Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8186 journals)
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ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 149 of 149 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Orthopaedica     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthopedics     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthroplasty Today     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Bone Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Burns & Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Orthopedic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Chinese Journal of Traumatology     Open Access  
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Concussion     Open Access  
Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Orthopaedic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Der Orthopäde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Die Wirbelsäule     Hybrid Journal  
Duke Orthopedic Journal     Open Access  
East African Orthopaedic Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Egyptian Journal of Orthopedic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Técnicas Quirúrgicas - Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
EMC - Tecniche Chirurgiche - Chirurgia Ortopedica     Full-text available via subscription  
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Podiatry / Revista Europea de Podología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Foot & Ankle International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Spine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Orthopaedics     Open Access  
International Musculoskeletal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JAAOS : Global Research & Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants     Hybrid Journal  
JBJS Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
JOR Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal de Traumatologie du Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal für Mineralstoffwechsel & Muskuloskelettale Erkrankungen     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bone and Joint Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Bone and Joint Infection     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Musculoskeletal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
Journal of Orthopaedic Association of South Indian States     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedic Diseases and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthopaedic Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Orthopaedic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Orthopaedic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Orthopaedic Translation     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Orthopaedics, Trauma and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Orthopedics & Rheumatology     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Musculoskeletal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Musculoskeletal Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma     Open Access  
North American Spine Society Journal (NASSJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
OA Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Obere Extremität     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Orthopedics and Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Trauma     Open Access  
Open Orthopaedics Journal     Open Access  
Operative Orthopädie und Traumatologie     Hybrid Journal  
Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopädie & Rheuma     Full-text available via subscription  
Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Orthopaedic Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopaedics and Trauma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Orthopedic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Orthopedic Research and Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Orthopedic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Orthoplastic Surgery     Open Access  
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Osteologie     Hybrid Journal  
Osteoporosis and Sarcopenia     Open Access  
OTA International     Open Access  
Paediatric Orthopaedics and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Prosthetics and Orthotics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Chilena de Ortopedia y Traumatología / Chilean Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Cubana de Ortopedia y Traumatologí­a     Open Access  
Revista de la Asociación Argentina de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Open Access  
Revista Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Portuguesa de Ortopedia e Traumatologia     Open Access  
Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Romanian Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology     Open Access  
SA Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SICOT-J     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Sport-Orthopädie - Sport-Traumatologie - Sports Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Strategies in Trauma and Limb Reconstruction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Techniques in Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma (Travma)     Open Access  
Trauma und Berufskrankheit     Hybrid Journal  
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology and Orthopedics of Russia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ортопедия, травматология и протезирование     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.908
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 78  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0009-921X - ISSN (Online) 1528-1132
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [330 journals]
  • Editor’s Spotlight/Take 5: Patients With Preexisting Anxiety and Mood
           Disorders Are More Likely to Develop Complex Regional Pain Syndrome After
           Fractures

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      Authors: Leopold; Seth S.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 22 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Patients With Preexisting Anxiety and Mood Disorders Are More Likely to
           Develop Complex Regional Pain Syndrome After Fractures

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      Authors: Pereira; Daniel E.; Momtaz, David; Gonuguntla, Rishi; Mittal, Mehul; Singh, Aaron; Dave, Dhyan; Hosseinzadeh, Pooya
      Abstract: imageBackground Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial condition that may affect patients who sustain a fracture in the upper and lower extremities. Prior investigations have formed a foundation for exploring a possible association between psychiatric disorders and the development of CRPS; however, current studies are conflicted regarding the existence and temporality of a relationship between psychiatric disorders and the potential development of CRPS.Questions/purposes (1) Are patients with preexisting anxiety and mood disorders (AMDs) at increased risk of receiving a diagnosis of CRPS after upper or lower extremity fractures' (2) Are patients with preexisting AMDs at increased risk of being diagnosed with CRPS after surgical fixation of their fracture'Methods A large, retrospective cohort study was conducted using the TriNetX electronic medical record platform, which contains data from more than 100 million patients. This platform gathers data from healthcare organizations in the United States and Europe and collects comprehensive data over time that includes temporality rather than simply the binary presence or absence of conditions. The cohort included 760,595 patients older than 18 years with upper or lower extremity fractures between 2003 and 2022. Included patients had a minimum 1-year follow-up. We defined AMDs as any diagnosis of anxiety, depressive episode or disorder, a manic episode, or bipolar disorder. Patients with polytrauma or concurrent upper and lower extremity fractures were excluded to reduce confounders. CRPS I diagnosis was identified via International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition codes. Propensity score matching was performed to balance cohorts based on age, gender, and race. Hazard ratios and Aalen-Johansen cumulative incidence curves for the diagnosis of CRPS were calculated for patients with and without AMD diagnoses before sustaining a fracture. A subanalysis was performed in which we examined individuals in the upper and lower extremity fracture cohorts who underwent surgical treatment.Results Patients with preexisting AMDs were at a higher risk of experiencing CRPS I than patients without AMDs were (upper extremity: HR 1.8 [95% CI 1.7 to 1.9]; p < 0.01, lower extremity: HR 2.2 [95% CI 2.0 to 2.3]; p < 0.01). Similarly, patients with preexisting AMDs were at higher risk of experiencing CRPS I after fracture fixation than patients without AMDs were (upper extremity: HR 1.3 [95% CI 1.2 to 1.5]; p < 0.01, lower extremity: HR 2.3 [95% CI 2.1 to 2.5]; p < 0.01).Conclusion Awareness of the relationship between AMDs and CRPS I will direct future research about the development of this condition and associated neurologic changes. Additionally, surgeons can address AMDs perioperatively and arrange for the treatment of these AMDs with psychiatrists, neurologists, or social work, as appropriate. Accordingly, patients with AMDs should also be made aware of the inherent risk of CRPS I after an upper or lower extremity fracture to comprehensively educate and care for this at-risk patient population.Level of Evidence Level III, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Fri, 22 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Value-based Healthcare: Cost Containment Does Not Equal Value Creation

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      Authors: Bernstein; David N.; Jayakumar, Prakash; Bozic, Kevin J.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 22 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Editorial: Allyship—Not the Solution, But a Way Forward

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      Authors: Gebhardt; Mark C.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORRelations Update: Foot and Ankle

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Robotic-assisted TKA is Not Associated With Decreased
           Odds of Early Revision: An Analysis of the American Joint Replacement
           Registry

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      Authors: Sershon; Robert
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Virtue Ethics in a Value-driven World: Cash for Care

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      Authors: Humbyrd; Casey Jo
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Not the Last Word: I Have Seen the Moment of My Greatness Flicker

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      Authors: Bernstein; Joseph
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Art in Science: Ansel Adams, Medical Photographer

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      Authors: Green; Stuart A.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Letter to the Editor: Anterior Malreduction is Associated With Lag Screw
           Cutout After Internal Fixation of Intertrochanteric Fractures

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      Authors: Chen; Shi-Yi; Li, Hao-Tao; Chang, Shi-Min
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Robotic-assisted TKA is Not Associated With Decreased Odds of Early
           Revision: An Analysis of the American Joint Replacement Registry

