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ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 152 of 152 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Orthopaedica     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthopedics     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Arthroplasty Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone & Joint 360     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Bone Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Burns & Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Orthopedic Research     Open Access  
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Chinese Journal of Traumatology     Open Access  
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Concussion     Open Access  
Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Orthopaedic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Der Orthopäde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Die Wirbelsäule     Hybrid Journal  
Duke Orthopedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
East African Orthopaedic Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
EFORT Open Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Técnicas Quirúrgicas - Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
EMC - Tecniche Chirurgiche - Chirurgia Ortopedica     Full-text available via subscription  
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Podiatry / Revista Europea de Podología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Foot & Ankle International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Spine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Orthopaedics     Open Access  
International Musculoskeletal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JAAOS : Global Research & Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants     Hybrid Journal  
JBJS Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
JOR Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal de Traumatologie du Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal für Mineralstoffwechsel & Muskuloskelettale Erkrankungen     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bone and Joint Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bone and Joint Infection     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Children's Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Musculoskeletal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Journal of Orthopaedic Association of South Indian States     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Diseases and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Orthopaedic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Orthopaedic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Orthopaedic Translation     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Orthopaedics, Trauma and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Orthopedics & Rheumatology     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Musculoskeletal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Musculoskeletal Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma     Open Access  
North American Spine Society Journal (NASSJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Obere Extremität     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Orthopedics and Rheumatology     Open Access  
Open Journal of Trauma     Open Access  
Open Orthopaedics Journal     Open Access  
Operative Orthopädie und Traumatologie     Hybrid Journal  
Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopädie & Rheuma     Full-text available via subscription  
Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Orthopaedic Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Orthopaedic Proceedings     Partially Free  
Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopaedics and Trauma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Orthopedic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Orthopedic Research and Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Orthopedic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthoplastic Surgery     Open Access  
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Open     Open Access  
Osteologie     Hybrid Journal  
Osteoporosis and Sarcopenia     Open Access  
OTA International     Open Access  
Paediatric Orthopaedics and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Prosthetics and Orthotics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Chilena de Ortopedia y Traumatología / Chilean Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Cubana de Ortopedia y Traumatologí­a     Open Access  
Revista de la Asociación Argentina de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Open Access  
Revista Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Portuguesa de Ortopedia e Traumatologia     Open Access  
Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Romanian Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology     Open Access  
SA Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SICOT-J     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Sport-Orthopädie - Sport-Traumatologie - Sports Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Strategies in Trauma and Limb Reconstruction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Techniques in Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma (Travma)     Open Access  
Trauma und Berufskrankheit     Hybrid Journal  
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology and Orthopedics of Russia     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ортопедия, травматология и протезирование     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.908
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 78  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0009-921X - ISSN (Online) 1528-1132
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • A Conversation With … Jane Melvin MBA, Branding Expert, on Why You
           Shouldn’t Build a Personal Brand

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      Authors: Leopold; Seth S.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Editor’s Spotlight/Take 5: Race, But Not Gender, Is Associated With
           Admissions Into Orthopaedic Residency Programs

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      Authors: Radcliff; Kris E.; Leopold, Seth S.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Race, But Not Gender, Is Associated With Admissions Into Orthopaedic
           Residency Programs

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      Authors: Poon; Selina C.; Nellans, Kate; Gorroochurn, Prakash; Chahine, Nadeen O.
      Abstract: imageBackground Orthopaedic surgery is one of the most competitive but least diverse surgical specialties, with ever-increasing academic achievements (such as test scores) shown by applicants. Prior research shows that white applicants had higher United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) Step 1 and Step 2 Clinical Knowledge scores as well as higher odds of Alpha Omega Alpha status compared with Black, Hispanic, and other applicant groups. Yet, it still remains unknown whether differences in application metrics by race/ethnicity sufficiently explain the underrepresentation of certain racial or ethnic minority groups in orthopaedic residency programs.Questions/purposes In this study, we sought to determine (1) the relative weight of academic variables for admission into orthopaedic residency, and (2) whether race and gender are independently associated with admission into an orthopedic residency.Methods The Electronic Residency Application System (ERAS) data from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) of first-time MD applicants (n = 8966) for orthopaedic surgery residency positions in the United States and of admitted orthopaedic residents (n = 6218) from 2005 to 2014 were reviewed. This dataset is the first and most comprehensive of its kind to date in orthopaedic surgery. Academic metrics, such as USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 Clinical Knowledge scores, number of publications, Alpha Omega Alpha status, volunteer experiences, work experience, as well as race and gender, were analyzed using hierarchical logistic regression models. The first model analyzed the association of academic metrics with admission into orthopaedic residency. In the second model, we added race and gender and controlled for metrics of academic performance. To determine how well the models simulated the actual admissions data, we computed the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) including the area under curve (AUC), which measures the model’s ability to simulate which applicants were admitted or not admitted, with an AUC = 1.0 representing a perfect simulation. The odds ratio and confidence interval of each variable were computed.Results When only academic variables were analyzed in the first model, Alpha Omega Alpha status (odds ratio 2.12 [95% CI 1.80 to 2.50]; p < 0.001), the USMLE Step 1 score (OR 1.04 [95% CI 1.03 to 1.04]; p < 0.001), the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge score (OR 1.01 [95% CI 1.01 to 1.02]; p < 0.001), publication count (OR 1.04 [95% CI 1.03 to 1.05]; p < 0.001), and volunteer experience (OR 1.03 [95% CI 1.01 to 1.04]; p < 0.001) were associated with admissions into orthopaedics while work and research experience were not. This model yielded a good prediction of the results with an AUC of 0.755. The second model, in which the variables of race and gender were added to the academic variables, also had a good prediction of the results with an AUC of 0.759. This model indicates that applicant race, but not gender, is associated with admissions into orthopaedic residency. Applicants from Asian (OR 0.78 [95% CI 0.67 to 0.92]), Black (OR 0.63 [95% CI 0.51 to 0.77], Hispanic (OR 0.48 [95% CI 0.36 to 0.65]), or other race groups (OR 0.65 [95% CI 0.55 to 0.77]) had lower odds of admission into residency compared with white applicants.Conclusion Minority applicants, but not women, have lower odds of admission into orthopaedic surgery residency, even when accounting for academic performance metrics. Changes in the residency selection processes are needed to eliminate the lower admission probability of qualified minority applicants in orthopaedic residency and to improve the diversity and inclusion of orthopaedic surgery. Changes including increasing the diversity of the selection committee, bias training, blinding applications before review, removal of metrics with history of racial disparities from an interviewer’s candidate profile before an interview, and use of holistic application review (where an applicants’ experiences, attributes, and academic metrics are all considered) can improve the diversity landscape in training. In addition, cultivating an environment of inclusion will be necessary to address these long-standing trends in orthopaedic surgery.Clinical Relevance Race, but not gender, is associated with the odds of acceptance into orthopaedic surgery residency despite equivalent academic metrics. Changes in residency selection processes are suggested to eliminate the lower admission probability of qualified minority applicants into orthopaedic residency and to improve the diversity and inclusion of orthopaedic surgery.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR® Curriculum—Orthopaedic Education: Changes in Resident Selection
           Lead to More Questions Than Answers

