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ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 152 of 152 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Orthopaedica     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthopedics     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Arthroplasty Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone & Joint 360     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Bone Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Burns & Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Orthopedic Research     Open Access  
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Chinese Journal of Traumatology     Open Access  
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Concussion     Open Access  
Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Orthopaedic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Der Orthopäde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Die Wirbelsäule     Hybrid Journal  
Duke Orthopedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
East African Orthopaedic Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
EFORT Open Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Técnicas Quirúrgicas - Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
EMC - Tecniche Chirurgiche - Chirurgia Ortopedica     Full-text available via subscription  
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Podiatry / Revista Europea de Podología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Foot & Ankle International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Spine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Orthopaedics     Open Access  
International Musculoskeletal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JAAOS : Global Research & Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants     Hybrid Journal  
JBJS Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
JOR Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal de Traumatologie du Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal für Mineralstoffwechsel & Muskuloskelettale Erkrankungen     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bone and Joint Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bone and Joint Infection     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Children's Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Musculoskeletal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Journal of Orthopaedic Association of South Indian States     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Diseases and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Orthopaedic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Orthopaedic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Orthopaedic Translation     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Orthopaedics, Trauma and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Orthopedics & Rheumatology     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Musculoskeletal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Musculoskeletal Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma     Open Access  
North American Spine Society Journal (NASSJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Obere Extremität     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Orthopedics and Rheumatology     Open Access  
Open Journal of Trauma     Open Access  
Open Orthopaedics Journal     Open Access  
Operative Orthopädie und Traumatologie     Hybrid Journal  
Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopädie & Rheuma     Full-text available via subscription  
Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Orthopaedic Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Orthopaedic Proceedings     Partially Free  
Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopaedics and Trauma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Orthopedic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Orthopedic Research and Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Orthopedic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthoplastic Surgery     Open Access  
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Open     Open Access  
Osteologie     Hybrid Journal  
Osteoporosis and Sarcopenia     Open Access  
OTA International     Open Access  
Paediatric Orthopaedics and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Prosthetics and Orthotics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Chilena de Ortopedia y Traumatología / Chilean Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Cubana de Ortopedia y Traumatologí­a     Open Access  
Revista de la Asociación Argentina de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Open Access  
Revista Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Portuguesa de Ortopedia e Traumatologia     Open Access  
Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Romanian Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology     Open Access  
SA Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SICOT-J     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Sport-Orthopädie - Sport-Traumatologie - Sports Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Strategies in Trauma and Limb Reconstruction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Techniques in Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma (Travma)     Open Access  
Trauma und Berufskrankheit     Hybrid Journal  
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology and Orthopedics of Russia     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ортопедия, травматология и протезирование     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.579
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1434-5293 - ISSN (Online) 1615-6714
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Periodontal health of unilateral labially vs. palatally impacted maxillary
           canines erupted by closed eruption technique

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      Abstract: Objective This study’s aim was to compare the periodontal health of labially and palatally impacted maxillary canines erupted by closed eruption technique, and to compare them with the contralateral canines that served as control teeth. Materials and methods A total of 32 subjects, 17 with unilateral labially impacted maxillary canines and 15 with palatally impacted maxillary canines were enrolled in this study. Pretreatment maxillary canine variables were evaluated from initial panoramic radiographs using Nolla stage, α‑angle, d‑depth and s‑sector. The closed eruption technique was used for surgical exposure of the impacted teeth. Posttreatment periodontal parameters such as plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding index (GBI), probing depth (PD), keratinized gingival width (KGW), attached gingival width (AGW), and gingival thickness (GT) were evaluated to compare the periodontal health with the contralateral canines. Results Intergroup comparison results exhibited insignificant differences in all periodontal parameters between the labially and palatally impacted maxillary canines. Intragroup comparison results showed a significant increase in PI, GI, GBI, and PD, and a significant decrease in AGW, KGW, and GT in the impacted teeth compared to the controls, except for PI in the palatally impacted maxillary canines. Conclusion The decrease in KGW, AGW, and GT was not associated with the pre-eruptive position of the impacted teeth. These side effects seen after orthodontic treatment of impacted teeth should be followed carefully in the long term.
      PubDate: 2022-07-29
       
