical models demonstrated the change in vessel circumference, with multiple geometric designs calculated, best shown through diagrams. For example, if the vessel width is 1 mm, the distance from the increasing vessel diameter to the final bifurcation is 1 mm, and the bifurcation angle is 45°, the circumference of the transected vessel increases by 82.8%. Models of transections at different angulations, for instance 30°, 45°, and 60°, yield an increase in elliptical circumference of 8.0%, 22.5%, and 58.1%, respectively. Additional derivations calculate the elliptical circumference at any angle in a single vessel, and at any angle in a bifurcating vessel.ConclusionThe theoretical and clinical aim of this project is to increase awareness of the anastomotic creativity and mathematically demonstrate the optimal anastomotic geometry, which has not been objectively explored to our knowledge. An in vivo study would further support clinical improvements, with the aim to map postoperative fluid dynamics through the geometric anastomoses.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-05-15T04:32:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221097252
       
  • The Effect of Chitohem Bleeding Inhibitor Powder on Pain and Bleeding
           After Tonsillectomy by Suturing Method

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      Authors: Seied-Reza Seied-Mohammad Doulabi, Alireza Moradi, Navid Ahmady Roozbahany, Sohbat Rezaei, Niloufar Khoshfetrat, Fahime Shamsian, Mehran Baghi
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study Design and ObjectivesThis study aimed to investigate Chitohem bleeding inhibitor powder’s effect on pain and bleeding after tonsillectomy by suturing method.Materials and MethodsThe present study was performed as a single-blind clinical trial on 150 patients who underwent a total tonsillectomy in the ENT department of Loghman Hakim Hospital in Tehran during 2014–2015. Candidates for total tonsillectomy were randomized into 2 groups one by one. Participants were randomly divided into 2 groups. Both groups matched homologically. Patients in both groups (intervention and control) underwent cold dissection total tonsillectomy. In addition to suturing, in the intervention group, Chitohem powder was used to control the local bleeding at the surgical site. In the control group, only sutures were used to control bleeding. The studied variables included: bleeding and pain 24 hours after surgery, Time to start oral feeding.ResultThe frequency of bleeding cases in the first 24 hours are included: 1 patient (1.33%) in the intervention group and 6 patients (8%) in the control group (P < .01). The mean duration of feeding onset in the intervention group was 3.3 ± 1.13 hours after surgery and in the control group, was 4.7 ± 1.52 hours after surgery (P < .01). Only 1.3% of patients in the intervention group took analgesics in the first 24 hours after surgery, while 12% of control group received analgesics in the same time period.ConclusionIn general, the results of this study showed that the use of Chitohem powder in total tonsillectomy could reduce bleeding, analgesics usage, and the time of feeding onset.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-05-15T03:27:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221092571
       
  • Extended Total Temporomandibular Joint Replacement – A Feasible Option
           for Functional and Aesthetic Reconstruction of Mandibular Defects
           Involving the Temporomandibular Joint

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      Authors: Juergen Schlabe, Rhodri O.H.L. Davies, Esben Aagaard, Gary Cousin, Andrew Ian Edwards, Kenneth McAlister, Luke Cascarini
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionAlloplastic temporomandibular joint replacement has been established as a standard technique for end-stage temporomandibular (TMJ) pathologies. Joint replacement when there are extensive mandibular defects remains a challenging clinical problem. Custom-made extended temporomandibular joint replacement is a feasible option but there is limited information about this emerging technique.Methods and patientsIn this retrospective case series, the authors report the results, surgical techniques, pitfalls and outcome of more than 2 years follow-up with reference to thirteen extended TMJ-replacements (TMJe) including twelve patients. The most common diagnosis was ameloblastoma of the mandibular ramus.DiscussionThe authors suggest a simplified anatomically based single-stage or two-stage regime, with both regimes achieved excellent anatomic reconstruction, facial appearance and function with low surgical morbidity.ConclusionCustom-made extended temporomandibular joint protheses appear an advanced and reliable solution for reconstruction of combined complex mandibular defects including the temporomandibular joint. If surgical clearance of the pathology can be achieved, a single-stage regime is favoured.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-05-14T08:29:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221094971
       
  • What Factors Influence the Hospitalization of Self-Inflicted
           Craniomaxillofacial Gunshot Wounds'