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      Authors: Dougherty; Paul J.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Value-based Healthcare: Has the Time Come for Comprehensive Infection Care
           Centers'

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      Authors: Whitmarsh-Brown; Meghan A.; Bozic, Kevin J.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • From Bench to Bedside: Detangling Safety and Efficacy for Products and
           Interventions That May Be Neither

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      Authors: Potter; Benjamin K.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Art in Science: Quackery and Promises Not Kept

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      Authors: Friedlaender; Gary E.; Friedlaender, Linda K.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Editorial Comment: 2021 Musculoskeletal Infection Society Proceedings

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      Authors: Zalavras; Charalampos G.; Hewlett, Angela
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Isothermal Microcalorimetry Improves the Time to Diagnosis of
           Fracture-related Infection Compared With Conventional Tissue Cultures

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      Authors: Cichos; Kyle H.; Spitler, Clay A.; Quade, Jonathan H.; Johnson, Joseph P.; Johnson, Michael D.; Ghanem, Elie S.
      Abstract: imageBackground A consensus definition recently was formulated for fracture-related infection, which centered on confirmatory criteria including conventional cultures that take time to finalize and have a 10% to 20% false-negative rate. During this time, patients are often on broad-spectrum antibiotics and may remain hospitalized until cultures are finalized to adjust antibiotic regimens.Questions/purposes (1) What is the diagnostic accuracy of isothermal microcalorimetry, and how does its accuracy compare with that of conventional cultures? (2) Does isothermal microcalorimetry decrease time to detection (or diagnosis) of fracture-related infection compared with conventional cultures? (3) Does isothermal microcalorimetry have a diagnostic accuracy or time advantage over conventional cultures in patients on chronic suppressive antibiotics?Methods Between July 2020 and August 2021, we treated 310 patients with concerns for infection after prior fracture repair surgery. Of those, we considered all patients older than 18 years of age with fixation hardware in place at the time of presentation as potentially eligible. All included patients returned to the operating room with cultures obtained and assessed by both isothermal microcalorimetry and conventional cultures, and all were diagnosed using the consensus criteria for fracture-related infection. Based on that, 81% (250 of 310) of patients were eligible; a further 51% (157 of 310) were excluded because of the following reasons: the capacity of the isothermal microcalorimetry instrument limited the throughput on that day (34% [106 of 310]), they had only swab cultures obtained in surgery (15% [46 of 310]), or they had less than 3 months follow-up after surgery for infectious concerns (2% [5 of 310]), leaving 30% (93 of 310) of the originally identified patients for analysis. We obtained two to five cultures from each patient during surgery, which were sent to our clinical microbiology laboratory for standard processing (conventional cultures). This included homogenization of each tissue sample individually and culturing for aerobic, anaerobic, acid-fast bacilli, and fungal culturing. The remaining homogenate from each sample was then taken to our orthopaedic research laboratory, resuspended in growth media, and analyzed by isothermal microcalorimetry for a minimum of 24 hours. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures were maintained for 5 days and 14 days, respectively. Overall, there were 93 patients (59 males), with a mean age of 43 ± 14 years and a mean BMI of 28 ± 8 kg/m2, and 305 tissue samples (mean 3 ± 1 samples per patient) were obtained and assessed by conventional culturing and isothermal microcalorimetry. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of isothermal microcalorimetry to diagnose fracture-related infection were compared with conventional cultures using a McNemar test based on the consensus definition of fracture-related infection. This consensus criteria is comprised of two levels of certainty for the diagnostic variables. The first is confirmatory criteria, where infection is considered definitely present and includes the presence of fistula/sinus tract/wound breakdown, purulent drainage or the presence of pus, presence of microorganisms in deep tissue specimens on histopathologic examination, presence of more than five neutrophils/high-powered field by histopathologic examination (only for chronic/late onset cases), and identification of phenotypically indistinguishable pathogens by conventional culture from at least two separate deep tissue/implant specimens. The second is suggestive criteria in which further investigation is required to achieve confirmatory status. Fracture-related infection was diagnosed for this study to minimize subjectivity based on the presence of at least one of the confirmatory criteria as documented by the managing surgeon. When suggestive criteria were present without confirmatory criteria, patients were considered negative for fracture-related infection and followed further in clinic after surgical exploration (n = 25 patients). All 25 patients deemed not to have fracture-related infection were considered infection-free at latest follow-up (range 3 to 12 months). The time to detection or diagnosis was recorded and compared via the Mann-Whitney U test.Results Using the consensus criteria for fracture-related infection, there were no differences with the numbers available between isothermal microcalorimetry and conventional cultures in terms of sensitivity (87% [95% confidence interval 77% to 94%] versus 81% [95% CI 69% to 89%]), specificity (100% [95% CI 87% to 100%] versus 96% [95% CI 79% to 99%]), PPV (100% [95% CI 90% to 100%] versus 98% [95% CI 89% to 99%]), NPV (74% [95% CI 60% to 84%] versus 65% [95% CI 52% to 75%]), or accuracy (90% [95% CI 83% to 96%] versus 85% [95% CI 76% to 91%]; p = 0.13). The concordance by sample between conventional cultures and isothermal microcalorimetry was 85%. Isothermal microcalorimetry had a shorter median (range) time to detection or diagnosis compared with conventional cultures (2 hours [0.5 to 66] versus 51 hours [18 to 147], difference of medians 49 hours; p < 0.001). Additionally, 32 patients used antibiotics for a median (range) duration of 28 days (7 to 1095) before presentation. In these unique patients, there were no differences with the numbers available between isothermal microcalorimetry and conventional cultures in terms of sensitivity (89% [95% CI 71% to 98%] versus 74% [95% CI 53% to 88%]), specificity (100% [95% CI 48% to 100%] versus 83% [95% CI 36% to 99%]), PPV (100% [95% CI...
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Isothermal Microcalorimetry Improves the Time to
           Diagnosis of Fracture-related Infection Compared With Conventional Tissue
           Cultures

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      Authors: Zalavras; Charalampos G.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Halicin Is Effective Against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms In Vitro