  • Multiheaded mandibular condyles

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      Abstract: Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of multiheaded condyles (MHC) in a group of Turkish subjects using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods In this retrospective study, CBCT scans of 975 patients (546 female, 429 male; age 15–89 years, mean age 42.46 years) who were referred to Istanbul University Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology between 2015 and 2021 were evaluated. Bifid and trifid mandibular condyle cases were analyzed according to the patients’ age, gender, and laterality, and their frequencies were determined statistically. Results A multiheaded mandibular condyle (MHC) was detected in 57 of the 975 patients (546 female, 429 male). MHC was diagnosed unilaterally in 49 patients; in 8 patients, it was observed bilaterally. A bifid mandibular condyle (BMC) was detected in 54 patients. A trifid mandibular condyle (TMC) was found in 2 women, and one tetrafid mandibular condyle was seen in 1 woman. Conclusions The prevalence of MHC was 5.84% in our proband, which is higher than in previous studies. There was no statistically significant difference between the prevalence of MHC in males or females.
      PubDate: 2022-07-26
       
  • Oral health-related quality of life in patients with cleft lip and/or
           palate or Robin sequence

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      Abstract: Purpose To compare the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in patients with cleft lip and/or palate or Robin sequence versus a healthy control group using the Child Oral Health Impact Profile (COHIP-G19). Factors such as age, gender, and cleft type were considered. Methods Over an 8-month period, the OHRQoL was surveyed by using the COHIP-G19 questionnaire. Included were patients with a craniofacial disorder (n = 61; average age 11.24 years) and a healthy control group (n = 70, average age 12.63 years) for a total of 131 patients (average age 11.99 years) from the Department of Orthodontics University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. These were divided into two age groups (6–11 years; 12–18 years). Results Statistically, patients with a craniofacial disorder presented a significantly lower OHRQoL than the control group (p = 0.0055). In the craniofacial disorder group, older patients revealed a significantly (p = 0.005) lower OHRQoL than the younger patients. Female patients showed in nearly all groups a better OHRQoL than male patients, but this difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Males with a craniofacial disorder scored significantly lower than males without (p = 0.016); females showed no differences between the groups. Visibility, location, and severity of the craniofacial malformation did not have a significant influence on the OHRQoL. Conclusion The occurrence of a craniofacial malformation impacted the OHRQoL especially in older and male affected patients, unrelated to the expression level or localization. An early instruction about oral health, rehabilitation and functional training should be considered in therapy.
      PubDate: 2022-07-19
       
  • Antibacterial properties and abrasion-stability: Development of a novel
           silver-compound material for orthodontic bracket application

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      Abstract: Purpose Bacteria-induced white spot lesions are a common side effect of modern orthodontic treatment. Therefore, there is a need for novel orthodontic bracket materials with antibacterial properties that also resist long-term abrasion. The aim of this study was to investigate the abrasion-stable antibacterial properties of a newly developed, thoroughly silver-infiltrated material for orthodontic bracket application in an in situ experiment. Methods To generate the novel material, silver was vacuum-infiltrated into a sintered porous tungsten matrix. A tooth brushing simulation machine was used to perform abrasion equal to 2 years of tooth brushing. The material was characterized by energy dispersive X‑ray (EDX) analysis and roughness measurement. To test for antibacterial properties in situ, individual occlusal splints equipped with specimens were worn intraorally by 12 periodontal healthy patients for 48 h. After fluorescence staining, the quantitative biofilm volume and live/dead distribution of the initial biofilm formation were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results Silver was infiltrated homogeneously throughout the tungsten matrix. Toothbrush abrasion only slightly reduced the material’s thickness similar to conventional stainless steel bracket material and did not alter surface roughness. The new silver-modified material showed significantly reduced biofilm accumulation in situ. The effect was maintained even after abrasion. Conclusion A promising, novel silver-infiltrated abrasion-stable material for use as orthodontic brackets, which also exhibit strong antibacterial properties on in situ grown oral biofilms, was developed. The strong antibacterial properties were maintained even after surface abrasion simulated with long-term toothbrushing.
      PubDate: 2022-07-18
       
  • Soft tissue changes with skeletal anchorage in comparison to conventional
           anchorage protocols in the treatment of bimaxillary proclination patients
           treated with premolar extraction