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      Authors: Dani Stanbouly, Sung-Kiang Chuang
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study Design and ObjectivesThe purpose of this retrospective cohort study is to compare the hospitalization outcomes of managing maxillofacial trauma attempted suicide among handguns, shotguns, and hunting rifles.Materials and MethodsThe following retrospective cohort study was competed using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample a database from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). The primary predictor variable was the type of firearm. The outcome variables were the hospital charges (U.S. dollars) and length of stay (days). We used SPSS version 25 for Mac (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA) to conduct all statistical analyses.ResultsA final sample of 223 patients was statistically analyzed. Relative to patients within the Q2 median household income quartile, patients in the Q4 median household income quartile added +$ 172’609 (P < .05) in hospital charges. Relative to patients living in “central” counties of metro areas, patients in micropolitan counties added +13.18 days (P < .05) to the length of stay. Relative to patients in the Q2 median household income quartile, patients in Q3 added +9.54 days (P < .05) while patients in Q4 added +11.49 days (P < .05) to the length of stay.ConclusionsBeing within the highest income quartile was associated with increased hospital charges. Patients living in micropolitan counties have prolonged hospitalization relative to patients in metropolitan counties. Relative to the second income quartile, length of stay was higher in the third income quartile and highest in the fourth income quartile. Increase income grants access to deadlier firearms.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T09:37:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221094975
       
  • Nine Years of Retrospective Study of Mandibular Fractures in Semi-urban
           Teaching Hospital, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India

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      Authors: Narotam K. Ghezta, Yogesh Bhardwaj, Rangila Ram, Monika Parmar, Rowena N. Basi, Pooja Thakur
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study designRetrospective study.ObjectiveTo evaluate current trends in maxillofacial trauma, a retrospective study of mandibular fractures at Government Dental College and Hospital Shimla H.P was carried out.Patients and MethodsIn this retrospective study, records of 910 patients with mandibular fractures were reviewed between 2007 and 2015 in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery out of total 1656 facial fractures. These mandibular fractures were assessed according to age, sex, aetiology in addition to monthly and yearly distribution. Post-operative complications such as malocclusion, neurosensory disturbances and infection were recorded.ResultsIt was observed that mandibular fractures were most frequent in males (67.5%) and in the age group of 21–30 years; accidental fall was the most common etiological factor (43.8%) in the present study and in stark difference to already published reports. The most common fracture site was that of condylar region 239 (26.2%). Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) were done in 67.3% cases whereas 32.6% were managed by maxillomandibular fixation and circummandibular wiring. Miniplate osteosynthesis was the most favoured technique. The complication with ORIF was 16%.ConclusionTo treat mandibular fractures, currently there are many techniques. However, in minimizing complications and in achieving satisfactory functional and aesthetic results experienced surgical team plays an important role.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T04:19:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221095984
       
  • Extracorporealization of the Mandibular Condyle: Effects on Viability and
           Function

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      Authors: Max R. Emmerling, Meghan LaVigne, Gary Warburton, John F. Caccamese, Robert A. Ord
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveFor certain condylar fractures, extracorporealization of the condylar segment may be performed via extra-oral vertical ramus osteotomy (EVRO) to facilitate reduction and fixation. This approach can similarly be used for condyle-sparing resection of osteochondromas of the condyle. Due to controversy regarding long-term health of the condyle after extracorporealization, we investigated the viability of this technique through a retrospective analysis of outcomes.MethodsTwenty-six patients were treated using EVRO with extracorporealization of the condyle for both condylar fractures (18 patients) and osteochondroma (8 patients). Of the 18 trauma patients, 4 were excluded due to limited follow-up. Clinical outcomes were measured, including occlusion, maximum interincisal opening (MIO), facial asymmetry, incidence of infection, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. Radiographic signs of condylar resorption were investigated, quantified, and categorized using panoramic imaging.ResultsAverage follow-up was 15.9 months. Average maximum interincisal opening was 36.8 mm. Four patients demonstrated mild resorption and one patient demonstrated moderate resorption. Two cases of malocclusion were attributed to failed repairs of other concurrent facial fractures. Three patients reported TMJ pain.ConclusionsExtracorporealization of the condylar segment with EVRO to facilitate open treatment of condylar fractures is a viable treatment option when more conventional approaches prove unsuccessful.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T10:29:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221095989
       
  • Plastic and Maxillofacial Training for War-Zones – A Systematic
           Review