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      Authors: Higashihira; Shota; Simpson, Stefanie Jan; Collier, Christopher David; Natoli, Roman Michael; Kittaka, Mizuho; Greenfield, Edward Michael
      Abstract: imageBackground Biofilms protect bacteria from the host immune system and many antibiotics, making the treatment of orthopaedic infections difficult. Halicin, a recently discovered antibiotic, has potent activity against nonorthopaedic infections in mice and the planktonic, free-living forms of many bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, a common cause of orthopaedic infections. Importantly, halicin did not induce resistance in vitro and was effective against drug-resistant bacteria and proliferating and quiescent bacteria. Quiescence is an important cause of antibiotic tolerance in biofilms. However, whether halicin acts on biofilms has not been tested.Questions/purposes (1) Does halicin reduce the viability of S. aureus in less mature and more mature biofilms as it does in planktonic cultures? (2) How do the relative effects of halicin on S. aureus biofilms and planktonic cultures compare with those of conventional antibiotics (tobramycin, cefazolin, vancomycin, or rifampicin) that are commonly used in clinical orthopaedic infections?Methods To measure minimal biofilm eradication concentrations (MBECs) with less mature 3-day and more mature 7-day biofilms, we used 96-well peg plates that provided high throughput and excellent reproducibility. After S. aureus-Xen36 biofilm formation, planktonic bacteria were removed from the cultures, and the biofilms were exposed to various concentrations of halicin, tobramycin, cefazolin, vancomycin, or rifampicin for 20 hours. Biofilm viability was determined by measuring resazurin reduction or by counting colony-forming units after sonication. To determine effects of halicin and the conventional antibiotics on biofilm viability, we defined MBEC75 as the lowest concentration that decreased viability by 75% or more. To determine effects on bacterial viability in planktonic cultures, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined with the broth dilution method. Each result was measured in four to 10 independent experiments.Results We found no differences between halicin’s effectiveness against planktonic S. aureus and 3-day biofilms (MIC and MBEC75 for 3-day biofilms was 25 μM [interquartile range 25 to 25 and 25 to 25, respectively]; p> 0.99). Halicin was eightfold less effective against more mature 7-day biofilms (MBEC75 = 200 μM [100 to 200]; p < 0.001). Similarly, tobramycin was equally effective against planktonic culture and 3-day biofilms (MIC and MBEC75 for 3-day biofilms was 20 μM [20 to 20 and 10 to 20, respectively]; p> 0.99). Tobramycin’s MBEC75 against more mature 7-day biofilms was 320 μM (320 to 480), which is 16-fold greater than its planktonic MIC (p = 0.03). In contrast, the MBEC75 for cefazolin, vancomycin, and rifampicin against more mature 7-day biofilms were more than 1000-fold (> 1000; p < 0.001), 500-fold (500 to 875; p < 0.001), and 3125-fold (3125 to 5469; p = 0.004) greater than their planktonic MICs, respectively, consistent with those antibiotics’ relative inactivity against biofilms.Conclusion Halicin was as effective against S. aureus in less mature 3-day biofilms as those in planktonic cultures, but eightfold higher concentrations were needed for more mature 7-day biofilms. Tobramycin, an antibiotic whose effectiveness depends on biofilm maturity, was also as effective against S. aureus in less mature 3-day biofilms as those in planktonic cultures, but 16-fold higher concentrations were needed for more mature 7-day biofilms. In contrast, cefazolin, vancomycin, and rifampicin were substantially less active against both less and more mature biofilms than against planktonic cultures.Clinical Relevance Halicin is a promising antibiotic that may be effective against S. aureus osteomyelitis and infections on orthopaedic implants. Future studies should assess the translational value of halicin by testing its effects in animal models of orthopaedic infections; on the biofilms of other bacterial species, including multidrug-resistant bacteria; and in combination therapy with conventional antibiotics.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Halicin Is Effective Against Staphylococcus aureus
           Biofilms In Vitro

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      Authors: Leeb-Zatorska; Beata
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • For Patients With Acute PJI Treated With Debridement, Antibiotics, and
           Implant Retention, What Factors Are Associated With Systemic Sepsis and
           Recurrent or Persistent Infection in Septic Patients'

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      Authors: Ludwick; Leanne; Siqueira, Marcelo; Shohat, Noam; Sherman, Matthew B.; Streicher, Sydney; Parvizi, Javad
      Abstract: imageBackground Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) can lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response and may result in systemic sepsis. However, little is known about how often systemic sepsis may occur in patients with PJI, and whether sepsis is associated with a greater likelihood of persistent or recurrent PJI.Questions/purposes (1) Among patients who present with acute or acute hematogenous PJI and who were treated with debridement, antibiotics, and implant retention (DAIR), what proportion have sepsis and what factors are associated with a presentation with sepsis? (2) For patients presenting with sepsis, what factors are associated with persistent or recurrent PJI?Methods In all, 320 patients who underwent DAIR for the treatment of acute postoperative or acute hematogenous PJI between January 2000 and December 2019 were included in this study. Exclusion criteria were patients with other known sources of infection, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infections, which could contribute to systemic sepsis (6% [18 of 320]), patients with chronic PJI, and those with less than 6 months of follow-up (21% [66 of 320]). Our final cohort consisted of 236 patients presenting with an acute postoperative or acute hematogenous PJI who underwent an irrigation and debridement procedure. Sepsis was defined by the criteria for systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or bacteria-positive blood culture results. Inclusion of patients with positive blood culture by organisms that caused their joint infection was important as all patients presented with fulminant acute infection of a prosthetic joint. Data, including vital signs, surgical variables, and treatment outcomes, were collected retrospectively through a chart review of an electronic medical record system. The statistical analysis comparing patients with sepsis versus patients without sepsis consisted of logistic regression to identify factors associated with sepsis. After confirming its ability to identify patients with a higher association with the development of sepsis through area under the curve models, a nomogram was generated to standardize our results from the regression, which was supported by the area under the curve model, to help readers better identify patients who are more likely to develop sepsis.Results A total of 44% (103 of 236) of patients had infections that met the criteria for sepsis. After controlling for confounding variables, including congestive heart failure, anemia, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), and the male sex, it was revealed that serum CRP (odds ratio 1.07 [95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.11]; p < 0.001) and male sex (OR 1.96 [95% CI 1.03 to 3.81]; p = 0.04) were associated with the development of systemic sepsis. For patients presenting with sepsis, persistent or recurrent PJI were associated with an increased CRP level (OR 1.06 [95% CI 1.02 to 1.11]; p = 0.01) and number of prior surgical procedures on the joint (OR 2.30 [95% CI 1.21 to 4.89]; p = 0.02).Conclusion Overall, our findings support that patients with systematic sepsis may benefit from two-stage revision rather than DAIR to decrease the bioburden more effectively, especially in those with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and polymicrobial infections. High serum CRP levels and a history of prior surgical procedures on the involved joint should trigger prompt, aggressive surgical treatment if the patient’s overall clinical status can tolerate such an intervention.Level of Evidence Level III, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: For Patients With Acute PJI Treated With Debridement,
           Antibiotics, and Implant Retention, What Factors are Associated With
           Systemic Sepsis and Recurrent or Persistent Infection in Septic
           Patients'

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      Authors: Kheir; Michael M.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Preoperative Colonization With Staphylococcus Aureus in THA Is Associated
           With Increased Length of Stay