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      Abstract: Purpose This review systematically evaluates the evidence related to comparisons between skeletal and conventional anchorage protocols in the treatment of bimaxillary proclination patients who underwent premolars extraction with respect to soft tissue profile changes, treatment duration and three-dimensional (3D) soft tissue changes. Methods Electronic database search and hand search with no language limitations were conducted in the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Ovid, Web of Science, Scopus and ClinicalTrials.gov. The selection criteria were set to include studies with patients aged 13 years and above requiring extractions of upper and lower first premolars to treat bimaxillary proclination with high anchorage demand. Risk of bias assessment was undertaken with Cochrane’s Risk Of Bias tool 2.0 (ROB 2.0) for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and ROBINS‑I tool for nonrandomised prospective studies. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used for quality assessment. Results were summarised qualitatively; no meta-analysis was conducted. Results Two RCTs and two nonrandomised prospective studies were included. According to the GRADE approach, there is low to very low quality of evidence that treatment using mini-implant anchorage may significantly change nasolabial angle, upper and lower lip procumbence, and facial convexity angle compared to treatment with conventional anchorage. Similarly, very low quality evidence exists showing no differences in treatment duration between treatments with skeletal or conventional anchorage. Conclusions The overall existing evidence regarding the effect of anchorage protocols on soft tissue changes in patients with bimaxillary protrusion and premolar extraction treatment plans is of low quality. Trial registration number: PROSPERO CRD42020216684
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
       
  • Anatomical and immunohistochemical analyses of the fusion of the
           premaxillary–maxillary suture in human fetuses

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      Abstract: Purpose The development of the premaxillary–maxillary suture (PMS) in human fetuses and a possible association between the fusion time of the PMS and maxillary deficiency were investigated. Expression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1 and TGF-β3) and of fibulins (fibulin‑1 and fibulin-5) were also investigated. Methods We analyzed 36 human fetus cadavers (19 males, 17 females; average age 23.97 ± 2.57 gestational weeks [gws], range 11–35 gws). Two cases, diagnosed with Down syndrome (DS), were characterized with maxillary deficiency; 34 fetus cadavers did not show any craniofacial abnormalities. The PMS was analyzed anatomically, followed by semi-quantitative immunohistochemical (IHC)-based expression analyses (i.e., TGF-β1/-β3, fibulin-1/-5). Spearman correlation test was conducted to investigate correlations. Results In the fetuses without DS, the labial region of the PMS was open at 11 gws, after which it began to ossify from the middle to the upper and lower ends of the suture, typically fusing completely at 27 gws. Fetuses with DS demonstrated complete fusion of the labial region of PMS with a spongy bone structure at 23 gws and those without DS at 27 gws. IHC revealed similar patterns of TGF-βs and fibulins expression in the PMS during the human fetal period. There were significant positive correlations between the expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 (r = 0.64, p = 0.009), TGF-β1 and fibulin‑1 (r = 0.66, p = 0.008), and TGF-β3 and fibulin‑1 (r = 0.67, p = 0.006). Conclusion Premature fusion of the PMS in the labial region during the human fetal period may be associated with maxillary deficiency, which is related to a class III malocclusion. Overall, the similar expression patterns of TGF-β1, TGF-β3 and fibulin‑1 suggested a close relationship between these factors in regulating the development of the PMS.
      PubDate: 2022-07-09
       
  • Biomechanical model registration for monitoring and simulating large
           orthodontic tooth movements in the maxilla and mandible

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      Abstract: Purpose Superimposition of digital dental-arch models allows quantification of orthodontic tooth movements (OTM). Currently, this procedure requires stable reference surfaces usually only present in the maxilla. This study aimed to investigate the accuracy of a novel superimposition approach based on biomechanical principles of OTM and the equilibrium of forces and moments (EFM)—applicable in both jaws—for monitoring and simulating large OTM. Methods The study included 7 patients who had undergone extraction of the first (PM1-Ex) or second (PM2-Ex) premolar in each quadrant. Digital models taken at start and end of the T‑Loop treatment phase were superimposed by applying 3 EFM variants differing in the number of teeth used for registration. Maxillary OTM results for EFM were validated against those for a conventional surface registration method (SRM). In an additional case study, OTM were simulated for PM1-Ex, PM2-Ex and non-extraction treatment strategies. Results The EFM variant that included all teeth of the dental arch achieved the highest accuracy, with median translational and rotational OTM deviations from SRM of only 0.37 mm and 0.56°, respectively. On average, retracted canines and first premolars were distalized by 3.0 mm, accompanied by 6.2° distal crown tipping and 12.2° distorotation. The share of space closure by molar mesialization was 19.4% for PM1-Ex quadrants and 34.5% for PM2-Ex quadrants. Conclusion EFM allows accurate OTM quantification relative to the maxillary and mandibular bases even in challenging situations involving large OTM. Superimposition of malocclusion and setup models enables realistic simulation of final tooth positions. This may greatly enhance the value of digital setups for decision-making in orthodontic treatment planning.
      PubDate: 2022-07-08
       