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      Authors: Kirchner; Gregory J.; Stambough, Jeffrey B.; Jimenez, Emily; Nikkel, Lucas E.
      Abstract: imageBackground Robotic-assisted TKA continues to see wider clinical use, despite limited knowledge of its impact on patient satisfaction and implant survival. Most studies to date have presented small cohorts and came from single-surgeon or single-center experiences. Therefore, a population-level comparison of revision rates between robotic-assisted and conventional TKA in the registry setting may help arthroplasty surgeons better define whether robotic assistance provides a meaningful advantage compared with the conventional technique.Questions/purposes (1) After controlling for confounding variables, such as surgeon, location of surgery, and patient comorbidity profile, were robotic-assisted TKAs less likely than conventional TKAs to result in revision for any reason at 2 years' (2) After again controlling for confounding variables, were robotic-assisted TKAs less likely to result in any specific reasons for revision than the conventional technique at 2 years'Methods The American Joint Replacement Registry was used to identify patients 65 years or older who underwent TKA between January 2017 and March 2020 with a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Patients were limited to age 65 yeas or older to link TKAs to Medicare claims data. Two retrospective cohorts were created: robotic-assisted TKA and conventional TKA. Patient demographic variables included in the analysis were age, gender, BMI, and race. Additional characteristics included the Charlson comorbidity index, anesthesia type, year of the index procedure, and length of stay. A total of 10% (14,216 of 142,550) of TKAs performed during this study period used robotics. Patients with robotic-assisted TKA and those with conventional TKA were similar regarding age (73 ± 6 years versus 73 ± 6 years; p = 0.31) and gender (62% [8736 of 14,126] versus 62% [79,399 of 128,334] women; p = 0.34). A multivariable, mixed-effects logistic regression model was created to analyze the odds of all-cause revision as a factor of robot use, and a logistic regression model was created to investigate specific revision diagnoses.Results After controlling for potentially confounding variables, such as surgeon, location of surgery, and Charlson comorbidity index, we found no difference between the robotic-assisted and conventional TKAs in terms of the odds of revision at 2 years (OR of robotic-assisted versus conventional TKA 1.0 [95% CI 0.8 to 1.3]; p = 0.92). The reasons for revision of robotic-assisted TKA did not differ from those of conventional TKA, except for an increased odds of instability (OR 1.6 [95% CI 1.0 to 2.4]; p = 0.04) and pain (OR 2.1 [95% CI 1.4 to 3.0]; p < 0.001) in the robotic-assisted cohort.Conclusion In light of these findings, surgeons should not assume that robotic assistance in TKA will lead to improved early implant survival. Our findings do not support an improvement over conventional TKA with robotic assistance with regards to common causes of early revisions such malalignment, malposition, stiffness, pain, and instability, and in some cases, suggest there is a benefit to conventional TKA. Differences in the mid-term and long-term revision risk with conventional versus robotic-assisted TKA remain unknown. Appropriate informed consent around the use of robotic assistance should not imply decreased early revision risk.Level of Evidence Level III, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Can the Acetabular Labrum Be Reconstructed With a
           Meniscal Allograft' An In Vivo Pig Model

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      Authors: Ricciardi; Benjamin F.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Thu, 02 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: In the Treatment of Lateral Epicondylitis by Percutaneous
           Perforation, Injectables Have No Added Value

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      Authors: Wallace; W. Angus
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Tue, 03 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Can the Acetabular Labrum Be Reconstructed With a Meniscal Allograft'
           An In Vivo Pig Model

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      Authors: Maimaitimin; Maihemuti; Yang, Fan; Huang, Hongjie; Ao, Yingfang; Wang, Jianquan
      Abstract: imageBackground No single graft type has been shown to have a benefit in acetabular labral reconstruction. The native labrum and lateral meniscus share many similarities, suggesting that the meniscus may be a promising source of graft material in labral reconstruction.Questions/purposes Using a pig model, we sought to evaluate the healing process of fresh-frozen meniscus allograft for acetabular reconstruction by assessing (1) MRI and macroscopic observations of the meniscus allograft; (2) histologic appearance and immunohistologic evaluation of the meniscus allograft, native meniscus, and labrum; (3) microscopic assessment of the native labrum and meniscus via scanning electron microscopy; and (4) biomechanical assessment of tensile properties.Methods Twelve skeletally mature male miniature Bama pigs (24 hips) were randomly divided into two groups: labral defect group (control) and lateral meniscus allograft group. The selection of Bama pig specimens was based on the similarity of their acetabular labrum to that of the human acetabular labrum, characterized by the presence of fibrocartilage-like tissue lacking blood vessels. The pigs underwent bilateral hip surgery. Briefly, a 1.5-cm-long section was resected in the anterior dorsal labrum, which was left untreated or reconstructed using an allogeneic lateral meniscus. The pigs were euthanized at 12 and 24 weeks postoperatively, and then evaluated by macroscopic observations and MRI measurement to assess the extent of coverage of the labral defect. We also performed a histologic analysis and immunohistologic evaluation to assess the composition and structure of meniscus allograft, native labrum, and meniscus, as well as scanning electron microscopy assessment of the microstructure of the native labrum and meniscus and biomechanical assessment of tensile properties.Results Imaging measurement and macroscopic observations revealed that the resected area of the labrum was fully filled in the lateral meniscus allograft group, whereas in the control group, the labral defect remained at 24 weeks. The macroscopic scores of the meniscus allograft group (8.2 ± 0.8) were higher than those of the control groups (4.8 ± 1.0) (mean difference 3.3 [95% CI 1.6 to 5.0]; p < 0.001). Moreover, in the meniscus allograft group, histologic assessment identified fibrocartilage-like cell cluster formation at the interface between the graft and acetabulum; cells and fibers arranged perpendicularly to the acetabulum and tideline structure that were similar to those of native labrum could be observed at 24 weeks. Immunohistochemical results showed that the average optical density value of Type II collagen at the graft-acetabulum interface was increased in the meniscus allograft group at 24 weeks compared with at 12 weeks (0.259 ± 0.031 versus 0.228 ± 0.023, mean difference 0.032 [95% CI 0.003 to 0.061]; p = 0.013). Furthermore, the tensile modulus of the lateral meniscus allograft was near that of the native labrum at 24 weeks (54.7 ± 9.9 MPa versus 63.2 ± 11.3 MPa, mean difference -8.4 MPa [95% CI -38.3 to 21.4]; p = 0.212).Conclusion In a pig model, lateral meniscus allografts fully filled labral defects in labral reconstruction. Regeneration of a fibrocartilage transition zone at the graft-acetabulum interface was observed at 24 weeks.Clinical Relevance The use of an autograft meniscus for labral reconstruction may be a viable option when labral tears are deemed irreparable. Before its clinical implementation, it is imperative to conduct a comparative study involving tendon grafts, which are extensively used in current clinical practice.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Intramedullary Nailing of Intertrochanteric Femoral
           Fractures in a Level I Trauma Center in Finland: What Complications Can Be
           Expected'