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      Authors: Tiffanie-Marie Borg, Naveen Cavale, Ghassan Abu-Sittah, Ali Ghanem
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionInjuries sustained in war-zones are variable and constantly developing according to the nature of the ongoing conflict. Soft tissue involvement of the extremities, head and neck often necessitates reconstructive expertise. However, current training to manage injuries in such settings is heterogenous. This study aims to evaluate interventions in place to train Plastic and Maxillofacial surgeons for war-zone environments so that limitations to current training can be addressed.MethodA literature search of Medline and EMBase was performed using terms relevant to Plastic and Maxillofacial surgery training and war-zone environments. Articles that met the inclusion criteria were scored then educational interventions described in included literature were categorised according to their length, delivery style and training environment. Between-group ANOVA was performed to compare training strategies.Results2055 citations were identified through this literature search. Thirty-three studies were included in this analysis. The highest scoring interventions were over an extended time-frame with an action-oriented training approach, using simulation or actual patients. Core competencies addressed by these strategies included technical and non-technical skills necessary when working in war-zone type settings.ConclusionSurgical rotations in trauma centers and areas of civil strife, together with didactic courses are valuable strategies to train surgeons for war-zones. These opportunities must be readily available globally and be targeted to the surgical needs of the local population, anticipating the types of combat injuries that often occur in these environments.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T07:22:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221083416
       
  • Single Institute Audit of Maxillofacial Trauma Cases Before and During
           COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Mithilesh Kadanthode, Zainab Chaudhary, Pankaj Sharma, Sujata Mohanty, Chayanika Sharma
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Aims and ObjectivesIn the year 2020, we saw the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 causing COVID-19 into a full blown pandemic. This resulted in constraints on healthcare resources, and the attention was shifted to reduce cross contamination and prevent spreader events. Maxillofacial trauma care was also affected similarly, and most of the cases were managed by closed reduction whenever possible. This paper is an endeavor to document our experience in treating maxillofacial trauma cases before and after nationwide lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic in India.Material and MethodsThe retrospective comparative study was conducted in Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Maulana Azad institute of Dental Sciences, Delhi, for a period of 20 months, that is, 10 months before and after nationwide lock down which was effective from 23rd March 2020 due to COVID-19 pandemic. The cases were grouped into Group A (those reporting from 1st June 2019 to 31st March 2020) and Group B (those reporting from 1st April 2020 to 31st January 2021). Primary objective were assessed and compared according to etiology, gender, location of the mandibular fractures, and treatment provided. Quality of life (QoL) associated with the treatment outcome by closed reduction was assessed after 2 months as a secondary objective using General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) in Group B.ResultA total of 798 patients sought treatment for mandibular fractures and included 476 patients in Group A and 322 in Group B. The groups showed similar age and male:female ratio. Cases showed a steep fall during first wave of pandemic, and most of the cases occurred as result of RTA followed by fall and assault. The fractures due to fall and assault showed an obvious rise during the lockdown period. There was 718 (89.97%) patients having exclusive mandibular fractures and 80 (10.03%) patients having involvement of both mandible and maxilla. Single fractures of mandible constituted of 110 (23.11%) and 58 (18.01%) in Group A and B, respectively. 324 patients (68.07%) and 226 patients (70.19%) had multiple fractures involving mandible in respective groups. Parasymphysis of mandible was most commonly involved (24.31%) followed closely by unilateral condyle (23.48%) then Angle and Ramus of mandible (20.71%) with coronoid being the least fractured. During the initial 6 months after lockdown, all the cases were treated successfully using closed reduction. GOHAI QoL assessment conducted in cases having exclusive mandibular fracture (210 Multiple, 48 Single) showed favorable results with significant (P < .05) difference between the single and multiple fractures.ConclusionAfter one and half years and recovering from the second wave of pandemic that hit the country, we have come to understand COVID-19 better and embraced better management protocol. The study reveals that IMF remains as the gold standard for the management of most of the facial fractures in pandemic situation. It was evident from the QoL data that most of the patients were able to carry out their day to day functions adequately. As the country prepares for a third wave of pandemic, management of maxillofacial trauma by closed reduction will remain the norm for most unless indicated otherwise.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T06:10:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875211064514
       
  • Printing in Time for Cranio-Maxillo-facial-Trauma Surgery: Key Parameters
           to Factor in

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      Authors: Léonard Bergeron, Michelle Bonapace-Potvin, François Bergeron
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study Designretrospective cohort study.Objective3D printing is used extensively in cranio-maxillo-facial (CMF) surgery, but difficulties remain for surgeons to implement it in an acute trauma setting because critical information is often omitted from reports. Therefore, we developed an in-house printing pipeline for a variety of cranio-maxillo-facial fractures and characterized each step required to print a model in time for surgery.MethodsAll consecutive patients requiring in-house 3D printed models in a level 1 trauma center for acute trauma surgery between March and November 2019 were identified and analyzed.ResultsSixteen patients requiring the printing of 25 in-house models were identified. Virtual Surgical Planning time ranged from 0h 08min to 4h 41min (mean = 1h 46min). The overall printing phase per model (pre-processing, printing, and post-processing) ranged from 2h 54min to 27h 24min (mean = 9h 19min). The overall success rate of prints was 84%. Filament cost was between $0.20 and $5.00 per model (mean = $1.56).ConclusionsThis study demonstrates that in-house 3D printing can be done reliably in a relatively short period of time, therefore allowing 3D printing usage for acute facial fracture treatment. When compared to outsourcing, in-house printing shortens the process by avoiding shipping delays and by having a better control over the printing process. For time-critical prints, other time-consuming steps need to be considered, such as virtual planning, pre-processing of 3D files, post-processing of prints, and print failure rate.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T04:26:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221083231
       