  • Evaluation´ of mandibular alveolar bone in patients with different
           vertical facial patterns

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      Abstract: Purpose The study aimed to investigate the morphological and structural differences of mandibular alveolar bone between different vertical facial patterns (VFP). Methods In all, 66 CBCT scans of patients were selected for the study: 24 were designated as hyperdivergent, 25 as normodivergent, and 17 as hypodivergent. Fractal values of the interdental alveolus were measured at the incisor, canine, premolar, and molar regions. The minimum trabecular bone width (MTBW) of the alveolus, the buccal and lingual cortical bone thicknesses, and the total alveolar width (AW) at the minimum trabecular bone level were measured. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey test were used to compare the groups. The correlations between FMA (Frankfurt mandibular plane angle) and other measurements were analyzed by Pearson analysis. Results No significant differences were detected in fractal values and buccal and lingual cortical bone thicknesses between the groups. The MTBW and AW of the hypodivergent individuals were found to be higher in the anterior and premolar interdental sites. FMA was found to be significantly correlated with MTBW and AW. Conclusions The patients with different VFPs did not exhibit significant differences in the trabecular complexity of the mandibular alveolus. Hypodivergent patients tend to have thicker trabecular and alveolar bone widths than normodivergent and hyperdivergent individuals.
      PubDate: 2022-07-05
       
  • Comparative assessment of dental and basal arch dimensions of passive and
           active self-ligating versus conventional appliances

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      Abstract: Purpose In this parallel, three-arm, single-center randomized trial, the dental and basal arch dimensions after orthodontic treatment using conventional brackets and passive and active self-ligating (SL) brackets were compared. Methods Patients needing comprehensive orthodontic treatment were randomly allocated to the active SL, passive SL, or conventional brackets (control) group. All patients were treated with a standardized arch wires sequence. Eligibility criteria included class I malocclusion in the permanent dentition, crowding (4–6 mm), and adequate oral hygiene. The primary outcome was intermolar width, based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Secondary outcomes were maxillary and mandibular widths in the canines and premolars regions, dental arch depth, buccolingual inclination, and alignment duration. Blinding of outcome assessment was implemented. Patients were followed every 4 weeks until insertion of the stainless steel 0.019 × 0.025 wire. Mean values were computed from CBCT sections, and data were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance. Results In all, 66 patients (ages 18–25 years) were randomized into a 1:1:1 ratio; 7 patients dropped out before treatment initiation. Examining dental arch dimensions in the canine and premolar regions showed that expansion of the maxillary dental arch was greatest in the passive SL brackets group, less in the active SL brackets group, and lowest in the control group (P < 0.01). Changes in maxillary intermolar width between the three groups were not significant, and changes in basal arch dimensions, depth of dental and basal arches, buccolingual inclination, and alignment duration were similar in the three groups. Conclusions Self-ligating brackets were not more effective than conventional brackets when examining intermolar width, basal transverse dimensions, depth of the arch, and alignment duration.
      PubDate: 2022-07-05
       
  • Assessment of the relationship between fractal analysis of mandibular bone
           and orthodontic treatment duration