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      Authors: Santana; Daniel C.; Klika, Alison K.; Jin, Yuxuan; Emara, Ahmed K.; Piuzzi, Nicolas S.; the Cleveland Clinic Orthopaedic Minimal Dataset Episode of Care (OME Arthroplasty Group
      Abstract: imageBackground Staphylococcus aureus is a common organism implicated in prosthetic joint infection after THA and TKA, prompting preoperative culturing and decolonization to reduce infection rates. It is unknown whether colonization is associated with other noninfectious outcomes of THA or TKA.Questions/purposes (1) What is the association between preoperative S. aureus colonization (methicillin-sensitive S. aureus [MSSA] and methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA]) and the noninfectious outcomes (discharge destination, length of stay, Hip/Knee Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [HOOS/KOOS] pain score, HOOS/KOOS physical function score, 90-day readmission, and 1-year reoperation) of THA and TKA? (2) What factors are associated with colonization with S. aureus?Methods Between July 2015 and March 2019, 8078 patients underwent primary THA in a single healthcare system, and 17% (1382) were excluded because they were not tested preoperatively for S. aureus nasal colonization, leaving 6696 patients in the THA cohort. Between June 2015 and March 2019, 9434 patients underwent primary TKA, and 12% (1123) were excluded because they were not tested for S. aureus colonization preoperatively, leaving 8311 patients in the TKA cohort. The goal of the institution’s standardized care pathways is to test all THA and TKA patients preoperatively for S. aureus nasal colonization; the reason the excluded patients were not tested could not be determined. Per institutional protocols, all patients were given chlorhexidine gluconate skin wipes to use on the day before and the day of surgery, and patients with positive S. aureus cultures were instructed to use mupirocin nasal ointment twice daily for 3 to 5 days preoperatively. Adherence to these interventions was not tracked, and patients were not rescreened to test for S. aureus control. The minimum follow-up time for each outcome and the percentage of the cohort lost for each was: for discharge destination, until discharge (0 patients lost); for length of stay, until discharge (0.06% [4 of 6696] lost in the THA group and 0.01% [1 of 8311] lost in the TKA group); for HOOS/KOOS pain score, 1 year (26% [1734 of 6696] lost in the THA group and 24% [2000 of 8311] lost in the TKA group); for HOOS/KOOS physical function, 1 year (33% [2193 of 6696] lost in the THA group and 28% [2334 of 8311] lost in the TKA group); for 90-day readmission, 90 days (0.06% [4 of 6696] lost in the THA group and 0.01% [1 of 8311] lost in the TKA group); and for 1-year reoperation, 1 year (30% [1984 of 6696] lost in the THA group and 30% [2475 of 8311] lost in the TKA group). Logistic regression models were constructed to test for associations between MSSA or MRSA and nonhome discharge, length of stay greater than 1 day, improvement in the HOOS/KOOS pain subscale (≥ the minimum clinically important difference), HOOS/KOOS physical function short form (≥ minimum clinically important difference), 90-day readmission, and 1-year reoperation. We adjusted for patient-related and hospital-related factors, such as patient age and hospital site. Variable significance was assessed using the likelihood ratio test with a significance level of p < 0.05. To assess factors associated with S. aureus colonization, we constructed a logistic regression model with the same risk factors.Results Among the THA cohort, after controlling for potentially confounding variables such as patient age, smoking status, and BMI, S. aureus colonization was associated with length of stay greater than 1 day (MSSA: odds ratio 1.32 [95% CI 1.08 to 1.60]; MRSA: OR 1.88 [95% CI 1.24 to 2.85]; variable p < 0.001 by likelihood ratio test) but not the other outcomes of THA. Male sex (OR 1.26 [95% CI 1.09 to 1.45]; p = 0.001) and BMI (OR 1.02 for a one-unit increase over median BMI [95% CI 1.01 to 1.03]; p = 0.003) were patient-related factors associated with S. aureus colonization, whereas factors associated with a lower odds were older age (OR 0.99 [95% CI 0.98 to 0.99]; p < 0.001) and Black race compared with White race (OR 0.64 [95% CI 0.50 to 0.82]; p < 0.001). Among the TKA cohort, S. aureus colonization was associated with 90-day readmission (MSSA: OR 1.00 [95% CI 0.99 to 1.01]; MRSA: OR 1.01 [95% CI 1.00 to 1.01]; variable p = 0.007 by likelihood ratio test). Male sex (OR 1.19 [95% CI 1.05 to 1.34]; p = 0.006) was associated with S. aureus colonization, whereas factors associated with a lower odds of colonization were older age (OR 0.99 [95% CI 0.98 to 0.99]; p < 0.001), Veterans RAND-12 mental component score (OR 0.99 [95% CI 0.99 to 1.00]; p = 0.027), Black race compared with White race (OR 0.70 [95% CI 0.57 to 0.85]; p < 0.001), and being a former smoker (OR 0.86 [95% CI 0.75 to 0.97]; p = 0.016) or current smoker (OR 0.70 [95% CI 0.55 to 0.90]; p = 0.005) compared with those who never smoked.Conclusion After controlling for the variables we explored, S. aureus colonization was associated with increased length of stay after THA and 90-day readmission after TKA, despite preoperative decolonization. Given that there is little causal biological link between colonization and these outcomes, the association is likely confounded but may be a proxy for undetermined social or biological factors, which may alert the surgeon to pay increased attention to outcomes in patients who test positive. Further study of the association of S. aureus colonization and increased length of stay after THA and readmission after TKA may be warranted to determine what the confounding variables are, which may be best accomplished using large cohorts or registry data.Level of Evidence Level III, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Preoperative Colonization With Staphylococcus Aureus in
           THA is Associated With Increased Length of Stay

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      Authors: Meermans; Geert
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Is the Direct Anterior Approach to THA Cost-effective' A Markov
           Analysis