  • Patterns and Trends of Facial Fractures at a Tertiary Care Trauma Center
           in India - A 13 years Retrospective Study

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      Authors: Debraj Shome, Monika Surana, Shiva Ram Male, Vaibhav Kumar, Supriya S. Vyavahare, Arundha Abrol, Rinky Kapoor
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study DesignRetrospective studyObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the prevalence, pattern, diagnosis, and treatment of the facial fractures falling under ambit of facial plastic surgery in a multi-specialty hospital at India from the year 2006–2019.MethodsThis retrospective study analyzed 1508 patients, having orbital fractures (from 2006 to 2019) for demographic data, cause of trauma, type of fracture, and the treatment given. The data were compiled in excel and analyzed by using SPSS version 21.0.ResultsOut of these 1508 patient (1127 (74.73%)–males and 381 (25.27%)–females), the etiology of injuries was Road traffic accident (RTA) (49.20%), assault (26.52%), and sports injuries (11.47%). The most common fracture pattern was Isolated Orbit and/or Orbital Floor fracture in 451 patients (32.08%), followed by Mid-facial fractures (21.93%). Also, 105 patients (6.96%) experienced ocular/retinal trauma along with other fractures.ConclusionOrbit, peri-ocular, and mid-face trauma comprised a large position of this study. It requires a great deal of expertise to treat such complex trauma, which is not covered in one specialty alone. Hence, a holistic approach of craniofacial fracture management, rather than limiting these skills to water-tight craniofacial compartments becomes necessary. The study highlights the critical need of multidisciplinary approach for predictable and successful management of such complex cases.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T06:18:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221084172
       
  • Comparison of Efficacy and Safety of Hybrid Arch Bar with Erich Arch Bar
           in the Management of Mandibular Fractures: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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      Authors: Hariram Sankar, Sachin Rai, Satnam S. Jolly, Vidya Rattan
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study DesignA clinical randomized control trial.ObjectivesTo compare the efficacy and safety of Hybrid arch bar (HAB) with Erich arch bar (EAB) in fracture management of the mandible.MethodsIn this randomized clinical trial, 44 patients were divided into 2 groups:- Group 1, N = 23 (EAB group) and Group 2, N = 21 (HAB group). The primary outcome was time taken for the application of arch bar, while the inner and outer glove puncture, operator prick, oral hygiene, arch bar stability, complications of HAB, and cost comparison were secondary outcomes.ResultsThe time taken for the application of arch bar in group 2 was significantly shorter than group 1 (55.66 ± 17.869 min vs 82.04 ± 12.197 min) and the frequency of outer glove puncture was also significantly lesser for group 2 (0 punctures vs 9 punctures). Better oral hygiene was found in group 2. EAB was cost-effective than HAB (Rs 700 ± 239.79 vs Rs 1742.50 ± 257.14). The stability of the arch bar was comparable in both groups. Group 2 had associated complications of root injury in 2 out of 252 screws placed and the screw head got covered by soft tissue in 137 out of 252 screws placed.ConclusionThus, HAB was better than EAB with a shorter time of application, less risk of prick injury, and improved oral hygiene.Clinical trial registry name- clinical trials registry- India, URL-http://ctri.nic.in, registration number- CTRI/2020/06/025966.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-03-29T03:47:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221080019
       
  • Treatment of Persistent Post-traumatic Diplopia – An Algorithmic
           Approach to Patient Stratification and Operative Management

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      Authors: Sashank K. Reddy, Salih Colakoglu, Joshua S. Yoon, Myan Bhoopalam, Shannath L. Merbs, Paul N. Manson, Michael P. Grant
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study DesignRetrospective chart review of revisional orbital surgery outcomes in patients with diplopia from prior operative treatment of orbital trauma.ObjectiveOur study seeks to review our experience with management of persistent post-traumatic diplopia in patients with previous orbital reconstruction and present a novel patient stratification algorithm predictive of improved outcomes.MethodsA retrospective chart review was performed on adult patients at Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital and at the University of Maryland Medical Center who underwent revisional orbital surgery for correction of diplopia for the years 2005–2020. Restrictive strabismus was determined by Lancaster red-green testing coupled with computed tomography and/or forced duction. Globe position was assessed by computed tomography. Seventeen patients requiring operative intervention according to study criteria were identified.ResultsGlobe malposition affected fourteen patients and restrictive strabismus affected eleven patients. In this select group, improvement in diplopia occurred in 85.7% of cases with globe malposition and in 90.1% of cases with restrictive strabismus. One patient underwent additional strabismus surgery subsequent to orbital repair.ConclusionsPost-traumatic diplopia in patients with prior orbital reconstruction can be successfully managed in appropriate patients with a high degree of success. Indications for surgical management include (1) globe malposition and (2) restrictive strabismus. High resolution computer tomography and Lancaster red-green testing discriminate these from other causes that are unlikely to benefit from orbital surgery.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T11:51:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221083084
       