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      Abstract: Purpose This retrospective study aimed to determine whether a correlation exists between the fractal dimension value and overall orthodontic treatment duration in children and young adults. Methods The study included a total of 643 patients (age: 10–25 years) who received orthodontic treatment between January 2015 and March 2020. Patient records and pretreatment panoramic radiographs were evaluated. The regions of interest selected for calculating fractal dimension were the bilateral mental foramen regions of the mandible. Fractal dimension was set in relation to orthodontic treatment duration using a linear regression model which was also adjusted for potential confounding variables. Total treatment duration was the outcome variable of interest used as a continuous variable. The predictor variables of interest included age, gender, type of dental and skeletal malocclusion, vertical growth pattern, extraction type, and fractal dimension. Results The mean age, treatment duration, and fractal dimension were 14.56 years, 27.01 months, and 1.23 mm, respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the fractal dimension had a significant influence on overall treatment duration (P < 0.001). From the other variables, Angle class II malocclusion significantly influenced treatment duration (P < 0.01), age showed a significant negative correlation with treatment duration (P < 0.01), and treatment duration significantly increased for patients with tooth extractions (P < 0.001). Conclusion There was a negative correlation between fractal dimensions at the mandibular mental region and total orthodontic treatment duration. Fractal dimension analysis may help to understand physiologic features of alveolar bone and predict orthodontic tooth movement.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Correction to: Expression of osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of
           nuclear factor κB ligand in root resorption induced by heavy force in
           rats

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      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Mitteilungen der DGKFO

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      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Variation of the modulus of elasticity of aligner foil sheet materials due
           to thermoforming

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      Abstract: Objective Investigate and compare the mechanical properties of different aligner materials before and after deep drawing and determine differences in the mechanical properties after thermoforming. Materials and methods Four aligner film sheets from three manufacturers (Duran Plus® [Scheu Dental, Iserlohn, Germany]; Zendura® [ClearCorrect, Bay Materials LLC, Fremont, CA, USA]; Essix ACE® and Essix® PLUS™ [Dentsply Sirona Deutschland, Bensheim, Germany]) were tested in 3‑point bending with support distances of 8, 16, and 24 mm. Dimension of the specimens was 10 × 50 mm2. Two groups each were tested: (1) 10 specimens were investigated in the as-received state (before thermoforming), (2) 10 specimens were deep drawn on a master plate with cuboids of the dimension 10 × 10 × 50 mm3. Then, specimens were cut out of the upper side and lateral walls and were measured in 3‑point bending. Forces and reduction in thickness were measured and corrected theoretical forces of drawn sheets after thickness reduction as well as Young’s modulus were calculated. Results At a support distance of 8 mm and a displacement of 0.25 mm Essix® PLUS™, having the highest thickness in untreated state, showed highest forces of 28.2 N, followed by Duran Plus® (27.3 N), Essix ACE® (21.0 N) and Zendura® (19.7 N). Similar results were registered for the other distances (16, 24 mm). Thermoforming drastically reduced thickness and forces in the bending tests. Forces decreased to around 10% or less for specimens cut from the lateral walls. Young’s modulus decreased significantly for deep drawn foil sheets, especially for Essix® PLUS™. Conclusions Three-point bending is an appropriate method to compare different foil sheet materials. Young’s modulus is significantly affected by thermoforming.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Procedure using CAD/CAM-manufactured insertion guides for purely
           mini-implant-borne rapid maxillary expanders

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      Abstract: Abstract With traditional rapid palatal expansion (RPE), orthopaedic forces are transmitted to the skeletal structures via the anchor teeth potentially leading to several unwanted dental side effects. To prevent these issues, tooth–bone-borne or purely bone-borne expanders were introduced using mini-implants in the palate. In this paper, the digitally planned Quadexpander is described which permits palatal expansion with only skeletal anchorage. The use of virtual insertion planning allows for insertion in areas of ideal bone, while avoiding roots and vital structures as well as the possibility of insertion into sites which would otherwise not be considered usable. A second advantage of digital planning is that mini-implants and the expander can be inserted in just one appointment.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Influence of WhatsApp and electronic mail reminders on oral hygiene
           compliance of orthodontic patients using planimetry

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      Abstract: Purpose To determine the effect of WhatsApp (Facebook Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA) and electronic mail reminders on oral hygiene compliance of orthodontic patients. Methods A randomized, parallel group, double blinded study was conducted on 54 patients undergoing orthodontic treatment at a university clinic. They were randomized to 3 groups, i.e., WhatsApp (W) group, electronic mail (email) (E) group and control (C) group with 18 subjects in each group. Group (W) and group (E) received oral health messages once a week through WhatsApp and email reminders, respectively, while group (C) did not receive any reminders. Plaque was measured at baseline (T0), after 4 weeks (T1), and after 8 weeks (T2). For each subject, intraoral photographs were taken after application of a plaque-disclosing agent; and the area covered by plaque was measured on teeth 12, 13, 43, 22, 23 and 33 by planimetry. Data were analyzed using SPSS (version 22, IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). Mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare plaque scores between and within the groups. Results A total of 54 subjects (14 males and 40 females) with mean age of 22.43 years completed the study. At the end of 8 weeks, no statistically significant difference in the mean plaque score was found between the groups at the different time intervals (p = 0.201). Conclusion WhatsApp and email reminders did not significantly influence the oral hygiene compliance of orthodontic patients.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Use of the sociodental approach in estimating orthodontic treatment needs
           in adolescent patients