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      Authors: George; Nicole E.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: How Have Patient Out-of-pocket Costs for Common
           Outpatient Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgical Procedures Changed Over
           Time' A Retrospective Study From 2010 to 2020

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      Authors: Chawla; Sagar
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Whole Blood Metal Levels in the Setting of an Oncologic
           Endoprosthesis: Is There Cause for Concern'

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      Authors: Griffin; Anthony Michael
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: How Are Age, Gender, and Country Differences Associated
           With PROMIS Physical Function, Upper Extremity, and Pain Interference
           Scores'

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      Authors: Pääkkönen; Markus
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: What Is the Likelihood of Union and Frequency of
           Complications After Parallel Plating and Supplemental Bone Grafting for
           Resistant Distal Femoral Nonunions'

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      Authors: Cornell; Charles N.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Intravenous Cefazolin Achieves Sustained High
           Interstitial Concentrations in Open Lower Extremity Fractures

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      Authors: Taylor; Kenneth F.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Does A Single Osteotomy Technique for Frozen Autograft
           (Pedicled Freezing) in Patients With Malignant Bone Tumors of the Long
           Bones Achieve Union and Local Tumor Control'

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      Authors: Leithner; Andreas
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Tue, 05 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • How Are Age, Gender, and Country Differences Associated With PROMIS
           Physical Function, Upper Extremity, and Pain Interference Scores'

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      Authors: Plessen; Constantin Yves; Liegl, Gregor; Hartmann, Claudia; Heng, Marilyn; Joeris, Alexander; Kaat, Aaron J.; Schalet, Benjamin D.; Fischer, Felix; Rose, Matthias; , the AOBERT Consortium
      Abstract: imageBackground The interpretation of patient-reported outcomes requires appropriate comparison data. Currently, no patient-specific reference data exist for the Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF), Upper Extremity (UE), and Pain Interference (PI) scales for individuals 50 years and older.Questions/purposes (1) Can all PROMIS PF, UE, and PI items be used for valid cross-country comparisons in these domains among the United States, the United Kingdom, and Germany' (2) How are age, gender, and country related to PROMIS PF, PROMIS UE, and PROMIS PI scores' (3) What is the relationship of age, gender, and country across individuals with PROMIS PF, PROMIS UE, and PROMIS PI scores ranging from very low to very high'Methods We conducted telephone interviews to collect custom PROMIS PF (22 items), UE (eight items), and PI (eight items) short forms, as well as sociodemographic data (age, gender, work status, and education level), with participants randomly selected from the general population older than 50 years in the United States (n = 900), United Kingdom (n = 905), and Germany (n = 921). We focused on these individuals because of their higher prevalence of surgeries and lower physical functioning. Although response rates varied across countries (14% for the United Kingdom, 22% for Germany, and 12% for the United States), we used existing normative data to ensure demographic alignment with the overall populations of these countries. This helped mitigate potential nonresponder bias and enhance the representativeness and validity of our findings. We investigated differential item functioning to determine whether all items can be used for valid crosscultural comparisons. To answer our second research question, we compared age groups, gender, and countries using median regressions. Using imputation of plausible values and quantile regression, we modeled age-, gender-, and country-specific distributions of PROMIS scores to obtain patient-specific reference values and answer our third research question.Results All items from the PROMIS PF, UE, and PI measures were valid for across-country comparisons. We found clinically meaningful associations of age, gender, and country with PROMIS PF, UE, and PI scores. With age, PROMIS PF scores decreased (age ßMedian = -0.35 [95% CI -0.40 to -0.31]), and PROMIS UE scores followed a similar trend (age ßMedian = -0.38 [95% CI -0.45 to -0.32]). This means that a 10-year increase in age corresponded to a decline in approximately 3.5 points for the PROMIS PF score—a value that is approximately the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). Concurrently, we observed a modest increase in PROMIS PI scores with age, reaching half the MCID after 20 years. Women in all countries scored higher than men on the PROMIS PI and 1 MCID lower on the PROMIS PF and UE. Additionally, there were higher T-scores for the United States than for the United Kingdom across all domains. The difference in scores ranged from 1.21 points for the PROMIS PF to a more pronounced 3.83 points for the PROMIS UE. Participants from the United States exhibited up to half an MCID lower T-scores than their German counterparts for the PROMIS PF and PROMIS PI. In individuals with high levels of physical function, with each 10-year increase in age, there could be a decrease of up to 4 points in PROMIS PF scores. Across all levels of upper extremity function, women reported lower PROMIS UE scores than men by an average of 5 points.Conclusion Our study provides age-, gender-, and country-specific reference values for PROMIS PF, UE, and PI scores, which can be used by clinicians, researchers, and healthcare policymakers to better interpret patient-reported outcomes and provide more personalized care. These findings are particularly relevant for those collecting patient-reported outcomes in their clinical routine and researchers conducting multinational studies. We provide an internet application (www.common-metrics.org/PROMIS_PF_and_PI_Reference_scores.php) for user-friendly accessibility in order to perform age, gender, and country conversions of PROMIS scores. Population reference values can also serve as comparators to data collected with other PROMIS short forms or computerized adaptive tests.Level of Evidence Level II, diagnostic study.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Which Acetabular Measurements Most Accurately
           Differentiate Between Patients and Controls' A Comparative Study

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      Authors: Tarwala; Rupesh
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Tue, 29 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • What Is the Likelihood of Union and Frequency of Complications After
           Parallel Plating and Supplemental Bone Grafting for Resistant Distal
           Femoral Nonunions'