  • Systematic Mapping Review of Orthognathic Surgery (Protocol)

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      Authors: Josefina Bendersky, Macarena Uribe, Maximiliano Bravo, Juan Pablo Vargas, Julio Villanueva, Gerard Urrutia, Xavier Bonfill
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study designThis document details the planning phase of a systematic mapping review.ObjectiveThe objective of this mapping review is to identify, describe, and organize evidence currently available from systematic reviews and primary studies regarding different co-interventions and surgical modalities used in orthognathic surgery (OS) and their outcomes.MethodsSystematic reviews (SRs), randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and observational studies that evaluate perioperative OS co-interventions and surgical modalities will be identified in an exhaustive search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Epistemonikos, Lilacs, Web of Science, and CENTRAL. Grey literature will also be screened.ResultsExpected results include identification of all PICO questions available in the evidence regarding OS and generation of evidence bubble maps, involving a matrix of all identified co-interventions, surgical modalities, and outcomes presented in the studies. This will achieve identification of research gaps and prioritization of new research questions.ConclusionsThe significance of this review will result in a systematic identification and characterization of the available evidence, leading to a reduction in research waste and a guidance of future efforts in developing studies for unsolved questions.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T10:28:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221078385
       
  • A Prospective Study on Autotransplantation of Mandibular Third Molars With
           Complete Root Formation

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      Authors: Shishir Dhar, Gaurav Singh, Madan Mishra, Amit Gaur
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study DesignAutotransplantation, if possible, is a viable option for replacing a missing tooth when a donor tooth is available. The most typical tooth transplant is the transfer of a third molar to a first molar site. No immune reaction results from transplants of this nature. It restores the proprioceptive function and normal periodontal healing; thus, the patient can have a natural chewing feeling and natural biological response.ObjectivesThis study aims to evaluate the prognosis of autotransplanted mandibular third molar and also to evaluate the cost effectiveness of the treatment performed when compared to the other treatment modalities for prosthetic rehabilitation.MethodsA prospective study was done in the Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Sardar Patel Post Graduate Institute of Dental & Medical Sciences, Lucknow, UP, India, with over 20 patients to evaluate the prognosis of autotransplanted mandibular third molars with complete root formation after atraumatic extraction of first or second mandibular molar, which were randomly selected irrespective of race, sex, caste, and socio-economic status. Regular clinical and radiographical examinations were performed over a period of 1 year and the patients were assessed for pain, swelling, infection, dry socket, periodontal pocket depth, ankylosis, root resorption, tooth mobility, and level of buccal bone in relation to cementoenamel junction (CEJ).ResultsEighteen out of 20 transplants were successful; only 2 mandibular transplants were extracted because of abnormal horizontal and axial mobility and the reason of failure was attributed to fact that the roots of transplant were short and conical and there was lack of alveolar bone height at the recipient site in one patient, while root resorption was the reason for failure of transplant in the other patient.ConclusionThis study assessed the efficacy of autotransplantation of molars and the viability of the procedure to replace unrestorable molar teeth; it also supports the hypothesis that transplantation of a mandibular third molar for replacement of a lost or seriously damaged molar tooth could be a reasonable alternative.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T04:28:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875211055600
       
  • Elevated Intracranial Pressure After Primary Surgical Correction of
           Sagittal Suture Craniosynostosis

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      Authors: Rami P. Dibbs, Andrew M. Ferry, Lesley Davies, David F. Bauer, Edward P. Buchanan, Han Zhuang Beh
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study Design: A Case Report.Objective: Craniosynostosis is a craniofacial condition defined by premature fusion of at least one cranial suture. Resynostosis or secondary craniosynostosis of a previously patent adjacent suture following primary repair is a relatively common complication. While studies have assessed the rates of secondary craniosynostosis and subsequent reoperation, extremely limited data regarding reoperation techniques is available.Methods: We present a unique case of a pediatric patient with sagittal craniosynostosis who previously underwent a modified pi procedure and later developed resynostosis of the sagittal suture and secondary synostosis of the bicoronal sutures. We subsequently performed total cranial vault reconstruction with virtual surgical planning (VSP).Results: At his 31-month postoperative follow-up, he displayed normal head shape and denied any clinical signs of elevated intracranial pressures with a normal ophthalmological exam.Conclusions: The reoperation was successful with no significant postoperative complications noted. Performing geometric expansion with VSP to manage fusion of a previously open suture following primary treatment of sagittal synostosis should be considered within the armamentarium of operative options.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T12:56:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875211064680
       