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      Authors: Berg; Ari R.; Held, Michael B.; Jiao, Boshen; Swart, Eric; Lakra, Akshay; Cooper, H. John; Shah, Roshan P.; Geller, Jeffrey A.
      Abstract: imageBackground The use of the direct anterior approach, a muscle-sparing technique for THA, has increased over the years; however, this approach is associated with longer procedure times and a more expensive direct cost. Furthermore, studies have shown a higher revision rate in the early stages of the learning curve. Whether the clinical advantages of the direct anterior compared with the posterior approach—such as less soft tissue damage, decreased short-term postoperative pain, a lower dislocation rate, decreased length of stay in the hospital, and higher likelihood of being discharged home—outweigh the higher cost is still debatable. Determining the cost-effectiveness of the approach may inform its utility and justify its use at various stages of the learning curve.Questions/purposes We used a Markov modeling approach to ask: (1) Is the direct anterior approach more likely to be a cost-effective approach than the posterior approach over the long-term for more experienced or higher volume hip surgeons? (2) How many procedures does a surgeon need to perform for the direct anterior approach to be a cost-effective choice?Methods A Markov model was created with three health states (well-functioning THA, revision THA, and death) to compare the cost-effectiveness of the direct anterior approach with that of the posterior approach in five scenarios: surgeons who performed one to 15, 16 to 30, 31 to 50, 51 to 100, and more than 100 direct anterior THAs during a 6-year span. Procedure costs (not charges), dislocation costs, and fracture costs were derived from published reports, and model was run using two different cost differentials between the direct anterior and posterior approaches (USD 219 and USD 1800, respectively). The lower cost was calculated as the total cost differential minus pharmaceutical and implant costs to account for differences in implant use and physician preference regarding postoperative pain management. The USD 1800 cost differential incorporated pharmaceutical and implant costs. Probabilities were derived from systematic review of the evidence as well as from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Utilities were estimated from best available literature and disutilities associated with dislocation and fracture were incorporated into the model. Quality of life was expressed in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), which are calculated by multiplying the utility of a health state (ranging from 0 to 1) by the duration of time in that health state. The primary outcome measure was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, or the change in costs divided by the change in QALYs when the direct anterior approach was used for THA. USD 100,000 per quality-adjusted life years was used as a threshold for willingness to pay. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed for the scenario in which the direct anterior approach is cost-effective to further account for uncertainty in model inputs.Results At a cost differential of USD 219 (95% CI 175 to 263), the direct anterior approach was associated with lower cost and higher effectiveness compared with the posterior approach for surgeons with an experience level of more than 100 operations during a 6-year span. At a cost differential of USD 1800 (95% CI 1440 to 2160), the direct anterior approach remained a cost-effective strategy for surgeons who performed more than 100 operations. At both cost differentials, the direct anterior approach was not cost-effective for surgeons who performed fewer than 100 operations. One-way sensitivity analyses revealed the model to be the most sensitive to fluctuations in the utility of revision THA, probability of revision after the posterior approach THA, probability of dislocation after the posterior approach THA, fluctuations in the probability of dislocation after direct anterior THA, cost of direct anterior THA, and probability of intraoperative fracture with the direct anterior approach. At the cost differential of USD 219 and for surgeons with a surgical experience level of more than 100 direct anterior operations, the direct anterior approach was still the cost-effective strategy for the entire range of values.Conclusion For high-volume hip surgeons, defined here as surgeons who perform more than 100 procedures during a 6-year span, the direct anterior approach may be a cost-effective strategy within the limitations imposed by our analysis. For lower volume hip surgeons, performing a more familiar approach appears to be more cost-effective.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Is the Direct Anterior Approach to THA
           Cost-effective' A Markov Analysis

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      Authors: Ryu; Keun Jung
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • No Benefit to Sensor-guided Balancing Compared With Freehand Balancing in
           TKA: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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      Authors: Sarpong; Nana O.; Held, Michael B.; Grosso, Matthew J.; Herndon, Carl L.; Santos, Walkania; Lakra, Akshay; Shah, Roshan P.; Cooper, H. John; Geller, Jeffrey A.
      Abstract: imageBackground Soft tissue balancing in TKA has traditionally relied on surgeons’ subjective tactile feedback. Although sensor-guided balancing devices have been proposed to provide more objective feedback, it is unclear whether their use improves patient outcomes.Questions/purposes We conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing freehand balancing with the use of a sensor-guided balancing device and evaluated (1) knee ROM, (2) patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) (SF-12, WOMAC, and Knee Society Functional Scores [KSFS]), and (3) various surgical and hospital parameters (such as operative time, length of stay [LOS], and surgical complications) at a minimum of 2 years of follow-up.Methods A total of 152 patients scheduled for primary TKA were recruited and provided informed consent to participate in this this study. Of these, 22 patients were excluded preoperatively, intraoperatively, or postoperatively due to patient request, surgery cancellation, anatomical exclusion criteria determined during surgery, technical issues with the sensor device, or loss to follow-up. After the minimum 2-year follow-up was accounted for, there were 63 sensor-guided and 67 freehand patients, for a total of 130 patients undergoing primary TKA for osteoarthritis. The procedures were performed by one of three fellowship-trained arthroplasty surgeons (RPS, HJC, JAG) and were randomized to either soft tissue balancing via a freehand technique or with a sensor-guided balancing device at one institution from December 2017 to December 2018. There was no difference in the mean age (72 ± 8 years versus 70 ± 9 years, mean difference 2; p = 0.11), BMI (30 ± 6 kg/m2 versus 29 ± 6 kg/m2, mean difference 1; p = 0.83), gender (79% women versus 70% women; p = 0.22), and American Society of Anesthesiology score (2 ± 1 versus 2 ± 1, mean difference 0; p = 0.92) between the sensor-guided and freehand groups, respectively. For both groups, soft tissue balancing was performed after all bony cuts were completed and trial components inserted, with the primary difference in technique being the ability to quantify the intercompartmental balance using the trial tibial insert embedded with a wireless sensor in the sensor-guided cohort. Implant manufacturers were not standardized. Primary outcomes were knee ROM and PROMs at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years. Secondary outcomes included pain level evaluated by the VAS, opioid consumption, inpatient physical therapy performance, LOS, discharge disposition, surgical complications, and reoperations.Results There was no difference in the mean knee ROM at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years postoperatively between the sensor-guided cohort (113° ± 11°, 119° ± 13°, and 116° ± 12°, respectively) and the freehand cohort (116° ± 13° [p = 0.36], 117° ± 13° [p = 0.41], and 117° ± 12° [p = 0.87], respectively). There was no difference in SF-12 physical, SF-12 mental, WOMAC pain, WOMAC stiffness, WOMAC function, and KSFS scores between the cohorts at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years postoperatively. The mean operative time in the sensor-guided cohort was longer than that in the freehand cohort (107 ± 0.02 versus 84 ± 0.04 minutes, mean difference = 23 minutes; p = 0.008), but there were no differences in LOS, physical therapy performance, VAS pain scores, opioid consumption, discharge disposition, surgical complications, or percentages of patients in each group who underwent reoperation.Conclusion This RCT demonstrated that at 2 years postoperatively, the use of a sensor-balancing device for soft tissue balancing in TKA did not confer any additional benefit in terms of knee ROM, PROMs, and clinical outcomes. Given the significantly increased operative time and costs associated with the use of a sensor-balancing device, we recommend against its routine use in clinical practice by experienced surgeons.Level of Evidence Level I, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: No Benefit to Sensor-guided Balancing Compared with
           Freehand Balancing in TKA: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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      Authors: Yau; W. P.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Can Weightbearing Cone-beam CT Reliably Differentiate Between Stable and
           Unstable Syndesmotic Ankle Injuries' A Systematic Review and
           Meta-analysis