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      Abstract: Purpose The sociodental model integrates clinical assessment, perceived impacts of malocclusion on quality of life, and behavioural propensity when prioritising orthodontic treatment. This study compares the effect of using different instruments to measure impact-related need on the assessment of orthodontic treatment need based on the sociodental framework. Materials and methods In this cross-sectional study, 206 Malaysian adolescents (age: 11–18 years) were screened in orthodontic clinics to identify those with normative need, oral impacts due to malocclusion, and having high and medium-to-high behavioural propensities. The Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need classified normative need. The Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics (PIDA) questionnaire and the Condition-Specific Child-Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (CS-OIDP) index measured oral impacts. Subjects’ behavioural propensities for successful treatment outcome were based on the Basic Periodontal Examination and International Caries Detection and Assessment System. Data were analysed using the McNemar test. Results The response rate was 99.0%. Estimates of normative need (89.7%) were significantly reduced under the sociodental model by 65.7% (p < 0.0001) when impact-related need was measured using PIDA, and by 41.7% (p < 0.0001) when measured using CS-OIDP. The difference between the results of the two instruments in proportions of identified need for orthodontic treatment was 24.0% (p < 0.0001). Conclusion For Malaysian adolescents, estimates of need for orthodontic treatment when assessed with the sociodental approach were substantially lower than normative clinical assessment and depended highly on the tools selected to assess the patient’s impact-related need. Health policy makers should understand the implication of adopting one instrument or the other when estimating orthodontic treatment need.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Numerical and biomechanical analysis of orthodontic treatment of recovered
           periodontally compromised patients

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      Abstract: Objective Generate a finite element (FE) model to simulate space closure and retraction mechanics for anterior maxillary teeth in periodontally compromised dentition, and compare the biomechanical effect of initial force systems with varying magnitude. Materials and methods The geometry of an idealized finite element model (FEM) of a maxilla was adapted such that the teeth showed reduced periodontal support together with extruded and flared incisors. In a first step, leveling and alignment of the front teeth were simulated. In a second step, force systems for orthodontic space closure of residual spaces on both sides distal to the lateral incisors were simulated. A combined intrusion and retraction cantilever was modeled, to simulate en masse retraction mechanics with segmented arches and elastic chains. A commercial FE system was used for all model generations and simulations. Results Results of the simulations indicated that a force of 1.0 N is too high for space closure of flared front teeth in periodontally damaged dentition, as extreme strains may occur. En masse retraction using cantilever mechanics with lower forces showed a uniform intrusion and retraction movement and thus proved to be a better option for treating patients with a periodontally compromised dentition. Conclusion The outcome of this study indicates that increased periodontal stresses resulting from severe attachment loss should be seriously considered by careful planning of the orthodontic mechanics and reduction of the applied forces is suggested. The presented cantilever mechanics seems to be an appropriate means for en masse retraction of periodontally compromised extruded front teeth.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Ideal treatment timing of orthodontic anomalies—a German
           clinical S3 practice guideline