  • Systematic Review of Laryngeal Fractures and Trends in Operative
           Management

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      Authors: Annie E. Moroco, Vijay A. Patel, Robert A. Saadi, John P. Gniady, Jessyka G. Lighthall
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study DesignSystematic review of the literature.ObjectiveThe goal of this study is to review the current literature on the trends in management of laryngeal fractures following trauma.MethodsIndependent searches of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases were performed. Articles from the period of 1963 to 2020 were collected. All studies which described laryngeal fractures using the Boolean method and relevant search term combinations, including “Laryngeal”, “Fracture”, “Operative”, and “Management” were collected.ResultsA total of 588 relevant unique articles were identified for analysis. Of these, 24 articles were deemed appropriate for inclusion in the literature review. Due to variability in study design and outcome measures, formal synthesis of data in the form of a meta-analysis was not possible.ConclusionsLaryngeal fractures are rare traumatic injuries that require early identification and evaluation with complex management options. This comprehensive review aims to highlight the breadth of the topic with regard to presentation and clinical management. Though there remains no clear best practice for laryngeal fracture management, we review trends in clinical practice throughout the literature.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T07:56:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221074847
       
  • Complicated Facial Lacerations: Challenges in the Repair and Management of
           Complications by a Facial Trauma Team

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      Authors: Moumita De, Sushma Sagar, Aniket Dave, Ruchi Pathak Kaul, Maneesh Singhal
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Face is our window to the world. It conveys our emotions and represents our identity. Any deformity of the face has profound impact on the social and psychological aspect of a person’s life. Therefore, management of any facial wound is of paramount importance. Most of the facial injuries are usually managed and repaired by emergency care physician or emergency surgeon. While basic surgical principles are applied in repairing such wounds, certain wounds require specialized knowledge and care owing to the complicated nature of these wounds and involvement of important structures. We present our experience in managing such complicated wounds over a period of 1 year at a level 1 trauma center by a dedicated facial trauma team consisting of a plastic surgeon, a trauma surgeon and a maxillofacial surgeon. We put forward the difficulties associated with such wounds and emphasize on specific aspects to be looked for and surgical principles in managing the same that can be applied by emergency care physicians or alert them regarding further complications.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T04:35:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875211064512
       
  • Likelihood of Craniofacial Injury and Hospitalization with Alcohol Use
           While Skateboarding and Scootering

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      Authors: Thomas J Sorenson, Matthew D Rich, Annika Deitermann, Rachael Gotlieb, Nicholas Garcia, Ruth J Barta, Warren Schubert
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeConcurrent alcohol and drug use has been found to increase the risk of injury for many recreational activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between substance use and craniofacial injury in a population of patients experiencing skateboard- and scooter-related trauma.MethodsWe report a cross-sectional study of patients reported to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) from January 1, 2019, to December 31, 2020, in the United States. Patients were included in our study if they were evaluated in the emergency department (ED) for a skateboard- or scooter-related injury. The primary outcome was craniofacial injury. The secondary outcome was hospitalization.ResultsThere were over 5396 total patients who presented to a NEISS-participating ED after skateboard- or scooter-related trauma during the study period. There were 1136 patients with a craniofacial injury (primary endpoint), and patients under the influence of alcohol or drugs had greater odds of experiencing a craniofacial injury than those not under the influence (odds ratio [OR]: 4.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.24-5.32, P < .0001). Four hundred-thirty patients were hospitalized (secondary endpoint), and patients under the influence had greater odds of being hospitalized than those not under the influence (OR: 2.83, 95% CI: 2.04-3.91, P < .0001).ConclusionsAlcohol and drug use while skateboarding or scootering drastically increases the likelihood of craniofacial injury and subsequent hospitalization and should be avoided whenever possible. The importance of wearing a helmet while operating these devices cannot be overstated.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-01-21T09:09:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875211069219
       
  • Comparison of Teriparatide and Combination of Cissus Quadrangularis and
           Dalbergia Sissoo on Bone Healing Against the Control Group in
           Maxillofacial Fractures: A Randomized Open-label Control Trial