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      Authors: Raheman; Firas J.; Rojoa, Djamila M.; Hallet, Charles; Yaghmour, Khaled M.; Jeyaparam, Srirangan; Ahluwalia, Raju S.; Mangwani, Jitendra
      Abstract: imageBackground Ankle injuries are common presentations to the emergency department and may lead to syndesmotic instability. These have a high socioeconomic burden due to prolonged rehabilitation, chronic pain, and posttraumatic arthritis. Early diagnosis is essential to minimize these complications, and the assessment of instability in the clinical setting is often limited by pain and clinician experience. Cross-sectional imaging of the distal syndesmosis accurately evaluates the syndesmosis through abnormal bony relationships, which in the presence of instability, worsens during physiological loading. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) has gained popularity in the diagnosis of these injuries because it enables syndesmotic assessment under weightbearing conditions, it mitigates the high radiation dose, and it is time-efficient.Questions/purposes The purposes of this systematic review were: (1) to establish normal values for weightbearing CBCT of the syndesmosis in uninjured ankles and ascertain interobserver reliability and (2) to identify the impact of weightbearing on the syndesmosis in patients with occult ankle injuries and assess the effect of patient demographics on these metrics.Methods This systematic review was reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and registered in PROSPERO (ID CRD42021248623). MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, and Emcare databases were searched for studies assessing for syndesmotic instability, of which 307 studies were screened and 11 studies with 559 ankles in 408 uninjured patients and 151 patients with syndesmotic instability were included. All patients 18 years of age or older presenting with unilateral ankle injuries who underwent weightbearing CBCT for the diagnosis of an occult fracture or syndesmotic instability compared with the uninjured contralateral side were included. A control group of uninjured ankles was identified during weightbearing CBCT performed for other indications such as forefoot or midfoot injuries. Methodological assessment of the studies was performed using the Risk of Bias In Non-randomized Studies (ROBINS-1) tool and most included studies had a low risk of bias. Thus, a random-effects restricted maximum likelihood ratio model was used.Results In the uninjured ankle, the mean area of the tibiofibular syndesmosis was 112.5 ± 7.1 mm2, which increased to 157.5 ± 9.6 mm2 after injury when compared with uninjured ankles with a standardized mean difference of 29.5 (95% confidence interval 19.5 to 39.5; p < 0.01), and an excellent interobserver agreement (κ = 1.0 [95% CI 0.9 to 1.0]). However, syndesmosis volume decreased with age (β = -0.76; p = 0.04), and therefore, has a negative association with increasing age.Conclusion Our study has shown that the syndesmotic area is the most reliable parameter in the assessment of syndesmotic injuries because it increases in the presence of instability during weightbearing status. It is a composite measurement that could potentially allow clinicians to use weightbearing CBCT as an adjunct when there is a clinical suspicion of syndesmotic instability. Thus, weightbearing CBCT has the potential of being diagnostic of syndesmotic instability and should be evaluated against current radiological modalities to evaluate its accuracy.Level of Evidence Level IV, prognostic study
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Can Weightbearing Cone-beam CT Reliably Differentiate
           Between Stable and Unstable Syndesmotic Ankle Injuries' A Systematic
           Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: de Cesar Netto; Cesar
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • What Factors Are Associated With Poor Shoulder Function and Serious
           Complications After Internal Fixation of Three-part and Four-part Proximal
           Humerus Fracture-dislocations'

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      Authors: Gavaskar; Ashok S.; Pattabiraman, Kirubakaran; Srinivasan, Parthasarathy; Raj, Rufus V.; Jayakumar, Balamurugan; Rangasamy, Naveen Kumar
      Abstract: imageBackground Three-part and four-part fracture-dislocations of the proximal humerus are characterized by severe soft tissue disruptions that can compromise the viability of the humeral head. As a result, nonunion and avascular necrosis are more common in these injuries. In such injuries, surgical treatment (internal fixation or arthroplasty) is performed in most patients who are determined to be fit for surgery to potentially restore shoulder function. Although the decision to preserve or replace the humeral head is simple in young patients or those> 65 years, in most other patients, the decision can be complicated, and little is known about which patient-related and injury-related factors may be independently associated with poor shoulder function or complications like avascular necrosis.Questions/purposes (1) What proportion of fractures united after internal fixation of a three-part or four-part fracture-dislocation of the proximal humerus, what is the mean Constant score at a minimum of 2 years after this injury, and what proportion had serious complications (such as loss of fixation, nonunion, reoperation, or avascular necrosis)? (2) After controlling for potential confounding variables, what factors are independently associated with poor shoulder function (defined as a Constant score < 55 out of 100) and occurrence of serious complications such as loss of fixation or reduction resulting in revision surgery, nonunion, or radiographic evidence of avascular necrosis of the humeral head?Methods Between 2011 and 2017, the senior author of this study (ASG) treated 69 patients with three-part or four-part proximal humerus fracture dislocations. During this time, indications for internal fixation in these patients were adequate humeral bone quality as determined by the surgeon on radiographs, adequate bone stock and volume available for fixation in the humeral head as determined on CT images, and the absence of a head split component as assessed on preoperative radiographs and CT images. On this basis, 87% (60 patients) underwent internal fixation with a locked plate and suture fixation of the tuberosities through a deltopectoral approach. Thirteen percent (nine patients) underwent either a hemiarthroplasty or a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Of the 60 patients who underwent internal fixation, four declined to participate in the study and two with brachial plexus palsy were not considered for inclusion. This study focused on the remaining 54 patients who were considered potentially eligible. To be included, a minimum follow-up of 2 years was required; 11% (6 of 54) were lost before that time, and the remaining 48 patients were analyzed at a mean of 48 months ± 17 months in this retrospective study, which drew data from longitudinally maintained institutional databases. Fracture union was assessed by obliteration of fracture lines and the presence of bridging trabecular bone on plain radiographs. Shoulder function was assessed using the Constant score, which is scored from 0 to 100 points, with 0 indicating the most disability and 100 the least disability. The anchor-based minimal clinically important difference for the Constant score is 9.8 points. Twelve patient-related and injury-related factors were analyzed using a multivariate regression model to identify factors that are independently associated with poor results after internal fixation as measured by shoulder function and the occurrence of serious complications. We categorized results as poor if patients had one or more of the following: Constant score < 55 out of 100 at the last follow-up examination (for patients who underwent revision surgery, the Constant score immediately before revision was considered) and loss of fixation or reduction resulting in revision surgery, nonunion, or avascular necrosis of the humeral head. Patients were screened for avascular necrosis at 6 and 12 months after surgery, then annually for another 2 years. Further assessments were made only based on symptoms.Results Seventy-nine percent of the fractures united within 18 weeks of surgery (38 of 48), and an additional 13% united by 24 weeks (6 of 48), while 8% did not unite (4 of 48). The mean Constant score at the last follow-up was 68 ± 12. Twenty-one percent (10 of 48) had a Constant score < 55, indicating poor shoulder function. Twenty-one percent (10 of 48) experienced avascular necrosis, and 15% (7 of 48) with either nonunion or avascular necrosis underwent revision shoulder arthroplasty. Two patients who underwent arthroplasty had both nonunion and avascular necrosis. After controlling for potentially confounding variables, we found that being a woman (odds ratio 1.7 [95% confidence interval 1.4 to 2.1]; p = 0.01), four-part fracture dislocations (OR 2.1 [95% CI 1.5 to 2.7]; p < 0.001), absence of a metaphyseal head extension (OR 2.4 [95% CI 1.8 to 3.3]; p < 0.001), absence of active back-bleeding from the humeral head (OR 3.4 [95% CI 2.3 to 5.1]; p < 0.001), height of the head segment < 2 cm (OR 2.3 [95% CI 1.8 to 2.8]; p < 0.001), and absence of capsular attachments to the head fragment (OR 2.2 [95% CI 1.6 to 2.9]; p < 0.001) were independently associated with poor shoulder function and the occurrence of complications such as nonunion and avascular necrosis.Conclusion Internal fixation of three-part and four-part proximal humerus fracture dislocations resulted in poor shoulder function and complications in a high number of patients, although fracture union was achieved in most patients. A nonunion proportion of 8%, 21% proportion of avascular necrosis, and 15% proportion of patients who underwent revision surgery suggests this is ...
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: What Factors Are Associated With Poor Shoulder Function
           and Serious Complications After Internal Fixation of Three-part and
           Four-part Proximal Humerus Fracture-dislocations'