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      Authors: Gavaskar; Ashok S.; Tummala, Naveen C.; Reddy, C. Rajasekara; Gopalan, Hitesh; Srinivasan, Parthasarathy
      Abstract: imageBackground. Management of resistant distal femur nonunions is challenging because patients not only have disability from an unhealed fracture, but also often have a shortened femur, stiff knee, deformities, and bone defects to address during revision surgery. Dual plating of the distal femur in such a setting can maintain stability that allows the nonunion to heal while also addressing bone defects and correcting deformities simultaneously. Dual-plating techniques that have been described lack standardization with regard to the size and type of medial-side implants and configuration of the dual-plate construct.Questions/purposes (1) What proportion of patients achieve radiologic evidence of union after parallel plating of resistant distal femoral nonunions' (2) What improvements in function are achieved with this approach, as assessed by improvements in femoral length discrepancy, knee flexion, and patient-reported outcome scores' (3) What complications are associated with the technique'Methods Between 2017 and 2020, the senior author of this study treated 38 patients with resistant distal femoral nonunions, defined here as nonunions that persisted for more than 12 months since the injury despite a minimum of two previous internal fixation procedures. During the study period, our preferred technique for treating aseptic, resistant distal femoral nonunions was to use dual plates in a parallel configuration augmented with autografts. Of 38 patients, three patients with active signs of infection who underwent resection and reconstruction using bone transport techniques and two patients older than 65 years with deficient distal femur bone stock who underwent endoprosthetic reconstruction were excluded. Of the 33 included patients, 67% (22 of 33) were male. The median age was 40 years (range 20 to 67 years). Nonunion was articular and metaphyseal in 13 patients and metaphyseal only in 20 patients. Our surgical approach was to remove existing implants, perform intraoperative culturing to rule out infection, debride the nonunion, correct the deformity, perform intra-articular and extra-articular lysis of adhesions with quadriceps release, and apply fixation using medial and lateral fixed-angle anatomic locked implants positioned in a parallel configuration. Every attempt to improve length was undertaken, and the defects were filled with autografts. A total of 97% of patients were followed until union occurred (one of 33 was lost to follow-up before union was documented), and 79% (26 of 33) were assessed for functional outcomes at a minimum of 2 years (median 38 months [range 25 to 60 months]) after excluding patients lost to follow-up and those in whom union did not occur after parallel plating. Union was defined as evidence of central trabecular bridging on AP radiographs and posterior cortical bridging on lateral radiographs. These radiologic criteria were defined to overcome difficulties in assessing radiologic healing in patients with lateral and medial plates. With parallel plating, bridging trabecular bone along the posterior cortex on lateral radiographs and the central region on AP radiographs is visualized and can be appreciated and interpreted as evidence of healing in two orthogonal planes. Preoperative and follow-up clinical assessment of knee ROM, the extent of femoral length correction based on calibrated femoral radiographs before and after surgery, and the evaluation of improvement in lower limb function based on the preoperative and follow-up differences in responses to the lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) were studied (the LEFS is scored from 0 to 80, with higher scores representing better function). Complications and secondary surgical procedures to address them were abstracted from a longitudinally maintained trauma database.Results Sixty-seven percent (22 of 33) of nonunions showed radiologic healing by 24 weeks, and another 24% (eight of 33) healed by 36 weeks. Six percent (two of 33) did not unite, and one patient was lost to follow-up before union was documented. In the 79% (26 of 33) of patients available for final functional outcome assessment, the median femoral shortening had improved from 2.4 cm (range 0 to 4 cm) to 1.1 cm (range 0 to 2.3 cm; p < 0.001), and the median knee ROM had improved from 70° (range 20° to 110°) to 100° (range 50° to 130°; p = 0.002) after surgery. The median LEFS score improved to 63 (range 41 to 78) compared with 22 (range 15 to 33; p < 0.001) before surgery. Serious complications, including major thromboembolic events, iliac graft site infection, knee stiffness (flexion < 60°), and medial plate impingement necessitating removal, were seen in 30% (10 of 33) of patients. Secondary surgical interventions were performed in 24% (eight of 33) of patients to address procedure-related complications.Conclusion Based on our findings, a high likelihood of union and improvements in knee and lower limb function can be expected with parallel plating of resistant distal femur nonunions using anatomic locked plates. However, the increased frequency of complications observed in our study suggests the need for improvements in dual-plating techniques and to explore possible alternative fixation methods through larger multicenter comparative studies.Level of Evidence Level IV, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Intravenous Cefazolin Achieves Sustained High Interstitial Concentrations
           in Open Lower Extremity Fractures

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      Authors: Bates; Taylor J.; Burgess, Matthew B.; Garcia, Gerardo R.; Akers, Kevin S.; Mangum, Lee C.; Lynch, Thomas B.; Wenke, Joseph C.; Pierrie, Sarah N.
      Abstract: imageBackground Infection remains a serious clinical concern in patients with open fractures, despite timely antibiotic administration and surgical debridement. Soft tissue and periosteal stripping may alter local tissue homeostasis and antibiotic pharmacokinetics in the injured limb. The tissue (interstitial) concentration of intravenously administered antibiotics at an open fracture site has not been characterized using direct sampling techniques.Question/purpose We performed this study to evaluate the concentration and pharmacokinetics of intravenously delivered cefazolin at an open fracture site after surgical debridement.Methods Twelve patients with an open fracture distal to the knee who presented at a regional Level I trauma center were approached for enrollment in this nonrandomized, observational study. Of the 12 patients, eight adults (one female, seven male) with a median age of 32 years (range 23 to 51 years) were enrolled and underwent successful sample collection for analysis. Three patients had incomplete datasets because of equipment malfunction and one elected not to participate. Seven patients had open tibia fractures, and one patient had an open fibula fracture associated with a closed tibia fracture. There were six Gustilo-Anderson Type II injuries and two Type IIIA injuries. Empiric antibiotics were administered in the prehospital setting or in the emergency department according to institutional protocol. When patients were taken to the operating room, a 2‐g intravenous dose of cefazolin was administered. After surgical debridement, fracture stabilization, and wound closure, a microdialysis catheter was placed transdermally into the injury zone (within 5 cm of the fracture site) and a second catheter was placed in the contralateral uninjured (control) limb. Additional doses of cefazolin were administered every 8 hours postoperatively. Baseline and periodic interstitial fluid and whole blood (plasma) samples were collected in the operating room and at prespecified times for 24 hours postoperatively. Free cefazolin in the interstitial fluid and plasma samples were analyzed by ultra‐high-performance liquid chromatography using C18 column separation with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection. Data from the second postoperative dose of cefazolin were used to characterize pharmacokinetic parameters through a noncompartmental analysis using time-concentration curves of free cefazolin and assuming first-order elimination. For pharmacodynamic analyses, the modal cefazolin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Staphylococcus aureus (1 µg/mL) was used.Results With the samples available, no difference was observed in the median free cefazolin exposure over 24 hours (f area under the curve [AUC]0→24hrs) between injured limbs (352 μg∙hr/mL [IQR 284 to 594 μg∙hr/mL]) and uninjured limbs (341 μg∙hr/mL [IQR 263 to 438 μg∙hr/mL]; p = 0.64). The median time to achieve the maximum concentration of free cefazolin (f Tmax) for injured limbs was delayed (2.7 hours [IQR 2.2 to 3.1 hours]) compared with control limbs (1.7 hours [IQR 1.2 to 2.0 hours]; p = 0.046). The time to the maximum concentration for plasma was not different from that of control limbs (p = 0.08). The time the cefazolin concentration was above the modal S. aureus MIC (T> MIC) in the injured and control limbs over 24 hours was 100% (IQR 100% to 100%) and 100% (IQR 97% to 100%), respectively.Conclusion These preliminary findings suggest that current prophylactic cefazolin dosing regimens result in successful antibiotic delivery to the traumatized limb in moderately severe open fractures. Although cefazolin delivery to open-fracture wound beds was delayed compared with healthy tissues, the cefazolin concentration was sustained above the European Union Committee Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing modal MIC for S. aureus, demonstrating a high likelihood of a prophylactic antimicrobial environment at an open fracture site with this empiric antimicrobial regimen. Importantly, patients in this analysis had Gustilo-Anderson Types II and IIIA injuries. Further research with a larger patient cohort is needed to determine whether antibiotic delivery to traumatized soft tissues in patients with higher-grade open fractures (Gustilo-Anderson Types IIIB and IIIC) demonstrates similar pharmacokinetic characteristics.Level of Evidence Level II, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Whole Blood Metal Levels in the Setting of an Oncologic Endoprosthesis: Is
           There Cause for Concern'