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      Authors: Gigi PG, Ankita Chugh, Kirti Chaudhry, Amanjot Kaur, Pravin Kumar, Shubham Gaur, Shailendra Kumar, Surjit Singh
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study DesignRandomized Control Trial.ObjectivesA randomized control trial was planned to aim to assess whether subcutaneous Injection of Teriparatide and Tablet Reunion (combination of Cissus Quadrangularis and Dalbergia sissoo) improves maxillofacial fracture healing as compared to the control group.Methods24 patients of mandibular fracture with or without concomitant maxillofacial fractures were randomly divided into 3 equal groups (Group 1- Control, Group 2- Tablet Reunion, and Group 3- Injection Teriparatide) and the treatment duration was 4 weeks. Pain, fracture site mobility, bite force, serum markers, and radiographic healing were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively at regular intervals till 12 weeks.ResultsGroup 2 showed early pain relief, although it was insignificant. Group 3 showed the highest anterior bite force at all the time points. Change in mean posterior bite force (PBF) showed a statistically significant increase at 8th week and 12th week in intergroup comparison; however, at 12th week, Group 3 was significantly better than Group 1 and reported the highest posterior bite force compared to other groups. Serum calcium and PTH level showed no significant difference, whereas Serum ALP showed a statistically significant increase in Group 3. The radiographic assessment showed no significant difference among the 3 groups.ConclusionBoth the intervention group drugs showed a promising effect on accelerating the fracture healing and improving bite force restoration with the osteoanabolic action; however, early radiographic healing and increased serum osteogenic markers in Group 3 indicate its possible optimistic role in maxillofacial fracture healing.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T12:32:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875211067007
       
  • Analysis of Neoclassical Canons in Adult Kenyans of Indian Descent

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      Authors: Krishan Sarna, Tom Mulama Osundwa, Martin Kamau, Khushboo Jayant Sonigra
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAnalysis of facial proportions is essential during the planning and execution of reconstructive surgery to achieve a pleasing aesthetic outcome. These proportions are derived from the neoclassical canons which have long been used as a guide for surgeons in numerous disciplines involving the facial region. Baseline anthropometric data describing these proportions is scarce for Kenyans of Indian descent. Therefore, this study aims to establish anthropometric norms and to test the validity of 4 neoclassical canons.MethodsUsing direct anthropometric landmarks, 3 vertical and 4 horizontal measurements were made on the faces of 130 adult Kenyans of Indian descent. The mean of each anthropometric measurement was calculated, and a student t-test was used to identify significant gender differences. These results were compared to 4 neoclassical canons and the percentage of each canon and its variants were recorded. A chi-square test was then performed to assess any gender differences between these findings.ResultsWhen comparing between sexes, the anthropometric means of males were larger than those of females except for eye fissure length. In addition, only the upper third displayed sexual dimorphism. As for the neoclassical canons, the orbital canon was found to apply to 20.0% of males and 21.6% of females, followed by the naso-oral canon found in 16.4% of males and 17.6% of females, and the orbito-nasal canon present in 14.5% of males and 18.9% of females. The vertical canon was not found to be applicable to any participant.ConclusionThe facial morphometric measurements in this population differ from the described neoclassical canons since they do not apply to the majority of these individuals. Therefore, surgeons should be guided by the observed population-specific differences during reconstructive and facial aesthetic surgery.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T06:55:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875221077005
       
  • The Most Dangerous Game: A Review of Head and Neck Injuries in American
           Football and Rugby

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      Authors: Jordan Richardson, Dani Stanbouly, Harrison Moynihan, Renée M. Reynolds, Matthew J. Recker, Michael R. Markiewicz
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study DesignThe investigators designed and implemented a 20-year cross-sectional study using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database.ObjectiveThe purpose of this study is to estimate and compare hospital admission (danger) rates between rugby and football of those who presented to the emergency department with head and neck injuries after playing these sports.MethodsThe primary predictor variable was sport played. The primary outcome variable was danger, measured by hospital admission rates.ResultsOver the past 20 years, there has been a trend of decreasing incidence of injuries presenting to the emergency department in both sports. There was no difference in the rate of hospital admission when comparing football and rugby (OR, 1.2; P = .1). Male gender was associated with an increased risk of admission. Other variables associated with hospital admission included white racial group, injury taking place in the fall, being either young (15–24 years old) or senior (65 years of age and over), and being injured at school or at a sport/recreational facility.ConclusionsThere is no difference in danger as measured by admission rates between American football and rugby. There exists, however, several variables that are associated with admission when sustaining injury to the head and neck, when playing these two sports.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-01-13T10:56:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875211073437
       
  • Intraoperative Positioning in Maxillofacial Trauma Patients With Cervical
           Spine Injury – Is It Safe' Radiological Simulation in a Healthy
           Volunteer