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      Authors: Hawi; Nael
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • General Anxiety Is Associated with Problematic Initial Recovery After
           Carpal Tunnel Release

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      Authors: Ryan; Claire; Miner, Harrison; Ramachandran, Shyam; Ring, David; Fatehi, Amirreza
      Abstract: imageBackground Carpal tunnel release can stop the progression of idiopathic median neuropathy at the wrist (carpal tunnel syndrome). Intermittent symptoms tend to resolve after surgery, but loss of sensibility can be permanent. Both pathophysiology (severe neuropathy) and mental health (symptoms of despair or worry) contribute to problematic recovery after carpal tunnel release, but their relative associations are unclear.Question/purpose Is problematic initial recovery after carpal tunnel release associated with psychologic distress rather than with disease severity?Methods We retrospectively studied 156 patients who underwent in-office carpal tunnel release between November 2017 and February 2020, and we recorded their symptoms of anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 [GAD]) and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire), signs of severe median neuropathy (loss of sensibility, thenar muscle atrophy, and palmar abduction weakness), and problematic recovery. The initial recovery (first 2 weeks) was categorized as problematic if the patient was upset about persistent numbness, experienced unsettling postoperative pain, developed hand stiffness, or experienced wound issues—all of which are routinely recorded in the medical record by the treating surgeon along with signs of severe median neuropathy. Twenty-four percent (38 of 156) of patients had a problematic initial recovery characterized by distress regarding persistent numbness (16% [25 of 156]), unsettling pain (8% [12 of 156]), hand stiffness (5% [8 of 156]), or wound issues (1% [2 of 156]); 6% (9 of 156) of patients had more than one issue. Associations between problematic initial recovery and age, gender, symptoms of anxiety and depression, disease severity, specific exam findings, and insurance were evaluated using t-tests, Mann-Whitney tests, and chi-square tests, with the plan to perform logistic regression if at least two variables had an association with p < 0.10.Results The only factor associated with problematic initial recovery was greater symptoms of anxiety (median GAD score 1.5 [interquartile range 0 to 7.8] for problematic initial recovery compared with a median score of 0 [IQR 0 to 2] for nonproblematic recovery; p = 0.04), so we did not perform a logistic regression. Physical examination findings consistent with severe median neuropathy were not associated with problematic initial recovery.Conclusion The finding that problematic initial recovery after carpal tunnel release was related to symptoms of anxiety and not to the severity of median neuropathy highlights the need to study the ability of efforts to ameliorate anxiety symptoms before carpal tunnel release as an effective intervention to reduce unplanned visits and additional tests, therapy, and repeat surgery, while improving patient-reported outcomes and experience.Level of Evidence Level III, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: General Anxiety Is Associated With Problematic Initial
           Recovery After Carpal Tunnel Release

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      Authors: Bernstein; David N.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Insights into Imprinting: How Is the Phenomenon of Tribocorrosion at
           Head-Neck Taper Interfaces Related to Corrosion, Fretting, and Implant
           Design Parameters'

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      Authors: Bormann; Therese; Müller, Ulrike; Gibmeier, Jens; Mai, Phuong Thao; Renkawitz, Tobias; Kretzer, Jan Philippe
      Abstract: imageBackground Wear and corrosion at modular neck tapers in THA can lead to major clinical implications such as periprosthetic osteolysis, adverse local tissue reactions, or implant failure. The material degradation processes at the taper interface are complex and involve fretting corrosion, third-body abrasion, as well as electrochemical and crevice corrosion. One phenomenon in this context is imprinting of the head taper, where the initially smooth surface develops a topography that reflects the rougher neck taper profile. The formation mechanism of this specific phenomenon, and its relation to other observed damage features, is unclear. An analysis of retrieved implants may offer some insights into this process.Questions/purposes (1) Is imprinting related to time in situ of the implants and to the taper damage modes of corrosion and fretting? (2) Are implant design parameters like neck taper profile, stem material, or head seating associated with the formation of imprinting? (3) Is imprinting created by an impression of the neck taper profile or can a different mechanistic explanation for imprinting be derived?Methods Thirty-one THAs with cobalt-chromium-molybdenum-alloy (CoCrMo) heads retrieved between 2013 and 2019 at revision surgery from an institutional registry were investigated. Inclusion criteria were: 12/14 tapers, a head size of 36 mm or smaller, time in situ more than 1 year, and intact nonmodular stems without sleeve adaptors. After grouping the residual THAs according to stem type, stem material, and manufacturer, all groups of three or more were included. Of the resulting subset of 31 retrievals, nine THAs exhibited a still assembled head-neck taper connection. The median (range) time in situ was 5 years (1 to 23). Two stem materials (21 titanium-alloy and 10 stainless steel), three kinds of bearing couples (11 metal-on-metal, 13 metal-on-polyethylene, and seven dual-mobility heads), and two different neck taper profiles (six wavy profile and 25 fluted profile) were present in the collection. Four THAs exhibited signs of eccentric head seating. The 31 investigated THAs represented 21% of the retrieved THAs with a CoCrMo alloy head during the specified period.At the head tapers, the damage modes of corrosion, fretting, and imprinting were semiquantitatively rated on a scale between 0 (no corrosion/fretting/imprinting) and 3 (severe corrosion/fretting/imprinting). Corrosion and fretting were assessed applying the Goldberg score, with the modification that the scale started at 0 and not at 1. Imprinting was assessed with a custom scoring system. Rating was done individually at the proximal and distal head taper half and summed to one total damage score for each retrieval and damage mode. Correlations between the damage modes and time in situ and between the damage modes among each other, were assessed using the Spearman rank order correlation coefficient (ρ). Associations between imprinting and implant design parameters were investigated by comparing the total imprinting score distributions with the Mann-Whitney U-test. Metallographically prepared cross-sections of assembled head-neck taper connections were examined by optical microscopy and disassembled head and neck taper surfaces were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).Results The imprinting damage score increased with time in-situ (ρ = 0.72; p < 0.001) and the corrosion damage score (ρ = 0.63; p < 0.001) but not with the fretting damage score (ρ = 0.35; p = 0.05). There was no difference in total imprinting score comparing neck taper profiles or stem materials, with the numbers available. Eccentric head seating had elevated total imprinting score (median 6 [interquartile range 0]) compared with centric seating (median 1 [2]; p = 0.001). Light optical investigations showed that imprinting can be present on the head taper surfaces even if the depth of abraded material exceeds the neck taper profile height. SEM investigations showed bands of pitting corrosion in the imprinted grooves.Conclusion The microscopic investigations suggest that imprinting is not an independent phenomenon but a process that accompanies the continuous material degradation of the head taper surface because of circular damage on the passive layer induced by grooved neck tapers.Clinical Relevance Material loss from head-neck taper connections involving CoCrMo alloy heads is a source of metal ions and could potentially be reduced if hip stems with smooth neck tapers were used. Surgeons should pay attention to the exact centric seating of the femoral head onto the stem taper during joining of the parts.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Insights into Imprinting: How Is the Phenomenon of
           Tribocorrosion at Head-Neck Taper Interfaces Related to Corrosion,
           Fretting, and Implant Design Parameters'