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      Authors: Houdek; Matthew T.; Couch, Cory G.; Wyles, Cody C.; Taunton, Michael J.; Rose, Peter S.; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Lewallen, David G.; Berry, Daniel J.
      Abstract: imageBackground Massive modular endoprostheses have become a primary means of reconstruction after oncologic resection of a lower extremity tumor. These implants are commonly made with cobalt-chromium alloys that can undergo wear and corrosion, releasing cobalt and chromium ions into the surrounding tissue and blood. However, there are few studies about the blood metal levels in these patients.Question/purpose What is the whole blood cobalt and chromium ion level in patients with massive modular endoprostheses'Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of our total joints registry to identify patients with a history of an endoprosthetic reconstruction performed at our institution. Patients who were alive at the time of our review in addition to those undergoing an endoprosthetic reconstruction after an oncologic resection were included. Whole blood samples were obtained from 27 (14 male and 13 female) patients with a history of a lower extremity oncologic endoprosthesis. The median time from surgery to blood collection was 8 years (range 6 months to 32 years). Blood samples were collected and stored in metal-free ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid tubes. Samples were analyzed on an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer in an International Organization for Standardization seven-class clean room using polytetrafluoroethylene-coated instruments to reduce the risk of metal contamination. The analytical measuring range was 1 to 200 ng/mL for chromium and cobalt. Cobalt and chromium levels were considered elevated when the blood level was ≥ 1 ppb.Results Cobalt levels were elevated in 59% (16 of 27) of patients, and chromium levels were elevated in 26% (seven of 27). In patients with elevated metal ion values, 15 of 17 patients had a reconstruction using a Stryker/Howmedica Global Modular Replacement System implant.Conclusion Blood metal levels were elevated in patients who received reconstructions using modular oncology endoprostheses Future work is needed to establish appropriate follow-up routines and determine whether and when systemic complications occur because of elevated metal levels and how to potentially address these elevated levels when complications occur. Prospective and retrospective collaboration between multiple centers and specialty societies will be necessary to address these unknown questions in this potentially vulnerable patient group.Level of Evidence Level IV, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Does Preoperative Pharmacogenomic Testing of Patients Undergoing TKA
           Improve Postoperative Pain' A Randomized Trial

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      Authors: Kraus; Molly B.; Bingham, Joshua S.; Kekic, Adrijana; Erickson, Colby; Grilli, Christopher B.; Seamans, David P.; Upjohn, David P.; Hentz, Joseph G.; Clarke, Henry D.; Spangehl, Mark J.
      Abstract: imageBackground Pharmacogenomics is an emerging and affordable tool that may improve postoperative pain control. One challenge to successful pain control is the large interindividual variability among analgesics in their efficacy and adverse drug events. Whether preoperative pharmacogenomic testing is worthwhile for patients undergoing TKA is unclear.Questions/purposes (1) Are the results of preoperative pharmacogenetic testing associated with lower postoperative pain scores as measured by the Overall Benefit of Analgesic Score (OBAS)' (2) Do the results of preoperative pharmacogenomic testing lead to less total opioids given' (3) Do the results of preoperative pharmacogenomic testing lead to changes in opioid prescribing patterns'Methods Participants of this randomized trial were enrolled from September 2018 through December 2021 if they were aged 18 to 80 years and were undergoing primary TKA under general anesthesia. Patients were excluded if they had chronic kidney disease, a history of chronic pain or narcotic use before surgery, or if they were undergoing robotic surgery. Preoperatively, patients completed pharmacogenomic testing (RightMed, OneOME) and a questionnaire and were randomly assigned to the experimental group or control group. Of 99 patients screened, 23 were excluded, one before randomization; 11 allocated patients in each group did not receive their allocated interventions for reasons such as surgery canceled, patients ultimately undergoing spinal anesthesia, and change in surgery plan. Another four patients in each group were excluded from the analysis because they were missing an OBAS report. This left 30 patients for analysis in the control group and 38 patients in the experimental group. The control and experimental groups were similar in age, gender, and race. Pharmacogenomic test results for patients in the experimental group were reviewed before surgery by a pharmacist, who recommended perioperative medications to the clinical team. A pharmacist also assessed for clinically relevant drug-gene interactions and recommended drug and dose selection according to guidelines from the Clinical Pharmacogenomics Implementation Consortium for each patient enrolled in the study. Patients were unaware of their pharmacogenomic results. Pharmacogenomic test results for patients in the control group were not reviewed before surgery; instead, standard perioperative medications were administered in adherence to our institutional care pathways. The OBAS (maximum 28 points) was the primary outcome measure, recorded 24 hours postoperatively. A two-sample t-test was used to compare the mean OBAS between groups. Secondary measures were the mean 24-hour pain score, total morphine milligram equivalent, and frequency of opioid use. Postoperatively, patients were assessed for pain with a VAS (range 0 to 10). Opioid use was recorded preoperatively, intraoperatively, in the postanesthesia care unit, and 24 hours after discharge from the postanesthesia care unit. Changes in perioperative opioid use based on pharmacogenomic testing were recorded, as were changes in prescription patterns for postoperative pain control. Preoperative characteristics were also compared between patients with and without various phenotypes ascertained from pharmacogenomic test results.Results The mean OBAS did not differ between groups (mean ± SD 4.7 ± 3.7 in the control group versus 4.2 ± 2.8 in the experimental group, mean difference 0.5 [95% CI -1.1 to 2.1]; p = 0.55). Total opioids given did not differ between groups or at any single perioperative timepoint (preoperative, intraoperative, or postoperative). We found no difference in opioid prescribing pattern. After adjusting for multiple comparisons, no difference was observed between the treatment and control groups in tramadol use (41% versus 71%, proportion difference 0.29 [95% CI 0.05 to 0.53]; nominal p = 0.02; adjusted p> 0.99).Conclusion Routine use of pharmacogenomic testing for patients undergoing TKA did not lead to better pain control or decreased opioid consumption. Future studies might focus on at-risk populations, such as patients with chronic pain or those undergoing complex, painful surgical procedures, to test whether pharmacogenomic results might be beneficial in certain circumstances.Level of Evidence Level I, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Does Preoperative Pharmacogenomic Testing of Patients
           Undergoing TKA Improve Postoperative Pain' A Randomized Trial

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      Authors: Enneking; F. Kayser
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Does A Single Osteotomy Technique for Frozen Autograft (Pedicled Freezing)
           in Patients With Malignant Bone Tumors of the Long Bones Achieve Union and
           Local Tumor Control'