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      Authors: Thomas Pepper, Harry Spiers, Alex Weller, Clare Schilling
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionCervical spine (C-spine) injury is present in up to 10% of patients with maxillofacial fractures. Uncertainty over the status of the C-spine and permitted head movements may delay maxillofacial surgical intervention, resulting in prolonged patient discomfort and return to oral nutrition, reducing quality of life. This study aimed to investigate the effects on the C-spine of positioning patients for maxillofacial procedures by simulating intraoperative positions for common maxillofacial procedures.MethodsMagnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the effects of head position in common intraoperative configurations – neutral (anterior mandible position), extended (tracheostomy position) and laterally rotated (mandibular condyle position) on the C-spine of a healthy volunteer.ResultsIn the tracheostomy position, maximal movement occurred in the sagittal plane between the cervico-occipital junction and C4–C5, as well as at the cervico-thoracic junction. Minimal movement occurred at C2 (on C3), C5 (on C6) and C6 (on C7). In the mandibular condyle position, C-spine movements occurred in both rotational and sagittal planes. Maximal movement occurred above the level of C4, concentrated at atlanto-occipital and atlanto-axial (C1–2) joints.ConclusionNeck extension is likely to be relatively safe in injuries that are stable in flexion and extension, such as odontoid peg fracture and fractures between C5 and C7. Head rotation is likely to be relatively safe in fractures below C4, as well as vertebral body fractures, and laminar fractures without disc disruption. Early dialogue with the neurosurgical team remains a central tenet of safe management of patients with combined maxillofacial and C-spine injuries.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T07:39:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875211053091
       
  • Associated Injuries Related to Patients With Facial Fractures

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      Authors: Rajarshi Ghosh, Kulandaswamy Gopalkrishnan
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo find out the incidence, type, and severity of injuries in other parts of the body in patients diagnosed with facial fractures. The study also analyzed any correlation between these injuries and facial fractures.Material & MethodsA retrospective study of 991 patients with facial fractures during the period of 2006-2016.Results111 patients reported associated injuries (11.1%). The most common type of injury was limb injury (33.33%), followed by head injury (22.5%), clavicle fracture (14.7%), rib fracture (10.9%), cervical spine injury (5.4%), and other injuries constituted (13.2%). Multiple associated injuries were observed in 14% of patients.ConclusionThe findings show that facial fracture management is a multidisciplinary approach. Prompt diagnosis and proper management are important to reduce the mortality rate and improve the prognosis of the patient.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T12:27:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875211069024
       
  • The Global Impact of COVID-19 on Craniomaxillofacial Surgeons: A Follow-Up
           Survey After One Year

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      Authors: Tevfik Cicek, Justin van der Tas, Thomas Dodson, Daniel Buchbinder, Stefano Fusetti, Michael Grant, Yiu Yan Leung, Erich Roethlisberger, Gregorio Sánchez Aniceto, Alexander Schramm, Edward Bradley Strong, Gerson Mast, Eppo Wolvius
      Abstract: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Ahead of Print.
      Study DesignComparative cross-sectional.The ObjectiveTo measure the impact that COrona VIrus Disease-19 (COVID-19) has had on craniomaxillofacial (CMF) surgeons after 1 year and compare it with 2020 data by (1) measuring access to adequate personal protective equipment (PPE), (2) performance of elective surgery, and (3) the vaccination status. This should be investigated because most CMF surgeons felt that hospitals did not provide them with adequate PPE.MethodsThe investigators surveyed the international AO CMF membership using a 30-item online questionnaire and compared it to a previous study. The primary predictor variable was year of survey administration. Primary outcome variables were availability of adequate personal protective equipment (adequate/inadequate), performance of elective surgery (yes/no), and vaccination status (fully vaccinated/partly vaccinated/not vaccinated). Descriptive and analytic statistics were computed. Binary logistic regression models were created to measure the association between year and PPE availability. Statistical significance level was set at P < .05.ResultsThe sample was composed of 523 surgeons (2% response rate). Most surgeons reported access to adequate PPE (74.6%). The most adequate PPE was offered in Europe (87.8%) with the least offered in Africa (45.5%). Surgeons in 2021 were more likely to report adequate PPE compared to 2020 (OR 3.74, 95% CI [2.59–4.39]). Most of the respondents resumed elective surgery (79.5% vs 13.3% in 2020) and were fully vaccinated (59.1%).ConclusionMost CMF surgeons now have access to adequate PPE, resumed elective surgery, and are either fully or partly vaccinated. Future studies should investigate the long-term impact of the fast-evolving COVID-19 pandemic on CMF surgeons.
      Citation: Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T02:47:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19433875211057877
       
 
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