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      Authors: Fernandez-Fairen; Mariano
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Arthroplasty Surgeons Differ in Their Intraoperative Soft Tissue
           Assessments: A Study in Human Cadavers to Quantify Surgical
           Decision-making in TKA

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      Authors: Elmasry; Shady S.; Sculco, Peter K.; Kahlenberg, Cynthia A.; Mayman, David J.; Cross, Michael B.; Pearle, Andrew D.; Wright, Timothy M.; Westrich, Geoffrey H.; Imhauser, Carl W.
      Abstract: imageBackground In TKA, soft tissue balancing is assessed through manual intraoperative trialing. This assessment is a physical examination via manually applied forces at the ankle, generating varus and valgus moments at the knee while the surgeon visualizes the lateral and medial gaps at the joint line. Based on this examination, important surgical decisions are made that influence knee stability, such as choosing the polyethylene insert thickness. Yet, the applied forces and the assessed gaps in this examination represent a qualitative art that relies on each surgeon’s intuition, experience, and training. Therefore, the extent of variation among surgeons in conducting this exam, in terms of applied loads and assessed gaps, is unknown. Moreover, whether variability in the applied loads yields different surgical decisions, such as choice of insert thickness, is also unclear. Thus, surgeons and developers have no basis for deciding to what extent the applied loads need to be standardized and controlled during a knee balance exam in TKA.Questions/purposes (1) Do the applied moments in soft tissue assessment differ among surgeons? (2) Do the assessed gaps in soft tissue assessment differ among surgeons? (3) Is the choice of insert thickness associated with the applied moments?Methods Seven independent human cadaveric nonarthritic lower extremities from pelvis to toe were acquired (including five females and two males with a mean age of 73 ± 7 years and a mean BMI of 25.8 ± 3.8 kg/m2). Posterior cruciate ligament substituting (posterior stabilized) TKA was performed only on the right knees. Five fellowship-trained knee surgeons (with 24, 15, 15, 7, and 6 years of clinical experience) and one chief orthopaedic resident independently examined soft tissue balance in each knee in extension (0° of flexion), midflexion (30° of flexion), and flexion (90° of flexion) and selected a polyethylene insert based on their assessment. Pliable force sensors were wrapped around the leg to measure the loads applied by each surgeon. A three-dimensional (3D) motion capture system was used to measure knee kinematics and a dynamic analysis software was used to estimate the medial and lateral gaps. We assessed (1) whether surgeons applied different moments by comparing the mean applied moment by surgeons in extension, midflexion, and flexion using repeated measures (RM)-ANOVA (p < 0.05 was assumed significantly different); (2) whether surgeons assessed different gaps by comparing the mean medial and lateral gaps in extension, midflexion, and flexion using RM-ANOVA (p < 0.05 was assumed significantly different); and (3) whether the applied moments in extension, midflexion, and flexion were associated with the insert thickness choice using a generalized estimating equation (p < 0.05 was assumed a significant association).Results The applied moments differed among surgeons, with the largest mean differences occurring in varus in midflexion (16.5 Nm; p = 0.02) and flexion (7.9 Nm; p < 0.001). The measured gaps differed among surgeons at all flexion angles, with the largest mean difference occurring in flexion (1.1 ± 0.4 mm; p < 0.001). In all knees except one, the choice of insert thickness varied by l mm among surgeons. The choice of insert thickness was weakly associated with the applied moments in varus (β = -0.06 ± 0.02 [95% confidence interval -0.11 to -0.01]; p = 0.03) and valgus (β = -0.09 ± 0.03 [95% CI -0.18 to -0.01]; p= 0.03) in extension and in varus in flexion (β = -0.11 ± 0.04 [95% CI -0.22 to 0.00]; p = 0.04). To put our findings in context, the greatest regression coefficient (β = -0.11) indicates that for every 9-Nm increase in the applied varus moment (that is, 22 N of force applied to the foot assuming a shank length of 0.4 m), the choice of insert thickness decreased by 1 mm.Conclusion In TKA soft tissue assessment in a human cadaver model, five surgeons and one chief resident applied different moments in midflexion and flexion and targeted different gaps in extension, midflexion, and flexion. A weak association between the applied moments in extension and flexion and the insert choice was observed. Our results indicate that in the manual assessment of soft tissue, changes in the applied moments of 9 and 11 Nm (22 to 27 N on the surgeons’ hands) in flexion and extension, respectively, yielded at least a 1-mm change in choice of insert thickness. The choice of insert thickness may be more sensitive to the applied moments in in vivo surgery because the surgeon is allowed a greater array of choices beyond insert thickness.Clinical Relevance Among five arthroplasty surgeons with different levels of experience and a chief resident, subjective soft tissue assessment yielded 1 to 2 mm of variation in their choice of insert thickness. Therefore, developers of tools to standardize soft tissue assessment in TKA should consider controlling the force applied by the surgeon to better control for variations in insert selection.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Letter to the Editor: Persistent Tennis Elbow Symptoms Have Little
           Prognostic Value: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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      Authors: Gorski; Jerrold
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Letter to the Editor: Military Service Members With Major Lower Extremity
           Fractures Return to Running With a Passive-dynamic Ankle-foot Orthosis:
           Comparison With a Normative Population

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      Authors: Ekinci; Safak; Ozyigit, Elif
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Letter to the Editor: Editorial: Should Orthopaedic Residents Be Required
           to Do Research, or Would Critical Reading Programs Be a Better Use of
           Their Time'

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      Authors: LeBrun; Drake G.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Letter to the Editor: Editorial: Should Orthopaedic Residents Be Required
           to Do Research, or Would Critical Reading Programs Be a Better Use of
           Their Time'

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      Authors: al Maskari; Sultan
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Letter to the Editor: Editorial: Should Orthopaedic Residents Be Required
           to Do Research, or Would Critical Reading Programs Be a Better Use of
           Their Time'

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      Authors: Hoekman; Ron
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Letter to the Editor: No Differences Between White and Non-White Patients
           in Terms of Care Quality Metrics, Complications, and Death After Hip
           Fracture Surgery When Standardized Care Pathways are Used

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      Authors: Rudisill; Samuel S.; Rahman, Rafa; Lane, Joseph; Amen, Troy B.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Reply to the Letter to the Editor: No Differences Between White and
           Non-White Patients in Terms of Care Quality Metrics, Complications, and
           

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      Authors: Parola; Rown; Neal, William H.; Konda, Sanjit R.; Ganta, Abhishek; Egol, Kenneth A.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Erratum to: Race, But Not Gender, Is Associated With Admissions Into
           Orthopaedic Residency Programs

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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