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      Abstract: Purpose Ideal treatment timing in orthodontics is controversially discussed depending on the type and extent of the dysgnathia and malocclusion present, especially with regard to efficiency, patient burden and treatment efforts of early compared to regular or late treatment. This German clinical practice guideline aims to clarify, at which time points an orthodontic anomaly can be effectively treated and how treatment efficiency differs depending on treatment timing. Methods A systematic literature search was performed in various guideline databases and databases PROSPERO, MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane Library, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform according to a predefined PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparison and Outcomes with added qualitative search terms) search algorithm and strategy. Appraisal of scientific evidence of the individual studies checked for eligibility was carried out according to SIGN (Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network), AMSTAR II (Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systemic Reviews), and AXIS (Appraisal Tool to Assess the Quality of Cross-sectional Studies) tools. Only controlled studies with a high, acceptable or moderate quality (and thus an acceptable risk of bias) were considered. Results A total of 309 studies of over 11,000 sources screened were identified to be eligible for inclusion and critically appraised for study quality and risk-of-bias. No relevant guidelines relating to the aims of the present guideline were found. Elected delegates of in total 21 German scientific societies and organizations agreed upon a total of 19 evidence-based statements and recommendations based on a nominal consensus process. Conclusions Although most malocclusions can be effectively treated both in the early, late mixed, and permanent dentition, evidence suggests that therapy of a pronounced skeletal or dental class II anomaly can be started early to reduce the risk of dental anterior tooth trauma, whereas in a moderate class II anomaly, therapy can preferably be carried out before or during the pubertal growth peak. Therapy of a skeletal or dental class III anomaly should be started early, as this also reduces the need for later surgery to correct the anomaly. The treatment of a pronounced skeletal or dental transverse anomaly should be started early in the upper jaw in order to utilize the high adaptivity of the maxillary structures in young patients.
      PubDate: 2022-06-17
       
  • Masticatory muscle activity and oral health-related quality of life in
           patients wearing clear thermoplastic versus wrap-around retainers

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      Abstract: Aim To evaluate the surface electromyography (sEMG) activity of the superficial masseter and anterior temporalis muscles at rest, during maximum voluntary clenching (MVC), and mastication, over 6 months of wearing clear thermoplastic or wrap-around retainers. Furthermore, the patients’ oral health-related quality of life was assessed using the Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP) index at 6 months. Materials and methods Sixty patients aged 14–39 years (19 males/41 females) who received upper and lower retainers after finishing orthodontic treatment were recruited. The patients were randomly divided into a clear thermoplastic retainer group (n = 30) or a wrap-around retainer group (n = 30). The sEMG activity was recorded at retainer delivery (T0), after 3 months (T1), and after 6 months of wearing (T2). The OIDP index was evaluated at T2. Results None of the sEMG parameters for the masseter and temporalis muscles were different between the two groups at T0, T1, or T2. Over the period of 6 months, both masticatory muscles in both groups demonstrated increased sEMG activity during MVC and mastication; however, only the temporalis muscle demonstrated decreased normalized sEMG activity at rest (P < 0.05). The frequency and severity of the OIDP in the eating aspect at T2 was low and similar in both groups. Conclusions sEMG activity of the two masticatory muscles tended to increase during MVC and mastication, while temporalis muscle activity tended to decrease at rest during the observation period, regardless of retainer type. Notably, these sEMG changes did not affect the patients’ subjective masticatory function.
      PubDate: 2022-05-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s00056-022-00402-w
       
  • Comparison of the short-term effects of tooth–bone-borne and tooth-borne
           rapid maxillary expansion in older adolescents

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      Abstract: Purpose To compare the short-term effects of tooth–bone-borne and tooth-borne rapid maxillary expansion (RME) devices on dentofacial structures in older adolescents. Methods The retrospective study reviewed pre- and posttreatment lateral and posteroanterior cephalometric images and orthodontic model records of patients who underwent maxillary expansion. Two groups were formed, in which the same upper jaw expansion protocol was applied with two different maxillary expansion devices: the first group consisted of 15 individuals treated with tooth–bone-borne (hybrid) RME (HRME; 9 girls and 6 boys; mean age, 16.9 ± 0.42 years) and the second group consisted of 15 individuals treated with tooth-borne (conventional) RME (CRME; 8 girls and 7 boys; mean age, 16.74 ± 0.54 years). Cephalometric and orthodontic model measurements were conducted on the records taken before and after treatment. Results Significant skeletal and dental expansions were observed in both groups (p < 0.05). However, the increase in nasal width measurements in the HRME group (2.24 ± 0.61 mm) was significantly higher than the increase in the CRME group (1.12 ± 0.25 mm; p < 0.01). Buccal tipping of the premolars was significantly less in the HRME group (0.46 ± 0.35°) than in the CRME group (2.46 ± 0.63°; p < 0.01). The amount of tipping of the molars was higher in the HRME group (4.76 ± 0.88°) compared to the CRME group (2.9 ± 1.03°; p < 0.01). Conclusion Although the HRME device increase the nasal width in older adolescents to a greater extent, more dental side effects were seen at the maxillary first molars.
      PubDate: 2022-05-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s00056-022-00401-x
       
 
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