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      Authors: El Masry; Ayman Mohammad; Azmy, Sherif Ishak; Rahman Mustafa, Mohamed Abdel; Abuelhadid, Mohammad Abdelmoemen
      Abstract: imageBackground Biological reconstruction by replanting the resected tumor-bearing segment is preferred by some surgeons when caring for a patient with a bone sarcoma. Frozen autografts are advantageous because they are cost-effective, provide an excellent fit, permit the maintenance of osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties, and are not associated with transmission of viral disease. The pedicle frozen autograft technique, in which only one osteotomy is made for the freezing procedure, keeping the affected segment in continuity with the host bone and soft tissue instead of two osteotomies, maintains the affected segment with the host bone and soft tissue. This could restore blood flow more rapidly in a frozen autograft than in a free-frozen autograft with two osteotomies.Questions/purposes (1) In what proportion of patients was union achieved by 6 months using this technique of frozen autografting' (2) What complications were observed in a small series using this approach' (3) What was the function of these patients as determined by Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score' (4) What proportion of patients experienced local recurrence'Methods Between 2014 and 2017, we treated 87 patients for primary sarcomas of the femur, tibia, or humerus. Of those, we considered patients who could undergo intercalary resection and showed a good response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy as potentially eligible for this technique. Based on these criteria, 49% (43 patients) were eligible; a further 9% (eight) were excluded because of inadequate bone quality (defined as cortical thickness less than 50% by CT assessment). We retrospectively studied 32 patients who were treated with a single metaphyseal osteotomy, the so-called pedicle freezing technique, which uses liquid nitrogen. There were 20 men and 12 women. The median age was 18 years (range 13 to 48 years). The median follow-up duration was 55 months (range 48 to 63 months). Patients were assessed clinically and radiologically regarding union (defined in this study as bony bridging of three of four cortices by 6 months), the proportion of patients experiencing local recurrence, the occurrence of nononcologic complications, and MSTS scores.Results Three percent (one of 32) of the patients had nonunion (no union by 9 months). The median MSTS score was 90%, with no evidence of metastases at the final follow-up interval. Nine percent (three of 32) of our patients died. The local recurrence rate was 3.1% (one of 32 patients). The mean restricted disease-free survival time at 60 months (5 years) was 58 months (95% CI 55 to 62 months). Twenty-five percent of patients (eight of 32) experienced nononcologic complications. This included superficial skin burns (two patients), superficial wound infection (two patients), deep venous thrombosis (one patient), transient nerve palsy (two patients), and permanent nerve palsy (one patient).Conclusion This treatment was reasonably successful in patients with sarcomas of the femur, tibia, and humerus who could undergo an intercalary resection, and this treatment did not involve the epiphysis and upper metaphysis. It avoids a second osteotomy site as in prior reports of freezing techniques, and union was achieved in all but one patient. There were few complications or local recurrences, and the patients’ function was shown to be good. This technique cannot be used in all long-bone sarcomas, but we believe this is a reasonable alternative treatment for patients who show a good response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, those in whom intercalary resection is feasible while retaining at least 2 cm of the subchondral area, and in those who have adequate bone stock to withstand the freezing process. Experienced surgeons who are well trained on the recycling technique in specialized centers are crucial to perform the technique. Further study is necessary to see how this technique compares with other reconstruction options.Level of Evidence Level IV, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Intramedullary Nailing of Intertrochanteric Femoral Fractures in a Level I
           Trauma Center in Finland: What Complications Can be Expected'

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      Authors: Lähdesmäki; Miika; Ylitalo, Antti AJ; Karjalainen, Leevi; Uimonen, Mikko; Mattila, Ville M.; Repo, Jussi P.
      Abstract: imageBackground Intertrochanteric hip fractures are one of the most common fractures in older people, and the number is estimated to increase. These fractures are often treated with intramedullary nailing; however, various complications have been reported. It is important to identify the potential complications and investigate whether the choice of implant and patient-related factors are associated with the risk of complications to develop better strategies for preventing them.Questions/purposes (1) In the treatment of intertrochanteric fractures with intramedullary nailing, what are the risks of major complications and 30-day mortality' (2) Which implant types are associated with greater odds of major complications' (3) Which patient-related factors are associated with increased odds of major complications'Methods In this retrospective, comparative study, we reviewed the health records of 2397 patients with a femoral fracture treated at one Level I trauma center between January 2014 and November 2020. Of those, we considered patients who were treated with intramedullary nailing for an intertrochanteric fracture after sustaining a low-energy injury as potentially eligible. Based on this criterion, 53% (1279) were eligible; a further 47% (1118) were excluded because the fixation method was other than intramedullary nailing, the fracture pattern was other than intertrochanteric fracture, or the fracture was caused by a high-energy injury mechanism. Another 4% (97) were excluded because they had incomplete datasets because of follow-up less than 12 months, leaving 49% (1182) for analysis. During the study period, intramedullary nails were generally used to treat nearly all intertrochanteric fractures at our hospital. The risk of complications was then assessed by chart review. Acute myocardial ischemia, cutout, nail breakage, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, stroke, and wound infection were defined as major complications. Cutout, nail breakage, and wound infection were defined as major complications leading to reoperation. To examine the association of implant type and major complications, a logistic regression analysis was performed. Additionally, the risks of major complications leading to reoperation were compared between implants. Finally, a univariable logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association between patient-related factors and major complications.Results The overall proportion of patients experiencing complications was 16% (183 of 1182), and the crude percentage of 30-day mortality was 9% (107 of 1182) based on the hospital`s medical records. After controlling for patient-related factors such as disease, age, and smoking, we found that nail type was not associated with odds of major complications leading to reoperation (Gamma3: OR 0.86 [95% CI 0.44 to 1.67]; p = 0.67; Trochanteric Fixation Nail: OR 0.61 [95% CI 0.2 to 1.53]; p = 0.33; Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation: OR 0.55 [95% CI 0.16 to 1.49]; p = 0.29) compared with the Trochanteric Fixation Nail Advanced. Anticoagulation (OR 1.70 [95% CI 1.11 to 2.59]; p = 0.01), congestive heart failure (OR 1.91 [95% CI 1.13 to 3.11]; p = 0.01), and hypertension (OR 1.67 [95% CI 1.08 to 2.63]; p = 0.02) were associated with a major complication. Liver disease (OR 5.19 [95% CI 0.78 to 20.8]; p = 0.04) was associated with a major complication leading to reoperation.Conclusion This study provides a better understanding of the occurrence of surgical and medical complications after intramedullary nailing of intertrochanteric fractures. The new-generation nail types are comparable options based on the risk of reoperation. Anticoagulation, congestive heart failure, and hypertension were associated with major complications, highlighting the need for careful management and monitoring of these comorbidities during intramedullary nailing procedures.Level of Evidence Level III, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • In the Treatment of Lateral Epicondylitis by Percutaneous Perforation,
           Injectables Have No Added Value

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      Authors: Keijsers; Renée; Kuijer, P. Paul F. M.; Gerritsma-Bleeker, Carina L. E.; Kleinlugtenbelt, Ydo V.; Beumer, Annechien; The, Bertram; Landman, Ellie B. M.; de Vries, Astrid J.; Eygendaal, Denise
      Abstract: imageBackground No single injection therapy has been proven to be superior in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. In most studies, the injection technique is not standardized, which makes it challenging to compare outcomes.Questions/purposes (1) Does injection with autologous blood, dextrose, or needle perforation only at the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon origin produce better VAS pain scores during provocation testing at 5 months of follow-up' (2) Which percutaneous technique resulted in better secondary outcome measures: VAS during rest and activity, VAS during maximum grip, Oxford elbow score (OES), QuickDASH, Patient-related Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE), or EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D)'Methods In this multicenter, randomized controlled trial performed from November 2015 to January 2020, 166 patients with lateral epicondylitis were included and assigned to one of the three treatment groups: autologous blood, dextrose, or perforation only. Complete follow-up data were available for the primary outcome measures at the 5-month follow-up interval for 77% (127 of 166) of patients. Injections of the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon were conducted in an accurate and standardized way. The three groups did not differ in terms of key variables such as age, gender, duration of symptoms, smoking habits, pain medication, and physiotherapy use. Data were collected at baseline and 8 weeks, 5 months, and 1 year after treatment and compared among the groups. The primary endpoint was the VAS pain score with provocation at 5 months. Our secondary study outcomes were VAS pain scores during rest, after activity, and after maximum grip strength; functional recovery; and quality of life. Therefore, we report the VAS pain score (0 to 100, with higher scores representing more-severe pain, minimum clinically important difference [MCID] 10), OES (0 to 48, with higher scores representing more satisfactory joint function, MCID 10), QuickDASH (0 to 100, with higher scores representing more severe disability, MCID 5.3), PRTEE (0 to 100, with higher scores representing more pain or more disability, MCID 20), EQ-5D/QALY (EQ-5D sumscore 0 to 1, with the maximum score of 1 representing the best health state, MCID 0.04), and EQ-5D VAS (0 to 100, with higher scores representing the best health status, MCID 8). For analysis, one-way analysis of variance and a linear mixed-model analysis were used. The analyses were performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Four patients from the perforation group opted to crossover to autologous blood after 5 months.Results No injection therapy proved to be superior to any other in terms of VAS pain scores during the provocation test at 5 months of follow-up (VAS for perforation: 25 ± 31; autologous blood: 26 ± 27; dextrose: 29 ± 32; p = 0.35). For the secondary outcomes, only a clinically important difference was found for the QuickDASH score. Both the perforation-only group (-8 [98% CI -4 to -12]) and autologous blood (-7 points [98% CI -3 to -11]) had improved QuickDASH scores over time compared with the dextrose group (MCID 5.3; p < 0.01). For the other outcomes, no clinically important differences were found.Conclusion There is no benefit to injectable autologous blood and dextrose over perforation alone to treat lateral epicondylitis, and they are therefore not indicated for this condition.Level of Evidence Level I, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Which Acetabular Measurements Most Accurately Differentiate Between
           Patients and Controls' A Comparative Study

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      Authors: Verhaegen; Jeroen C. F.; DeVries, Zach; Rakhra, Kawan; Speirs, Andrew; Beaule, Paul E.; Grammatopoulos, George
      Abstract: imageBackground Acetabular morphology is an important determinant of hip biomechanics. To identify features of acetabular morphology that may be associated with the development of hip symptoms while accounting for spinopelvic characteristics, one needs to determine acetabular characteristics in a group of individuals older than 45 years without symptoms or signs of osteoarthritis. Previous studies have used patients with unknown physical status to define morphological thresholds to guide management.Questions/purposes (1) To determine acetabular morphological characteristics in males and females between 45 and 60 years old with a high Oxford hip score (OHS) and no signs of osteoarthritis; (2) to compare these characteristics with those of symptomatic hip patients treated with hip arthroscopy or periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) for various kinds of hip pathology (dysplasia, retroversion, and cam femoroacetabular impingement); and (3) to assess which radiographic or CT parameters most accurately differentiate between patients who had symptomatic hips and those who did not, and thus, define thresholds that can guide management.Methods Between January 2018 and December 2018, 1358 patients underwent an abdominopelvic CT scan in our institution for nonorthopaedic conditions. Of those, we considered 5% (73) of patients as potentially eligible as controls based on the absence of major hip osteoarthritis, trauma, or deformity. Patients were excluded if their OHS was 43 or less (2% [28]), if they had a PROMIS less than 50 (1% [18]), or their Tönnis score was higher than 1 (0.4% [6]). Another eight patients were excluded because of insufficient datasets. After randomly selecting one side for each control, 40 hips were left for analysis (age 55 ± 5 years; 48% [19 of 40] were in females). In this comparative study, this asymptomatic group was compared with a group of patients treated with hip arthroscopy or PAO. Between January 2013 and December 2020, 221 hips underwent hip preservation surgery. Of those, eight were excluded because of previous pelvic surgery, and 102 because of insufficient CT scans. One side was randomly selected in patients who underwent bilateral procedure, leaving 48% (107 of 221) of hips for analysis (age 31 ± 8 years; 54% [58 of 107] were in females). Detailed radiographic and CT assessments (including segmentation) were performed to determine acetabular (depth, cartilage coverage, subtended angles, anteversion, and inclination) and spinopelvic (pelvic tilt and incidence) parameters. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to assess diagnostic accuracy and determine which morphological parameters (and their threshold) differentiate most accurately between symptomatic patients and asymptomatic controls.Results Acetabular morphology in asymptomatic hips was characterized by a mean depth of 22 ± 2 mm, with an articular cartilage surface of 2619 ± 415 mm2, covering 70% ± 6% of the articular surface, a mean acetabular inclination of 48° ± 6°, and a minimal difference between anatomical (24° ± 7°) and functional (22° ± 6°) anteversion. Patients with symptomatic hips generally had less acetabular depth (20 ± 4 mm versus 22 ± 2 mm, mean difference 3 mm [95% CI 1 to 4]; p < 0.001). Hips with dysplasia (67% ± 5% versus 70% ± 6%, mean difference 6% [95% CI 0% to 12%]; p = 0.03) or retroversion (67% ± 5% versus 70% ± 6%, mean difference 6% [95% CI 1% to 12%]; p = 0.04) had a slightly lower relative cartilage area compared with asymptomatic hips. There was no difference in acetabular inclination (48° ± 6° versus 47° ± 7°, mean difference 0.5° [95% CI -2° to 3°]; p = 0.35), but asymptomatic hips had higher anatomic anteversion (24° ± 7° versus 19° ± 8°, mean difference 6° [95% CI 3° to 9°]; p < 0.001) and functional anteversion (22° ± 6° versus 13°± 9°, mean difference 9° [95% CI 6° to 12°]; p < 0.001). Subtended angles were higher in asymptomatic at 105° (124° ± 7° versus 114° ± 12°, mean difference 11° [95% CI 3° to 17°]; p < 0.001), 135° (122° ± 9° versus 111° ± 12°, mean difference 10° [95% CI 2° to 15°]; p < 0.001), and 165° (112° ± 9° versus 102° ± 11°, mean difference 10° [95% CI 2° to 14°]; p < 0.001) around the acetabular clockface. Symptomatic hips had a lower pelvic tilt (8° ± 8° versus 11° ± 5°, mean difference 3° [95% CI 1° to 5°]; p = 0.007). The posterior wall index had the highest discriminatory ability of all measured parameters, with a cutoff value of less than 0.9 (area under the curve [AUC] 0.84 [95% CI 0.76 to 0.91]) for a symptomatic acetabulum (sensitivity 72%, specificity 78%). Diagnostically useful parameters on CT scan to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic hips were acetabular depth less than 22 mm (AUC 0.74 [95% CI 0.66 to 0.83]) and functional anteversion less than 19° (AUC 0.79 [95% CI 0.72 to 0.87]). Subtended angles with the highest accuracy to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic hips were those at 105° (AUC 0.76 [95% CI 0.65 to 0.88]), 135° (AUC 0.78 [95% CI 0.70 to 0.86]), and 165° (AUC 0.77 [95% CI 0.69 to 0.85]) of the acetabular clockface.Conclusion An anatomical and functional acetabular anteversion of 24° and 22°, with a pelvic tilt of 10°, increases the acet...
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • How Have Patient Out-of-pocket Costs for Common Outpatient Orthopaedic
           Foot and Ankle Surgical Procedures Changed Over Time' A Retrospective
           Study From 2010 to 2020

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      Authors: Goldfarb; Sarah I.; Xu, Amy L.; Gupta, Arjun; Mun, Frederick; Durand, Wesley M.; Gonzalez, Tyler A.; Aiyer, Amiethab A.
      Abstract: imageBackground Out-of-pocket (OOP) costs can be substantial financial burdens for patients and may even cause patients to delay or forgo necessary medical procedures. Although overall healthcare costs are rising in the United States, recent trends in patient OOP costs for foot and ankle orthopaedic surgical procedures have not been reported. Fully understanding patient OOP costs for common orthopaedic surgical procedures, such as those performed on the foot and ankle, might help patients and professionals make informed decisions regarding treatment options and demonstrate to policymakers the growing unaffordability of these procedures.Questions/purposes (1) How do OOP costs for common outpatient foot and ankle surgical procedures for commercially insured patients compare between elective and trauma surgical procedures' (2) How do these OOP costs compare between patients enrolled in various insurance plan types' (3) How do these OOP costs compare between surgical procedures performed in hospital-based outpatient departments and ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs)' (4) How have these OOP costs changed over time'Methods This was a retrospective, comparative study drawn from a large, longitudinally maintained database. Data on adult patients who underwent elective or trauma outpatient foot or ankle surgical procedures between 2010 and 2020 were extracted using the MarketScan Database, which contains well-delineated cost variables for all patient claims, which are particularly advantageous for assessing OOP costs. Of the 1,031,279 patient encounters initially identified, 41% (427,879) met the inclusion criteria. Demographic, procedural, and financial data were recorded. The median patient age was 50 years (IQR 39 to 57); 65% were women, and more than half of patients were enrolled in preferred provider organization insurance plans. Approximately 75% of surgical procedures were classified as elective (rather than trauma), and 69% of procedures were performed in hospital-based outpatient departments (rather than ASCs). The primary outcome was OOP costs incurred by the patient, which were defined as the sum of the deductible, coinsurance, and copayment paid for each episode of care. Monetary data were adjusted to 2020 USD. A general linear regression, the Kruskal-Wallis test, and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test were used for analysis, as appropriate. Alpha was set at 0.05.Results For foot and ankle indications, trauma surgical procedures generated higher median OOP costs than elective procedures (USD 942 [IQR USD 150 to 2052] versus USD 568 [IQR USD 51 to 1426], difference of medians USD 374; p < 0.001). Of the insurance plans studied, high-deductible health plans had the highest median OOP costs. OOP costs were lower for procedures performed in ASCs than in hospital-based outpatient departments (USD 645 [IQR USD 114 to 1447] versus USD 681 [IQR USD 64 to 1683], difference of medians USD 36; p < 0.001). This trend was driven by higher coinsurance for hospital-based outpatient departments than for ASCs (USD 391 [IQR USD 0 to 1136] versus USD 337 [IQR USD 0 to 797], difference of medians USD 54; p < 0.001). The median OOP costs for common outpatient foot and ankle surgical procedures increased by 102%, from USD 450 in 2010 to USD 907 in 2020.Conclusion Rapidly increasing OOP costs of common foot and ankle orthopaedic surgical procedures warrant a thorough investigation of potential cost-saving strategies and initiatives to enhance healthcare affordability for patients. In particular, measures should be taken to reduce underuse of necessary care for patients enrolled in high-deductible health plans, such as shorter-term deductible timespans and placing additional regulations on the implementation of these plans. Moreover, policymakers and physicians could consider finding ways to increase the proportion of procedures performed at ASCs for procedure types that have been shown to be equally safe and effective as in hospital-based outpatient departments. Future studies should extend this analysis to publicly insured patients and further investigate the health and financial effects of high-deductible health plans and ASCs, respectively.Level of Evidence Level III, economic and decision analysis.
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8186 journals)
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ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 149 of 149 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Orthopaedica     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthopedics     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthroplasty Today     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Bone Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Burns & Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Orthopedic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Chinese Journal of Traumatology     Open Access  
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Concussion     Open Access  
Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Orthopaedic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Der Orthopäde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Die Wirbelsäule     Hybrid Journal  
Duke Orthopedic Journal     Open Access  
East African Orthopaedic Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Egyptian Journal of Orthopedic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Técnicas Quirúrgicas - Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
EMC - Tecniche Chirurgiche - Chirurgia Ortopedica     Full-text available via subscription  
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Podiatry / Revista Europea de Podología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Foot & Ankle International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Spine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Orthopaedics     Open Access  
International Musculoskeletal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JAAOS : Global Research & Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants     Hybrid Journal  
JBJS Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
JOR Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal de Traumatologie du Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal für Mineralstoffwechsel & Muskuloskelettale Erkrankungen     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bone and Joint Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Bone and Joint Infection     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Musculoskeletal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
Journal of Orthopaedic Association of South Indian States     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedic Diseases and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthopaedic Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Orthopaedic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Orthopaedic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Orthopaedic Translation     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Orthopaedics, Trauma and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Orthopedics & Rheumatology     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Musculoskeletal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Musculoskeletal Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma     Open Access  
North American Spine Society Journal (NASSJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
OA Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Obere Extremität     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Orthopedics and Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Trauma     Open Access  
Open Orthopaedics Journal     Open Access  
Operative Orthopädie und Traumatologie     Hybrid Journal  
Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopädie & Rheuma     Full-text available via subscription  
Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Orthopaedic Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopaedics and Trauma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Orthopedic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Orthopedic Research and Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Orthopedic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Orthoplastic Surgery     Open Access  
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Osteologie     Hybrid Journal  
Osteoporosis and Sarcopenia     Open Access  
OTA International     Open Access  
Paediatric Orthopaedics and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Prosthetics and Orthotics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Chilena de Ortopedia y Traumatología / Chilean Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Cubana de Ortopedia y Traumatologí­a     Open Access  
Revista de la Asociación Argentina de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Open Access  
Revista Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Portuguesa de Ortopedia e Traumatologia     Open Access  
Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Romanian Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology     Open Access  
SA Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SICOT-J     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Sport-Orthopädie - Sport-Traumatologie - Sports Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Strategies in Trauma and Limb Reconstruction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Techniques in Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma (Travma)     Open Access  
Trauma und Berufskrankheit     Hybrid Journal  
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology and Orthopedics of Russia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ортопедия, травматология и протезирование     Open Access  

           

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